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COAST RANCH BIG SUR, CALIFORNIA

DRE# 00891159 | CELL: 831.214.1990 W W W.T I M A LLEN PRO PERT I ES.CO M

TIM ALLEN PRO PE RT I ES


THE VIEW FROM THE TOP


COAST RANCH

0 COASTL ANDS | BIG SUR, CA

Offering seclusion and privacy, the Short Estate is within easy access of the Monterey Peninsula to the north, within walking distance of the famous inns, restaurants and businesses of Big Sur, and well located to take full advantage of the recreational opportunities available at the six Big Sur State Parks and the Los Padres National Forest. The 130 acre Short Estate is located in the Coastlands neighborhood of Big Sur. Improvements consist of a historic adobe cabin and outbuildings. The property lies to the South and the West of the Post Ranch Inn, and northwest of the Coastlands development. There is easy access to the property off of Coast Highway One. Composed of four separate parcels, the principal usable portion of the Short property lies astride an ocean front ridge with commanding views out over the Pacific Ocean. Groves of oak, bay, and redwood trees give definition to the stunning potential home sites. The views here are sensational: to the North and South the classic Sur Coast Headlands vistas, to the East the Holy Hills of the Coast Range. To the West, the land drops dramatically to meet the Pacific Ocean at a 3/4 of a mile length of spectacular private sandy beach with fresh water springs. Price Available Upon Request Presented By: Tim Allen Coldwell Banker Del Monte Realty


ACCOMMODATIONS


DECK OUTSIDE PODS


VIEW FROM DECK


ACCOMMODATIONS


THE PROPERTY


DOWN AT THE BEACH


THE BEACH


PRIVATE BEACH


HISTORY & PROPERTY INFORMATION


THE SHORT ESTATE COASTLANDS PROPERTY SUMMARY

Property:

The Short Estate, Big Sur

Lot Size:

130 Acres

Cross Street:

Highway 1

Zoning:

WSC / 40 (CZ)

Lot/ Block:

Lot 1, 4, 5, 6

Tract: Coastlands APN#:

420-171-032, 420-011-002

Sewer/ Septic:

Septic

Gas/ Electric:

Propane/ Utility Company

Water Source:

Coastlands Mutual Water Co.

Flood Zone:

See Report

Coastal Zone:

See Report

Terms: Conventional


I.

The Historic Short Estate.

The Short Estate, is a property never before offered for sale. For those who delight in the drama of being at the western most part of our continent, the natural beauty of this unique convergence of mountain and sea makes this offering one to be carefully considered by discriminating buyers looking to acquire world-class coastal property. This offering represents a rare opportunity to own one of the truly great properties in the heart of Big Sur. The buyer of this offering will own several of the last remaining undeveloped premier building sites on the Big Sur Coast. Properties possessing ocean frontage are rarely available along this part of the California Coast and the Short Estate offers exceptionally fine ocean frontage: the sun, the sand, the Pacific Ocean, it's dazzling. I believe the following property summary will arouse your interest and imagination but it is no substitute for a visit to the property. I encourage you to come and experience this extraordinary Big Sur location and invite you to spend some time here exploring the land: wear your hiking shoes, enjoy a picnic lunch, and stay for the sunset. The 130 acre Short Estate is located in the Coastlands neighborhood of Big Sur. Improvements consist of a historic adobe cabin and outbuildings. The property lies to the South and the West of the Post Ranch Inn, and northwest of the Coastlands development. There is easy access to the property off of Coast Highway One. Composed of four separate parcels, the principal usable portion of the Short property lies astride an ocean front ridge with commanding views out over the Pacific Ocean. Groves of oak, bay, and redwood trees give definition to the stunning potential home sites. The views here are sensational: to the North and South the classic Sur Coast Headlands vistas, to the East the Holy Hills of the Coast Range. To the West, the land drops dramatically to meet the Pacific Ocean at a 3/4 of a mile length of spectacular private sandy beach with fresh water springs. The Short parcels each share in all the privileges and benefits accorded to owners of Coastlands lots. Offering seclusion and privacy, the Short Estate is within easy access of the Monterey Peninsula to the north, within walking distance of the famous inns, restaurants and businesses of Big Sur, and well located to take full advantage of the recreational opportunities available at the six Big Sur State Parks and the Los Padres National Forest.

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Contents: I.

THE HISTORIC SHORT ESTATE. ............................................................................................................ 2

II.

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION.................................................................................................................. 6

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. III.

A. B. C.

BIG SUR. ............................................................................................................................... 6 THE COASTLANDS. ............................................................................................................... 6 THE SHORT ESTATE. ........................................................................................................... 10 DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL. ............................................................................................... 22 PRICE AND TERMS. .............................................................................................................. 28 CONTACT INFORMATION. .................................................................................................... 28 LEGAL NOTICE.................................................................................................................... 28 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND MATERIAL AVAILABLE. ................................................ 28 THE SHORT WAY TO THE PACIFIC – A FAMILY HISTORY. ..................................................... 30

THE SHORT FAMILY WAY. ................................................................................................. 30 BUILDING THE FAMILY CABIN. .......................................................................................... 31 AFTER A LONG SHORT TIME. ............................................................................................. 31

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Figures: Figure 1 - Looking West From The Cabin Lawn. ............................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 2 – South Coast As Seen From The Short Estate, Big Sur, Ca. ............................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 3 – Property’s Relationship To Monterey County. ................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 4 - Looking Southeast From The Short Estate Ridge ........................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 5 - The Coastlands Parcel Map .............................................................................................................................................. 7 Figure 6 - A Marine Terrace on The Short Estate ............................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 7 - The Coastlands Trail System............................................................................................................................................ 9 Figure 8 - Pfeiffer Point From The Ridge Top................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 9 – Central Coast Region, Big Sur, California..................................................................................................................... 11 Figure 10 - Short Parcel 1 (Lot 20), Detail ..................................................................................................................................... 13 Figure 11 - Parcel 4......................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Figure 12 - Looking East from The Short Estate ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 13 - The Short Estate & Surrounding Properties ................................................................................................................. 15 Figure 14 - Honey, Big Beach, The Short Estate, September 2001 ................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 15 - The Post Ranch Inn As Seen From The Short Estate .................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 16 - Principle Points of Interest In Big Sur .......................................................................................................................... 17 Figure 17 - The Short Cabin, Big Sur, CA 1949 ............................................................................................................................. 18 Figure 18 – The View From The Doorway. ..................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 19 - Beach, The Short Estate ............................................................................................................................................... 20 Figure 20 – Arial View of The Short Estate.................................................................................................................................... 21 Figure 21 – Looking South From The Ridge Above The Cabin, The Short Estate, Big Sur, Ca. .... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 22 – Sunset ........................................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 22a- Map ........................................................................................................................................................................... 23a Figure 23 - More Beach on The Short Estate ................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 24 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.116, RDR(CZ) ..................................................................................... 25 Figure 25 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) ...................................................................................... 26 Figure 26 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) cont. ............................................................................. 27 Figure 27 – Ridge Trail #1 Passing The Short Estate ...................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 28 – Sands Of Time ............................................................................................................................................................. 30 Figure 29 - Big Beach, 1934 ........................................................................................................................................................... 31

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Figure 3 – Property’s Relationship To Monterey County.

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II.

Property Description.

A. Big Sur. Big Sur is in Monterey County, a part of the Central Coast region of California, approximately 125 miles South of San Francisco. The subject property is located in the region known as the Big Sur Coast in the unincorporated area of Monterey County. The Big Sur Coast is a rugged mountainous stretch of approximately 90 miles of the Pacific Coast that is accessed only by Coast Highway One. The Big Sur area is geographically distinctive, and consists of the western slopes of the Santa Lucia Mountains, which reach an elevation of 5,200 feet at Cone Peak and drop dramatically to meet the Pacific Ocean as sheer cliffs and bluffs at the shoreline. A single main ridge, the Coast Ridge, fronts much of the immediate coastline. The steep slope of this ridge is cut by numerous narrow wooded canyons opening onto the Pacific Ocean, that create the scenery for which Big Sur is famous. Narrow, chaparral-covered spur ridges, perpendicular to the Coast Ridge, separate the coastal canyons. These canyons have been created by the more than fifty watersheds and creeks that flow into the sea.

B. The Coastlands. 1. Location and Access. The Short property is situated in an area known as Coastlands, which is located on the West side of Highway One, between the Ventana Inn and Nepenthe. Located thirty miles South of the Monterey Peninsula, Coastlands is a desirable mature neighborhood, with a well-established character, surrounded by lands of exceptional beauty. The thirty-eight residential parcels range in size from less than an acre to six acres. Access from Coast Highway One is by a paved, private one-lane road, Ridge Trail No. 1, which traverses a portion of the Short property and provides automotive access to residences further south along the ridge

2. Neighborhood. Progressive people established this distinct Big Sur neighborhood as a residential subdivision in 1926 from land that had formerly been part of the Post family's homestead, the magnificent Rancho Sierra Mar. Originally incorporated as the Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. the development is today known simply as Coastlands, and it remains as perhaps the finest residential community in the Big Sur area. An artistic and literary community at heart, Coastlands residents have always been a wide-ranging group, mystics and politicians, businessmen and lawyers, living alongside homesteaders and bohemians, painters, potters, and poets. Together they have lovingly stewarded this neighborhood through these past seventy years. The 29 homes in Coastlands are within walking distance to the Ventana Inn, Nepenthe, the Post Ranch Inn, art galleries, the post office, deli, grocery store, and the extensive trail system of the Ventana Wilderness.

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The Short Estate Parcel 1 .15 Acre Coastlands Lot 20

Figure 5 - The Coastlands Parcel Map

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3. Topography and Vegetation. Coastlands is composed of a group of ridges intersected by steep canyons, which are heavily forested with redwoods, oaks and bay trees. Within the Coastlands, building sites are usually on the ridges, which have magnificent views of the Pacific Ocean, the Big Sur Coastline, and the Santa Lucia Mountains. Oak trees, bays, and madrones are commonly found growing on the ridges, along with often-dense chaparral. The chaparral is a coastal scrub community, dominated by Coyote bush, sagebrush, poison oak and ceanothus. Numerous small native shrubs, flowers, and trees also grow here, their diversity reflecting the many microclimatic areas.

4. Utilities. The developers of Coastlands formed the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, incorporated as a nonprofit corporation with the purpose of maintaining and operating and improving the Coastlands water system. The corporation also was "to own and control said water rights in the interest of all those lot owners who join and become shareholders in this corporation.� All Coastlands lot owners pay an annual fee for water, road, and trail maintenance to the Coastlands Mutual Water Company. Payable in January, the fee is seven hundred dollars ($700.00) for an unimproved lot, and fifteen hundred dollars ($1500.00) for an improved lot, plus special assessments as necessary. a) Water and Road Maintenance. The Coastlands Mutual Water Company provides water service to Coastlands lots, and maintains the paved road system. The roads are surfaced for all-weather travel. Fireplugs are located at appropriate intervals on all Coastlands roads. b) Private Walking Trail System. The canyons of Coastlands, with their three year round creeks, Colby Creek, Mule Creek, and Graves Creek, may be enjoyed by the residents via a private walking trail system which meanders through the enchanting groves of redwood and bay trees. The sunlight filtering down through the tall trees casts an almost primordial light on the lushly growing native plants and ferns. It is very peaceful and quiet. The water company maintains the trail system. The trails run through the redwood canyons and on down a steep hillside trail to Coastlands Beach, a private sand beach at the mouth of Mule Canyon, for use only by Coastlands residents. c) Electricity, Telephone, Septic, Television, and Trash. Electricity, telephone and trash collection are provided in Coastlands by public utilities. Cellular phone reception can be excellent. Septic systems are used for sewage disposal. Propane delivery and trash collection are available. Good television reception is obtainable with a satellite dish.

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Figure 7 - The Coastlands Trail System

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C. The Short Estate. 1. Location and Access. The Short Estate is located in the area of the Coastlands neighborhood. Access to the property from Coast Highway One is by a paved, private one-lane road, Ridge Trail #1. The turn to the Short driveway is located one half mile from Highway One. The driveway runs south along the eastern side of the ridge, rises to the ridge-top, heads west, turns north and suddenly to your left, the vast Pacific Ocean. The view is spectacular. Just before reaching the cabin the driveway crosses again to the eastern slope of the ridge where, just beyond a carport, it divides. Turning to the left, the driveway continues North up the ridge, and provides access to the building sites beyond the cabin. Turning to the right at the divide, the driveway completes the large circular loop and returns to Ridge Trail #1. The most ideal building site is located along a ridge that runs parallel to the coast. This ridge begins at an elevation of 1150 feet in the large open flats of Rancho Rico, then extends south across the Post Ranch, where it drops slightly in elevation to meet the Short Property at elevations of 900 to1000 feet. The ridge then begins a gradual descent toward Graves Canyon. There is approximately 2000 feet of ridge-top on the Short property between the Post Ranch and Coastlands. One of the three Short parcels, APN #420-171-32, is located within the Coastlands development. The other three parcels are contiguous with, but outside the area of the Coastlands, lying immediately adjacent to the west and north. These three lots of record are today grouped under a single assessor parcel number, APN #420-011-002, which is 132+- acres in size, uses the Coastlands road system for access, has water rights in the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, and is otherwise physically indistinguishable from the land of the original Coastlands development.

2. The Distinguishing Quality. Aside from its spectacular ocean frontage what is most distinguishable about the Short Property is its size and pristine condition. Compared to the small acreage of all Coastlands parcels, which range in size from less than an acre up to six acres, the Short 132+- acres represents a veritable kingdom as it rises from sea level to an elevation of approximately 1000 feet.

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Figure 9 – Central Coast Region, Big Sur, California

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3. Parcels. a) Parcel 3, APN #420-171-032. Parcel 3 is Lot 20 of Coastlands Tract No. 1, part of the original Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. development. This is an unimproved triangularly shaped parcel containing approximately 10,000 square feet. A five-foot wide trail easement is contiguous with, and parallels, the westerly line. Ridge Trail No. 1, the main Coastlands access road, is contiguous with the easterly parcel line of Lot 20. The lot is moderately forested with native trees and shrubs and is about 80% level. The balance is moderately to steeply down sloping. Lot 20 is not a practical or attractive building site in its current configuration, but this can be resolved by an adjustment of the lot line. Lot 20 could be expanded through this process to include additional acreage, an ocean-view building site, and a portion of beach. This expanded lot would most naturally include the southern portion of the ridge top with its magnificent views of the Big Sur South Coast. b) Parcel 1 And Parcel 3 and 4, APN #420-011-002. The total acreage of Parcels 1 and 3 and 4 is 107.2. Parcel 1 consists of 34+- acres and includes the northern-most inland portions of the property with the highest elevations. Parcel 4 is 75 acres including the existing residence and the entire shore frontage. Although Parcel 1 and 3 and 4 are grouped under a single assessor parcel number, they are potentially separate pre-existing lots of record. The significance of legal lots of record is discussed below in the section titled Potential for Development. (1)

Parcel 1.

Parcel 2 is land that was purchased from the Post Family in the nineteen twenties. This land, as well as the Coastlands development, had been part of the original Post Family homestead. The property extends from a corner at the hairpin turn along Ridge Trail #1 where it begins its traverse of the Short Property, up the canyon and over the ridge to the west, where there is a large building site with sweeping views in all directions. With construction of an access road this would be one of the most sensational building sites on the Big Sur Coast. As with Lot 20, it may be determined that a lot line adjustment, resulting in a reconfigured lot would be beneficial to Parcel 1. Such a reconfigured parcel could include beach frontage and increased ridgeline acreage. Beyond the above-described building site, Parcel 1 continues north to the northeast property corner. The land here is a series of ridges and canyons that slope downward from the ridge along the easterly parcel line to the ocean 1000 feet below, (passing across Parcel 3) These canyons and ridges are mostly covered in dense brush, while some of the deeper canyon areas have water loving trees, sycamores, redwoods, and willows, as well as a wide variety of small native trees and shrubs. There are numerous small areas of level to gently sloping terrain which are large enough to site a dwelling on this part of the property. These sites have magnificent ocean views and plentiful water, as these small canyons have fresh water springs, with enough water in two of the canyons to create running streams. However, the terrain is too steep for the practical construction of an access road. When one looks out of the window of the restaurant at Post Ranch Inn, the ridges lying directly to the west are part of the series of canyons and ridges on the northern section of the Short property.

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2

3

3

Figure 10 - Short Parcel 1 (Lot 20), Detail

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(2)

Parcel 3.

Oak, bay, redwood, pine, cypress, and other native trees and shrubs grow on the ridge top of parcel 3. Several groupings of these trees give definition to the landscape. At the northern and southern ends of the property there are groves of beautiful oak trees. A wide variety of trees grow in the area around the cabin; pine, bay, and oak, as well as many non-natives, including several yew trees, olive and walnut trees, Australian tea trees, and many more. Several fruit trees from the old orchard grow in the large open field south of the cabin. On the eastern side of the ridgeline, about half-way along the length of the parcel, there is a lovely grove of redwood trees, their roots reaching down into the steep canyon of Colby Creek, toward the Short Property eastern border. Beautiful South Sur Coast views open up at the southern end of the parcel. A wonderful grove of oak trees shade elegant stone terraces (built on the Short property by the previous owner of Lot 21) with an outlook that stretches south from Rancho Grande to Lopez Point. The property reaches its most westerly point on a small ridge beyond the oak grove, an excellent location for sunset viewing and to the north there is an ocean outlook point, with lawn and benches. West of the cabin, out beyond the front lawn, the land slopes down to the shoreline from an elevation of about 650 feet. The elevation of these steep western slopes varies from approximately 550 feet at the southern part of the property to over 1000 feet in the north. Most of the slope is too steep for development. Moving north, the series of canyons and ridges (described in the Parcel 2 section) that slope downward from the ridge along the easterly parcel line (alongside of the Post Ranch) to the ocean below, run across both Parcel 2 and 3. There are several sizeable flat coastal bluffs, or marine terraces, located between 100 to 350 feet above sea level. These marine terraces were formed as waves cut flat platforms into the then-submerged bedrock and deposited coarse sediments upon them. With the most recent geological uplifting of the Santa Lucia Range, an uplift that began 1.8 million years ago and believed to be on-going today, these platforms have risen well above sea level and are today fabulous, however difficult to reach, as the steep terrain would prohibit practical construction of an access road. Yet these terraces are so extraordinary that with imagination, ingenuity, and good engineering, these practical difficulties might be overcome. Today, work continues on the trail to these terraces with the objective of providing easy access to these coastal bluffs.

4. Parcel 4. Title research has identified the acreage of the Short Estate located in Section 6 as a separate legal lot of record. This lot includes a large part of Big Beach, two canyons, one with spring, and portions of three ridges, however there is no known access to building sites. In summary, the 107.43 acre Short property is composed of two assessor parcels, APN #420-011-002, and APN #420-171-032. Within these two parcels there are three legal lots of records, and a forth identified by recent title research. An evaluation of the property's full development potential would benefit from a determination of the actual number and description of separate parcels, an issue to be clarified with the Monterey County Planning Department.

Figure 11 - Parcel 4

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Figure 13 - The Short Estate & Surrounding Properties

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5. Beaches. Private sand beaches are a rare thing to find in Big Sur and the three quarters of a mile of pristine, private beach is one of the Short Estate's most compelling assets. This is a world-class beach. To be on these beaches is to be in Shangri-La. It had been thought that over the years the old hiking trail down to the beach had been almost totally obscured, making reasonable access to the beach very difficult. However, after discovering several sections of completely intact trail, several Short Family members began the work of repairing the path to the beach. Although the hike descends quite a distance, there have been many camping expeditions to the beach during the last eighty years, with all the gear being carried down to the beach, and afterwards, carried back up again. Any coastal access is a special thing but this hike is particularly rewarding. From the tip of Coastlands, at the mouth of Mule Canyon, fan-shell shaped sand beaches run north ending at Wreck Beach, just south of Pfeiffer Point. The beaches are each different, but the best beach of all is the Short's beach, or Big Beach, where there is a large rock formation known as Mr.& Mrs. Majors which extends well out into the ocean creating the unique coastal environment. The wide sands of Big Beach have formed to the north of this rocky ridge. The marine terraces, which lie above the beach, the waterbearing canyons that end at the beach, the rocky ridge, and the extensive inter-tidal area, all contain a wide diversity of native plants and animal species. Offshore the lushly growing forests of sea kelp attest to the richness of the marine life. The harbor seal is the marine mammal most often seen here, as they haul out on the beach during low tide for a relaxing nap and sunbath. Sea lions also haul their bulk onto the rocks of Mr. and Mrs. Majors. Sea Otters live in the near shore kelp-beds. Gray whales provide hours of viewing pleasure, as they pass the beach, heading south in December-January, returning north in March-April. Blue whales, killer whales, elephant seals, dolphins and porpoises can be seen. Big Beach is a good place for watching seabirds and shorebirds. Processions of pelicans glide along the shore, cormorants and gulls roost on the rocks, sanderlings chase the edge of retreating waves. Large marsh birds such as the blue heron, the great egret, and the snowy egret are a common sight perched on floating kelp or driftwood, and bobbing up and down with the ocean swells as they fish the kelp forests and tidal pools. Big Beach is where the Short family traditionally camped, living off the land, gathering the driftwood that naturally collects here to build great bonfires, eating the fish they caught, and abalone and mussels they gathered. There is plentiful fresh water here with several of the canyons having excellent springs. The magical quality that is the experience of being on this beach has made the effort to develop comfortable beach access well worth the effort.

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Figure 16 - Principle Points of Interest In Big Sur

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6. Improvements.

Figure 17 - The Short Cabin, Big Sur, CA 1949

The improvements found on this land consist of a small adobe cabin, and outbuildings. They are described in a 1984 appraisal: "The Short family cabin is a one-story structure, consisting of a living room, kitchen, two bedrooms and a bath. The living room was built in 1932. This 22x26 foot portion of the building is constructed of adobe bricks made on site and painted with several coats of plaster. Subsequent additions were made using redwood board and batten construction. The floor is concrete. The roof is wood shake on the adobe section and tar and gravel on the remainder. The interior walls are a combination of plaster, sheetrock, and plywood paneling. Ceilings are wood decked with exposed beams. A rock fireplace and electric wall heaters supply heating. The kitchen and bathroom are modestly appointed and quite dated. Wiring and plumbing are deficient and exposed rafter ends show deterioration. The dwelling is considered to contain 1,235 square feet.� This is a home with true Big Sur soul. Since taking possession of the property in January of 2001, the Short Grandchildren have, with a breath of fresh air and elbow grease, transformed the little house back into the cozy cottage of so-many-year-ago. The dimensions and design of the adobe living room recall the Craftsman building style. It is a room that feels good to sit in, especially in the evening with a fire burning in the fireplace. There is a sense of history here, which feels worth protecting. A guest house perhaps, or housing for a caretaker? Outside of the cabin there are two small patios, walkways, a lawn, and landscaping with flowers and ornamental shrubs and plants, both native and introduced varieties. Other than the small landscaped area surrounding the cabin, the property become overgrown and chocked with dense brush during the last forty years. Coyote bush and sagebrush, poison oak and other native vegetation took over and made the land nearly impassable. Recently much of the ridge-top has been cleared of the brush revealing evidence from the nineteen thirties and forties of the formerly landscaped and cultivated areas of the property. The tall flax that is growing on the ridge above the cabin, which burst forth after the brush was cleared providing room for growth, recalls these earlier years, as does the oak tree in the front yard with an ingrown chain wrapped around a limb. A swing hangs from this chain, and it was here that Edward Weston made his famous photograph, Winter Idle, of his wife Charis swinging. Weston, a family friend, took many photographs at the Short Property. He immortalized the above-mentioned flax in his photograph, Grasses, Big Sur. The second significant structure is a detached concrete block garage building. This is a substantial structure, built to support a second level that has never been added. The structure contains 630 square feet, space enough for three cars.

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7. Utilities. a) Water. "Whiskey is for drinking, and water is for fighting about.� Mark Twain The Coastlands Mutual Water Company has a good history of operation. The Short Estate has two water rights within this water company. One right is associated with the ownership of Lot 20, and the other conveyed to Short in 1927 is associated with the 132 acre parcel. The availability of water is a major issue affecting the development of all existing lots of record in Big Sur. There are two parts to this issue. The first is whether the property in question possesses clear title to a water right. The second concerns permit approval for the water system from the Health Department.

(1)

Rights.

In 1927 and 1928 John Douglas Short acquired access to his land and water rights through two separate agreements made with the developers of the Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. In the first agreement dated 1927 Short traded an easement to build a road across his property for domestic water rights for one family residence. This is the first Short water right. The developer needed this easement in order to reach the lots along the ridge to the south of the Short property. In these agreements Short also acquired the right to use this road, Ridge Trail #1, the main road into Coastlands from Highway One. From that time on, Short Parcel 2 has enjoyed free usage of both road and water. Short Parcel 1, Lot 20, however, pays the annual unimproved parcel fee for water, road and trail maintenance to the Coastlands Mutual Water Company. Currently that fee is seven hundred dollars. In 1928 the 1927 agreement was altered to include the surveyed road description and the location as to where Short was to take his water, “where the pipeline crosses Lot 20."

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Lot 20, which is adjacent to Short’s parcel 1, was not owned by Short when the original water and road agreement was made with Coastlands. Short had not bothered to buy Lot 20 from Coastlands, believing the lot could not be built upon. Much to his surprise, a Carmel developer, Barney Segal, purchased the lot in 1949 from Coastlands. Short purchased it in 1950 concerned by Segal’s plans for development of the lot. When Segal bought Lot 20 it was conveyed with a water right. The Covenants, Conditions, Restrictions and Limitations in that sales document states that a water right was an appurtenance to the land and this water right passed to Short when he bought the lot. This is the second Coastlands Mutual Water Company right acquired by Short. (2)

Health Department Approval.

The second water issue is that of obtaining a permit. Approval for a proposed water system for residential use must be obtained from the County Health Department. Having an unquestionable right to water from a private water system is not a guarantee that the Health Department will approve a connection to the system as officials must be convinced that the water system itself meets all existing health standards. (3)

Additional Sources Of Water.

If an increased water supply is desired, the most reasonable option may well be the installation of a private well. That there is plenty of water on this property is evident by the number of springs one sees when taking a hike to the beach. Presently, the owner of a lot may construct a private well as a single connection water system in the development of a single-family dwelling. As additional connections are added to a water system, the system becomes subject to, and burdened by, increasing layers of complication as a result of County, State, and Federal regulations. The drilling of a well may cost from $10,000 on up, depending on circumstances such as location, the depth where good water is found, etc. but having a single connection water system is a blessing. b) Septic Systems. In Big Sur, septic systems are required for sewage disposal by Monterey County. Before a building permit may be obtained, soils tests must to be conducted to determine whether the soils quality at the proposed building site is suitable for a septic tank and leach field. These tests will identify the locations where septic systems will be permitted. The results will assist in mapping lot line adjustments as well the planning and building of residences. There are no known problems with the septic tank or leach field at the Short cabin. c) Electric Power and Telephone. Pacific Gas and Electric Company supplies electricity to the Short property. Pacific Bell provides telephone service.

Figure 19 - Beach, The Short Estate

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8. General Plan - Overview. The subject property is located in the unincorporated area of Monterey County and is subject to the land use restrictions imposed by the Monterey County General Plan and Zoning Ordinance. The property is also located within the Coastal Zone as administered by Monterey County and the California Coastal Commission. The Monterey County General Plan contains provisions set forth by the California State Coast Coastal Commission and Coastal Plan. As such, land use decisions on properties situated in this jurisdiction are determined at the county level and reviewed by the California Coastal Commission. Development approvals issued by the County may be appealed to the California Coastal Commission in some instances

9. Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan / Local Coastal Program. The Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan, Local Coastal Program (LUP), which was adopted in 1985, supersedes the Monterey County Coast Master Plan, adopted in 1962. The general goals and policies of the Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan / Local Coastal Program are further clarified and applied according to the Monterey County Coastal Implementation Plan. This is a six-part document that was adopted in 1988, two parts of which are of direct importance to the Short property and other properties in the greater Big Sur area. • • • •

a) First (Part 1: Coastal Zone Regulations). Coastal Zone Regulations (Chapters 20.105-20.139). Regulations for Coastal Development Permits (Chapter 20,140). General Provisions and Exceptions in Coastal Zone (Chapter 20.142). Title 20 (Zoning Ordinance).

b) Second (Part 3: Regulations for Development). These regulations may be reviewed at the Monterey County's Department of Planning and Building Inspection which also maintains an informative web site at www.co.monterey.ca.us.

Figure 20 – Arial View of The Short Estate

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D. Development Potential. 1. Legal Lots of Record. Although having only two assessor parcel numbers at this time, the Short Estate is actually composed of three pre-existing legal lots of record, that is, parcels which were legal parcels of record prior to the County's establishment of zoning. For these pre-existing lots to be legally recognized by the County, a chain of title which delineates the parcel's history is submitted, along with an application for a Certificate of Compliance (C of C), and of course, a fee. Only recently, title research has disclosed the existence of a fourth legal lot of record in the Short Estate, composed of the acreage located in Section 6. This parcel would include wonderful beach frontage where the parcel's canyons and ridges meet the Pacific Ocean. Confirmation of this legal lot of record increases the property’s development potential. Having a confirmed legal lot of record is significant in two ways. First, under current County policy, legal lots of record are considered buildable parcels suitable for development in accordance with the applicable zoning and planning regulations. Second, legal lots of record have the possibility of being reconfigured through a process of lot line adjustment.

2. Lot Line Adjustments. Contiguous, legal lots of record may be reconfigured through a relatively simple process known as a Lot Line Adjustment (LLA). In a Lot Line Adjustment the boundaries between parcels may be adjusted to configure them for optimum development potential. The Lot Line Adjustment process includes confirmation by the County of the parcels existing legality, making an application for a Certificate of Compliance unnecessary.

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On the Short Estate the shape of the parcels might be redrawn such that each parcel would have an optimum building site with several acres of ridge-top, fabulous ocean view, private beach footage, and so forth. There are many natural building locations that are far enough apart as to offer privacy at each site. There are many factors to consider when making decisions about the proposed location of the adjusted lot lines. The microenvironments on the property need to be studied and understood. The subtle changes in the terrain, the vegetation and the soils, the orientation of a potential building site to other sites, to the ocean, and to the path of the sun, all these factors are important to consider in order maximizing the integrity of each resulting parcel. There are also personal feelings and personal choices to be considered when making lot line decisions and while these choices are subject to regulatory limitations, they remain perhaps the most important element in the decision making process. For this reason, the Short Family has decided that it should be the choice of the new owner as to just how the parcels might be reconfigured. There are relatively few restrictions or conditions that can be placed on lot line adjustments. As long as the newly configured parcels do not increase any existing non-conformities, and each newly configured parcel can demonstrate a building site in compliance with existing regulations, the County has almost no discretion to deny approval. A lot line adjustment can be applied for with or without an accompanying application for residential development. Either way, a Coastal Development Permit (CDP) application is required. Also required are engineering studies that may include a survey of contours around the house site, as well as geo-technical, archeological and biological studies. One must prove that the site has adequate water and potential for a septic system.

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3. Building Permit and Development Standards. The final stage of Entitlement involves the application for an actual building permit. A Coastal Development Permit is required, and can be applied for in conjunction with a Lot Line Adjustment application. The requirements for a building permit are very strict. The size and location of any proposed building is regulated through the process of obtaining Design and Site Review Approvals, and Building and Grading Permits. These permit and approval processes take into consideration many environmental factors, such as soil erosion, drainage of water, scenic viewshed, traffic, slope topography and any potential impact on wildlife and vegetation. The building site must have a Septic Permit from the Board of Health, and an approved source of water.

4. Critical Viewshed. The Critical Viewshed includes everything in sight of Highway One. "If you can see the highway, the highway can see you" is the local rule-of-thumb. While most of the Short ridge-top is screened from view by existing vegetation, there is a small area that is visible from Highway One. An understanding of viewshed constraints is important in an analysis of the property's development potential. With some forethought and care it should be possible to gain approval for new structures along the ridge-top. Effort should be made to site and design proposed buildings out of the highway viewshed. The vegetative screening that exists today should be protected and new growth encouraged to provide as much screening from Highway One as is possible.

5. Zoning - WSC/40 (CZ). As shown on the attached zoning map, Parcel 2 and Parcel 3 are zoned WSC/40(CZ), Watershed Scenic Conservation District/40 acre minimum (Coastal Zone), which allows for a division of land into 40-acre minimum lots for single family residences. The purpose of WSC zoning as defined according to Section 20.118.010 of the Monterey County Coastal Implementation Plan (MCCIP): "‌ to provide a district to allow development in the more remote or mountainous areas in the Coastal Zone while protecting the significant and substantial resources of these areas. Of specific concern are the highly sensitive resources inherent in such areas such as view shed, water shed, plant and wildlife habitat, streams and riparian corridors..."

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Figure 24 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.116, RDR(CZ)

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Figure 25 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ)

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Figure 26 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) cont.

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6. Zoning - RDR/40(CZ). Parcel 1 and Lot 20 are located within an area zoned RDR/40(CZ), or rural density residential. Although this is a more restricted residential use zoning classification, it has the same density requirements as WSC/40(CZ) zoning. The purpose of RDR zoning is defined in Section 20.116.010: "‌ to allow low density and intensity residential uses in the rural areas of the Coastal Zone where such residential use is compatible with the character of the rural area." In reading of Chapter 20.116.80, Density of Development, it seems nonsensical that Coastlands should have zoning of RDR/40, which means that this RDR(CZ) district, consisting of only of Coastlands parcels, has a maximum net density of one unit to forty acres, when the largest parcel in Coastlands is six acres in size. This zoning of one residence per 40 acres applies to almost all of the land West of Coast Highway One, and was adopted to guide the development of Big Sur. See the Zoning Regulations that follow for the Principle and Conditional Uses allowed and building requirements, such as sets backs, and height limits. Variances to stipulated requirements of these zoning regulations are regularly granted to mitigate the environmental constraints of a given site, such as view shed, slope, or other criteria.

7. Site Constraints. There are a number of policies and zoning regulations that govern the development potential of a particular lot. These are typically analyzed as site constraints that reduce the maximum potential development capacity of a parcel. For example, development will ordinarily not be allowed on that portion of a parcel comprised of slopes exceeding thirty percent. Other considerations include tree removal, archaeological resources, forest resources, ridgeline development, environmentally sensitive habitat, soil stability, geological considerations, etc.

E. Price and Terms. Offering Price: Twenty Million Dollars (US$20,000,000.00.) While the owners prefer an all-cash sale, the terms are negotiable, financing may be available.

F. Contact Information. To visit this property, or to obtain further information, please contact: Tim Allen Coldwell Banker Del Monte Realty Junipero 2 SW of 5th Carmel, CA 93921 Timallen1@aol.com www.Uniquepeninsulahomes.com

G. Legal Notice. Although all information in this document is from sources deemed reliable, this information should be reviewed and analyzed carefully by any prospective buyer. Tim Allen, and Coldwell Banker make no representations or warranties, either expressed or implied, as to the validity of the information contained herein, and advise any prospective buyer to obtain their own legal, tax and accounting advice.

H. Additional Information and Material Available. 1. Preliminary Title Report. Preliminary Title Report by First American Title Company dated June 25, 2001, including copies of all Exceptions.

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2. Articles of Incorporation. 1947 Articles of Incorporation of the Coastlands Mutual Water Company.

3. Coastlands Covenants. Coastlands Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&R's), as set forth in a Deed from Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. to Barnet Segal, 1949.

4. Water Rights. 1927 and 1928 Agreements for Water Rights and Right of Way between John Douglas Short and Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc.

5. Mutual Water Company Covenant. 1965 Covenant, Coastlands Water Company, recorded in February 1966, for annual assessment.

6. Agreement. 1980 Agreement between the Post family and the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, concerning the water system.

7. Coastlands Subdivision Map. 1927 Map of Coastlands Tract No. 1, recorded in Monterey County Map Book 3, p. 46.

8. Lot 20 Survey Map. 2001 Plat of survey showing the location of certain improvements over and across Lots 20 and 21 of the Coastlands Tract #1, Rasmussen Land Surveying.

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III. The Short Way To The Pacific – A Family History. "Often, when following the trail which meanders over the hills, I pull myself up in an effort to encompass the glory and the grandeur which envelops the whole horizon. Often, when clouds pile up in the North and the sea is churned with white caps, I say to myself: This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of he Earth as the Creator intended it to look." Henry Miller And so it was for John W. Short, and his son, John Douglas Short, Sr., when they traveled by horseback to Big Sur from Carmel early in the early 1900's. It was a trip that would profoundly influence the course of events of their lives. In the Twenties, after many visits to this pristine coast, Douglas, and his wife Marie Hathaway Short, acquired their first piece of Big Sur land as part of a State of California sale benefiting a State educational fund. Marie's father purchased an adjoining 43 acres as a gift for Douglas and Marie. Seven years later Douglas purchased additional land from their neighbors, the Post family, bringing the acreage belonging to the Shorts to a total of one hundred and fifty acres, A final acquisition was completed in 1950 when Douglas purchased a small contagious parcel, Lot 20, of the original Coastlands development. Together these properties formed a very private retreat for the family to enjoy with their four children, John Douglas Jr., Bill, daughter Kraig, and Erik, and their many grandchildren.

A. The Short Family Way. From the very beginning the Short family enjoyed camping expeditions on their land, camping at what is now the cabin site, and on Big Beach, where they lived off the land, catching ocean fish and gathering abalone and mussels. "This beach is very lovely: elegant fine white sand, fresh water springs, a variety of ocean fish, shell fish, and an abundance of small game. We all greatly enjoyed those days of the late 1920' and early 1930's; we were naked in the sun, wind, and water most of the time, and built huge fires of driftwood at night near where we slept. These were very happy days for the family,” so wrote one of the Short children, John D. Short, Jr., describing their idyllic lifestyle.

Figure 28 – Sands Of Time

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B. Building The Family Cabin. By 1932 a section of the ridge had been cleared of brush, revealing the lovely open meadows that face the sea. It was here the Shorts planted an orchard and fields of grain, which waved on each ocean breeze. It was here they gathered to build a cabin of hand made adobe bricks. With the sea at it's feet and the sky reaching above, this cabin stands as testimony to the spirit of the family and friends who have celebrated the beauty of this land for nearly a century. "In 1933 we began to build the adobe bricks: Douglas, Bill, and I, with regular help from Cole Weston and David Hagemeyer. Within a year we had created enough bricks (4"x12"x24"), about 1,500, to build the present cabin. When the bricks had dried in the sun for some months so they were sufficiently mature to handle we began construction of the cabin. Starting with a slab concrete floor and footings, we set up the bricks with a mud mortar and eventually created the gabled shell of the house, 20'x30' feet. On this adobe shell we built a roof, shakes of redwood, added a fireplace and the very long eaves provided a snug and dry little cabin.� John D. Short, Jr. Six or eight adobe rooms were to be added to this cabin, extending out toward the sea with a large living room at the cliff edge, thus forming an interior court; it was a lovely idea that was never realized.

C. After A Long Short Time. Following the completion of the cabin in the late 1930's, the family moved back to Woodside, California. In 1939 Douglas and Marie divorced, after which Marie settled in Carmel. That same year Douglas married Kaye Gorringe Justice. John Douglas Short Sr., upon his death in 1955, gave the entire Big Sur retreat to his four children, while bequeathing a life-estate to his beloved wife Kaye, a gift she enjoyed until her death early at an age of ninety-three. The property is now in the capable hands of the twelve grandchildren of Douglas and Marie Short, the forth generation of the Short family in Big Sur.

Figure 29 - Big Beach, 1934

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I.

The Historic Short Estate.

The Short Estate, is a property never before offered for sale. For those who delight in the drama of being at the western most part of our continent, the natural beauty of this unique convergence of mountain and sea makes this offering one to be carefully considered by discriminating buyers looking to acquire world-class coastal property. This offering represents a rare opportunity to own one of the truly great properties in the heart of Big Sur. The buyer of this offering will own several of the last remaining undeveloped premier building sites on the Big Sur Coast. Properties possessing ocean frontage are rarely available along this part of the California Coast and the Short Estate offers exceptionally fine ocean frontage: the sun, the sand, the Pacific Ocean, it's dazzling. I believe the following property summary will arouse your interest and imagination but it is no substitute for a visit to the property. I encourage you to come and experience this extraordinary Big Sur location and invite you to spend some time here exploring the land: wear your hiking shoes, enjoy a picnic lunch, and stay for the sunset. The 130 acre Short Estate is located in the Coastlands neighborhood of Big Sur. Improvements consist of a historic adobe cabin and outbuildings. The property lies to the South and the West of the Post Ranch Inn, and northwest of the Coastlands development. There is easy access to the property off of Coast Highway One. Composed of four separate parcels, the principal usable portion of the Short property lies astride an ocean front ridge with commanding views out over the Pacific Ocean. Groves of oak, bay, and redwood trees give definition to the stunning potential home sites. The views here are sensational: to the North and South the classic Sur Coast Headlands vistas, to the East the Holy Hills of the Coast Range. To the West, the land drops dramatically to meet the Pacific Ocean at a 3/4 of a mile length of spectacular private sandy beach with fresh water springs. The Short parcels each share in all the privileges and benefits accorded to owners of Coastlands lots. Offering seclusion and privacy, the Short Estate is within easy access of the Monterey Peninsula to the north, within walking distance of the famous inns, restaurants and businesses of Big Sur, and well located to take full advantage of the recreational opportunities available at the six Big Sur State Parks and the Los Padres National Forest.

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Contents: I.

THE HISTORIC SHORT ESTATE. ............................................................................................................ 2

II.

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION.................................................................................................................. 6

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. III.

A. B. C.

BIG SUR. ............................................................................................................................... 6 THE COASTLANDS. ............................................................................................................... 6 THE SHORT ESTATE. ........................................................................................................... 10 DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL. ............................................................................................... 22 PRICE AND TERMS. .............................................................................................................. 28 CONTACT INFORMATION. .................................................................................................... 28 LEGAL NOTICE.................................................................................................................... 28 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND MATERIAL AVAILABLE. ................................................ 28 THE SHORT WAY TO THE PACIFIC – A FAMILY HISTORY. ..................................................... 30

THE SHORT FAMILY WAY. ................................................................................................. 30 BUILDING THE FAMILY CABIN. .......................................................................................... 31 AFTER A LONG SHORT TIME. ............................................................................................. 31

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Figures: Figure 1 - Looking West From The Cabin Lawn. ............................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 2 – South Coast As Seen From The Short Estate, Big Sur, Ca. ............................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 3 – Property’s Relationship To Monterey County. ................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 4 - Looking Southeast From The Short Estate Ridge ........................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 5 - The Coastlands Parcel Map .............................................................................................................................................. 7 Figure 6 - A Marine Terrace on The Short Estate ............................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 7 - The Coastlands Trail System............................................................................................................................................ 9 Figure 8 - Pfeiffer Point From The Ridge Top................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 9 – Central Coast Region, Big Sur, California..................................................................................................................... 11 Figure 10 - Short Parcel 1 (Lot 20), Detail ..................................................................................................................................... 13 Figure 11 - Parcel 4......................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Figure 12 - Looking East from The Short Estate ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 13 - The Short Estate & Surrounding Properties ................................................................................................................. 15 Figure 14 - Honey, Big Beach, The Short Estate, September 2001 ................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 15 - The Post Ranch Inn As Seen From The Short Estate .................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 16 - Principle Points of Interest In Big Sur .......................................................................................................................... 17 Figure 17 - The Short Cabin, Big Sur, CA 1949 ............................................................................................................................. 18 Figure 18 – The View From The Doorway. ..................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 19 - Beach, The Short Estate ............................................................................................................................................... 20 Figure 20 – Arial View of The Short Estate.................................................................................................................................... 21 Figure 21 – Looking South From The Ridge Above The Cabin, The Short Estate, Big Sur, Ca. .... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 22 – Sunset ........................................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 22a- Map ........................................................................................................................................................................... 23a Figure 23 - More Beach on The Short Estate ................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 24 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.116, RDR(CZ) ..................................................................................... 25 Figure 25 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) ...................................................................................... 26 Figure 26 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) cont. ............................................................................. 27 Figure 27 – Ridge Trail #1 Passing The Short Estate ...................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 28 – Sands Of Time ............................................................................................................................................................. 30 Figure 29 - Big Beach, 1934 ........................................................................................................................................................... 31

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Figure 3 – Property’s Relationship To Monterey County.

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II.

Property Description.

A. Big Sur. Big Sur is in Monterey County, a part of the Central Coast region of California, approximately 125 miles South of San Francisco. The subject property is located in the region known as the Big Sur Coast in the unincorporated area of Monterey County. The Big Sur Coast is a rugged mountainous stretch of approximately 90 miles of the Pacific Coast that is accessed only by Coast Highway One. The Big Sur area is geographically distinctive, and consists of the western slopes of the Santa Lucia Mountains, which reach an elevation of 5,200 feet at Cone Peak and drop dramatically to meet the Pacific Ocean as sheer cliffs and bluffs at the shoreline. A single main ridge, the Coast Ridge, fronts much of the immediate coastline. The steep slope of this ridge is cut by numerous narrow wooded canyons opening onto the Pacific Ocean, that create the scenery for which Big Sur is famous. Narrow, chaparral-covered spur ridges, perpendicular to the Coast Ridge, separate the coastal canyons. These canyons have been created by the more than fifty watersheds and creeks that flow into the sea.

B. The Coastlands. 1. Location and Access. The Short property is situated in an area known as Coastlands, which is located on the West side of Highway One, between the Ventana Inn and Nepenthe. Located thirty miles South of the Monterey Peninsula, Coastlands is a desirable mature neighborhood, with a well-established character, surrounded by lands of exceptional beauty. The thirty-eight residential parcels range in size from less than an acre to six acres. Access from Coast Highway One is by a paved, private one-lane road, Ridge Trail No. 1, which traverses a portion of the Short property and provides automotive access to residences further south along the ridge

2. Neighborhood. Progressive people established this distinct Big Sur neighborhood as a residential subdivision in 1926 from land that had formerly been part of the Post family's homestead, the magnificent Rancho Sierra Mar. Originally incorporated as the Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. the development is today known simply as Coastlands, and it remains as perhaps the finest residential community in the Big Sur area. An artistic and literary community at heart, Coastlands residents have always been a wide-ranging group, mystics and politicians, businessmen and lawyers, living alongside homesteaders and bohemians, painters, potters, and poets. Together they have lovingly stewarded this neighborhood through these past seventy years. The 29 homes in Coastlands are within walking distance to the Ventana Inn, Nepenthe, the Post Ranch Inn, art galleries, the post office, deli, grocery store, and the extensive trail system of the Ventana Wilderness.

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The Short Estate Parcel 1 .15 Acre Coastlands Lot 20

Figure 5 - The Coastlands Parcel Map

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3. Topography and Vegetation. Coastlands is composed of a group of ridges intersected by steep canyons, which are heavily forested with redwoods, oaks and bay trees. Within the Coastlands, building sites are usually on the ridges, which have magnificent views of the Pacific Ocean, the Big Sur Coastline, and the Santa Lucia Mountains. Oak trees, bays, and madrones are commonly found growing on the ridges, along with often-dense chaparral. The chaparral is a coastal scrub community, dominated by Coyote bush, sagebrush, poison oak and ceanothus. Numerous small native shrubs, flowers, and trees also grow here, their diversity reflecting the many microclimatic areas.

4. Utilities. The developers of Coastlands formed the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, incorporated as a nonprofit corporation with the purpose of maintaining and operating and improving the Coastlands water system. The corporation also was "to own and control said water rights in the interest of all those lot owners who join and become shareholders in this corporation.� All Coastlands lot owners pay an annual fee for water, road, and trail maintenance to the Coastlands Mutual Water Company. Payable in January, the fee is seven hundred dollars ($700.00) for an unimproved lot, and fifteen hundred dollars ($1500.00) for an improved lot, plus special assessments as necessary. a) Water and Road Maintenance. The Coastlands Mutual Water Company provides water service to Coastlands lots, and maintains the paved road system. The roads are surfaced for all-weather travel. Fireplugs are located at appropriate intervals on all Coastlands roads. b) Private Walking Trail System. The canyons of Coastlands, with their three year round creeks, Colby Creek, Mule Creek, and Graves Creek, may be enjoyed by the residents via a private walking trail system which meanders through the enchanting groves of redwood and bay trees. The sunlight filtering down through the tall trees casts an almost primordial light on the lushly growing native plants and ferns. It is very peaceful and quiet. The water company maintains the trail system. The trails run through the redwood canyons and on down a steep hillside trail to Coastlands Beach, a private sand beach at the mouth of Mule Canyon, for use only by Coastlands residents. c) Electricity, Telephone, Septic, Television, and Trash. Electricity, telephone and trash collection are provided in Coastlands by public utilities. Cellular phone reception can be excellent. Septic systems are used for sewage disposal. Propane delivery and trash collection are available. Good television reception is obtainable with a satellite dish.

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Figure 7 - The Coastlands Trail System

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C. The Short Estate. 1. Location and Access. The Short Estate is located in the area of the Coastlands neighborhood. Access to the property from Coast Highway One is by a paved, private one-lane road, Ridge Trail #1. The turn to the Short driveway is located one half mile from Highway One. The driveway runs south along the eastern side of the ridge, rises to the ridge-top, heads west, turns north and suddenly to your left, the vast Pacific Ocean. The view is spectacular. Just before reaching the cabin the driveway crosses again to the eastern slope of the ridge where, just beyond a carport, it divides. Turning to the left, the driveway continues North up the ridge, and provides access to the building sites beyond the cabin. Turning to the right at the divide, the driveway completes the large circular loop and returns to Ridge Trail #1. The most ideal building site is located along a ridge that runs parallel to the coast. This ridge begins at an elevation of 1150 feet in the large open flats of Rancho Rico, then extends south across the Post Ranch, where it drops slightly in elevation to meet the Short Property at elevations of 900 to1000 feet. The ridge then begins a gradual descent toward Graves Canyon. There is approximately 2000 feet of ridge-top on the Short property between the Post Ranch and Coastlands. One of the three Short parcels, APN #420-171-32, is located within the Coastlands development. The other three parcels are contiguous with, but outside the area of the Coastlands, lying immediately adjacent to the west and north. These three lots of record are today grouped under a single assessor parcel number, APN #420-011-002, which is 132+- acres in size, uses the Coastlands road system for access, has water rights in the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, and is otherwise physically indistinguishable from the land of the original Coastlands development.

2. The Distinguishing Quality. Aside from its spectacular ocean frontage what is most distinguishable about the Short Property is its size and pristine condition. Compared to the small acreage of all Coastlands parcels, which range in size from less than an acre up to six acres, the Short 132+- acres represents a veritable kingdom as it rises from sea level to an elevation of approximately 1000 feet.

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Figure 9 – Central Coast Region, Big Sur, California

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3. Parcels. a) Parcel 3, APN #420-171-032. Parcel 3 is Lot 20 of Coastlands Tract No. 1, part of the original Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. development. This is an unimproved triangularly shaped parcel containing approximately 10,000 square feet. A five-foot wide trail easement is contiguous with, and parallels, the westerly line. Ridge Trail No. 1, the main Coastlands access road, is contiguous with the easterly parcel line of Lot 20. The lot is moderately forested with native trees and shrubs and is about 80% level. The balance is moderately to steeply down sloping. Lot 20 is not a practical or attractive building site in its current configuration, but this can be resolved by an adjustment of the lot line. Lot 20 could be expanded through this process to include additional acreage, an ocean-view building site, and a portion of beach. This expanded lot would most naturally include the southern portion of the ridge top with its magnificent views of the Big Sur South Coast. b) Parcel 1 And Parcel 3 and 4, APN #420-011-002. The total acreage of Parcels 1 and 3 and 4 is 107.2. Parcel 1 consists of 34+- acres and includes the northern-most inland portions of the property with the highest elevations. Parcel 4 is 75 acres including the existing residence and the entire shore frontage. Although Parcel 1 and 3 and 4 are grouped under a single assessor parcel number, they are potentially separate pre-existing lots of record. The significance of legal lots of record is discussed below in the section titled Potential for Development. (1)

Parcel 1.

Parcel 2 is land that was purchased from the Post Family in the nineteen twenties. This land, as well as the Coastlands development, had been part of the original Post Family homestead. The property extends from a corner at the hairpin turn along Ridge Trail #1 where it begins its traverse of the Short Property, up the canyon and over the ridge to the west, where there is a large building site with sweeping views in all directions. With construction of an access road this would be one of the most sensational building sites on the Big Sur Coast. As with Lot 20, it may be determined that a lot line adjustment, resulting in a reconfigured lot would be beneficial to Parcel 1. Such a reconfigured parcel could include beach frontage and increased ridgeline acreage. Beyond the above-described building site, Parcel 1 continues north to the northeast property corner. The land here is a series of ridges and canyons that slope downward from the ridge along the easterly parcel line to the ocean 1000 feet below, (passing across Parcel 3) These canyons and ridges are mostly covered in dense brush, while some of the deeper canyon areas have water loving trees, sycamores, redwoods, and willows, as well as a wide variety of small native trees and shrubs. There are numerous small areas of level to gently sloping terrain which are large enough to site a dwelling on this part of the property. These sites have magnificent ocean views and plentiful water, as these small canyons have fresh water springs, with enough water in two of the canyons to create running streams. However, the terrain is too steep for the practical construction of an access road. When one looks out of the window of the restaurant at Post Ranch Inn, the ridges lying directly to the west are part of the series of canyons and ridges on the northern section of the Short property.

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2

3

3

Figure 10 - Short Parcel 1 (Lot 20), Detail

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(2)

Parcel 3.

Oak, bay, redwood, pine, cypress, and other native trees and shrubs grow on the ridge top of parcel 3. Several groupings of these trees give definition to the landscape. At the northern and southern ends of the property there are groves of beautiful oak trees. A wide variety of trees grow in the area around the cabin; pine, bay, and oak, as well as many non-natives, including several yew trees, olive and walnut trees, Australian tea trees, and many more. Several fruit trees from the old orchard grow in the large open field south of the cabin. On the eastern side of the ridgeline, about half-way along the length of the parcel, there is a lovely grove of redwood trees, their roots reaching down into the steep canyon of Colby Creek, toward the Short Property eastern border. Beautiful South Sur Coast views open up at the southern end of the parcel. A wonderful grove of oak trees shade elegant stone terraces (built on the Short property by the previous owner of Lot 21) with an outlook that stretches south from Rancho Grande to Lopez Point. The property reaches its most westerly point on a small ridge beyond the oak grove, an excellent location for sunset viewing and to the north there is an ocean outlook point, with lawn and benches. West of the cabin, out beyond the front lawn, the land slopes down to the shoreline from an elevation of about 650 feet. The elevation of these steep western slopes varies from approximately 550 feet at the southern part of the property to over 1000 feet in the north. Most of the slope is too steep for development. Moving north, the series of canyons and ridges (described in the Parcel 2 section) that slope downward from the ridge along the easterly parcel line (alongside of the Post Ranch) to the ocean below, run across both Parcel 2 and 3. There are several sizeable flat coastal bluffs, or marine terraces, located between 100 to 350 feet above sea level. These marine terraces were formed as waves cut flat platforms into the then-submerged bedrock and deposited coarse sediments upon them. With the most recent geological uplifting of the Santa Lucia Range, an uplift that began 1.8 million years ago and believed to be on-going today, these platforms have risen well above sea level and are today fabulous, however difficult to reach, as the steep terrain would prohibit practical construction of an access road. Yet these terraces are so extraordinary that with imagination, ingenuity, and good engineering, these practical difficulties might be overcome. Today, work continues on the trail to these terraces with the objective of providing easy access to these coastal bluffs.

4. Parcel 4. Title research has identified the acreage of the Short Estate located in Section 6 as a separate legal lot of record. This lot includes a large part of Big Beach, two canyons, one with spring, and portions of three ridges, however there is no known access to building sites. In summary, the 107.43 acre Short property is composed of two assessor parcels, APN #420-011-002, and APN #420-171-032. Within these two parcels there are three legal lots of records, and a forth identified by recent title research. An evaluation of the property's full development potential would benefit from a determination of the actual number and description of separate parcels, an issue to be clarified with the Monterey County Planning Department.

Figure 11 - Parcel 4

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Figure 13 - The Short Estate & Surrounding Properties

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5. Beaches. Private sand beaches are a rare thing to find in Big Sur and the three quarters of a mile of pristine, private beach is one of the Short Estate's most compelling assets. This is a world-class beach. To be on these beaches is to be in Shangri-La. It had been thought that over the years the old hiking trail down to the beach had been almost totally obscured, making reasonable access to the beach very difficult. However, after discovering several sections of completely intact trail, several Short Family members began the work of repairing the path to the beach. Although the hike descends quite a distance, there have been many camping expeditions to the beach during the last eighty years, with all the gear being carried down to the beach, and afterwards, carried back up again. Any coastal access is a special thing but this hike is particularly rewarding. From the tip of Coastlands, at the mouth of Mule Canyon, fan-shell shaped sand beaches run north ending at Wreck Beach, just south of Pfeiffer Point. The beaches are each different, but the best beach of all is the Short's beach, or Big Beach, where there is a large rock formation known as Mr.& Mrs. Majors which extends well out into the ocean creating the unique coastal environment. The wide sands of Big Beach have formed to the north of this rocky ridge. The marine terraces, which lie above the beach, the waterbearing canyons that end at the beach, the rocky ridge, and the extensive inter-tidal area, all contain a wide diversity of native plants and animal species. Offshore the lushly growing forests of sea kelp attest to the richness of the marine life. The harbor seal is the marine mammal most often seen here, as they haul out on the beach during low tide for a relaxing nap and sunbath. Sea lions also haul their bulk onto the rocks of Mr. and Mrs. Majors. Sea Otters live in the near shore kelp-beds. Gray whales provide hours of viewing pleasure, as they pass the beach, heading south in December-January, returning north in March-April. Blue whales, killer whales, elephant seals, dolphins and porpoises can be seen. Big Beach is a good place for watching seabirds and shorebirds. Processions of pelicans glide along the shore, cormorants and gulls roost on the rocks, sanderlings chase the edge of retreating waves. Large marsh birds such as the blue heron, the great egret, and the snowy egret are a common sight perched on floating kelp or driftwood, and bobbing up and down with the ocean swells as they fish the kelp forests and tidal pools. Big Beach is where the Short family traditionally camped, living off the land, gathering the driftwood that naturally collects here to build great bonfires, eating the fish they caught, and abalone and mussels they gathered. There is plentiful fresh water here with several of the canyons having excellent springs. The magical quality that is the experience of being on this beach has made the effort to develop comfortable beach access well worth the effort.

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Figure 16 - Principle Points of Interest In Big Sur

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6. Improvements.

Figure 17 - The Short Cabin, Big Sur, CA 1949

The improvements found on this land consist of a small adobe cabin, and outbuildings. They are described in a 1984 appraisal: "The Short family cabin is a one-story structure, consisting of a living room, kitchen, two bedrooms and a bath. The living room was built in 1932. This 22x26 foot portion of the building is constructed of adobe bricks made on site and painted with several coats of plaster. Subsequent additions were made using redwood board and batten construction. The floor is concrete. The roof is wood shake on the adobe section and tar and gravel on the remainder. The interior walls are a combination of plaster, sheetrock, and plywood paneling. Ceilings are wood decked with exposed beams. A rock fireplace and electric wall heaters supply heating. The kitchen and bathroom are modestly appointed and quite dated. Wiring and plumbing are deficient and exposed rafter ends show deterioration. The dwelling is considered to contain 1,235 square feet.� This is a home with true Big Sur soul. Since taking possession of the property in January of 2001, the Short Grandchildren have, with a breath of fresh air and elbow grease, transformed the little house back into the cozy cottage of so-many-year-ago. The dimensions and design of the adobe living room recall the Craftsman building style. It is a room that feels good to sit in, especially in the evening with a fire burning in the fireplace. There is a sense of history here, which feels worth protecting. A guest house perhaps, or housing for a caretaker? Outside of the cabin there are two small patios, walkways, a lawn, and landscaping with flowers and ornamental shrubs and plants, both native and introduced varieties. Other than the small landscaped area surrounding the cabin, the property become overgrown and chocked with dense brush during the last forty years. Coyote bush and sagebrush, poison oak and other native vegetation took over and made the land nearly impassable. Recently much of the ridge-top has been cleared of the brush revealing evidence from the nineteen thirties and forties of the formerly landscaped and cultivated areas of the property. The tall flax that is growing on the ridge above the cabin, which burst forth after the brush was cleared providing room for growth, recalls these earlier years, as does the oak tree in the front yard with an ingrown chain wrapped around a limb. A swing hangs from this chain, and it was here that Edward Weston made his famous photograph, Winter Idle, of his wife Charis swinging. Weston, a family friend, took many photographs at the Short Property. He immortalized the above-mentioned flax in his photograph, Grasses, Big Sur. The second significant structure is a detached concrete block garage building. This is a substantial structure, built to support a second level that has never been added. The structure contains 630 square feet, space enough for three cars.

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7. Utilities. a) Water. "Whiskey is for drinking, and water is for fighting about.� Mark Twain The Coastlands Mutual Water Company has a good history of operation. The Short Estate has two water rights within this water company. One right is associated with the ownership of Lot 20, and the other conveyed to Short in 1927 is associated with the 132 acre parcel. The availability of water is a major issue affecting the development of all existing lots of record in Big Sur. There are two parts to this issue. The first is whether the property in question possesses clear title to a water right. The second concerns permit approval for the water system from the Health Department.

(1)

Rights.

In 1927 and 1928 John Douglas Short acquired access to his land and water rights through two separate agreements made with the developers of the Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. In the first agreement dated 1927 Short traded an easement to build a road across his property for domestic water rights for one family residence. This is the first Short water right. The developer needed this easement in order to reach the lots along the ridge to the south of the Short property. In these agreements Short also acquired the right to use this road, Ridge Trail #1, the main road into Coastlands from Highway One. From that time on, Short Parcel 2 has enjoyed free usage of both road and water. Short Parcel 1, Lot 20, however, pays the annual unimproved parcel fee for water, road and trail maintenance to the Coastlands Mutual Water Company. Currently that fee is seven hundred dollars. In 1928 the 1927 agreement was altered to include the surveyed road description and the location as to where Short was to take his water, “where the pipeline crosses Lot 20."

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Lot 20, which is adjacent to Short’s parcel 1, was not owned by Short when the original water and road agreement was made with Coastlands. Short had not bothered to buy Lot 20 from Coastlands, believing the lot could not be built upon. Much to his surprise, a Carmel developer, Barney Segal, purchased the lot in 1949 from Coastlands. Short purchased it in 1950 concerned by Segal’s plans for development of the lot. When Segal bought Lot 20 it was conveyed with a water right. The Covenants, Conditions, Restrictions and Limitations in that sales document states that a water right was an appurtenance to the land and this water right passed to Short when he bought the lot. This is the second Coastlands Mutual Water Company right acquired by Short. (2)

Health Department Approval.

The second water issue is that of obtaining a permit. Approval for a proposed water system for residential use must be obtained from the County Health Department. Having an unquestionable right to water from a private water system is not a guarantee that the Health Department will approve a connection to the system as officials must be convinced that the water system itself meets all existing health standards. (3)

Additional Sources Of Water.

If an increased water supply is desired, the most reasonable option may well be the installation of a private well. That there is plenty of water on this property is evident by the number of springs one sees when taking a hike to the beach. Presently, the owner of a lot may construct a private well as a single connection water system in the development of a single-family dwelling. As additional connections are added to a water system, the system becomes subject to, and burdened by, increasing layers of complication as a result of County, State, and Federal regulations. The drilling of a well may cost from $10,000 on up, depending on circumstances such as location, the depth where good water is found, etc. but having a single connection water system is a blessing. b) Septic Systems. In Big Sur, septic systems are required for sewage disposal by Monterey County. Before a building permit may be obtained, soils tests must to be conducted to determine whether the soils quality at the proposed building site is suitable for a septic tank and leach field. These tests will identify the locations where septic systems will be permitted. The results will assist in mapping lot line adjustments as well the planning and building of residences. There are no known problems with the septic tank or leach field at the Short cabin. c) Electric Power and Telephone. Pacific Gas and Electric Company supplies electricity to the Short property. Pacific Bell provides telephone service.

Figure 19 - Beach, The Short Estate

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8. General Plan - Overview. The subject property is located in the unincorporated area of Monterey County and is subject to the land use restrictions imposed by the Monterey County General Plan and Zoning Ordinance. The property is also located within the Coastal Zone as administered by Monterey County and the California Coastal Commission. The Monterey County General Plan contains provisions set forth by the California State Coast Coastal Commission and Coastal Plan. As such, land use decisions on properties situated in this jurisdiction are determined at the county level and reviewed by the California Coastal Commission. Development approvals issued by the County may be appealed to the California Coastal Commission in some instances

9. Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan / Local Coastal Program. The Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan, Local Coastal Program (LUP), which was adopted in 1985, supersedes the Monterey County Coast Master Plan, adopted in 1962. The general goals and policies of the Big Sur Coast Land Use Plan / Local Coastal Program are further clarified and applied according to the Monterey County Coastal Implementation Plan. This is a six-part document that was adopted in 1988, two parts of which are of direct importance to the Short property and other properties in the greater Big Sur area. • • • •

a) First (Part 1: Coastal Zone Regulations). Coastal Zone Regulations (Chapters 20.105-20.139). Regulations for Coastal Development Permits (Chapter 20,140). General Provisions and Exceptions in Coastal Zone (Chapter 20.142). Title 20 (Zoning Ordinance).

b) Second (Part 3: Regulations for Development). These regulations may be reviewed at the Monterey County's Department of Planning and Building Inspection which also maintains an informative web site at www.co.monterey.ca.us.

Figure 20 – Arial View of The Short Estate

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D. Development Potential. 1. Legal Lots of Record. Although having only two assessor parcel numbers at this time, the Short Estate is actually composed of three pre-existing legal lots of record, that is, parcels which were legal parcels of record prior to the County's establishment of zoning. For these pre-existing lots to be legally recognized by the County, a chain of title which delineates the parcel's history is submitted, along with an application for a Certificate of Compliance (C of C), and of course, a fee. Only recently, title research has disclosed the existence of a fourth legal lot of record in the Short Estate, composed of the acreage located in Section 6. This parcel would include wonderful beach frontage where the parcel's canyons and ridges meet the Pacific Ocean. Confirmation of this legal lot of record increases the property’s development potential. Having a confirmed legal lot of record is significant in two ways. First, under current County policy, legal lots of record are considered buildable parcels suitable for development in accordance with the applicable zoning and planning regulations. Second, legal lots of record have the possibility of being reconfigured through a process of lot line adjustment.

2. Lot Line Adjustments. Contiguous, legal lots of record may be reconfigured through a relatively simple process known as a Lot Line Adjustment (LLA). In a Lot Line Adjustment the boundaries between parcels may be adjusted to configure them for optimum development potential. The Lot Line Adjustment process includes confirmation by the County of the parcels existing legality, making an application for a Certificate of Compliance unnecessary.

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On the Short Estate the shape of the parcels might be redrawn such that each parcel would have an optimum building site with several acres of ridge-top, fabulous ocean view, private beach footage, and so forth. There are many natural building locations that are far enough apart as to offer privacy at each site. There are many factors to consider when making decisions about the proposed location of the adjusted lot lines. The microenvironments on the property need to be studied and understood. The subtle changes in the terrain, the vegetation and the soils, the orientation of a potential building site to other sites, to the ocean, and to the path of the sun, all these factors are important to consider in order maximizing the integrity of each resulting parcel. There are also personal feelings and personal choices to be considered when making lot line decisions and while these choices are subject to regulatory limitations, they remain perhaps the most important element in the decision making process. For this reason, the Short Family has decided that it should be the choice of the new owner as to just how the parcels might be reconfigured. There are relatively few restrictions or conditions that can be placed on lot line adjustments. As long as the newly configured parcels do not increase any existing non-conformities, and each newly configured parcel can demonstrate a building site in compliance with existing regulations, the County has almost no discretion to deny approval. A lot line adjustment can be applied for with or without an accompanying application for residential development. Either way, a Coastal Development Permit (CDP) application is required. Also required are engineering studies that may include a survey of contours around the house site, as well as geo-technical, archeological and biological studies. One must prove that the site has adequate water and potential for a septic system.

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3. Building Permit and Development Standards. The final stage of Entitlement involves the application for an actual building permit. A Coastal Development Permit is required, and can be applied for in conjunction with a Lot Line Adjustment application. The requirements for a building permit are very strict. The size and location of any proposed building is regulated through the process of obtaining Design and Site Review Approvals, and Building and Grading Permits. These permit and approval processes take into consideration many environmental factors, such as soil erosion, drainage of water, scenic viewshed, traffic, slope topography and any potential impact on wildlife and vegetation. The building site must have a Septic Permit from the Board of Health, and an approved source of water.

4. Critical Viewshed. The Critical Viewshed includes everything in sight of Highway One. "If you can see the highway, the highway can see you" is the local rule-of-thumb. While most of the Short ridge-top is screened from view by existing vegetation, there is a small area that is visible from Highway One. An understanding of viewshed constraints is important in an analysis of the property's development potential. With some forethought and care it should be possible to gain approval for new structures along the ridge-top. Effort should be made to site and design proposed buildings out of the highway viewshed. The vegetative screening that exists today should be protected and new growth encouraged to provide as much screening from Highway One as is possible.

5. Zoning - WSC/40 (CZ). As shown on the attached zoning map, Parcel 2 and Parcel 3 are zoned WSC/40(CZ), Watershed Scenic Conservation District/40 acre minimum (Coastal Zone), which allows for a division of land into 40-acre minimum lots for single family residences. The purpose of WSC zoning as defined according to Section 20.118.010 of the Monterey County Coastal Implementation Plan (MCCIP): "‌ to provide a district to allow development in the more remote or mountainous areas in the Coastal Zone while protecting the significant and substantial resources of these areas. Of specific concern are the highly sensitive resources inherent in such areas such as view shed, water shed, plant and wildlife habitat, streams and riparian corridors..."

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Figure 24 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.116, RDR(CZ)

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Figure 25 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ)

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Figure 26 - Monterey County Zoning Regulations CH.20.118 WSC(CZ) cont.

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6. Zoning - RDR/40(CZ). Parcel 1 and Lot 20 are located within an area zoned RDR/40(CZ), or rural density residential. Although this is a more restricted residential use zoning classification, it has the same density requirements as WSC/40(CZ) zoning. The purpose of RDR zoning is defined in Section 20.116.010: "‌ to allow low density and intensity residential uses in the rural areas of the Coastal Zone where such residential use is compatible with the character of the rural area." In reading of Chapter 20.116.80, Density of Development, it seems nonsensical that Coastlands should have zoning of RDR/40, which means that this RDR(CZ) district, consisting of only of Coastlands parcels, has a maximum net density of one unit to forty acres, when the largest parcel in Coastlands is six acres in size. This zoning of one residence per 40 acres applies to almost all of the land West of Coast Highway One, and was adopted to guide the development of Big Sur. See the Zoning Regulations that follow for the Principle and Conditional Uses allowed and building requirements, such as sets backs, and height limits. Variances to stipulated requirements of these zoning regulations are regularly granted to mitigate the environmental constraints of a given site, such as view shed, slope, or other criteria.

7. Site Constraints. There are a number of policies and zoning regulations that govern the development potential of a particular lot. These are typically analyzed as site constraints that reduce the maximum potential development capacity of a parcel. For example, development will ordinarily not be allowed on that portion of a parcel comprised of slopes exceeding thirty percent. Other considerations include tree removal, archaeological resources, forest resources, ridgeline development, environmentally sensitive habitat, soil stability, geological considerations, etc.

E. Price and Terms. Offering Price: Twenty Million Dollars (US$20,000,000.00.) While the owners prefer an all-cash sale, the terms are negotiable, financing may be available.

F. Contact Information. To visit this property, or to obtain further information, please contact: Tim Allen Coldwell Banker Del Monte Realty Junipero 2 SW of 5th Carmel, CA 93921 Timallen1@aol.com www.Uniquepeninsulahomes.com

G. Legal Notice. Although all information in this document is from sources deemed reliable, this information should be reviewed and analyzed carefully by any prospective buyer. Tim Allen, and Coldwell Banker make no representations or warranties, either expressed or implied, as to the validity of the information contained herein, and advise any prospective buyer to obtain their own legal, tax and accounting advice.

H. Additional Information and Material Available. 1. Preliminary Title Report. Preliminary Title Report by First American Title Company dated June 25, 2001, including copies of all Exceptions.

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2. Articles of Incorporation. 1947 Articles of Incorporation of the Coastlands Mutual Water Company.

3. Coastlands Covenants. Coastlands Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&R's), as set forth in a Deed from Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc. to Barnet Segal, 1949.

4. Water Rights. 1927 and 1928 Agreements for Water Rights and Right of Way between John Douglas Short and Santa Lucia Coast Lands, Inc.

5. Mutual Water Company Covenant. 1965 Covenant, Coastlands Water Company, recorded in February 1966, for annual assessment.

6. Agreement. 1980 Agreement between the Post family and the Coastlands Mutual Water Company, concerning the water system.

7. Coastlands Subdivision Map. 1927 Map of Coastlands Tract No. 1, recorded in Monterey County Map Book 3, p. 46.

8. Lot 20 Survey Map. 2001 Plat of survey showing the location of certain improvements over and across Lots 20 and 21 of the Coastlands Tract #1, Rasmussen Land Surveying.

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III. The Short Way To The Pacific – A Family History. "Often, when following the trail which meanders over the hills, I pull myself up in an effort to encompass the glory and the grandeur which envelops the whole horizon. Often, when clouds pile up in the North and the sea is churned with white caps, I say to myself: This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of he Earth as the Creator intended it to look." Henry Miller And so it was for John W. Short, and his son, John Douglas Short, Sr., when they traveled by horseback to Big Sur from Carmel early in the early 1900's. It was a trip that would profoundly influence the course of events of their lives. In the Twenties, after many visits to this pristine coast, Douglas, and his wife Marie Hathaway Short, acquired their first piece of Big Sur land as part of a State of California sale benefiting a State educational fund. Marie's father purchased an adjoining 43 acres as a gift for Douglas and Marie. Seven years later Douglas purchased additional land from their neighbors, the Post family, bringing the acreage belonging to the Shorts to a total of one hundred and fifty acres, A final acquisition was completed in 1950 when Douglas purchased a small contagious parcel, Lot 20, of the original Coastlands development. Together these properties formed a very private retreat for the family to enjoy with their four children, John Douglas Jr., Bill, daughter Kraig, and Erik, and their many grandchildren.

A. The Short Family Way. From the very beginning the Short family enjoyed camping expeditions on their land, camping at what is now the cabin site, and on Big Beach, where they lived off the land, catching ocean fish and gathering abalone and mussels. "This beach is very lovely: elegant fine white sand, fresh water springs, a variety of ocean fish, shell fish, and an abundance of small game. We all greatly enjoyed those days of the late 1920' and early 1930's; we were naked in the sun, wind, and water most of the time, and built huge fires of driftwood at night near where we slept. These were very happy days for the family,” so wrote one of the Short children, John D. Short, Jr., describing their idyllic lifestyle.

Figure 28 – Sands Of Time

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B. Building The Family Cabin. By 1932 a section of the ridge had been cleared of brush, revealing the lovely open meadows that face the sea. It was here the Shorts planted an orchard and fields of grain, which waved on each ocean breeze. It was here they gathered to build a cabin of hand made adobe bricks. With the sea at it's feet and the sky reaching above, this cabin stands as testimony to the spirit of the family and friends who have celebrated the beauty of this land for nearly a century. "In 1933 we began to build the adobe bricks: Douglas, Bill, and I, with regular help from Cole Weston and David Hagemeyer. Within a year we had created enough bricks (4"x12"x24"), about 1,500, to build the present cabin. When the bricks had dried in the sun for some months so they were sufficiently mature to handle we began construction of the cabin. Starting with a slab concrete floor and footings, we set up the bricks with a mud mortar and eventually created the gabled shell of the house, 20'x30' feet. On this adobe shell we built a roof, shakes of redwood, added a fireplace and the very long eaves provided a snug and dry little cabin.� John D. Short, Jr. Six or eight adobe rooms were to be added to this cabin, extending out toward the sea with a large living room at the cliff edge, thus forming an interior court; it was a lovely idea that was never realized.

C. After A Long Short Time. Following the completion of the cabin in the late 1930's, the family moved back to Woodside, California. In 1939 Douglas and Marie divorced, after which Marie settled in Carmel. That same year Douglas married Kaye Gorringe Justice. John Douglas Short Sr., upon his death in 1955, gave the entire Big Sur retreat to his four children, while bequeathing a life-estate to his beloved wife Kaye, a gift she enjoyed until her death early at an age of ninety-three. The property is now in the capable hands of the twelve grandchildren of Douglas and Marie Short, the forth generation of the Short family in Big Sur.

Figure 29 - Big Beach, 1934

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Coast Ranch  

Tim Allen Properties

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