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Empowering students to think critically and creatively since 1913

VOLUME 105 ISSUE 5 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

IN THE NEWS

SOUTH PASADENA HIGH SCHOOL 1401 FREMONT AVE, SOUTH PASADENA, CA 91030

Presidents’ Day

Winter Arts Crawl

Toiletry Drive

Students and staff have a four-day weekend Friday to Monday, Feb. 15-18 in honor of Presidents’ Day.

The annual event, entitled “All You Need is Love,” will celebrate art, music, and food Saturday, Feb. 17.

The Holy Family Youth Club will be collecting donations until Feb. 20 to support Hands Together.

Talent Show 2019 STORY ADAM KWOH PHOTOS TONY CHEN & ANDRÉS OYAGA

the crowd in awe with his high energy beatboxing performance that incorporated both rapid and controlled beats.

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Kim discovered his beatboxing talent only a year before the talent show, practicing making different sounds during his spare time at home and school. After competing in the East LA Beatbox Battles competition last December, Kim saw the talent show as another opportunity to reach a wider audience and be a part of the show’s success.

he SPHS 2019 Talent Show showcased students’ unique and entertaining talents Friday, Feb. 8. This year the assembly strayed away from typical acts of past talent shows, instead emphasizing diversity through its 11-act set. Moderate Jive opened the show with their feel-good performance of “Sunflower” by Rex Orange County. Junior Serenda Camarillo’s rendition of Bruno Mars’ “When I Was Your Man” prompted the crowd to wave their phone lights in harmony, while senior James Gomez performed Frank Sinatra’s “The Way You Look Tonight.” Löded Diper energized the crowd with their inclusion of a dancing banana during their performance of “Y.M.C.A.” by Village People. The show’s modern dance group, SNUZE, brought the stage to life with K-pop styled movements and a mix of colorful special effects. Duo dance group Banana Bread executed a lively dance routine with infallible coordination. Sophomore Kayla Nielsen rapped her tap shoes in tandem with the hip hop and trap beats of “Salute” by Little Mix while sophomore pianist Audrey Lin and senior guitarist Paul Pan performed complex pieces that demonstrated the expertise and mastery of their instruments. 2018 East LA Beatbox Battles champion, sophomore Yutae Kim, left

“I know there has been a heritage of beatboxers in the talent show — like last year there was Josh Nahm,” Kim said. “I auditioned because I wanted to keep that heritage.” Kim’s impressive performance secured him the 1st place prize of $100. Nielsen’s tap act trailed Kim with a 2nd place spot, while Camarillo’s vocal stylings took 3rd place. “We had so many talented acts this year and it was difficult to choose who to accept and because of this we ended up accepting more acts than past years,” Clark said. “Due to the number of acts and the announcement of Grad Night..., we simply didn’t have enough time to include more skits or commentary.” During the show, ASB introduced seniors to the 2019 Grad Night location: Disney California Adventure. Registration is now open, with tickets starting at $105.

CITY COUNCIL

CHINCHIKURIN

This month’s staff editorial analyzes the implications of South Pasadena’s habit of total consensus in municipal decisions upon the community. Page 5

The Little Tokyo restaurant showcases the rebuilding of Hiroshima postWorld War II, offering okonomiyaki, “Hiroshima’s Soul Food.” Page 10

TIGERNEWSPAPER.COM

ENTERTAINMENT RANKINGS Tiger ranks the nine spring sports based on their entertainment value to fans. Page 15


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TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

NEWS

Black History Month STORY CAT FLORES, CAROLINE KIMBEL, & ADAM KWOH

PAGE TALULLA CHOW & ELAINE YANG

PHOTOS TONY CHEN & OSCAR WALSH

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he Black community is a prominent influencer in art and music, shaping both society and pop culture. During times of societal and political struggle, Black art was considered as an outlet of expression. Today, the community’s pieces remain important reminders of African American history. The works of Black artists continue to shape the cultural landscape of the world — especially in Los Angeles’ diverse neighborhoods. Many of Los Angeles’ museums and organizations are spotlighting of the works of Black artists who have inspired change. Tiger ventures into the greater L.A. area to explore a few places to visit during Black History Month.

Time is Running Out of Time Exhibit

EXPERIMENTAL FILMS produced by Black artists line the walls of Art + Practice’s latest collaboration with The Broad. The Art + Practice foundation collaborated with The Broad for their latest exhibit, “Time is Running Out of Time,” to spotlight the experimental works of Black filmmakers in the 1960s and 1970s. The exhibition’s selection mainly covers films created by UCLA students during the Civil Rights movement and Watts riots. The exhibit title was inspired by a 1970s song written by poet and singer Abiodun Oyewole. His song was later used in Haile Garima’s film Hour Glass, which was considered a subtle plea for political change after its release. Many of the films produced by the UCLA student artists continued Oyewole’s message and challenged the view of Black suffering through their experimental storytelling and images of Black people. Works such as Alima Lee’s Naia documented the life of a young girl who faced discrimination at school due to her ethnicity in an effort to question the rhetoric of society against Black women. Other featured films also include commentary on civil rights leaders, showing the propaganda of radical Malcolm X who encouraged violence in the 1970s. “Time is Running Out of Time” will be open at Art + Practice until Sept. 14.

Los Angeles Public Library

California African American Museum

The California African American Museum (CAAM) serves to support underrepresented artists of color and grant the public a greater understanding of African American artists’ contribution to American culture. Along with free admission, the museum pursues its mission year-round through exhibits that examine monumental racial historical events as well as more abstract showings from new up-and-coming Black artists. The “Los Angeles Freedom Rally” is currently on display at CAAM, documenting the Wrigley Field civil rights rally led by Martin Luther King Jr. His speech is broadcasted live throughout the exhibit, accompanied with pictures from the event. The exhibit also displays photographic documentations of other significant rallies that occurred throughout the Civil Rights Movement. CAAM is additionally showcasing Robert Pruitt’s Devotion exhibit. Through sculptures, photography, and drawings, the New York artist draws connections between Black identity and cultural traditions.

THE CAAM EXHIBIT displays the artwork of individuals during the Civil Rights Movement.

JAZZ is DEAD “JAZZ is DEAD,” Highland Park’s non-profit jazz organization, will be spotlighting the influential Black artists of Los Angeles in the spirit of Black History month. The series of live concerts includes both classic and innovative “soul and jazz masters,” featuring artists from the civil rights period of the 1970s to those who began their music career in the 2000s.

SINGER JACOB LUSK shares the history of Black gospel’s sacred songs through both storytelling and performance. The Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL), which has branches throughout the greater LA area, is hosting numerous events for people of all ages to enjoy throughout February in honor of Black History Month. At the Eagle Rock branch, pianist Jamelle Houston and singer Jacob Lusk performed gospel music. Lusk shared the history of gospel, which translates to “good news”, which was used by slaves in the South as hymns and sacred songs, often in a call-and-response form. The performance by Houston and Lusk included an abundance of gospel songs such as “Joy” by the Georgia Mass Choir, “A Change Is Gonna Come” by Sam Cooke, and many others. Lusk’s powerful voice truly captured the spirit of gospel music, along with Houston’s masterful piano skills. Along with this performance, the LAPL will be hosting a wide variety of other events. The Central library located in Downtown Los Angeles will have genealogy expert Adrian Foushee share his insight on African American ancestry research on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 16th. There will also be an African American book tasting at the Central library on Feb. 27th, showcasing African American literature and important reads by Black authors.

Featured jazz artist Brian Jackson grew up in the apartments of Brooklyn, New York during a time of racial division. Brooklyn became a center of protest and Jackson experienced the sight of riots for most of his childhood. In high school, he discovered a love for music and pursued his career as a jazz musician. Jackson would produce albums that commented on the melancholy life of Black people through soulful vocals, which included his 1974 classic of “Your Daddy Loves You.” Jackson now most notably incorporates electric piano and flute in his songs, bringing a traditional jazz feel with a trace of innovative elements. 1960s jazz saxophonist Gary Bartz focuses on bringing funk to his pieces, while jazz composer Roy Ayers includes hip hop beats. Bartz and Ayers are set to perform at the Lodge Room on Feb. 17 and Feb. 28, respectively.


TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

NEWS

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SP residents propose to raise minimum wage

The minimum wage ordinance aims to alleviate social and economic concerns in South Pasadena STORY DOMINIC MARZIALI PHOTO JAYDEN EDEN GRAPHIC TALLULA CHOW

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outh Pasadena residents announced a proposal to raise the minimum wage at a city council meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 6. South Pasadena’s rate has remained stagnant over the recent years while surrounding cities and unincorporated Los Angeles County have continually bumped up their minimum wage. John Srebalus, on behalf of an informal group of South Pasadena residents, has written and proposed an ordinance to increase the minimum wage in businesses with 26 or more employees to $14.25 an hour on July 1, 2019. In 2020, the rate will be pushed up again to $15.00 an hour, and after 2022 South Pasadena will adopt the future rates established by the the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers for the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Srebalus and other concerned residents formed their campaign to address the social issues that come with a low minimum wage. Srebalus met with Councilmember Richard Schneider, who agrees that the city needs to increase the minimum wage to address a part of South Pasadena’s general plan, which seeks to balance business and housing within the City. According to Srebalus, the ordinance’s increases in minimum wage will, hopefully, translate to boosts in the wellbeing of members of the workforce and their families that rely on minimum wage jobs. The ordinance may have an effect on a small number of homegrown South Pasadena Chamber of Commerce businesses, but it is largely directed at

major chains and fast food restaurants. The ordinance will force chains like McDonald’s and KFC to increase wages, yet will likely have little effect on workers, prices, or hours. The McDonald’s in Pasadena pays a higher minimum wage, but prices items equally as those at its South Pasadena counterpart. However, the ordinance could force mom and pop shops like Fair Oaks Pharmacy to raise prices or adjust their hours to offset wage changes. Outside of South Pasadena-based businesses, only nine other members of the Chamber could be affected. Changes to minimum wage rates are less dramatic for employers of 25 or fewer employees. Under the proposal, the minimum wage would increase $1.00 each year from 2019 to 2023, ending at $15.00 an hour. The proposal aims to combat a social and economic issue, and is likely to gain traction with the city and Chamber of Commerce. Currently, the ordinance has tentative support from the Chamber and the results of limited mail-in polls have indicated that constituents are largely in support of raising the minimum wage in the city to match those of Pasadena, Los Angeles, and unincorporated LA County. “In a place like South Pas, where you have a lot of politically liberal residents, they make purchasing decisions based on the direction of the company,” Srebalus said. “I think this is definitely in line with where [residents] want to be seen and perceived.” The next step for Srebalus is to gain the support of the rest of the Council and organize a vote on the ordinance before the first planned wage increase on July 1.

THE PROPOSED INCREASE would likely have a minimal impact on a small section of South Pasadena businesses.


TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

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NEWS

AND THE OSCAR GOES TO... STORY KIMBERLY HSUEH, RACHEL LU, AANJI SIN, & MATTHEW TSAI

ILLUSTRATIONS ELAINE YANG

PAGE & GRAPHICS MADDIE YOO

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he 91st Academy Awards features a diverse spread of films. Bohemian Rhapsody tells the story of Freddie Mercury, a sexually fluid singer, BlacKkKlansman and Green Book highlight racial inequality, while Black Panther follows the fictional Wakandan king T’Challa. Tiger predicts who will take home the Oscar in the annual ceremony Sunday, Feb. 24.

BEST

BEST

ANIMATED FEATURE

ORIGINAL SONG Bradley Cooper’s remake of A Star is Born proved to be a phenomenal success. Reaching number five on the Billboard Hot 100, “Shallow” has already scored two Grammy awards and has become a worldwide favorite. The standout song skillfully connects with the audience — instilling both a deep emotional connection and a relatable message of rising above failure. The song highlights Cooper’s and Lady Gaga’s soulful voices and conveys the powerful story of mutual understanding and pain from social oppression. Both Gaga and Cooper step out of their typical specializations — with Gaga expanding her musical repertoire to the country genre and Cooper releasing his first ever singing performance.

RAMI MALEK

Many comic book fans were skeptical when SpiderMan: Into the Spider-Verse was announced in 2015 — the film would mark the character’s fourth reboot in 17 years. Despite the Spider-Man fatigue, Sony Pictures Animation gambles on the lesser known Miles Morales character and delivers a near perfect Spider-Man film. The animation style is a fantastic blend of 2D and computer animation that flawlessly captures the essence of a comic book. Writer Phil Lord crafts an exciting story, flawlessly juggling Miles Morales’ origin story and emotional character arcs. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse will break Disney’s six year animated picture winning streak and take home the Academy Award.

BEST

BEST

ACTOR

ACTRESS

Rami Malek succeeds in his impeccably realistic portrayal of the eccentric Freddie Mercury in the Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody. He perfectly captures Mercury’s emotional struggle with his life in the public eye, including his sexual orientation and his diagnosis of AIDS, all while nailing the rock star’s distinct mannerisms. Malek’s incredible performance will win him another award for Best Actor at the Academy Awards.

This year’s category is packed with impressive performances by nominees from unconventional to veteran acting backgrounds. Six-time nominee Glenn Close is continuously stellar and Yalitza Aparicio is the first-ever indigenous nominee. Olivia Colman, however, prevails in The Favourite. She leads the entire film with consistent complexity, bringing alive the emotional turmoil of the period and Queen Anne.

OLIVIA COLMAN

BEST SUPPORTING

BEST SUPPORTING

ACTOR

ACTRESS

Mahershala Ali amazes in Green Book as pianist Don Shirley, developing an intense, heartwarming, and funny performance. Ali brings a dominating presence to the screen, while still being able to nail the more personal moments with Viggo Mortensen’s Frank Vallelonga. Ali masters the art of expressing emotions through his movement and will claim his second Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Regina King delivers a fantastic, heartfelt performance as the supporting role of Sharon Rivers in If Beale Street Could Talk. She leads a party of skilled actors, but stands out in her strong, loving, maternal role, bringing a sense of hope and acceptance amidst dark times. King took home the Golden Globe for her performance and the tenderness she crafted will win her the Academy Award as well.

MAHERSHALA ALI

BEST

PICTURE BLACKKKLANSMAN Two decades have passed since the last time a Spike Lee film was nominated for the Best Picture Award. Based on a true story, BlacKkKlansman has offered an effective cinematic message on modern day racism and has generated much buzz among its audience. The movie expertly straddles the line between comedy and drama, maintaining racial tensions without being overly serious. Along with the distinguished performances and well developed characters of Ron Stallworth and Flip Zimmerman, the cinematography of the film perfectly encapsulates the racial climate of the 70s’. BlacKkKlansman is up for six awards and deserves the most prestigious honor of the Oscars: the Best Picture Award. ium erferit aquunt

REGINA KING


TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

OPINION

THE TIGER ESTABLISHED 1913

CSPA CROWN AWARD 2018 CSPA GOLD MEDALIST 2017 CSPA CROWN AWARD 2016 CSPA GOLD MEDALIST 2015 CSPA GOLD MEDALIST 2014 CSPA GOLD MEDALIST 2013 CSPA GOLD MEDALIST 2011

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STAF F ED IT OR IA L

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MATT WAKUMOTO MANAGING EDITORS OONA FOLEY, Print RACHEL LU, Online NEWS ISABELLA TSAI, Editor ADAM KWOH, Associate OPINION PETER WANG, Editor AANJI SIN, Associate FEATURE ALEX BETTS, Editor DOMINIC MARZIALI, Associate SPORTS NOAH PARKER, Editor PRESTON SHARKEY, Associate DESIGN KATE ROGERS, ELAINE YANG, Co-Editors TALULLA CHOW, Associate PHOTOGRAPHY ALICIA ALDERETE, Editor OSCAR WALSH, Associate COPY CAROLINE KIMBEL, MAYA WILLIAMSON STAFF WRITERS AUDREY ERNST, CAT FLORES, KIMBERLY HSUEH, NICOLAS LIU, CHRISTINE MAO, MATTHEW TSAI, RAYMOND YEO, MADDIE YOO, LUYANG ZHANG PHOTOGRAPHERS TONY CHEN, JAYDEN EDEN, ANDRÉS OYAGA, SOPHIE YEUNG ILLUSTRATORS NICHOLAS FORMAN, DAVID SOHN BUSINESS & ADS HYUN KIM WEBMASTER ALEX PARRA FACULTY ADVISOR MIKE HOGAN VOL. 105 NO. 5 DISTRIBUTED ON FEB. 13, 2019. DISTRIBUTION: 1436 STUDENTS; 70 COMMUNITY. 1600 COPIES PRINTED. DISTRIBUTED BY TIGER STAFF FREE OF CHARGE.

TIGER IS PRODUCED BY THE ADVANCED JOURNALISM NEWSPAPER CLASS AT SOUTH PASADENA HIGH SCHOOL, 1401 FREMONT AVE, SOUTH PASADENA, CA 91030. LAYOUT AND PHOTO IMAGING ARE COMPLETED ON-SITE. PRINTED BY L.A. WEB OFFSET PRINTING, INC., EL MONTE, CA. SIGNED ARTICLES APPEARING IN TIGER REPRESENT THE WRITER’S OPINIONS AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE STAFF, STUDENT BODY, FACULTY OR ADMINISTRATION OF SPHS. ORIGINAL STORIES WILL CARRY BYLINES, ALTHOUGH STORIES REWRITTEN BY ANYONE OTHER THAN THE ORIGINAL WRITER WILL NOT RECEIVE A BYLINE. CONTRIBUTING WRITERS WILL ALSO RECEIVE BYLINES. CONTACT THE PUBLICATIONS OFFICE AT (626) 441-5820 EXT. 2615 BETWEEN 8:00 A.M. AND 4:00 P.M. FOR ADVERTISING RATES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. TIGER WELCOMES ARTICLES, LETTERS OR REBUTTALS FOR PUBLICATION IN THE PRINT AND ONLINE EDITIONS. ALL LETTERS MUST BE SIGNED AND VERIFIABLE, BUT NAMES WILL BE WITHHELD UPON REQUEST.

TIGER’S MISSION IS TO PROVIDE A RELIABLE NEWS OUTLET FOR SPHS AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY. THROUGH A VARIETY OF COVERAGE, TIGER EMPOWERS/ENABLES STUDENTS TO THINK CRITICALLY AND CREATIVELY, COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY, SOLVE PROBLEMS, SET AND REACH GOALS, AND WORK COOPERATIVELY AND INDEPENDENTLY AS RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS. TIGER IS A FORUM FOR STUDENT FREE SPEECH, IN ACCORDANCE WITH CALIFORNIA ED CODE 48907 . ALL REMAINING CURRENT TIGER NEWSPAPER POLICIES ARE ONLINE AT TIGERNEWSPAPER. COM INCLUDING: CONFLICT OF INTEREST, LETTERS TO THE EDITOR, CORRECTIONS, AND SOCIAL MEDIA.

City Politics and the Need for Community Deliberation Members of South Pas leadership are in constant agreement, thus ignoring the need for productive discussion on important issues

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ocal politics are generally portrayed through a blackand-white lens by media sources; in descriptions of city meetings and actions, there are only the facts. However, recent developments in the city have made political coverage more vivid. One of Dr. Marina Khubesrian’s first acts as mayor was the appointment of 16 female citizens out of 18 total positions to public commissions in December 2018. This action sparked significant controversy among citizens and press alike, with many claiming that the exclusion of male applicants — three of whom were qualified incumbents — is a blatant act of discrimination. The debate on the ethics of Khubesrian’s decision merits a discussion in itself, yet that is not the most pressing concern presented by this situation. The reality of the issue is that despite the obvious controversy surrounding it, the decision to appoint 16 women to commissions came about without the knowledge or consent of the South Pas community. Regardless of whether the supposed exclusion of men was ethical, the lack of discussion makes the action an inaccurate representation of the citizens’ desired changes. South Pasadena’s current governing system overwhelmingly skews the power of its members over the community it is meant to serve. The structure of the city’s governing bodies should be adjusted to foster increased citizen involvement, so that the larger community can be trusted to make difficult choices when necessary. Members of local legislature tend to collectively lean one way or another on topics covered during meetings. Even before the South Pas school board reconvenes to open session, a majority of its members’ decisions have already been made — with minimal deliberation. This is not to say that representatives

are always identical in opinions. However, these members’ consistent agreement will result in a lack of productive debate when more weighty decisions are necessary. Since most recent decisions have been about unimpactful or one-sided issues, they alone do not indicate that individual board members are able to effectively address difficult situations. A significant reason behind the unanimity of board decisions is the fact that many of the current members are overly familiar with each other. City Council members Mahmud, Joe, and Khubesrian all began their terms within two years of each other, and school board members Abajian and Primuth both started in 2015. The friendly atmosphere generated from these relationships may jeopardize unbiased decision making, as council members would want to avoid contention with their peers who, after years of experience together, would have adopted similar views and mindsets. A reasonable method to enhance decision making is to increase citizen involvement through polling. By factoring in community input on all decisions, city leaders will be able to better discern and address the priorities of the populace. This will also keep members’ decisions from being the only influence in city matters, reducing potential bias among leadership. If such change to city law-making is unachievable in the near future, it is still a significant step for city leaders to understand the danger of neglecting decisions that demand thorough deliberation. The role of city government is immense: maintaining the stability and progression of its respective community. Keeping this in mind, the decision-making system of South Pas leadership should include increased citizen involvement. The refreshed interaction between leadership and citizens will allow for local governments to better represent the city.

Boos & Bravos Tiger ’s cheers and jeers for the month of February. BOOS

BRAVOS

BOO to AP forms for reminding us that our teachers hate us as students and people.

BRAVO to the STEM building for triggering our IKEA nostalgia with that dank sawdust smell.

BOO to all of the winter sports teams for getting kicked out of CIF after the first round.

BRAVO to grass for growing through the turf.

BOO to the STEM building desks that don’t exist. BOO to the Grammys. Like seriously, JLO?

BRAVO to Winter Formal this year. Only seven kids got kicked out this year. BRAVO to Peter for not submitting Boos and Bravos on time.


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TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

OPINION

PRO CON : Constitution The Constitution has been one of America’s few constants through centuries of turmoil. Considering today’s rapid pace of change, should the cornerstone of the US be rewritten?

+ Stability isn’t always a given STORY AUDREY ERNST ILLUSTRATION DAVID SOHN The Constitution is just as relevant as it was when America was founded over 200 years ago. It has accomplished something that many countries have failed to do: provide its people with fundamental rights. It not only lays down the rights of the people, but also creates guidelines for updating those rights. Some might argue that the Constitution is outdated, but a closer look proves that it is more relevant today than ever. The framework of the federal government —which outlines the balance of power— remains unchanging. The amendments, on the other hand, act as the way to keep the Constitution relevant with the changing political climate. New issues will always arise as time goes on, and the founding fathers saw to that by permitting amendments to be added and abolished. Those who disagree with the Constitution threaten to destabilize the government. America relies on its Constitution to be the authority of the nation. It constructs its fundamental branches of power that cannot be overridden. The judiciary, legislative, and executive branches call for equal power in the federal government. The importance of this system cannot be argued against. Although not everyone will be in favor of every aspect, they need to retain some respect for the stability the document

provides for the U.S. Ultimately, not everyone is going to agree with how the government is structured or its amendments, as there will never be a perfect Constitution. Whatever its faults, it is better to have a flawed Constitution than none at all. Very few other forms of government protect the rights of its citizens. Our Constitution grants its people with many liberties, such as the freedom of speech and civil trials. It also maintains stability and assurance to the government by the balance of powers, a rarity amongst other countries. A document that cannot be manipulated stabilizes the government. By providing the government with a framework to follow, it limits the authority of the people in charge. The amendments are the part that can be changed, but it requires a long process. This document prevents anarchy because it details the authority of its people by outlining the power of the elected officials — it’s almost a foolproof plan. The Constitution is the basis of American democracy. The regard for the document maintains the justice and freedom that America prides itself on. As long as our Constitution is respected, America will continue to thrive. No matter what state our country is in, the Constitution will stabilize the government. People need to stop taking the Constitution for granted because it is what makes the U.S. a strong country.

- The government is outdated STORY AANJI SIN ILLUSTRATION DAVID SOHN The Constitution was written during a time when white ruled over Black, women were regularly accused of witchcraft, and powdered wigs were all the rage. Since then, the United States has changed drastically. While it is true that the Constitution has helped the United States government survive past tribulations, the time has come to revisit the document itself. The amendments are technically the solution for a constantly changing political atmosphere, allowing for such an important document to adapt with the times. Thus, the issue of misinterpretation of the amendments cannot be ignored. The most infamous of vague constitutional amendments is the second, which deals with a citizen’s right to own firearms. It can be interpreted as establishing the individual citizen’s right to own firearms, but it could also imply that local, state, and federal legislations have the power to regulate those rights. It is unclear terms like these that make the Constitution unstable and in need of revisions. Another issue with the Constitution is the life tenure it establishes for Supreme Court justices. Although the nominations must be reviewed by the Senate, the President is given too much power when they are able to select nominees with certain political leanings that

will affect decisions of the highest court for decades. Appointing justices with outdated opinions for life means forcing the judiciary to lag behind today’s society. As seen with the case of Brett Kavanaugh, the terms laid out by the Constitution also allow deeply flawed justices to be sworn in. The most pressing problem with the Constitution is how it balances the power of Congress. The populationdependent House and population-independent Senate allow for equal representation for large and small states. However, dividing the legislative body of our government by state means that the two sides are constantly pulled back and forth, the representatives of each state pushing for legislations that benefit their region while disregarding the needs of other states. Congress must be structured to benefit the nation as a whole, instead of staying divided over state issues. The vague and unsteady legislations that the Constitution creates are in serious need of revision. What the United States needs is a system that encourages connectivity between states and their representatives, as well as maintains a true balance of power between branches. Because of this instability, the Constitution can be deemed outdated and unsuitable for the country in its current state. The United States prides itself on being democratic; it needs a government that will maintain that ideal.

WE LIVE IN A SOCIETY | OONA FOLEY

Friends don’t let friends be slacktivists It is shocking to me just how many seniors are panicking about meeting the community service requirement at this point in our high school career. Especially when many of these people preach about the value of fighting social injustice. Performative social justice activism is at its peak. It seems as though nearly everyone on Instagram is fighting the good fight: attending the Women’s March, calling out problematic celebrities, and retweeting all the right posts. But even the “wokest baes” don’t really seem to go any further than this lazy internet “slacktivism.” This isn’t an original realization by any definition: people have been making fun of slacktivism and performative online allyship since the dawn of

social media. In 2019, we should all be holding each other accountable for actually practicing what we preach. I know I am guilty of idolizing people simply for their woke Instagram rants. There is something to be said for deep critical thinking, but for some reason I find myself putting these people on a pedestal over those who actually spend their time organizing for a good cause. It is tempting to prioritize someone’s ability to articulate their thoughts on social issues over their devotion to mitigating them. Publicly displayed anger has proved to be much more clout-worthy than quietly donating time or money. It is for this reason that I have begun to think critically about the people I surround myself with. As I go off to college and once again begin the process of

choosing who to call my friends, I am challenging myself and those around me to view people’s commitment to sharing their privilege as a valid reflection of their character. This commitment also means casting this same critical view inward and surrounding myself with people who will see me in this same light. Community organizing comes from having resources to spare, and I have no authority to declare who does or doesn’t have this excess time or money. Many kids have much bigger personal responsibilities to worry about before they can get to addressing any social responsibilities. But I hope that in the coming year we can all think a little harder about reasonably raising our expectations of one another, especially in South


TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

OPINION

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Kamala Harris: a regressive prosecutor As Harris launches her presidential bid, its crucial to examine her shameful record in criminal justice up sex workers.”

STORY CAROLINE KIMBEL ILLUSTRATION MADDIE YOO California senator and former district attorney Kamala Harris is prefacing her 2020 presidential candidacy on having been a progressive prosecutor, branding herself as a candidate that is “For the People.” For the most part, she has emulated this platform. From aggressively denouncing Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban to tenaciously questioning Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Harris has surfaced as one of the Democratic Party’s most prominent candidates. Digging deeper into district attorney history, though, her deplorable criminal justice record ultimately diminishes her progressive authenticity. Rather than an advocating ally, Harris is an opponent of those faulted by the criminal justice system. When she took the role of San Francisco district attorney in 2003, the city’s felony conviction rate rose from 52 to 67 percent in only three years, with most convictions being for nonviolent drug-related offenses. As the California attorney general in 2014, she tried to prohibit the release of second strike offenders from overcrowded state prisons in fear that the “prisons would lose an important labor pool.” In addition to these discrepancies, Harris shut down escort websites that often protect sex workers from exploitation and violence. Based on her history, Harris should call herself a regressive prosecutor. “I can’t tell people how to vote, but I think there are definitely sex workers who would just sit out the election if the choices were Kamala and Trump,” sex worker and activist Phoenix Calida said. “Neither of them are going to demilitarize police, neither of them are going to cut back on arrests, neither of them are going to stop locking

Many have argued that Harris’ prosecution record is not faulty because being a prosecutor involves difficult decision making and an ultimate opposition to the fight against mass incarceration. However, the problem isn’t her position as a prosecutor, but the particularly flawed decisions she made in the position. Addressing her criminal justice history could possibly salvage her reputation, but instead she is displaying herself as a progressive prosecutor and blaming her own misconduct on the position itself. Upon comparing her to former Philadelphia district attorney, Larry Krasner, Harris is placed in an especially poor light. In his time serving, Krasner ceased to charge sex workers with fewer than three convictions, stopped prosecuting marijuana possession, and instructed his prosecutors to calculate the cost of incarcerating everyone sentenced with a crime for a better image of the system. Progressively, the reforms he made were for the betterment of the defendants, the group in dire need of help. The same cannot be said about Harris. With such a disgraceful criminal justice record, it is ironic that Harris is claiming to be the people’s candidate. It is as if those who she has faulted, many of them prisoners, do not belong to the group of people that matter when it comes to politics, serving as a reminder of the prevalent corruption within the criminal justice system. Today, entire neighborhoods of color are excluded from participating in politics through the practice of mass policing and incarceration. As she abided aggressively by the overzealous system of prosecution in her political history, Harris likely prioritize this issue in her presidency, but realistically degrade it farther back as she did in California.

Make the classroom an inclusive space for females STORY CAT FLORES ILLUSTRATION OSCAR WALSH GRAPHIC TALULLA CHOW

male students that female students often do not display. Thus, boys are more keen to raise their hands or volunteer in class. When it comes to the classroom, this disparity in confidence interferes with the education and progress of female students. If a male student gets an answer wrong in class, it isn’t a big deal, he just tried. If a female students gets an answer wrong, she is looked down upon by her peers and thought to be less intelligent. Because of this, girls are less encouraged to participate in class due to a fear of being judged for making mistakes — something that everyone does. This lowers their self esteem and overall confidence in their ability to voice their own opinions. Whether they don’t notice it, or it seems insignificant, teachers need to recognize this lack of participation and work to fill in this gender gap in motivation by motivating their female students to be active in class. This can be done in multiple ways. Call on female students more often. Pick on a girl to speak instead of that guy who raises his hand every time. We get it, he knows the answer, but no one benefits from the same person explaining

F

or a school that prides itself on inclusion, SPHS classrooms are awfully sexist. From allowing male students to dominate class discussions to making misogynistic comments, some teachers continue to make the classroom a suffocating environment for female students. Teachers need to stop perpetuating gender stereotypes, normalizing sexism, and degrading girls. Instead, they must make their classrooms more inclusive and encouraging for female students. “In a certain class I feel very uncomfortable because of my fellow classmates’ racist and sexist comments, which my teacher never makes an effort to call out,” said a student who wishes to remain anonymous. “How am I expected to participate in an environment where I feel targeted by my peers, and my teacher has an inability to call out inappropriate comments?”

what they already know. Everything should be a learning process, especially if students struggle to get the correct answer the first time. Teachers should foster an environment that upholds this principle, as it would help facilitate female learning empowerment instead of discouraging girls to engage in class out of fear of answering incorrectly and being condemned. This lack of participation by the ladies at SPHS must be recognized and dealt with, and teachers can greatly help by taking these simple steps to do so.

“I feel very uncomfortable because of my fellow classmates’ racist and sexist comments... How am I expected to participate in an environment where I feel targeted by my peers, and my teacher has an inability to call out inappropriate comments?

-Anonymous student

When addressing students, teachers should consider the weight of their implicit gender biases. There is no need for unnecessary comments aimed at female students, or separating the class on a gender basis. Using language like “can I get help from some strong boys,” “ladies can sit this one out,” “you have terrible handwriting for a girl,” and “ladies, let’s please not be dramatic about this,” all invoke sexism. Boys and girls should not be put into separate categories and treated differently. Teachers need to work on making the classroom a safe space for female studnets. Sexism in the classroom is not solely caused by teachers. It is also perpetuated by a gender gap in academic confidence. Usually, boys are judged less harshly compared to girls in every aspect of life, especially in terms of intelligence. Because of this, there is a confidence in

thought to be not smart.


8

TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

IN TRANSIT

In Transit

STORY OONA FOLEY & MATT WAKUMOTO

GRAPHICS TALULLA CHOW & MADDIE YOO

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAN EVANS, MIKE MANNING, & PINTEREST

PAGE TALULLA CHOW & ELAINE YANG

On Fair Oaks Avenue near the South Pasadena Middle School, a grassy median separates traffic. To many, it is just an attractive feature dividing the street. But to the few who grew up in South Pasadena in the 1950’s, the median simply fills the space where one of South Pasadena’s four train lines once stood. At the time, the trains were South Pasadena’s lifeline to the rest of Southern California. But now, the train, and the others that passed directly through South Pasadena, are mainly the subject of oral history and folklore. The four main railroads were the Santa Fe, The Pacific Electric’s South Pasadena Line, Southern Pacific, and Union Pacific.

9

Pacific Electric

M

LOS ANGELES AND SAN GABRIEL BOUND: workers and passsengers peer out over the rails. This 1877 train made its treks, connecting South Pasadena to the Greater Los Angeles Area, through and above the Arroyo Seco.

THE RED CARS could take riders all over, whether it was a trip to the local YMCA or a morning commute to downtown LA.

Santa Fe/Gold Line Fair Oaks

THE ORIGINAL LA TERMINAL covered an expanse of Pacific Electric original trains throughout the Arroyo Seco.

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he single-track “old line” was the first electric train to reach South Pasadena. It was built in 1895 by just two men and ran along Fair Oaks Boulevard, Mission Street, and through the Arroyo Seco. In 1901, American railroad magnate Henry Huntington bought out the old Line, replacing it with Pacific Electric Railway lines. One of these lines, built in 1903, spanned the distance from Downtown Los Angeles to Glendora, stopping in South Pas along the way. The Pasadena Short Line ran from the south end of Fair Oaks to Pasadena and provided South Pasadena residents with shorter travel times and more frequent service than before. The Pacific Electric’s signature “red cars” served as a connection between South Pasadena and the greater Los Angeles area throughout the 1920s. The red cars provided South Pas residents access to beach in under an hour and became the basis of LA’s urban structure in the pre-freeway stages of development. Until its demise in 1951, the rail service steadily declined in the face of The Great Depression, World War II, the rise of the personal automobile, and increasing competition.

THE SANTA FE TRACKS dropped travelers off at the Raymond Hotel, which was the first major resort hotel in the San Gabriel Valley.

Monrovia/Glendora

THE VIEW FROM RAYMOND HOTEL overlooked the Santa Fe Raymond Depot, a pinnacle of South Pas’ early transportation. Founded in 1883, the Los Angeles San Gabriel Valley Railroad was the first steam railway that crossed through South Pasadena. By 1887, the railway had become the Santa Fe railroad which steered three trains daily through the Santa Fe station on Meridian Avenue, located near today’s South Pasadena Metro station. Though the station was torn down in 1951, much of the exterior signage is preserved at the South Pasadena Historical Museum. Artifacts from the station’s interior were donated to Disney. Legend has it that the telegraph in Disneyland’s New Orleans Square was a Santa Fe station original. Every foot of the current Gold Line track lies along the same route as the former Santa Fe railway. The original Gold Line opened in July of 2003 and went from Union Station to Sierra Madre Villa station. There was hardly any connection between South Pasadena and LA at the time. The Gold Line Eastside Extension opened service all the way to Atlantic station in East LA, opening stops in Little Tokyo and Boyle Heights. The Gold Line Foothill Extension added stops westward from Sierra Madre, from Arcadia and Monrovia to its final stop at APU/Citrus College station in Azusa. The Metro Regional Connector Project, forecasted to open in 2022, will create a new branch of the Gold Line, connecting Little Tokyo station to the 7th Street/ Metro Center station which currently services the Red, Blue, Purple, and Expo lines. Metro also plans on constructing new tracks to Montclair.

NEAR WHAT IS NOW MISSION STREET, tracks from the Monrovia/Glendora area look towards Raymond Hill.

Union Pacific Once united with the Southern Pacific, the Union was broken apart during Theodore Roosevelt’s trust busting movement in the start of the 20th Century. The Union Pacific purchased what was once the Los Angeles Railway Line, which crossed the Arroyo Seco. The line, which was also known as the Altadena Railway and Pasadena Railway, was created near the Raymond Hotel, and eventually reached all the way down to San Pedro. It was first a passenger train, but eventually became used primarily for freight.

Los Angeles

OVER THE BRIDGE, the then-Santa Fe Line is now a recognizable Gold Line sight.

Southern Pacific Although the train did not stop in South Pasadena, it rolled directly through the heart of the city. Like the Sante Fe, the Southern Pacific line, which went through South Pas, was a steam powered engine. The train went from New Orleans, El Paso, Tucson, and cut from LA up to San Francisco and Sacramento. The railroad, which originated in Northern California after it was founded in 1865, slowly accumulated a smattering of rails around the area. These lines include the Los Angeles & San Pedro, which was Southern California’s first railroad.

SPECIAL THANKS

Information on these pages is based off of Tiger’s recent interview with South Pasadena resident Dan Evans, who currently serves on the The Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority’s Board of Directors. Norma LeValley’s “The Road to Somewhere…” (published in the South Pasadena Quarterly in the summer of 1992) and Fletcher Swan’s “South Pasadena Santa Fe Railway Station” (published in The Quarterly in the summer of 2004)


TIGER

10 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

FEATURE

FEATURE

Et Cetera MAYA WILLIAMSON

Down with the Manic Pixie As Valentine’s Day comes around and romantic movies re-enter the relevant domain of pop culture, I’ve seen the phrase “Manic Pixie” thrown around more often as giggly female love interests frolic across the big screen. If you’ve never heard of it, the Manic Pixie Dream Girl is a term coined by film critic Nathan Rabin in 2007 to describe a specific stock character in the romance genre. The Manic Pixie Dream Girl is a beautiful, quirky, adventurous young woman who teaches the cynical male protagonist how to enjoy life and its infinite wonders (see Kirsten Dunst’s character in Elizabethtown). The MPDG is widely recognized as a character trope of bad writing as she never pursues any personal goals herself.

OFFERING OKONOMIYAKI, a post-World War II staple of Japanese cuisine, Chinchikurin gives customers an entirely unique look into Japanese culture during the mid-20th century.

Chinchikurin memoralizes Japanese history and cuisine Okonomiyaki, “Hiroshima’s Soul Food,” gains new life in Little Tokyo

STORY ANDRÉS OYAGA PHOTOS ALICIA ALDERETE

focus of the original flour pancake, noodles, cabbage, and bean sprouts.

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Guests are able to sit at small tables with a teppanyaki and four stools, much like the tents in Hiroshima decades ago. Once the food is placed in front of you, chopsticks and a hera — a spatula traditionally used to eat okonomiyaki — are handed to those ready to devour the dish. Every presentational aspect of the restaurant, from the seating, to preserved photographs and slideshows of old okonomiyaki tents, contribute to the overall genuine Hiroshima experience.

iroshima, Japan is often synonymous with destruction and suffering at the hands of the first atomic bomb ever dropped. The result was a city left in shambles and a world that would never be the same. As the people of Hiroshima began to rebuild the city, chefs would set up tents on the streets. Inside, one could find a teppanyaki (flat top grill) and four stools. The struggling people of Hiroshima would congregate here after extremely trying days. These tents were places of communion, laughter, and hope; the origin of okonomiyaki. With little rice, almost no meat, and an impending food shortage, the chefs were forced to improvise in post-war Japan. The lack of rice was made up for in flour, an essential ingredient in making a thin, grilled pancake, which was then topped with flour noodles. Cabbage and bean sprouts, both cheap food staples, were added to make the savory dish more filling. As time passed and the city grew into the metropolis it is today, it became more common to find versions of the dish all over Hiroshima. Because of the dish’s historical significance, and ingenuity, the people of Japan have designated okonomiyaki as “Hiroshima’s Soul Food.” The chefs at Chinchikurin in Little Tokyo greet customers with an extensive menu and a warm “irasshaimase!” which translates to “Hello, welcome to our restaurant!” A meat of choice, whether it be tender beef, chashu (pork belly), or ikaten (fried squid), can be added to the base of the plate. Okonomiyaki sauce, which is made from Worcester sauce and dates, is spread over a thinly prepared egg and laid over the platter. Despite these new additions and combinations to okonomiyaki, Chinchikurin never loses

At first glance to a novice customer, the dish is an unusual compilation of ingredients you would never think mesh well together. Despite any apprehension, each bite of the okonomiyaki was absolutely delicious. I ordered “The Hiroshima,” which included ikaten, chashu, and green onions. The pungent fried seafood flavor was balanced by the green onions and distinct flavor of the okonomiyaki sauce. The only issue was the cost: the dish was built during a time of poverty but the higher price tag ($15-20) somewhat undermines the purpose of the food, which was to unite people in a time of hardship without hurting your wallet. Located in Little Tokyo, Chinchikurin is a short 20-minute train ride and an even shorter walk. Guests should be prepared to wait if you arrive during the lunch and dinner rush. But it’s well worth the wait — Chinchikurin serves its guests incredibly flavorful plate and provides an inviting space for all people, which is the ultimate purpose of okonomiyaki. Address: 350 E 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90012 Hours: Wednesday -Monday (11:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m, 5:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m) Price: $$-$$$

When I first heard the term, I thought it was brilliant. In Rabin’s original article, the label is insightfully used to point out a common tactic in romance films to tap into a specific male fantasy of being “saved” by a fantastical, girl-nextdoor type of hot female who disappears once her function within his narrative has served its purpose. Labeling the MPDG is the first step to calling out bad writing, which is obviously a good thing. However, the original meaning of the phrase has spiraled out of control and is now more popularly used to describe any female character that fits the charming, idiosyncratic aesthetic. While I hate one-dimensional characters, what I have begun to hate perhaps even more is the term Manic Pixie Dream Girl itself and all its misuses. The term “Manic Pixie” has become a cliché equal to the trope. For years I have hoped that MPDG would simply drop out of the cinematic lexicon, but, the term has permeated pop culture and its effect is actually pretty harmful. First, because well-rounded characters are labeled as something they are not (including characters based on real, autonomous women). Evidence of this can be found by simply looking up Manic Pixie Dream Girl and checking the Wikipedia examples list. Second, because the Manic Pixie Dream Girl has come to be viewed as something desirable — I’ve even discovered buzzfeed quizzes asking “Which Manic Pixie Dream Girl are YOU?!” To be clear, the MPGD is a fundamentally sexist trope. Rabin recognized how the term has spiraled and even condemned its use in 2014. All writers need to focus on creating more prominent and nuanced female characters, and critics should be more careful with who they stick with the controversial label.


TIGER FEBRUARY 13, 2019

FEATURE

11

PERSONALITY PROFILES THOSE FROM BEYOND SOUTH PAS KALEX SHEN: FLOURISHING WITH CHANGE STORY MAYA WILLIAMSON PHOTOS OSCAR WALSH Kalex Shen is a man of many names. Most SPHS students know him as Kalex (pronounced K-Alex or Kay-lex — he doesn’t care which) but he’s also answered to Jirong, Kevin, and if he were ever to perform drag (which he hopes to after he turns 18) he’d choose the name Holly Wood, for his love of film and TV shows. Shen was born and raised in Beijing, where his friends and teachers knew him by both his Chinese name, Jirong, and Kevin. He moved to South Pasadena in sixth grade, and admits the transition was rough. In his year and a half at SPMS (at which point, he was known mostly as Kevin) he knew very little English. His experience in South Pas was short-lived, though, as he moved to a military boarding school near San Diego in eighth grade. For those acquainted with Shen, this probably comes as a surprise. His close friends describe him as “weird, sassy, and flamboyant,” not exactly the hard, disciplined exterior one might expect from a teenager molded by a strict military regimen. Overall though, Shen believes that aside from the longer schedules, the military school was very similar to SPHS. “When you think about it it’s not that different; like public school with an extra edge,” said Shen.

It was in this environment where Shen was able to effectively learn English. The senior credits his proficiency in the language to the time he spent binge-watching American TV shows during free-time. He started with the notoriously long (fifteen seasons and counting) Supernatural, and progressed onto similar horror dramas like his all-time favorite, American Horror Story. Shen’s love for the show can describe his interests in general. “I love American Horror Story because it gives you horror, fashion, gayness, and drama,” he explained. Shen left military school after his sophomore year when he started to seriously consider his future. Most of his classmates wanted to pursue careers in the military, but Shen had always nurtured a love for drawing and design. Shen devotes at least half an hour a day to drawing, deriving inspiration from everything around him. Life in South Pas better suits these artistic leanings; in AP Art, he has focused his pieces on family, music, and his current concentration: his favorite Chinese television drama, Home Temptation. With this last change in scenery for Shen came his final name change. His mother observed that there were a lot of Kevins in America and Shen certainly isn’t one to blend in with a crowd. He decided on Kalex after searching through a book of names that bring good fortune with his mom. The name seems fitting; as unique as the person that holds it.

IN SPITE OF HIS MANY NAMES and home addresses, from Beijing, to military school, to South Pas, senior Kalex Shen has continued to carry his creative and vibrant nature through life.

LAURA MANCINI: HUMANIZING STRUGGLE STORY KIMBERLY HSUEH PHOTOS ANDRÉS OYAGA Senior Laura Mancini spent her childhood in the city of Sāo Paulo, Brazil. However, after Mancini’s fifteen year-old sister was held at gunpoint and nearly kidnapped, her mother made the lifechanging decision to move the family to South Pasadena. When she arrived in South Pasadena in seventh grade, Mancini — who primarily spoke Portuguese and Italian — was not familiar with English, and felt isolated in her English Language Development class. Struggling to interact with her classmates, she felt a strong determination to improve her English to be more confident in communicating during school. Mancini developed her English and Spanish speaking skills over time watching American TV shows and Spanish telenovelas.

AN AVID PHOTOGRAPHER of street life, senior Laura Mancini can often be found in the darkroom at SPHS printing her photos. Mancini hails from Sao Paulo, Brazil, and moved to South Pas in seventh grade.

She initially struggled to adjust to the greater socioeconomic and racial diversity in the United States. Back in Brazil, schools are often sorted by race, and then into different social classes. Families who could afford to attend private schools received a much better education than those of lower socioeconomic status, who had to attend public schools or became maids. At her Italian school, there weren’t any cliqués among people, prompting her to mainly interact with classmates who had the same financial situation. Mancini was often judged based on her well-off financial situation, including the brand of car her father drove or how many maids her household had. “I wasn’t aware at all of diversity since it wasn’t shown to me as I was growing

up. I didn’t know much about different cultures. I didn’t know about racism, that wasn’t to my knowledge. Now that I’ve moved here, I’m super passionate of people’s rights, such as Black Lives Matter. There aren’t a lot of movements there.” Unlike Sāo Paulo, one of the most dangerous cities in Brazil, many local cities in California are much safer. Back in Brazil, Mancini was constantly trapped in her house, unable to roam around the city. Due to this confinement, social oppression, and lack of diversity in Brazil, when Mancini moved to the US, she became more passionate about movements such as Black Lives Matter and Women’s Rights, highlighting those who are unseen and unheard. “I think it took me a while to be as culturally aware as I am today. What really got me to care as much as I do about equality of all people, no matter what race, gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation they may be, were journalism and modern world history. I at first became stressed with the fact that people’s basic rights are constantly being infringed upon, and that was what really got to me. After I first started researching it, I never stopped. I write all the time and am possibly planning on a career in journalism.” Along with her passions for politics and journalism, she finds herself dabbling in street photography. She regularly rides the Metro to downtown LA and snaps candid shots of people in scandalous attire. Using both her Canon A-1, her father’s old camera, and a film camera that her grandfather gifted her, Mancini hopes to share the stories hidden within her photos.


TIGER

12 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

FEATURE

Netflix and Hulu magnify Fyre Festival’s disastrous origins NETFLIX’S FYRE Chris Smith

director genre

Documentary

run time

1 hr 37 mins

HULU’S FYRE FRAUD Jenner Furst and Julia Willoughby Nason

directors genre

Documentary

run time

1 hr 36 mins

STORY DOMINIC MARZIALI & RAYMOND YEO ILLUSTRATION KATE ROGERS

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romised deluxe housing situations, top-of-the-line performances, and meals from celebrity chefs, attendees arrived at a private Great Exuma Island flexing their few-thousand dollar tickets. However, those expecting a luxury music festival were instead met with a scene reminiscent of an apocalyptic moonscape. Guests hoisted mattresses on their backs while scrambling for emergency tents across a vacant gravel pit and battled for their luggage after it was carelessly thrown out of a truck. “Dinner” was served in a styrofoam carry-out box, the gourmet meal replaced with an unflattering slice of cheese and bread. In the aftermath, investors were left misled, workers unpaid, and attendees struggling to find a flight back home from the disaster. Two documentaries from Netflix and Hulu examine the events that led to the 2017 Fyre Festival’s failure:

inadequate planning, over hyping the event, and the effect of social influencers. While Netflix’s Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened examines the logistics of why the festival failed through interviews with project managers, Hulu’s Fyre Fraud explores the past of festival co-founder Billy McFarland, when he began developing his deception skills as a devious elementary schooler. Hulu’s version of the catastrophe takes a drawn-out approach to what made Fyre Festival a disaster. The documentary takes a closer look at Billy McFarland’s history, portraying him as a greedy, money-driven entrepreneur. McFarland and Ja Rule, an American rapper and the co-founder of the fiasco, are quickly labeled as masterminds of a sweeping social media effort to entice millennials with the allure of a dayslong party on a private island in the Bahamas with close proximity to celebrities and social media influencers. After months of mental conditioning via social media, unsuspecting millennials were dismayed to find their dreams of the paramount musical festival were never planned out. The Netflix documentary introduces the primary purpose of the festival: a platform to promote the revolutionary book-a-musician app Fyre, and unpacks the engineering of the event chronologically. Although the main subjects, McFarland and Rule, are introduced as normal businesshopefuls with impressive resumes, statements such as “we’re selling a pipe dream to your average loser” shift their roles from likeable anti-heroes to borderline sociopaths. The documentary retains a tone of confusion among employees of Fyre Festival, and Netflix’s inclusion of first person accounts escalates the message to a point of chaos. Although the two films have different origins, both drive home the same message: McFarland is an instinctive liar who deceived the public. If one already knows the gist of the festival’s demise and desires to learn more about the greedy McFarland’s past, Fyre Fraud is a must watch. For those seeking more information on how the festival fell apart, watch Fyre.

David Perez Espinosa ‘19 Elaine Gong ‘19

Livvy Johnson ‘19

SENIOR LIVVY JOHNSON’S STORYBOARD, “The Burdwoods” Jade Li ‘19 (see top right), was inspired by a set of Canadian islands.

Jade Li ‘19

TIGER ART GALLERY

Ashlyn Kawakami ‘19

Featuring the handrawn and handpainted pieces of SPHS student artists, whose work goes largely unseen by the South Pas community Livvy Johnson ‘19

SENIOR ELAINE GONG painted “Within Reach” (see below) on a circular, wooden base, believes that despite our less than perfect reality, “if we make an effort to try, our dream will be ‘within reach.’”

Jade Li ‘19 Ashlyn Kawakami ‘19

David Perez Espinosa ‘19

SENIOR DAVID PEREZ ESPINOSA’S piece “All Saints” (see left) was awarded first place in the 2018 Congressional Art Awards by Representative Judy Chu.

i Ela

9

g ‘1

on ne G


TIGER 13 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

FEATURE

TAAGLAA: Mariachi Plaza TIGER’S AWESOME ADVENTURES IN THE GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA STORY LUYANG ZHANG PHOTOS SOPHIE YEUNG

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s more regions are gentrified, Los Angeles is losing the variety of backgrounds and cultures that have always made it so special. Despite this rising trend of renovation, the Mariachi Plaza, located in Boyle Heights, has remained steadfast to its traditional Mexican roots and has been a hotspot for mariachi players waiting for gigs at Mexican celebrations and life milestones, such as weddings and funerals, since the 1930s. As somebody who rarely leaves the house, much less embarks on near spontaneous cultural adventures to Downtown Los Angeles, I was excited for a change of scenery. Sophie Yeung and I hopped on a Metro for a thirty minute trip after school on Friday to kick off our weekend on a high note and experience the Mariachi Plaza in person. The plaza is elegantly simplistic, with nothing more than a round gazebo and a statue celebrating the singer Lucha Reyes, the “mother of ranchera music.” Mariachi musicians sat scattered around the perimeter of the plaza, some practicing quietly while others were immersed in conversation with their instruments tucked away in their cases. We soon noticed that many of the surrounding storefronts were covered in sprawling, hand-painted murals commemorating the historical significance of mariachi music. Prompted to take a closer look, we meandered around the plaza admiring the artwork, before the darkening sky forced us to reluctantly return home. Sophie and I met up again two days later for part two of our adventure, the weekly Boyle Heights Community Market, located beside the Mariachi Plaza. Luckily, the downpour of rain earlier in the day hadn’t stopped vendors from setting up their multicolored canopy tents to sell their freshly handmade food. As we approached the small cluster of canopies, we began to smell the mouthwatering scent of churros and hot corn tortillas wafting through the chilly air.

keeping with the heritage of the plaza, most of the stands offered Mexican cuisine, from fried plantains to buñuelos — a fried dessert food covered in cinnamon — alongside funnel cakes and foods you might expect to find at a fair or a boardwalk. Even though, most of these foods were on the expensive side, I was looking forward to trying some — only to realize I had forgotten my money. Although I can’t say that history or cultural studies have ever been my absolute favorite subjects in school, my visit to the Mariachi Plaza surpassed my expectations. Far from the typical cultural learning experiences that I have associated with long-winded museum docents since my elementary field trip days, the plaza provided an unexpectedly engaging opportunity for me to appreciate the culture that continues to persist within Los Angeles. The Boyle Heights Community Market is open every week on Sunday from 12-6 p.m. at the intersection between First and Boyle Street, next to the Mariachi Plaza. Address of Plaza: 730 Pleasant Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 Hours of Farmers’ Market: Sundays (12 p.m. - 6 p.m.) Prices at Farmers’ Market: $$

RESISTING GENTRIFICATION, Mariachi Plaza and the Boyle Heights farmers market At first, the surprisingly small amount of vendors present at the market disappointed us, but we soon found that what commemorate Los Angeles’ Mexican roots with the market lacked in size, it made up for with character. In Mariachi musicians and Latin American murals.


TIGER 15 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

SPORTS

Senior free passes are inhibiting athletic success

Ranking the entertainment value of spring sports

STORY NOAH PARKER After hundreds of hours spent in the gym or on the field, four-year athletes have put in the work to perfect their physical and leadership skills, earning them the right to compete on their respective varsity teams. Yet these senior athletes’ commitment to the game is being bypassed by newcomers: other seniors who decide to join the teams in their final year of eligibility. Seniors who try out for teams almost always make the rosters based on their supposed “experience.” Yet for many new senior athletes, this experience is severely lacking, or, in some cases, completely absent. However, they are still put on the team by coaches who feel the need to do so based on the players’ stature. This has become a common occurance in South Pas athletics. Whether it be new athletes who just want to spend time with their friends or long time players who want one last crack to play, this trend has become more apparent over the past few years. Newcomers are especially common in the spring season when these players are presented with their last opportunity to play. Yet what seems a fun time for the seniors is actually substantially hurting our sports program. New seniors are taking up valuable roster spots that could have gone to developing juniors or underclassmen. The development of these younger players is fundamental to the growth of our programs and is necessary for the sustainability of future success. Sending these role players to the bench or J.V. to make room for seniors causes a wide gap in the program: as the seniors graduate, it leaves holes that are not able to be filled by the inexperienced and unqualified underclassmen. Part of this trend can be attributed to the sports culture at SPHS. The sports program is underfunded and underappreciated, and therefore stunts like this go overlooked. Seniors getting free passes onto teams would seem a preposterous idea to schools with large, successful sports programs. Reversing this process could help save our struggling sports programs. Promoting athletes to play all four years of their high school careers, rather than joining when they know they will automatically make the team, will strengthen the cohesiveness and future play of teams across the school.

WITH NINE SPRING TEAMS TO CHEER FOR, fans may struggle deciding which game to attend. STORY MATTHEW TSAI PHOTO ALICIA ALDERETE

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he SPHS athletics program fields 15 teams that compete in hundreds of contests each spring. With so many sporting events to attend, students are often left wondering which game they should watch. Tiger considers many variables, such as comfort and excitement, as criteria for the spring sports entertainment rankings. 1. Boys’ Volleyball: Boys’ volleyball will make the leap from Division II to Division I this year, but it doesn’t just earn the top spot because of strong serves and spectacular saves. Volleyball takes the cake because of its perfect viewer experience. Playing in the air-conditioned gym, fans can avoid the relentless SoCal sun while satisfying their hunger at the snack stand. The audience can comfortably enjoy some Tiger volleyball with their bellies full. 2. Badminton: Although often forgotten, badminton is arguably the best program in South Pasadena

sports. Last year, the team was unstoppable, winning league and bringing home the CIF Division 1 Southern Section title. Badminton also benefits from indoor comfort and all seats are courtside. In the small gym, students can watch multiple matches at the same time. 3. Track and Field: Track and field is one of the largest programs at SPHS, providing moments of excitement as well as times of slight boredom. Track typically attracts many viewers, creating a fun, buzzing atmosphere. Fans will enjoy watching the events, as close finishes are sure to bring crowds to their feet. However, the periods between events can make students lose interest and some may tire from watching athletes run for more than ten minutes. 4. Baseball/Softball: The baseball and softball teams are both subpar and the available seating leaves a lot to be desired. Blowout losses are expected and very few enjoy sitting outside for two hours, but at least each sport has one redeeming quality. Opponents consistently dominate softball, making for some

entertaining one sided games, while baseball has a snack stand. 5. Swimming: Similar to track and field, swimming lacks a fun factor. Despite the potential for thrilling photo finishes, fans will soon realize that racing across the pool is only fun for the first two minutes. Still, chiseled bodies make for some appealing eye candy. 6. Boys’ golf: High school golf is not allowed to have an audience and that works in boys’ golf’s favor. The sport seemingly knows it lacks excitement and saves students from having to watch a golf match. 7. Boys’ tennis: In terms of entertainment, boys’ tennis fails to keep up with the other sports. The matches can last up to five hours and high school regulations prohibit cheering from the three parents in attendance. There are no places to sit and the view of the game is obstructed by rusting chain link fences. Additionally, the team has struggled to find success the past few years, and this season figures to be more of the same.

CIF conspiracies: the story behind first-round letdowns to play a CIF game didn’t carry much meaning. In a league with far less experienced teams, such as Monrovia, Blair, and San Marino, the Tigers can take a playoff berth for granted. With a significant portion of their team lacking the extra enthusiasm necessary for a playoff game, the discrepancy between attitudes of seniors and underclassmen proved to be the undoing for the Tigers against Gabrielino. “We got exposed tonight because we played like a group of individuals and not as one cohesive unit,” Coach Cody Masden said.

The emotions of players on the team ranged from apathetic to relieved, despite just having played their last game in a South Pasadena uniform.

While giving their best effort against the Eagles, the Tigers were out of sync offensively and executed poorly on defense, leading to a double digits loss to a team that they had previously beaten by seven points without their starting forwards. Despite a 6-2 league record, this years’ team was plagued by a lack of chemistry between seniors and younger players that prevented their talented team from competing with the league champion La Cañada Spartans or mounting a deep CIF run.

For a program such as girls’ basketball, which has qualified for CIF playoffs in every season since 2005, the opportunity

“Going into the game we had a lot of negative energy in our practices and coach tried to confront the issue in our

UNITED IN A HUDDLE BUT EMOTIONALLY DIVIDED, the team listens to coach Cody Masden during the second half of their CIF game. STORY PRESTON SHARKEY PHOTO SOPHIE YEUNG The tattered yellow school bus rolled quietly down San Gabriel Boulevard carrying the girls’ basketball team home after suffering a season ending 64-49 loss to Gabrielino in their first playoff game.

last practice,” an anonymous senior basketball player said. “The negativity had been going on all season and was likely a big reason why we lost in the first round. After four years of nonstop basketball, we’re ready to move on.” After the demanding grind of five practices a week since freshman year, playing a win or go home CIF game as a senior would seem to be like the most memorable, important game in the mind of a SPHS athlete. However, the toll of four long seasons has taken away the motivation to win in CIF this year for several senior athletes. All four of the winter teams that qualified for CIF lost in their first playoff game, compared to three of four teams advancing past the first round last year. While there were many athletes who hoped to make another long playoff run, many seniors had trouble finding a motivation to win with the sights of a relaxing offseason ahead of them. Girls’ basketball isn’t unique; this same lack of an ultra competitive spirit in CIF is evident in many other teams following a stressful league season. The fatigue from a long season of practice can ultimately doom teams in CIF who are not able to find an extra gear for the playoffs.


TIGER

16 FEBRUARY 13, 2019

SPORTS

Ray Writes RAYMOND YEO

Inside the mind of a recovering athlete My left knee did not bid farewell to me with last words, but with a haunting pop. I collapsed and writhed under the scorching August heat during a club game, hoping for the best but expecting the worst. An MRI confirmed an athlete’s worst nightmare in just my junior year: a complete ACL tear.

JUMPING UP TO DIVISION I, boys’ volleyball has high expectations for the 2019 season.

Spring sports preview STORY CHRISTINE MAO, PRESTON SHARKEY, MATTHEW TSAI, & RAYMOND YEO PHOTO ALICIA ALDERETE Badminton: After securing the the title of CIF Division I Southern Section champions last season, the SPHS coed badminton team heads into its fifth season in the Almont League with a strong outlook. The team has not lost any players due to graduation and are in good shape for a repeat championship run behind the swings of prolific junior Charles Liu. Baseball: The Tigers will look to flip the script this year after posting a disappointing 0-12 league record in 2018. Although the team will be losing a large chunk of its lineup due to graduated seniors, there is nowhere else to go besides up offensively for this year’s squad. Senior Noah Parker will head the Tiger’s pitching rotation, while senior Dylan Benton will lead the offense at the plate. Boys’ Golf: Unlike most other teams, boys’ golf will enter the 2019 season without any players lost to graduation. The team will depend on the consistency of senior Josh Ramos and rising star sophomore Justin Toshima to help them to a CIF berth. Softball: Softball can only improve upon its last season, in which they went winless in league. Although the team has lost a few key players to graduation, softball is poised to salvage a few games in preseason and league. Three year varsity member Katelyn Wooton will lead the promising sophomore heavy squad as they seek to bring a change to what has been an underwhelming decade for the program.

Swimming: Following an impressive postseason, boys’ and girls’ swimming will seek to repeat its success in 2019. Leading the pack for the boys will be senior Jaden Mullin, senior Henrique Sannibale, and junior Tim Chiu. The girls will turn to senior Kyra Angkasa, as well as standout sophomore Maya Villaseñor, who placed top twenty in CIF in the 50 meter freestyle in her freshman year. Boys’ Tennis: Under first year head coach Karina Akhmedova, South Pasadena will look to improve upon its fourth place league finish last season. The road to success will be tough, as Akhmedova’s team is severely inexperienced. Juniors Desmond Chan and Ben Pestana will lead the Tiger charge as singles one and two, as the team hopes to turn around its recent poor play. Track: Junior triple jumper Tianhao Wei will headline this year’s talented track team after advancing to the CIF State finals as a sophomore. Seniors Christina Taylor and Ashley Hugasian, along with junior Gianna Beasley, will look to advance to CIF Masters this year as the girls’ team’s faster sprinters. After a successful cross country season, junior Sam Clark, freshman Sydney Morrow, and senior Kai Dettman will also have a good shot at going deep into CIF again this year. Boys’ Volleyball: Following a 19-13 season, South Pasadena has been promoted to Division 1 volleyball. Captains senior Addison Hsiao and junior Dylan Schreibfeder will lead a deep, talented roster that has nine new additions. Hsiao will anchor the Tiger defense while the high-flying senior duo of Paul Pan and Jason Barrientos will spearhead the offensive attack. Under coach Ivy Chew, the Tigers will look to continue its league dominance and claim its fourth title in six years.

Following our first round CIF loss this year and my final high school game ever, my coach came up to me and told me that if he had a “sophomore Ray,” the season would not have ended so quickly. As he said those sentimental words, I began to remember the “sophomore Ray” he was referring to. The Ray who had decided to do everything in his power to put himself in a position to play college soccer. The Ray who dedicated hours in the gym and on the field crafting himself into the offensive threat that upper division coaches desired. To this day, I still cannot believe that all my work and passion translated not into recruitment, but instead a gross protruding scar below my left knee. I feel robbed of the opportunity to show “junior Ray” and even the final saga of “senior Ray” to my coach, teammates, and more importantly, myself. Tearing an ACL seems like something that only happens to other people, an unlucky few who have been cursed with unstable ligaments or a clumsy body. The truth is, it’s much more common than one would expect. According to MedlinePlus, knee ligament injuries trail the notoriously common shin splints as the fifth most common athletic injury. Of all knee injuries, none are as frequent as an ACL tear. While a ligament or tendon rupture may not look as gruesome as broken bones, the recovery procedure is far more brutal. The minimum nine month rehabilitation period is laced with unbudging self doubt, to a point where one begins to feel powerless; almost as if you are playing a game of Russian roulette, in one round loaded a retorn ACL. Even if you manage to avoid the staggeringly high 30% ACL retear rate on both surgical and non-surgical knees, you are faced with earlier symptoms of arthritis and an increased risk of other athletic injuries. Nobody deserves to see their athletic career take a blow so early in their life, and I am urging for a paradigm shift in high school sports. After talking to my peers in similar high-contact athletics, it became clear that high schoolers and their coaches do not place enough importance, if any, on preventing injuries. I understand that there are other things that seem more practical, such as fitness or perfecting plays, than practicing balancing or jumping and landing techniques. But spending nine months teaching myself how to walk and run again was also a waste of time. It’s all relative.

Winter sports struggle in CIF opening round STORY NICOLAS LIU, PRESTON SHARKEY, & MATTHEW TSAI PHOTO TONY CHEN

F

ollowing a successful winter league season, South Pasadena sent four winter sports teams — girls’ and boys’ soccer, girls’ water polo, and girls’ basketball — to the CIF Southern Section playoffs. However, despite top three finishes during league play, all four teams fell in the first round of postseason play, ending their seasons prematurely. The girls’ water polo team ran out of gas in its first CIF matchup against the Newbury Park Panthers despite getting off to a fast start. Senior Jael Osborne enjoyed a terrific first half, scoring five goals, but was ejected late in the second period, severely hurting the Tigers’ chance of a victory. In the second half, South Pas struggled to generate any offense and the Panthers scored ten unanswered goals to defeat the Tigers 16-10. Girls’ soccer couldn’t recreate the postseason magic of 2018’s team, as they fell 1-0 to Sierra Canyon in their opening round CIF match. The Tigers conceded an early goal to the Trailblazers and couldn’t recover. Seniors Uma Hornish and Emma Barrera created multiple offensive chances, but the Tigers were unable to convert against the talented Sierra Canyon defense.

Boys’ soccer was kept from CIF advancement after a 2-1 loss at the hands of the Pacific Pirates. The team suffered from both early offensive and defensive inefficiencies in the match’s first half, giving up two goals before twenty minutes had elapsed. Despite a significant rallying by the Tiger offense in the second half and a late goal by junior captain Kai Endo, the team was unable to salvage a tie and ended season play with a 14-4-1 record. Girls’ basketball was unable to contain Gabrielino’s main scorer, allowing her to score 35 points and hand South Pas a first round exit by a score of 64-49. South Pas got off to a cold start shooting the ball, and quickly fell behind the Eagles’ and their up-tempo style of play. Freshman Allysan Tse kept the Tigers close in the first half with her contributions on both ends of the court, but was forced to take a backseat on defense after she got into foul trouble in the first half. Juniors Megan Yee and Sydney Sakamoto each hit three pointers in the third quarter, but the Tigers were unable to handle the pressure of the Eagles’ defense and could not mount a comeback in the fourth. Despite the lack of success in CIF playoffs, the winter teams continued to display their dominance in the Rio Hondo, while staking their claim as the best sports season at SPHS.

FOLLOWING A CHAMPIONSHIP LAST YEAR, girls’ soccer was knocked out in the first round of CIF.

Profile for Tiger Newspaper

Tiger Newspaper February 2019  

Tiger Newspaper February 2019  

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