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Vol. 17, No. 1. November, 2000

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asstc Townsend Harris High School at Queens College

149-11 Melbourne Avenue, Flushing, NY 11367

Founder's Day features 'Passing of Torch' theme by Jessica Berger

Founder's Day, an annual Townsend Harris tradition, contained more meaning and sentimentality this year because it marked the last Founder's Day to be celebrated with Malcolm Largmann as principal. He will retire at the end of January. The theme of the event, "Passing the Torch," came to symbolize not only the imminent passing of the principal's position from Dr. Largmann to his successor, but also the sharing of advice, lessons, and experience between alumni, teachers, and students. Lynne Greenfield, Assistant Principal of Humanities and Coordinator of Founder's Day, introduced Dr. Largmann by quoting the words of alumnus David Herszenhorn, Class of 1990: Dr. Largmann "is a prin-

cipal with principles ... , who every day lives by [the Ephebic Oath]." Speaking of the great importance of "passing the torch," Dr. Largmann addressed the student body for his final Founder's Day speech as principal. He encouraged students to continue to uphold the values that have defined this school, explaining that every student contributes to the Townsend Harris torch. Siufong Ngo, Bettina Blanchard and Jennifer Fernandez sing song parodies that give "And, I promise you old favorites a Harris twist. They were part of the Founder's Day Chorus. that each student here is part of the flame and has the capacity to reach his/her goals," said Dr. Largmann. In keeping with this theme, junior Emily Fishbaine designed the Founder's Day program cover which features a hand carrying a torch. The event opened with the recitation of the pledge and singing of the national anthem, led by Student Union President,

by Danielle Lord & Shara Siegel

Beloved teacher and friend

Thomas Sweetin works with Crimson and Gold Business Editor Monica Patel, '97. Whether it was late afternoon or a week-end, chances were you could find him in the yearbook office.

College Stats pp. 8-9 T

knowing doesn't mean we know everything; you have to keep studying." Daphne Manhart, Co-President of the PTA, also spoke. Following the speeches, senior Hannah Vanek-Mcilwain played Introduction and Tarantella by Pablo Sarasate, accompanied on the piano by Ivy Adrian. This performance received a standing ovation from

Mock campaign brings Gore victory

In Memory of Thomas Sweetin

See pages 2 and 11

Eric Trager. This was followed by a succession of speeches from officials such as Dr. Marvin Leiner, the Director of the Queens College "College Preparatory Program," who instructed Harrisites to "continue to embrace our tradition [of Founder's Day] .'' Lester Friesner, the President of the THHS Alumni Association, warned students that "a little

the crowd. As a tribute to Townsend Harris alumnus Richard Rogers, the Concert Band, led by music teacher Peter Lustig, presented a medley of songs from The Sound of Music, The King and /, Oklahoma, and South Pacific. Another alumna, Tanya Odom, Class of 1988, shared several of her Townsend Harris experiences and gave the present students words to live by: "listen, learn, laugh, and live." Then, Ms. Greenfield introduced the Founder's Day Challenge. Harrisites had been asked to create Founder's Day projects for their English classes. Only a select few were chosen and adapted for presentation by Ms. Greenfield and English teachers Judy Biener and Debra Michlewitz. One of these skits, "How To Survive Freshman Year," gave humorous advice about the different teachers and their unique personalities. The next segment, Continued on p. 4

The outcome of the presidential race at Townsend Harris was not ambiguous. While the national results were too close to call on Election Day, November 7, Harrisites, voting on November 6, gave a landslide victory to the Democratic candidate, Vice President AI Gore. Closely mirroring the actual New York state returns, they also voted to send Hillary Rodham Clinton to the Senate. The mock election marked the culmination of the school-wide simulation of the presidential and senatorial campaigns that began in September, with seniors assuming the roles of the candidates, the media, and various interest groups. Gore, played by Keith Ng, won 421 popular votes, which translated into 489 electoral votes in the school. The Republican candidate, Governor George W. Bush, simulated by Daniel Salamon, won 113 popular votes, which gave him 27 electoral votes. The Green Party's Ralph Nader, played by George Zervos, came in third with 104 popular votes, or 11 electoral votes, while the Reform Party's Patrick Buchanan, played by Ashish Arora, received 41 popular votes and zero electoral votes. In the Senatorial race, First Lady Clinton, played by senior Danielle Davis, won just under 55% of the Harrisite votes, and Congressman Rick Lazio, represented by senior Brian Cooperman, received 45%; in the "real" New York election, Clinton won by 55% to Lazio's 43%. The annual election simulation is conducted by the senior class as part of the Participatory Democracy course. Taught by Social Studies teachers Nancy Leib, Myron Moskowitz and Fntnco Scardino, the classes imitated political campaigns, and interest groups, as well as print and broadcast media. Commercials and news shows aired once a week in most Social Studies or English classes. Donations of simulated money ("simbucks"), fundraising sales, radio broadcasts, interest group rallies, and live presidential and senatorial debates all encouraged involvement of the underclassmen and motivated them to get out and vote. Continued on p. 11

Halloween Photos p. 11

-Carbone Takes the Plunge p. 13

Fencing Team Triumphs p. 16


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Throwing away decency One of the first lessons we learn as children is not to run with scissors, not to throw anything sharp at others. When we are little, we are reprimanded for not following this basic rule of decency. However, Roger Clemens, a pitcher for the New York Yankees, broke this cardinal rule on national television while pitching in the 2000 World Series. Rather than his suffering the same consequences as the children who watched him and looked up to him would, he instead got off with an extremely small fine. He did not accept blame for his actions and he did not even apologize. This teaches today's youth that so long as you are successful, moral flaws don't matter and will be overlooked. What was supposed to be a time of great joy and pride for New Yorkers turned into an event of moral dispute. For the first time in over 40 years, both New York Major League Baseball teams, the Mets and Yankees, earned spots in the World Series. Classrooms in Townsend Harris were abuzz with teachers and students playfully debating which t.eam would win. However, within a few days, this discussion was overshadowed by the violent actions of Clemens. With his amazing pitching ability, Clemens, also known as 'The Rocket,' is a role model for millions of young Americans. However, he is also notorious for his high temper. On July 8, in Yankee Stadium, Clemens pitched to Mike Piazza of the · New York Mets. The ball came careening into Piazza's head, arid leftPiazza barely conscious. Piazza had to leave the game and was forced to miss the upcoming AllStar Game. Bad blood boiled between Clemens and the Mets, as they believed the ball was deliberately targeted at Piazza. Cut to game two of the World Series, October 22, 2000. As Clemens was on the everywhere watched on the television as one of their role models showed them mound and Piazza ready to hit, tensions were running high in Yankee Stadium. that it's acceptable to react with violence and not show remorse. Both Mets and This confrontation had been anticipated ever since that fateful summer day. Piazza Yankees fans throughout Harris were taken aback not only by Clemens' action, hit the ball and his bat broke into several sharp pieces. The pieces went flying in but also by his subsequent hubris. What he did was blatantly wrong, no matter various directions. Piazza began to run to first base when all of a sudden, a large what his intentions. Whether he threw the bat at Piazza accidentally or not, an pointy piece of the bat came soaring right in front of his face from Clemens' direc- apology would have made him seem like a much bigger man . . tion. Clemens had apparently thrown the bat and could have seriously injured Celebrities are thrust into the public eye and must accept the consequences for Piazza. Umpires, players, and managers filled the field, separating Piazza and their actions. In freshman year, we learn that a hero is someone who possesses Clemens in order to stop any impending confrontation between the two. After a great physical strength, courage, and intelligence. In addition to these characterisfew minutes of commotion, Clemens was still in the game. The man had just thrown tics, though, true heroes realize their place as role models and use it as a chance to an extremely sharp object straight at one of his "co-workers" and was only pun- demonstrate high morals. While we would like our heroes to show self-control in ished with a slap on the wrist, a fine of $50,000. For a professional athlete, this is the first place, they are humans and can make errors in judgment. When they do a minute amount of money. In addition, Clemens was allowed to continue pitching so, they must learn from their actions and not repeat them. No one is perfect, but as if nothing had happened. .those who are setting an example for America's future need to realize how imporInitial shock was the first emotion of most who viewed the game. Children tant their role is in molding the people who will be future leaders.

In celebration of Tom Sweetin Students who have developed a strong sense of pride and affection for their school often are able - long after classes have ended - to recall their "teacher-heroes." Those special teachers who, students know instinctively, are advocates and friends while being demanding scholars in the classroom are not forgotten. Their names and stories, quips and antics, kindnesses and sense of play, academic standards of logic and precision are remembered and will be retold among classmates for decades to come. Tom Sweetin was all of these to his students throughout his years at Townsend Harris. · His calling as a teacher became a mission, one that he fulfilled with energy and "joie" every day. Not only a perfectionist in his academic demands upon himself- each lesson he insisted be intellectually challenging and provocative for himself as well as for students - he was meticulous, precise, and elegant in all that he undertook. Mr. Sweetin was an innovator whose ideas have set traditions for years to come. Senior class trip, senior prom, senior communal service, senior yearbook, commencement and baccalau-

reate traditions, and even senior "bagel sales," and hilarious staff Halloween costumes- each was planned, organized, and executed by Mr. Sweetin. His professional life was devoted to this school and to our students. Few are aware of Tom Sweetin's efforts for students in need or "in trouble," of his willingness always to go the extra mile for a colleague, of the long evenings volunteered to attend meetings or to work with parent groups. All do know, however, that Tom never denied anyone who needed help - and, if you let him, he · would do the entire task for you. That way, perhaps, he knew the work would be done to his standard! When it came toTownsend Harris, the product would be superior. Tom Sweetin was a kind, good man - a wonderful model for young people and a devoted colleague to his peers. His passing from among us leaves a physical world, but his gentle spirit and sense of fun have been infused in who we are and in the Townsend Harris mystique. Thank you, Tom, for how much you cared! - Malcolm Largmann

Letters to the Editor Alumni from 'old' Harris read Classic To the Editor:

Dear ones- Happy to receive your "Summer 2000" I am one of the 'old boys' ; - '36 clan. I have been happily involved in Alumni and grateful to those who undertook leadership in re-establishing the school and influencing the funding to create the beautiful new building. Reading The Classic is a pleasant insight into today. The page listing graduates and 'their colleges is very informative. A thought for you: Why not consider an article in each edition about 'the old school.,' as both .information and education (and inspiration, too), foF today's students? Alums, not just the Laureates, could be interesting to read. Even interviews by your student-reporters. · Bob Spodick '36 Alice Lee Allis.on Slotnick Co-Editors-in-Chief Sylvia Stanojev

Arielle Frost

Feature Editor

Sports Editor

Hye-Kyung Yang

Carolina Pruss·

Photography Editor

Business and Circulation Manager

Kerry Purtell . Emily Rivlin-Nadler

Townsend Harris High School at Queens College 149-11 Melbourne Avenue, Flushing, N.Y. 11367

. Alice Iosifescu

Readers are invited to submit letters to the editors. Letters should be placed in Ms. Cowen's · · mailbox in the general office. The Classic reserves the right to edit all letters. Letters must include name and official class. Names will be withheld upon request.

News Editor

Art Editors

News Staff: Anthony Ciolli, Beth Dubin, Emmy Favilla, Debbie Gopstcin. Akshta Kalla, Lorraine Kapovich, Bryan Kirschen, Narae Lee, Danielle Lord, Rachel Mindlin, Michelle Potof.sky, Carolina Pruss, Tian Ying Feature Staff: Jessica Berger, Nataliya Binshteyn, Danny Bloch, Marlo Dublin, Jennifer Gong, Jamie Gullen, Karen Hendershot, Angela Hom, Stavie lsraelian, Sybil Kollappallil, Terrance Lai, Steven Lee, Anna Olsen, Sunayna Ramdeo, Rachc~l Schiffman, Sarah Schnee, Steven Seidenfeld, Katherine Shi, Shara Siegel, Diane Tiao, Tina Wu Sports Staff: Rachel Acosta, Carolina Chang, Josh Fox, Talya Lieberman. Ashley Pillsbury Photography Staff: John Boneta, Gloria Chi, Kaveeta Desai, Jamie Gullen, Matthew Kirschner, Hillary liomler, Jamie Liu, Linh Ly. Laura Ng, Shard Siegel, Jennifer Sheth, William Yang Artists: Raymond Baro, Vivian Chang, Doris Ortega. Layout Staff: David Belsky. James Cleveland, Clarke Gmdinger Advisor - lisa Cowen

Principal • Dr. Malcolm Largmann


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Letters to the Editor Continued from p. 2 To the Editor: Thank you for the Summer 2000 issue of Townsend Harris High School's newspaper. It brought back memories of the old school on the ninth to the twelfth floors of the Baruch building at 23rd and Lexington. It showed me also how the new school at Queens College is different from the one that I attended almost sixty years ago. I still remember taking the entrance examination in the Baruch auditorium, with some 1,000 or more other hopefuls, of whom only about one in five would be admitted. That was the most important test many of us took, because graduation from THHS assured us of a place at City College. Remember, this was during the Depression. Our parents could not afford to send us to college. Little did we know that many of us would become financially the beneficiaries of the education provisions of the GI Bill as a result of our World War II military service. So we considered THHS as our route to college. At that time, THHS had an allmale student body, and, if memory serves me, and all-male faculty, except for the library staff. Also, the students and faculty were overwhelmingly Caucasian. It was a sad day in June, 1942 when the school closed. Many of us went on to City College for a brief time, until we entered military service. After the war, some of us returned to City College, while others went to other schools. For all of us, the GI Bill was an important source of funding for tuition, books, room and board and other necessities. Reading The Classic, I could not help but note major changes. Both the student body and the faculty are now co-ed. The pictures and the names listed in the class of 2000 show that the school now embraces a greater mix of ethnicity than existed in my day. Also, out of some 250 graduates in 2000, only some 25 are going to schools in the City University system. No doubt this change in colleges which will be attended is due to the $18 million in scholarships, an amount which boggles my mind. I suppose there is nothing more boring than an alumnus who goes on and on. I will cut my comments short by wishing more power and success to the students, faculty and Alumni Association (of which I am proud to be a member.) - Arnold Grushky '42

With safety concerns gone, seniors:get to use back door By Sarah Schnee Seniors may now both exit and enter through the back door, which leads directly to the Queens College campus, and all students may leave this way at the end of the school day. The door has been offlimits since school opened this fall because of safety concerns connected with extensive campus construction, some of it near the Harris building. The new policy was approved at an administrative cabinet meeting November 6 after Queens College assured Townsend Harris that the vicinity around the back door no longer poses any danger. Seniors, who take classes at Queens College, have traditionally' enjoyed the privilege of exiting from the back door, which had been closed to all other students, but security issues had previously prevented them from receiving the right to enter through it as well. These issues have been re-

The search for new principal:

Committee narrows down choices by Allison Slotnick The first stage in the process to select a successor to Principal Malcolm Largmann, who will retire at the end of January, was completed November 9 when the C-30 (Circular 30) Committee, the inschool group charged with the responsibility of narrowing down the candidates, sent their recommendations to the Superintendent's office. After four evenings of reviewing the applications, and interviewing candidates, the committee was to submit a maximum of five names to be considered in the next stage of the process; the exact number is being kept confidential. Superintendent John Lee will be joined by another borough superintendent and a Board of Education representa-

tive to further narrow the candidates down to two. The names of these two nominees will be sent to Chancellor Harold Levy, who will make the final decision. This choice is expected to be made in earlyto-mid-January. The C-30 Committee includes representatives of all groups that comprise the Harris community. Students are represented by Brian Cooperman, senior, who was elected by his peers in a schoolwide vote and Eric Trager, Student Union (SU) President, whose position on the committee was guaranteed. Two teachers representing the United Federation of Teachers, Wanda Nix, dean, and Valerie Billy, librarian; gained their spots through a faculty election. The 10 parents on the committee -

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Joseph Dubowski, Barbara Gradinger, Barbara Hochrad, Karen Homier, Lois Lee, Daphne Manhart, Neil Manis, Elizabeth Schnee, Kay Smith, and Sharon Steinhoff - won a Parent Teachers Association (PTA) election. Marvin Leiner, the Queens College liaison; Sheila Orner, Assistant Principal of Pupil Personnel and Council of Supervisors and Administrators (CSA) representative; and Carol Homiak, library aide and representative for the non-teaching district 36, also served on the committee. Two alumni, Ted Peck,'42,and David Herszenhorn, '90, attended as observers who were allowed to comment on the candidates and take part in the process, but had no vote in the final decision that was sent to the superintendent.

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The C.lossre recetved a ratmg oflntemattonal Fust Pla¢e by Qw11 and Scroll, the lntemational. flonor Society for High School Journalists. The Columbia Scholastic Press Association honored follf Cla.rsie writers with tpeir national Gald Cirde Awards. They are Rachel ~obel, senior (Second Place, sports· feature); Andrew Goldberg, '00 (ThitdPlace, column); Alice Lee, senior and Rebecca Munoz, '00, (Cemifieates of Merit, Alice for a personality feature and Rebecca for an entertainment review). Lany Manis, senior, was awarded a $5,000 scholarship in the Lena Home Youth Award c0mpetition'for his·research project, "Generations Connecting: Teens Teaching Senior Citizens M(}w to Use the Internet." Joshua Roseler, senior, won 350 Signet passics fer theTownsend Harris library in thePenguin Putnam essay contest. His entry was on Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Vi'vian Intermont, senior, won second place and $2"50 in the New York State Bar A-ssociation's Sixth Annual School Essay Contest. Her essay was on "Tensicm BeJween Student Rights and Student Safety." Shun Chi Cho, Nieole Oeary, Nicole Conroy, Marc Flonnan, .EffihiaGalanis. JohnPiilgol, Angel Zhang, and Tina Kim are finalists in the Poetic Possibilities Competition for Haiku. Senior Uara GoOdman was awarded the grand prize in the New York City Art Against Abuse Poster Contest.

solved with the arhowever, does not appear to be rival last month of an option because of the lima third security ited classroom space available. guard, Penelope "It has been very difficult to Yearwood, and the program our teachers around decision to issue the Q1,1eens College schedule," colored program said Assistant Principal of Hucards that will manities Lynne Greenfield. readily identify "Nobody's happy about this . Harris seniors. . Nobody likes .it, but we don't The back door have a choice, so we're makis not the only iming the best of it," she explained pact that the conwith a shrug. struction has had "Powdermaker Hall is being on Harris seniors .. completely renovated, gutted It has also changed A mere shell of its forrmer self, Powdermak~r· Hall, the Queens College building which used to house senior Humanities seminars, is undergoing total renovation. The construction out, and made more modern their schedules, has affected the scheduling of senior classes. with up-to-date facilities," said particularly for the As a result of this construc- and 50 minute class is ridicu- Ron Cannava, Public Relations Humanities seminar. This college-level course, which has tion, Queens _College class lous! The class is structured so for News and Information Sernine sections, is team-taught by schedules have been altered to that we have open discussions vices of Queens College. "The Townsend Harris and Queens maximize the use of classroom but it's difficult to discuss place has been standing around College faculty. It used to meet space, and the schedule of the things for such a iong period of , a long time and it needs ~o 9e Humanities seminar has there- time," said Dawn Wing, senior. ,; rehabilitated.;; • in Powdermaker Hall. . The construction is expected In a $52 million project, fore been changed as well. The "The Humanities schedule is all Queens College is rebuilding seminar now meets twice a right but I think they should cut to be finished in two years. As Powdermaker Hall, one of the week; one class is 110 minutes it back to one hour and extend for whether the Humanities largest buildings on campus, and ·the other is 50 minutes. In the remaining time to a third classes can then return to their containing 40% of Queens Col- previous years, classes were 75 day, because an almost two- old schedule, Mr. Cannava hour class gets too tiring," said said, "There's really no way of lege classrooms. Now the semi- minutes each. "To sit through a one hour senior Loveleen Bindra. This, knowing at this stage." nars mostly meet in Kiely Hall.


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Carbone Comes Down To Earth by Carolina Pruss Imagine being 13,500 feet in the air. The wind is blowing in your face. You cannot see any details on the ground, no matter how hard you try. And, you think that you are about to discover yourself all over again as you begin to fall at 130 miles per hour, living the extreme: skydiving. English teacher Michael Carbone made skydiving part of his main agenda this summer. He got the idea by watching "one too many episodes of Road Rules ... [and figuring that] if they can do it, so can [he]". Mr. Carbone spent a total of $260 jumping off a plane in Gardiner, NY. Mr. Carbone was only given a 3 0minute training period before the jump. He was not too serious about learning the different rules, but began to pay a little more attention near the end when he noticed all of the cuts and bruises on his instructor's legs. However, the worry was very short and minimal. "My philosophy was that [the instructor] was going to do all of the work anyway because he sure as heck does not want to die any more than I do. He took one look at me and said, 'Ifl leave this up to him, I am not going to land alive,' as he knew that I would not pull the parachuteopening strings due to my constant laughing. So, he was in control the entire time. I just enjoyed the ride," explained Mr. Carbone. Moreover, he took the experience quite lightheartedly. "They told me to jump. I told them to hold a Tommy flag for me," said Mr. Carbone. He did, in fact, have his instructor hold a Tommy Hilfiger flag during and before the jump, as seen on the video that Mr. Carbone has been showing to Harrisites all over school. "I

wanted to profess my love for Tommy, my idol, and to fulfill my Hilfiger obsession," he said. However, he was a little upset when he noticed that the flag was upside down. Mr. Carbone jumped attached to his instructor. New York State law requires beginners to be tethered to their instructors their first three jumps, and until they receive more training. Mr. Carbone seems certain, though, that he will be jumping alone by year 2002. Mr. Carbone is planning a Carbone family jump in June of200l.lt is going to include his 65- year-old father, from whom Mr. Carbone says he gets his "daredevil-character," as well as his two brothers, two sisters and close friends of the family. Of the entire experience, Mr. Carbone's favorite part was the freefall, the 130 mile-per-hour-drop. "[The freefall] feels like you are standing still in time, like you are weightless, or. like you are waiting in line at Banana Republic," he stated. Fear was not even an issue, claims Mr. Carbone, saying that he did not scream during the jump. He explained his wideopen mouth, as seen on the video, by the enormous air pressure pushing up on him, and said that the reassuring, confident and professional appearance and attitude of the instructors kept him from being fearful. "I was proud that I did such a brave thing ... [though] it never felt dangerous, and the club [called the Sky Dive Club: The Ranch] seemed so confident in [its] staff," said Mr. Carbone at no point did he consider this a neardeath experience. However, he did have to "sign [his] life away to the ranch over and over again, [equaling about) seven pages worth of

contracts." He even decided to write his own will, "just in case." "The will was 'not very helpful, though," said Mr. Carbone. "I signed everything over to myself in my grave. I could not part with my clothes and CDs, even in death. Some things will never change." Mr. Carbone brought AleifaAlly, a 1999 graduate of Townsend Harris, as well as her sister along with him for the experience. In fact, he says that it was Aleifa who was going skydiving and invited Mr. Carbone to go. Although he wanted more people to come, he says that daredevils are hard to find. "No one was really interested in jumping. People reacted the same way. "Oh I saw that on Road Rules," he said. However, when asked whom he would bring if he had the choice, Mr. Carbone immediately answered Tommy Hilfiger. Mr. Carbone admitted that he "worked his way up the ladder" to skydiving, as he began riding roller-coasters at age five, went white-water rafting at age 20, and then bungee-jumped at age 22. He says that he has "never been afraid of such wild adventures," but he avoids camping at all costs, due to the lack of room service in the woods. Mr. Carbone said that he was a little insulted by the fact that no one tried to stop him from skydiving. "Everyone who knew me gleamed when I explained the life waiver forms to him, too. I

started •to develop a complex," he stated. As for the revelation that he expected, Mr. Carbone was disappointed. "I had expected a wake-up call, a reality check after doing this deathdefying deed," he said. Mr. Carbone thought that he would view the world through different eyes. "I think maybe I should jump again, just to see if the revelation was a little slow getting to me," he said. Mr. Carbone insisted on describing his wardrobe for the day. He wore Abercrombie and Fitch pants with a matching Adidas shirt and Reebok sneakers, to complete his sporty look. "I would have worn all Tommy gear, but the workers there said that sometimes clothes get ruined in the landing. I could not take that risk ... to put my Tommy clothes in that precarious situation. Abercrombie was the sacrificial lamb," he explained. Mr. Carbone enjoyed the adventure, saying that "once you have experienced extreme things, nothing seems to shock you." His only regret is the required helmet he wore, which did not come out as well as he had hoped in the video. Mr. Carbone's goal is to use theresponse "been there, done that" to as many questions asked of him, with his extreme experiences now ranging to the sport of skydiving.

Biener Cruises Through Sabbatical By Beth Dubin As a result of her spring term sabbatical, English teacher Judy Biener was able to venture out of the country and visit two "exotic" places: Prague and Alaska. Ms. Biener was originally looking into Ireland and Greece, but as she put it, "They [the trips] were free; you go where the trip is free." Thanks to her husband's job as a radio broadcaster, Ms. Biener was swept away on .what were for the most part, all-expenses paid trips. During spring vacation, her husband who is an announcer for the classical radio station, WQXR-FM, was scheduled to go on a business trip to broadcast from the capital of the Czech Republic, Prague. Ms. Biener was able to keep herself quite busy for her one-week stay while her husband worked. She enjoyed "being alone and exploring" what she labels "a very walkable city."" Prague is one of the only cities that hasn't been bombed," she added. The Mozart Theater was just one of the many tourist spots she visited. Mozart lived in Prague and worked in that very

theater. There he conducted his famous Don Giovani and segments of the film Amadeus were filmed. Ms- Biener also caught a performance of the local Philharmonic, which she noted, "took place in a small, intimate concert hall." Other areas of i·nterest for Ms. Biener in Prague were the "old beautiful buildings," (specifically Jewish temples), and the everyday culture. She enjoyed performances by street musicians and puppeteer, the food, and visiting parks where she took advantage of the weather by . doing something she loves-running. "It was very hilly," she said with a laugh. Ms. Biener added that most people knew English there, but she only learned a few words of their very difficult language, Czechoslovakian. Two months later, Ms. Biener's husband's radio station announced a cruise to Alaska to be hosted by the husband and wife "team." This time, 80 listeners came along. Ms. Biener and her husband also brought their parents, uncles, and aunts, making it a family event.

This Alaskan odyssey was the English teacher's first cruise. On deck, there were many activities. There was a gym on board, so Ms, Biener exercised regularly. There were piano bars and dancing; Ms. Biener even celebrated her wedding anniversary with some romantic dancing on the ship. "The food was very fancy; three big meals a day," she said. Alaska is often referred to as the "land of the midnight sun." While Ms. Biener was on the cruise, though, it got dark at 11 PM. Although the weather was very cool and rainy at times, she found the night skies beautiful and optimal for star sighting. On one sunny day that the ship docked sightseeing was encouraged. Some of the things Ms. Biener did were "hike in a lush green rainforest," take a train ride through a valley famous from the age of the gold rush, and visit Glacier Bay National Park, which holds old blue glaciers and is a home for harp seals. Among the other wildlife she caught a glimpse of were bald eagles, bears, whales, and otters.

Ms. Biener did many other things during her sabbatical. Like all teachers who take time off, she earned required academic credits. She studied women's history, one of her favorite topics, and wrote two extremely long papers relating to it, (about 20 and 46 pages in, respectively). "I've never enjoyed writing so much," she noted. "I [also] got smarter, which is what you are supposed to do on your sabbatical," she added with a laugh. Ms. Biener also traveled within the United States. She went to Florida and Delaware to see her nieces. Overall, these past few months were • quite exciting for Ms. Biener. "I felt so fortunate to be off (from telfching] and have these opportunities to expand my horizons," she said. But, how does she feel to be back? According toMs Biener, she was at first "very happy, energetic, and rested, but then went through a period of fatigue, in which she was even unable to exercise." However, she is currently "back in the groove." "There's · always Christmas vacation [to look forward to]," she said with a grin.


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November 2000

Karaoke, color war, costumes . demonstrate classes' spirit Books bagged at a bargain by Emmy Favilla Perhaps the only time one could discover a shy friend belting out N' Sync tunes to the entire cafeteria or find English teacher Michael Carbone in a bright red wig and dress as Little Orphan Annie, was during the traditional October Spirit Week that also included Founder's Day. "The dress had been sitting in my closet for years; it was just calling my name," Mr. Carbone said. "Actually, though, I went shopping with [English teachers Farah] Khan and [Stephanie] Falcone, and I wanted everyone to see me in attire other than Tommy [Hilfiger]." Halloween spirit day, which actually fell on October 31 this year, followed the prior week's string of events in which students had the opportunity to exhibit their Townsend Harris spirit, or lack thereof, in a variety of ways. The week kicked off on Tuesday, October 24, with the annual "color war" between classes. A new addition to the traditional color war, which is usually illustrated through clothing, was the designation of a specific floor for each grade; students were encouraged to use their color in its decoration. Teachers who lent their help included Shi Beng Shen, Craig Weiss, Michael Carbone, Rosemary Eaton, and Adam Stonehill. While the territories of freshmen in green, sophomores in red, and juniors in yellow were clearly marked, the senior floor was lacking any particular scheme. "We didn't get a chance to decorate the third floor because no one really knew that color war day was also decorate your floor day," said senior Emma Guerrieri, who assisted in putting up blue balloons, posters, and crepe paper decorations the following day, "As seniors, it's diffcult to stay aware of what's going on because we're out of the building so much, and no one made it a point to remind us."

Despite their delayed reaction to the by Jessica Wang Amidst the excitement of Spirit Week, the second annual book sale in the cafcolor war, seniors made their spirit clear during Pajama/Karaoke Day on Octo- eteria attracted upperclassmen and underclassmen alike on October 24 and 25 ber 25. Students had the opportunity to during the lunch bands. The proceeds of the sale, $120 in total, will be going to choose from hundreds of musical selec- the same charity as the Thanksgiving baskets assembled on Founders Day, the tions and sing, as either a solo or group Mercy Center in the Bronx, which aids the homeless. Books for sale included Shakespeare's Hamlet, Jean Craighead George's My effort, as the words flowed across a televison screen in the cafeteria. Each Side of the Mountain and books from Ann M. Martin's "The Babysitters' Club" lunch band, though, provided only lim- series. The books, donated by members of the school community, sold at 50 cents ited time and a large demand of people for a paperback and a dollar for a hardcover. "Based on looks, business is less than it was last year, but still, it's a good who wished to perform; this meant that turnout," Rachel Nobel, senior, said. "It looks like everybody's coming, not just many were left without a chance to parthe students, but also teachers, aides and the security guards." ticipate. Elisa Pucio, sophomore, said, Seniors and sophomores worked side by side at the event, trying to encourage "I didn't really take part in any of the others to purchase books.. Health and physical education teacher Ellen Schwartz, spirit days, but my favorite was karaoke 路 the advisor to this project, explained why representatives from only two classes day. It was fun to watch because so worked at the sale: "Staff members working on Founder's Day projects decided to many people got really into it." In resplit up activities between grades. The sophomores and seniors are in charge of sponse to the suggestion of repeating this [sale] and the juniors and freshmen will be in charge of something else." karaoke day as part of a spirit week latt;r The purpose of the sale was not only to raise money for Mercy Shelter, but also on in the year, Coordinator of Student to celebrate literature and encourage people to read. "This year's theme is 'PassActivities (COSA) advisor, Mr. ing the Torch,' so you can hand down books that may be helpful to other people in Stonehill said, "It is definitely realistic." future," said sophomore Julie Deluty. Classics, such as Mark Twain's The the near Spirit week continued with Jersey/ of Huckleberry Finn, were in great demand. Andrea Shliselberg, sophoAdventures Advice Day on October 26, which was more, remarked, "I wanted to see more classics for sale. Most of the books were dominated by the never-ending battle children." for between Mets and Yankee fans in rival Even though many people complained that there was a lack of variety in the baseball jerseys worn in celebration of available books, the sale still had its appeal. When asked about what interested the "Subway" Series. Large poster them about the event, people cited their love for reading and their desire to help sheets outside the cafeteria also dispeople in need. played advice from the upperclassmen Susan Chang, sophomore, said, "The books are cheap, and you're donating to to the freshmen. A "What's Hot/What's charity. You give something and get something in return. It gives you a good Not" list, for example, labeled punk and feeling." rap music as "hot," but capri pants and Humanities as "not." The annual Founder's Day assembly on October 27, the.tlrst ever student-teacher whiffle ball game (see article below) on Monday, October 30, and finally Halloween, completed Spirit Week. During the lunch bands, contests were held to determine the most creative costumes. The winners received a pizza party the next day. Among those awarded with the pizza were juniors Aristotle Labiaga as an extreme skateboarder, Stephanie Bernadel as Sailor Moon, Mayuri Saxena as a big baby and senior Justin Lee as the Man in the Can.

Teacher win takes Spirit Week home by Rachel Schiffman The first ever student-teacher whiffle ball game helped wrap up Spirit Week on October 30 with a 7-3 win by the teachers. The Student Union sponsored the game, which cost $1 for admission. The captain of the teachers' team was Adam Stonehill, Coordinator of Student Activities (COSA), and the co-captains of the students' team were juniors Jenna Sangastiano and Marc Florman. Spectators cheered, "Go Greenfield, Go," as Lynne Greenfield, Assistant Principal of Humanities, got a base hit in the first inning. A double play by junior Ruben Perez ended the first inning with no score. During the second inning, students and teachers had to run the bases in reverse order. Along with this confusing peculiarity, two strikes equaled an out and the number of innings were shortened. "It was really funny to watch everyone run in the wrong directions," said sophomore Hilary Homier. Freshman Andrew Rivera hit a

homerun for the students, allowing junior Jessica Sharoffto score, and give the students a 2-0 lead. However, global studies teacher Judith Fried responded by catching a high fly ball, and the teachers, in control again, dominated the fourth inning. Surprise guest Mark Soffer, a retired social studies teacher who now serves as a substitute, brought physics teacher Craig Weiss home with a base hit. Mr. Stonehill followed with a hit which brought in himself and Mr. Soffer, giving the teachers a 3-2lead. Thomas Loheide, junior, tied the score in the fifth inning. "I really thought the students had a chance to beat the teachers and win the game," said sophomore Jennifer Sheth. In the end, though, the teachers had a series of successful plays. Not only did Mr. Weiss' homerun bring in himself and AP European History teacher Chris Hackney, but it also set the stage for Mr. Stonehill's triple, physical education teacher Robin Figelman's homerun, and a fly ball caught by Mr. Hackney to end the game.

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The Classic

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Novemb<>r ?ooo -------

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Getting to know new faculty: Latest staff additions Brustein takes helm include familiar faces of science department As the first fall term of the new millennium unfolded, Harrisites recognized four familiar faces among the new teachers. How can a teacher be new, yet still have a familiar face? For the seniors, juniors an~ sophomores who sat in classes taught by Eleanor Reilly, Franco Scardino and Stephanie Falcone before their official appointment to the school, or who played on the Boys' Track team, this concept does not seem so strange.

Eleanor Reilly Math teacher Eleanor Reilly came to Harris last June as a temporary substitute for Kerry Prince, who went on a maternity leave. Now officially appointed to this school, Ms. Reilly is teaching MQ5, Computer Programming and AP Computer Science. When she arrived here last June, Ms. Reilly was a little apprehensive about her new job because many people told her "subbing was going to be a nightmare." However, she said it "was actually pleasant."

Franco Scardino

byNaraeLee

Although social studies teacher Franco Scardino is beginning his first year as a full-time teacher at Townsend Harris, he was a student teacher here last year training under Myron Moskowitz and Chris Hackney. Mr. Scardino is currently teaching three freshman global history classes and one senior Participatory Democracy class. Along with his classes, Mr. Scardino is advising two extra curricular activities. He is supervising the FED challenge, which is the nation's most prestigious economic competition. This competition allows students to simulate the Federal Reserve. Students compete for prizes of as much as $10,000. He also _advises the Stock Market Game, which is a contest that separates students into small groups to create and invest in a portfolio. " I like working with academic high achievers," said Mr. Scardino. The students here are wonderful. I also respect my colleagues; they're very good and supportive." Originally a graduate of New York University, Mr. Scardino completed his Masters degree in Social Studies at Columbia's Teaching College last year. Mr. Scardino had aspirations of teaching at Harris after reading about the school. He says it was a real "battle to come here." Although this school's size and rigorous academic life appealed to him, Columbia had no affiliation with Townsend Harris. Mr. Scardino explains that it took him a full summer of speaking with Assistant Principal of Humanities Lynne Greenfield and his advisors at Columbia to get himself a student ~-----------------------, c: ~

~

Hear ye! Hear ye! New member aboard! Replacing Captain Brendan Curran, the former Assistant Principal of Scien-ce, Susan Brustein joined the Harrisite ship, as of August 28, taking

Susan Brusteln

the commander~in-chlef seat of the Science Department crew. As Stuyvesant High School's former program ehairperson, grade adv,isor, and teacher of organic as well as Regents chemis,try, Ms. Brustein was attracted to Townsend Harris by the "quality of the student body, administration, and what they stood for.'' She said that the jab offer of being the new Assistant Principal of the Science Depattment was one she could not refuse. "I'm very, very happy here. It's even better than I hoped for,'' said Ms. Brustein. Ms. Brustein has high hopes of creating new elective classes in the futur.e, such as Organic Chemistry, Astronomy, Physics of sports, and Envi-

~

Eleanor Reilly

c:

"' ~ Ms. Reilly has taught at Leonia High School in New Jersey and St. Raymonds in the Bronx. More recently, she taught at Iona College in New Rochelle and at St. John's University several minutes away from Townsend Harris. Ms. Reilly decided to return to high school teaching because she missed it and she really had had enough of college teaching. The hours of college teaching were much more widespread throughout the day, Ms. Reilly also notes. "In St. John's, my hours were from 7:00a.m. to 9:30 p.m. It was too much." She also enjoys teaching on a more personal level. She says, "I love high school teaching. I love it." "I plan on staying here," Ms. Reilly 路 said. '"'The kids are great and the atmosphere is warm. Everyone hugs each other in the halls." - Debbie Gopstein

~ :t

a teacher prevented him from doing this originally. He sold his business in 1999 once he felt financially comfortable. Now, says Mr. Scardino, he is "very happy to be here." - Debbie Gopstein

Stephanie Falcone

Franco Scardino

teaching position at Townsend Harris. Mr. Scardino, who was born in Italy, moved to New York before high school and then attended Christ the King in Queens. After graduating from NYU, he spent 12 years with his own food and catering business. Mr. Scardino always wanted to be a teacher but the salary of

"When I was little, I always thought I'd be a teacher," said Townsend Harris graduate of '93, Stephanie Falcone. The newest addition to the English department, Ms. Falcone is replacing English teacher Helen Rizzuto who is on sabbatical for one year. She is balancing a schedule teaching three sophomore and two freshman classes, and has also accepted the position of sophomore grade advisor, working with science teacher Rosemarie Eaton. With a bachelor's degree in English from Queens College, Ms. Falcone became a state certified teacher last May. Some may still remember her from Lin-

ronmental Science. In addition to running her department, she teaches two classes of chemistry and supervises the seniors working on projects for the prestigious Intel competition. Ms. Brustein also has her eyes set toward the possibility of having new science AP classes in the school. ''I'm so thrilled to be here. The people in the school have gone out of their way to make me feel at home,'' she said. Ms. Brustein describes Townsend Harris as "lovely,'' "excellent,'' and "warm." Born and bred in New York City, Ms. Bmstein attended Brooklyn College. She is married to a dermatologist in Queens with two "beautiful" children, an-18-year-old son and a 22year-old daughter; Aside from being a mother, wife, teacher and assistant principal, Ms. Brustein also spends time hiki,ng, cooking, baking, and reading. She especially enjoys the "beautiful and exquisite words'' of her favorite novelist, Pat Conrow, who wrote Beach Music and Rive-r Wide. "If I could be an animal... ,'' Ms. Brustein ref'Jected when she was asked a list of hypothetical questions., "I would be a dove because it is associated with peace and gentlenes.s.,It gets a perspective not everyone gets to have ... [And] because it soars." She also responded to the inquiry, "If you were stranded on an island, what three things would you bring with you?" by saying "a Bible, because it is something that you could read and read, a radio, for music and news, and a journal to record." Ms. Brustein., in peeping into the future, plans and hopes to stay here: "You bet! I hope for a long time!" guistics last term where she was a student teacher for Debra Michelwitz. She views her first official year of teaching as wonderful. "The students are pleasant, insightful, and have got personality," she says, ''I'm grateful to be teaching at the top, where teachers in the city want to be." Like many high school students, Ms. Falcone was not always sure of her career path. She never would have guessed she would be coming back to Townsend Har~ ris to teach. "I've always enjoyed English and poetry," she said, and even fancied herself as being a poet in the future, but as an English major at Queens College, she leaned toward the business world of publishing. However, when she gave it some thought, the idea of office work seemed unfulfilling and she decided that teaching would be more gratifying. Continued on p. 7


The Classic ~~~~~--~

7

November2000

Fall 2000 brings many staff changes Stephaine Falcone Continued from p. 6

swer questions on his philosophies and his goals as an educator. He chose Townsend Harris because it gave him the greatest opportunity to develop students' talents. As the coach of the Boys' Track Team, he is looking forward to another tremendous year. Last year's team was able to compete in the City Championships of the cross-country season. In his spare time, Mr. Rio likes play-

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Stephaine Falcone

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ÂŁ Self-described as an easy person to please, Ms. Falcone most wants to find happiness - to live a nice, settled-down married life with a "comfortable middle class existence." "I'm not looking to be a millionaire," she said, and she feels it would be great to continue living the way she is now. "A splendid night out would be going with a bunch of friends out to eat or to the theater-off Broadway," she said. Crazy about Pottery Bam and housewares, she would very much like her own home with a big backyard, hammock and a wraparound porch - "I have to have a wraparound porch!" she exclaimed, because she loves being outside. It's what relaxes her the most. She stated she would be content if she could "be out there and sit and just listen to what's around." Ms. Falcone hopes to travel the world in the future and continue her education. A self-described "life long learner," she is currently studying towards getting her Master's degree at Queens College. Uncertain of her future, she hopes to use this year to grow as a teacher and become part of the school community. - DianeTiao

~

Mathematics teacher Rochelle Bakst believes that "Ultimate success in education does not depend on your 'I.Q." but rather on your "I will." If you want to, you will succeed." Formerly a teacher at Yeshiva Central Queens, a private school, and in Israel, she is now here teaching MQ3 and MQS. Ms. Bakst decided to teach at Townsend Harris because it "has a welldeserved reputation for excellence." "I wanted to be a part of it," she said. She enjoys the challenge offered "by very bright and creative students." As for goals, "I would certainly be pleased if I could raise the students'

ing golf, rooting for the New York Mets, following Tiger Woods and watching track and field events on television. He had hoped ~at the Mets would go all the way and win the World Series for the first time in over 10 years. -Steven Lee

Magdalena Kalinowska Previously a teacher at Martin Luther High School in Maspeth, Magdalena Kalinowska is filling in for math teacher John Brown. She would like to show her students that "everyone can do math and have fun with it." Ms. Kalinowska has other interests

achievement level even further," she said. Ms. Bakst describes herself as "motivated, becuase I'm never fully satisfied with my past accomplishments." -Angela Hom

Makiko Funato

along with math. "Camping and hiking are two of my favorite activities during summer. I also love to ski," she said. She is also open to many varied music genres, such as classical, pop, rock and R & B. One of her favorite books is David Coppeifield by Charles Dickens. "I've learned that our background and circumstances may have influenced who we are, but we are responsible for who

customs." She thought she would teach Japanese when she came to America, so Ms. Funato decided to work at a language school in Tokyo where she taught Japanese to foreigners living there. Through a friend in New York, Ms.

Rochelle Bakst .

George Rio

George Rio Another familiar face among this year's new faculty belongs to physical education and health teacher George Rio. He has taught these subjects for over 20 years, most recently at Sarah J. Hale High School in South Brooklyn. He comes to Harris-after having been the track coach of the Boys' Track Team for a year. "I like it here a lot. The whole school has direction- everybody's on the same page to get their education," Mr. Rio said. "Teaching here so far has been a very rewarding experience. Kids listen and seem to want to learn. I've got wonderful support from the administration, staff and parents." In order to become a teacher here, Mr. Rio had to interview for the position left open by physical education teacher Keith Hanson who is on sabbatical. A committee of teachers, administration and parents then reviewed his application and held a meeting in which he was able to present himself and an-

we become," said Ms. Kalinowska. In response to being asked to describe herself using only a word, she said, "I believe people are too complex to narrow their wide personality to just one word-Angela Hom

Makiko Funato is a newcomer to Townsend Harris. Between teaching her three Japanese classes in the morning and writing her book on educational issues, Ms. Funato, a Japanese teacher for 18 years now, has quite a busy schedule, but enjoys every minute of it, "I didn't have the slightest idea how to be a t~acher when I graduated from college," said Ms.Funato. She learned English in junior and senior high school and continued it for two years in college in Japan. She began her career as a translator, and also fulfilled her high school dream of becoming a writer. Ms. Funato wrote magazine articles and most of her published works were translated material. Those she wrote herself were mainly detective stories and science fiction. While translating American books, Ms. Funato thought she should have "real experiences of American life, culture and

01)

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Makiko Funato

Funato heard of a Japanese community paper and decided to come to the Big Apple in 1979. Excited about her new job for the paper, she covered both public and private schools, chiefly elementary and junior highs, including Japanese schools in New York. Written in Japanese, Ms. Funato's articles compared Japanese and American schools, and reported on how Japanese children studying in American schools were doing. "The purpose of the paper was to give useful information about health, education, entertainment and community news to Japanese families living in New York," she explained. Her reports motivated her to write her book, which is still in progress. She hopes to include Japanese writings about society and culture as well as short poems. Since Ms. Funato knew a number of Board members from the New York Board of Education, she was asked to be a consultant for the Japanese language and studies department. She then began teaching at two of the 12 public high schools where Japanese was offered - Franklin K. Lane and John Dewey High School. -Diane Tiao

Bloom returns After saying good-bye to his students and colleagues here last June, physical education and health teacher Robert Bloom is back. He is replacing Keith Hanson, who is on sabbatical. Mr. Bloom's expected permanent appointment to Forest Hills High School fell through when the teacher he was supposed to replace there decided to stay for another year. As the coach of the Girls' Tennis team, he is looking forward to the upcoming season. He said he would welcome the opportunity to coach other teams, as he already coached the Fencing team last year.


8

The Classic November 2000

Ballpark figures: what it takes to get into the cc by Alice Lee Marilyn Blier, the statistics for last year's acceptances are in tabular form. According to Ms. Blier, an important note should be made about the SAT scores listed below: They are not the lowest SAT scores accepted," said Ms. Blier, "not the highest SAT scores rejected by the school. They are the SAT scores of the person ~ho had the lowest average acceptep, or the ~AT sc<;>res. of the person who haq the h,ighest average re-

Is it ever too early to think about college? Or, has this question been on your mind since you entered high school? Looking back at your grades since freshman year, do you feel discouraged about your chances of admission to your dream college? Well, here is a statistical appro~ch to .your college search: Year 2000's :results of Harris seniors' admission to colleges. Compiled by the College Office and College Counselor,

jected." The initials "SA" next to the average of some schools means "Special Admit." . Special Admit means that the individual was accepted to the college because he or she possessed a quality deemed beneficial to the college. These characteristics are: gender; ethnicity; special talents; .such as musical and/or athletic;..and family "legacy." Family legacy refers td .students wlrose family members are alumni of that university.

Among all the schools where last year's seniors did exceptionally well were: Hofstra University, which took 26 out of 26 students who applied; Fordham University, which took41 out of 42 students who applied; Boston University, which took 44 out of 50 applicants; University of Delaware, which took 8 out of the 11 applicants; University of Maryland, which took 30 out of 37 applicants; St.

The Class of 2000 PRIVATE

APPLIED

ADELPHI UNIVERSITY

ACCEPTED

•OWAVERACC

..·

14

ALBRIGHT COLLEGE

14 3 '

ALFRED UNIVERSITY

5

5

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

3

3

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

87 .15 730/640 SA)

640/580

84 .78

90 12 58CI620

0

BABSON COLLEGE'

1

0

BARD

4

3

92.34 6201640

.1

I

86.5

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86.3!

JAMES MADISON

1

I

JOHNS l:iOPKINS

2

94.3!

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ITHACA COLLEGE

84 .4 530/680

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY AMHERST COLLEGE

VIM SAT . HIGH AVER i-iEJ VIM SAT_.~

77 .61 560!430

JOHNSON & WALES

1

KEUKA COLLEGE

1

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

5

s

1M

a; 85 .31

85.5 680/590

LEMOYNE

1

_.J

9(

84.4 530/680

LONG ISLAND UNIV. (Brooklyn)

2

l

87 51 78

BARNARD COLLEGE

21

5

92.24 550/690

945 720/650

LONG ISLAND UNIV. (CW Post)

5

s

BOSTON COLLEGE

17

91 .92 650/690

92.1 3 6401720

LONG ISLAND UNIV. (Southampton)

1

1

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

50

3 44

85.31 620/630

88.05 590/640

LOYOLA OF MARYLAND

1

1

90.18

1

1

8904 790/660

MAN I IAr 1 AN COLLEGE

3

3

87 24

9

5

95 02 7301690

94 21 720/700

MANHATTANVILLE COLLEGE

4

4

75 11

19

3

94.24 800/660

95 63 720/680

MARIST COLLEGE

5

4

85 756

89 02 640/510

MARl AORO COLLEGE

BOWDOII'II BRANDEIS BROWN UNIVERSITY BRYN MAWR

5

3

88 .51 560/590

CALIFORNIA UNIV OF PENNSYLVANI

1

1

8116 580/520

MARY! AND . UNIVERSITY OF

CANISIUS COLLEGE

1

1

MARYMOUNT MANHATTAN

14

,,

8116 580/520

CARNEGIE MELLON

1

84 .4

30 1

84 .83

10 1.

86.36

29

22

89.88 85 .'59 '

13

MASS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

93 .76 5801710

CARNEGIE MELLON (Computer Science)

1 37 1

MASSACHUSETTS, UNIV. OF

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8:<

5

85.66 94 .66

CARNEGIE MELLON (Science)

92 .24 550/690

MICHIGAN. UNIVERSITY OF

CARNEGIE MELLON (Business)

9068 6301740

MT . HOLYOKE COLLEGE ,

4

41

CARNEGIE MELLON (Social Science)

91 02 6301690

NEW HAVEN. UNIVERSITY OF

2

2

82 13

76.11 4701500

NEW YORK INST. OF TECHNOLOGY

3

3

82 .131

90

47

CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIV

1

1

CHICAGO . UNIVERSITY OF

5

2

94 .66 7001770

1

89 59 670/570

1

1

88 630/620

CL4.RK-ATLANTA UNIVERSITY

1

1

79 .83 510/470

NYU

COLLEGE OF MT ST VINCENT

2

2

88.34 570/500

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

5

COLLEGE OF WILLiAM & MARY

1

1

95 .96 640/690

NORTHWFSlERN UNIVERSITY

4

COLORADO . UNIVERSITY OF

;

1

90 12 550/620

NOTRE DAME

1

35

2

94 670/680

CHICAGO. UNIVERSITY OF (SA) CLARKSON UNIVERSITY

COLUMBIA UNIVERSiTY

95 .85 7 10/680

CONNECTICUT. UNIVERSITY OF

2

2

86.36 550/550

COOPER UNION

6

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92 .33 690/700

945 6901700

48

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3

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

6

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

94 .26 630/670

NYU · ARTS & SCIENCES

90 67

NYU · SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

89 31

STERN

93 1

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9

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PARSONS SCHOOL OF DESIGN

2

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91 .72 6201720

94.69 670/640

PENN ST" TE · UNIVERSITY PARK

46

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94 04 760/600

92 .21 8001630

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6001660

90 75 760!740

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94 86 690/790

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670/600

86 39 560/600 670/690

94.59 740/690

86 36 550/550

88 590/640

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE ARTS/SCI

2

POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

9

PRATT INSTITUTE

6

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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

4

0 90 .18 I 87 51

5

5

91 25 {

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2

92 05 640/670

'HHODE ISLAND SCH OF DESIGN

EMERSON COLLEGE

3

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85 .95

610/5 90

87 .12 6201650

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92 55 630/620

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15

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12

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FLORIDA . UNIVERSITY OF

3

FLORIDA. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH

1

FLORIDA. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL

1

1

96 640/690

10

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95 .2 750/680

41

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1ST JOHN'S UNIVERSITY

52

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9

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90 45 590/610

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1

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90 39 630/700

95 .08 6201740 84 .83 5201670

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4

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HARVARD & RADCLIFFE

9

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95 95 7901800

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HOWARD UNIVERSITY ILLINOIS UNIV. OF :Urbana )

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90 13 6

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4

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90 12 6

SPELMAN COLLEGE

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92 06 7

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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community ·service, teacher recommendations, and the college ·essays. As for students who want a head start on their col- · lege search Ms. Blierrecoinmends that students· use summers, vacations, and weekendsto visit desirable colleges.

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Johns University, which tookall52 appli- applied; Yale accepted one out of the seven cants and New York University, which who applied; University of Pennsylvania took 47 out of the 90 applicants. One of took 11 out of the 20 who applied; and the most "Harris friendly" Ivy League Brown took three out of the 19 who applied. schools, Cornell, took 18 out of the 48 stu- However, Princeton rejected all of the four dents who applied. As for the other Ivies: students who applied there. Harvard & Radcliffe took three out of the While SAT and grade point averages nine applicants; Columbia UniveFsHy ac..: . (GPA) are crucial in these .cut-throat college cepted two out of the ·35 students.; application processes, do not overlookthe Dartmouth accepted two out of the six who importance of :extracurr:icular activities,

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The annual student/faculty Roth Pond Regatta. The rules are simple: all boats must be homemade, and only six materials can be used -only two of which, duct tape and paint, re-sist water. The rewards are better: a chance to develop skills that will help you navigate through college. The Regatta is a metaphor for how we approach education. Just as faculty and students must work together, the undergraduate experience must be a collaborative process between learning and life. This environment has led to some of the world's most impor tant discoveries. More importantly, it leads to a wonderful college experience. After all, the more you learn from the journey, the more you appreciate the destination. Even in a cardboard boat.

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW 't'ORK

BRt\~-K

THE UIIUERSITY WITH AMilD Of ITS OWn. Call631.632.6868 xlll or visitourWeb site at W'/fflsunysb.edu .


10

The Classic November 2000

Young neighbors welcome at campus events Hillary Clinton Expresses Views on Education Scholar tells 'what went wrong' by Alice Iosifescu

is targeted toward the training work in order to increase parenHillary Clinton announced of teachers. Lazio introduced tal involvement in school. her proposals for new initia- the Empowering Our Educators Clinton plans to fund her tives to improve the public edu- Act to strengthen teacher proposals through the current by Jessica Wang and Danny cation system of New York in a mentoring programs. Under the budget surplus. "I want to do Armed with note pads and major policy speech at Queens bill, incentives would be given for children today what my parpens, all members of lisa College on September 7. to veteran educators to mentor ents and their generation did for Cowen's journalism and EnQueens Borough President less experienced teachers. In me and my classmates," she glish 3 classes walked across Claire Shulman, Townsend the Queens College campus Harris and Queens College stuto attend the lecture "Dickens dents attended the event held in in America: What Went .g the Student Union Building. Wrong?" on October 25. <c David Townsend Harris students Parker, a well-known bO were given the opportunity to 路a expert on the English author attend the event through the in~ Charles Dickens, spoke at the u vitation of Dr. Michael Krazner, c event. 0 Professor of Political Science at .5 The talk focused on 0 Queens College, who assists Dickens' enthusiastically an"' ticipated first trip to America Townsend Harris in the election 0 simulation. Assistant Principal ~ in 1842. Much to his disapof Humanities Lynne pointment, the United States Greenfield, Classic advisor Ilsa was not the country he en viCowen, members of The Classioned it to be. In letters to sic staff, and many seniors athis friends during the tour tended Mrs. Clinton's speech. and in his later published "Hearing the issues directly American Notes, Dickens from Mrs. Clinton gave me a criticized many aspects of much better understanding of American society, such as After meeting Classic editors Alice Iosifescu, Alice Lee and Hye Kyung Yang, her position on education," said as well as newspaper advisor lisa Cowen and Assistant Principal for Humanities slavery, the press, and even senior Collette Spalding. Lynne Greenfield, Senate candidate Hillary Clinton suggests a group photo. the public display of spitting. Clinton began by citing the Senior Ka Wah Cheuljg, rear, also waited to greet her. Dr. Parker explained that problems she has seen in her American Notes was flawed visits to public schools. "I've addition, the bill addresses the said. "That means we take this because Dickens' imaginabeen in schools where teachers teacher shortage by encourag- surplus, this moment of great tion and sense of irony failed have the only textbook," she ing professionals to take up prosperity; and we do the rehim. "Never go abroad said. Although public schools teaching as a second career, sponsible things with it. We thinking, 'It's going to be are "local responsibilities," she providing them with alternative don't give trillion-dollar tax perfect,'" Dr. Parker told his cuts, most of which go to said that their improvement avenues for certification. audience. "It never is." He must be "a national priority." Mrs. Clinton supports the people who are already doing then went on to explain that One of the main focuses of testing of new teachers prior to well." the Dickens sense of humor Rick Lazio espouses many her speech was her plan to in- their entering the classroom. was abandoned "because he troduce a National Principal's She favors a national pay-for- of the same objectives as Mrs. wanted America to embody Corps, an initiative that could performance model to reward Clinton's proposals, such as rehis dreams," but in reality, he potentially attract 10,000 prin- high quality teachers. Senior ducing class size and training failed to find what he cipals within five years. Audrey Austrie, who attended more teachers. However, Lazio expected, "something akin to Citing New York's expected the event, said "In today's so- disagrees with her objections to Utopia." loss of 70 percent of its teach- ciety, teachers have become tax cuts. He has outlined proAlthough this was the first ers over the next five years, both parents and teachers. They posals that would both allocate time most of the journalism Mrs. Clinton also announced a deserve to be rewarded. There- a portion of the surplus to eduand English students atplan for a National Teacher fore, I agree with Hillary'~ plan cation funding and allow for tended a lecture at Queens tax cuts. "We don't need taxes Corps which, she says, would for teacher incentives." 路 College, students from help 75,000 people become Mrs. Clinton supports re- from struggling families," said Townsend Harris have been teachers each year. It includes quiring of school districts to senior Brian Cooperman who invited to events sponsored a proposal to provide college provide parents with statistics is portraying Lazio in the by the college in the past. scholarships to 60,000 young about violent incidents and dis- Townsend Harris election This was actually the second people annually who agree to . cipline problems. This informa- simulation. In addition, he does lecture on Dickens that Ms. teach in at-risk neighborhoods tion, which would be posted on not agree with the Clinton's Cowen's classes have been for four years. Furthermore, the the Internet as part of a report plans to fund specific educainvited to attend in recent plan will offer training to help card evaluating the school, tional programs. Rather, Lazio years. Stanley Freeman, Pro15,000 mid-career profession- would include statistics on the advocates leaving that choice fessor Emeritus of. English, als become teachers. She also number of students who have up to the educators themselves. extended the invitation to atwants to grant signing bonuses brought weapons to school, "The money should be spent by tend Dr. Parker's lecture to experienced teachers who have been involved in school the community on what it feels through Marvin Leiner, the come out of retirement. "If we fights, as well as those who is necessary," Cooperman, Queens College liaison to give athletes signing bonuses, have caused major classroom speaking for Lazio, said. Furthermore, Rick Lazio is why don't we give qualified disruptions and engaged in vioteachers signing bonuses?" lence towards teachers. Over- skeptical of her efforts to imClinton asked. all, Mrs. Clinton said she wants prove education due to her fail- called these efforts "a dismal Mrs. Clinton's Republican to strengthen the partnership ure to turn around failing failure whereby taxpayers spent opponent, Rick Lazio, advo- between parents and educators. schools in Arkansas when her more money and got worse recates a plan that shares many She wants to expand the Fam- husband was governor there. In sults." When asked about why she similarities with Mrs. Clinton's ily and Medical Leave Act to a recent New York Times article National Principals Corps, but allow parents to take off from (September 8, 2000), Lazio chose to run in New York, Mrs.

When Dickens visited America

~

Bloch Townsend Harris. "I found the trip to be worthwhile, because when we go to college, we'll be attending lectures. Classes at Townsend Harris are usually notheldintheformatoflectures, so this trip was really a new experience. Now I know what college classes will be like," Jennifer Gong, a sophomore journalism student, said. Sophomore Angel Yau felt that being on the campus might allay some student fears about college. "It's a great way for students to feel comfortable in a college area," she said, 路" becuase most of us feel that college is a different world, but if we're let into the atmosphere a little, it'll be better." ''It makes us feel as if we're a part of the Queens College family," said sophomore Marlo Dublin. "[At the lecture,] I felt older because of the other people around us. It was on a higher level than high school, and I felt like I was being included in it." As a part of the curriculum, sophomores will read a Charles Dickens' novel, either A Tale of Two Cities or Great Expectations, with their English 3 class. During the lecture, Dr. Parker said that neither book contained Dickens' impressions of America. However, he added that A Tale ofTwo Cities, in which Dickens talks of the failures of the French Revolution, could be indirectly linked to American Notes. I really didn't expect the lecture to be interesting, but I was wrong," admitted Andrea Shliselberg, sopho路more. "When you know more about an author, his or' her books become more appealing. I think I'll be looking forward to reading A Tale ofTwo Cities."

Clinton explained that "qualifications are more important than where you were born and raised. I feel like a missionary about the beauty and potential of New York."


The Classic

November 2000

Stonehill starts as COSA by Jennifer Gong "Increased school spirit within the student body," is only one of the things that Adam Stonehill hopes to accomplish as the new Coordinator of Student

given him various tips and showed him "the nuts and bolts of the job," which has helped Mr. Stonehill to start familiarizing himself with his new position. At the moment, he expresses that 路"the first year is about gaining experience becoming 00 and - ~ comfortable with the job." Mr. Stonehill describes himself as a "sports fanatic." In his spare time, he runs five times a week whenever possible and averages 30 miles a week. He enjoys playing baseball twice a week as well. Aside from sports, Adam Stonehill, COSA, and junior Marc Florman lend a helping Mr. Stonehill also hand during the Founder's Day food drive. participates in a book club and is Activities (COSA). Mr. Stonehill has still in touch with a "close knit group of taught history here for four years and is college friends." taking on new roles as an Advanced As the new COSA, Mr. Stonehill has Placement European History teacher as already planned dances, Founder's Day well as COSA. He was chosen to replace activities, and various walks and conOdile Garcia, previous COSA, who re- ferences. He is also the advisor of Arcently retired to pursue other activities chon, Amnesty International and Eduin Spain. cate to Elevate. For the future, he hopes Mr. Stonehill's desire to become to create a "grade-wide Olympics" and COSA stemmed from the fact that it was to have more student-teacher events. He time-wise a more flexible job. "I have also welcomes any suggestions or new my own schedule," he explained. He ideas from students. also pointed out that it was a "more stuMr. Stonehill's main theme for the dent-oriented" position and likes that he year is school spirit. He would like has more time to interact with students. Townsend Harris to have "better spirit "It's more informal than standing in days," with participation of the whole front of the classroom and teaching a student body. He feels that it is a shame class," he said. that students aren't as invested in the fun The last part of Mr. Stonehill's sum- part of school as they are in academics. mer was spent preparing for his new re- Mr. Stonehill believes that "THHS isn't sponsibilities as COSA. Ms. Garcia had a perfect place, but it is a great place." ~

Gore wins in mock voting Continued from p. 1 For the fifth consecutive year, the four-week simulation was organized by Assistant Principal of Humanities Lynne Greenfield. A grant from News day once again covered the costs of mock publications and broadcasts. Dr. Michael Krasner, a political science professor at Queens College, was also a guiding force behind the simulation. Dr. Krasner is the Co-Director of Queens College's Taft Institute, whose objective is to raise political awareness, especially among young people. This year, the simulation also received a grant from the New York Community Trust. The interest group rally, held October 26 in the auditorium, offered an opportunity for the groups to clarify their stand on important issues, such as taxes and gun control. This rally was one of the last chances the campaigns had to persuade undecided voters before the Harris election day. Juniors Lindsay Jenkins, Jenna

11

In Memory of Thomas .Sweetin: Beloved Teacher and Friend by Sylvia Stanojev On Monday, October 23, students and faculty received the news that long-time teacher, supporter, and friend Thomas Sweetin had passed away. His death has left a hole in the heart of the school community. Colleagues as well as former students miss the man who was so instrumental in creating the heartbeat of the school as we know it today, and each person he came in contact with seems to have his or her own "Tom Sweetin story" to tell. Mr. Sweetin became part of the Harris community two years after the school's re-opening in 1984. During his career here, he created many facets of student life that still exist today. As senior grade advisor, he launched student activities such as prom and yearbook that kept him working through nights, summers, and weekends. "He was a model of someone who gave 11 0%," said Assistant Principal of Humanities Lynne Greenfield. "He was very approving, and totally supportive. People need that." It was at Tildon High School in Brooklyn, where Mr. Sweetin worked as an English teacher, that he first met Malcolm Largmann. After Dr. Largmann accepted the invitation to be principal of Townsend Harris, Mr. Sweetin applied for and was granted a teaching position here. He taught English, Latin, and German. "I've known Mr. Sweetin for many years," remarked Dr. Largmann."He had complete loyalty to the people he worked with." His colleagues remember Mr. Sweetin as being extremely intelligent and a gifted teacher. English teacher Judy Biener recalled the time she observed his junior English class while they were reading The Scarlet Letter. "He was so great, and completely different. He was so erudite," she said. "It was just wonderful to be in his classroom." Dr. Largmann also praised Mr. Sweetin as a scholar. "He had high standards, and really taught what it meant to work towards those standards," he said. "[Mr. Sweetin] also presented teaching with a sense of humor. He knew he dealt with adolescents, not adults." Part of Mr. Sweetin's sense of humor was exhibited every year during Halloween, when he would take the spirit of the season to heart and dress up in costumes that everyone looked forward to seeing. Some of his past costumes included Batman, a woman in drag, and a nun (with his trademark mustache). "He was the most giving, selfless, and devilishly funny man I ever met," said Ms. Greenfield. "It was a rare combination." Mr. Sweetin played an active role in the Townsend Harris Alumni Association. "Tom was the loveliest person," said Lester Friesner, President of the Alumni Association. "He was very accommodating at meetings. We all admired him. Because Mr. Sweetin attended the meetings regularly and was so helpful, he was made an honorary member of the board and acted as the association's liaison to the school. Irving Gerber, editor of the Alumni Association's newsletter, recalled a particular incident when Mr. Sweetin's devotion to stay after hours saved the entire school. One cold Sunday afternoon, Mr. Sweetin came in to do extra work. One of the pipes burst, and the school flooded. The cafeteria and even the library were affected by the water. As a result, some books were destroyed. Mr. Sweetin was the only one in the school, so he called the custodian at home and asked him to turn off the water valve. From then on, he was referred to as "the little kid who saved the school." Ms. Biener has one memory of Mr. Sweetin that, she feels, summarizes his generosity and devotion to the school. During her first year as Coordinator of Student Activities, the Winter Carnival included a wedding booth. There was no one she wanted to marry but Mr. Sweetin, but he was busy running the carnival. However, she proposed, and he accepted. He even commemorated the occasion with a big kiss on the lips. "He stopped to make me happy," she said.

Sangasiano and~Shara Siegel hosted the rally, introducing such groups as the AFL/CIO, National Organization for Women (NOW), New Rainbow Coalition, Christian Coalition, National Rifle Association (NRA), and theBusiness A memorial service to celebrate the life of Tom Sweetin will be held in Roundtable. This happened to be the the Townsend Harris auditorium on Sunday morning, December 10, at best prepared, the best pointed skits in 10 AM. Those who wish to attend should notify Lorraine Goldfien ~t finding truth in the campaigns," said Ms. 718.575.5580, Ext. 399 Lei b. In the Gore campaign's skit, Belma Koprencka, Samantha Alongi, Monica started September 27 at the Kick-off simbucks. The simbucks were a very Trauzzi, Sophie Kupperstock and rally. George W. Bush (Daniel Salamon) important part of the simulation because Lauren Macri were cheerleaders who rapped aboiut some of the issues, and the campaigns had to pay an allotted C'alled themselves the "Gore Girls." Clinton's supporters marched their can- number to hang posters, create commer"This skit was a definite highlight of the didate (Daniel Davis) up to the podium cials and arrange personal appearances by the candidates.The campaigns started 路 rally," said junior Anna Olson. "The while chanting a military style drill. Assuming the roles of voters, the off with varying numbers of simbucks performers showed a lot of enthusiasm and overall it was very entertaining." non-seniors played an important role in to reflect the finances of the real candiMembers of the Lazio campaign started financing the campaigns. One out of dates. Bush and Gore received 4,000 their act with mourners objecting to high every three students was given 50 each. Buchanan received 2,500, folfuneral prices. Brian Cooperman ran in simbucks which could be donated to lowed by Nader, who began with 1,000. as Lazio, singing Billy Joel's "I'm in a campaigns of their choice. Two students The Clinton and Lazio campaigns each in each grade were designated as "fat received 2,500 simbucks. New York State of Mind." The election simulation officially cats," meaning that they received 1,000 Alice Lee contributed to this article.


12

The Classic November 2000

·- . .}rl;;·(" ···, Sleigh bells rang early for costume winners Jonathon Grassi and Jason Dileo, both juniors.

The queens of comedy and drama, seniors Kris Pueyo and Bettina Blanchard, strike a pose.

~~

Hallou.Jeen

Chupacabia, a.k.a. sophomore Carlos Gonzalez, plants a kiss on Yogi the Bear, senior Michael Delaney.

c\

. ·-tea. ,..-o: ,._ S'9"'-t1: ~-t~-t\o'l\ oi ce\e 31 ~ee~

October

'tO 9Freshmen Tina Wu, Karen Yau, and Gizelle De Colongnon concoct spell for a bewitching time

In the spirit of the season, all walks of life take time out to snap a picture together. (clockwise, from left: freshman Allyson Goodwin, junior LaTanya Lemon, and freshmen Sebra Seonarain and Stephanie Inwald).

"I'm too sexy for this dress," is what senior Sunny Singh seems to be thinking.

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The Classic November 2000

13

Carbone Comes Down To Earth by Carolina Pruss Imagine being 13,500 feet in the air. The wind is blowing in your face. You cannot see any details on the ground, no matter how hard you try. And, you think that you are about to discover yourself all over again as you begin to fall at 130 miles per hour, living the extreme: skydiving. English teacher Michael Carbone made skydiving part of his main agenda this summer. He got the idea by watching "one too many episodes of Road Rules ... [and figuring that] if they can do it, so can [he]". Mr. Carbone spent a total of $260 jumping off a plane in Gardiner, NY. Mr. Carbone was only given a 3 0minute training period before the jump. He was not too serious about learning the different rules, but began to pay a little more attention near the end when he noticed all of the cuts and bruises on his instructor's legs. However, the worry was very short and minimal. "My philosophy was that [the instructor] was going to do all of the work anyway because he sure as heck does not want to die any more than I do. He took one look at me and said, 'Ifl leave this up to him, I am not going to land alive,' as he knew that I would not pull the parachuteopening strings due to my constant laughing. So, he was in control the entire time. I just enjoyed the ride," explained Mr. Carbone. Moreover, he took the experience quite lightheartedly. "They told me to jump. I told them to hold a Tommy flag for me," said Mr. Carbone. He did, in fact, have his instructor hold a Tommy Hilfiger flag during and before the jump, as seen on the video that Mr. Carbone has been showing to Harrisites all over school. "I

wanted to profess my love for Tommy, my idol, and to fulfill my Hilfiger obsession," he said. However, he was a little upset when he noticed that the flag was upside down. Mr. Carbone jumped attached to his instructor. New York State law requires beginners to be tethered to their instructors their first three jumps, and until they receive more training. Mr. Carbone seems certain, though, that he will be jumping alone by year 2002. Mr. Carbone is planning a Carbone family jump in June of200l.lt is going to include his 65- year-old father, from whom Mr. Carbone says he gets his "daredevil-character," as well as his two brothers, two sisters and close friends of the family. Of the entire experience, Mr. Carbone's favorite part was the freefall, the 130 mile-per-hour-drop. "[The freefall] feels like you are standing still in time, like you are weightless, or like ypu are waiting in line at Banana Republic," he stated. Fear was not even an issue, claims Mr. Carbone, saying that he did not scream during the jump. He explained his wideopen mouth, as seen on the video, by the enortnous air pressure pushing up on him, and said that the reassuring, confident and professional appearance and attitude of the instructors kept him from being fearful. "I was proud that I did such a brave thing ... [though] it never felt dangerous, and the club [called the Sky Dive Club: The Ranch] seemed so confident in [its] staff," said Mr. Carbone at no point did he consider this a neardeath experience. However, he did have to "sign [his] life away to the ranch over and over again, [equaling about) seven pages worth of

contracts." He even decided to write his own will, "just in case." "The will was 'not very helpful, though," said Mr. Carbone. "I signed everything over to myself in my grave. I could not part with my clothes and CDs, even in death. Some things will never change." Mr. Carbone brought AleifaAlly, a 1999 graduate of Townsend Harris, as well as her sister along with him for the experience. In fact, he says that it was Aleifa who was going skydiving and invited Mr. Carbone to go. Although he wanted more people to come, he says that daredevils are hard to find . "No one was really interested in jumping. People reacted the same way. "Oh I saw that on Road Rules," he said. However, when asked whom he would bring if he had the choice, Mr. Carbone immediately answered Tommy Hilfiger. Mr. Carbone admitted that he "worked his way up the ladder" to skydiving, as he began riding roller-coasters at age five, went white-water rafting at age 20, and then bungee-jumped at age 22. He says that he has "never been afraid of such wild adventures," but he avoids camping at all costs, due to the lack of room service in the woods. Mr. Carbone said that he was a little insulted by the fact that no one tried to stop him from skydiving. "Everyone who knew me gleamed when I explained the life waiver forms to him, too. I

started ,to develop a complex," he stated. As for the revelation that he expected, Mr. Carbone was -disappointed. "I had expected a wake-up call, a reality check after doing this deathdefying deed," he said. Mr. Carbone thought that he would view the world through different eyes. "I think maybe I should jump again, just to see if the revelation was a little slow getting to me," he said. Mr. Carbone insisted on describing his wardrobe for the day. He wore Abercrombie and Fitch pants with a matching Adidas shirt and Reebok sneakers, to complete his sporty look. "I would have worn all Tommy gear, but the workers there said that sometimes clothes get ruined in the landing. I could not take that risk ... to put my Tommy clothes in that precarious situation. Abercrombie was the sacrificial lamb," he explained. Mr. Carbone enjoyed the adventure, saying that "once you have experienced extreme things, nothing seems to shock you." His only regret is the required helmet he wore, which did not come out as well as he had hoped in the video. Mr. Carbone's goal is to use theresponse "been there, done that" to as many questions asked of him, with his extreme experiences now ranging to the sport of skydiving.

Biener Cruises Through Sabbatical By Beth Dubin As a result of her spring term sabbatical, English teacher Judy Biener was able to venture out of the country and visit two "exotic" places: Prague and Alaska. Ms. Biener was originally looking into Ireland and Greece, but as she put it, "They [the trips] were free; you go where the trip is free." Thanks to her husband's job as a radio broadcaster, Ms. Biener was swept away on what were for the most part, all-expenses paid trips. During spring vacation, her husband who is an announcer for the classical radio station, WQXR-FM, was scheduled to go on a business trip to broadcast from the capital of the Czech Republic, Prague. Ms. Biener was able to keep herself quite busy for her one-week stay while her husband worked. She enjoyed "being alone and exploring" what she labels "a very walkable city." " Prague is one of the only cities that hasn't been bombed," she added. The Mozart Theater was just one of the many tourist spots she visited. Mozart lived in Prague and worked in that very

theater. There he conducted his famous Don Giovani and segments of the film Amadeus were filmed. Ms- Biener also caught a performance of the local Philharmonic, which she noted, "took place in a small, intimate concert hall." Other areas of interest for Ms. Biener in Prague were the "old beautiful buildings," (specifically Jewish temples), and the everyday culture. She enjoyed performances by street musicians and puppeteer, the food, and visiting parks where she took advantage of the weather by doing something she loves-running. "It was very hilly," she said with a laugh. Ms. Biener added that most people knew English there, but she only learned a few words of their very difficult language, Czechoslovakian. Two months later, Ms. Biener's husband's radio station announced a cruise to Alaska to be hosted by the husband and wife "team." This time, 80 listeners came along. Ms. Biener and her husband also brought their parents, uncles, and aunts, making it a family event.

This Alaskan odyssey was the English teacher's first cruise. On deck, there were many activities. There was a gym on board, so Ms, Biener exercised regularly. There were piano bars and dancing; Ms. Biener even celebrated her wedding anniversary with some romantic dancing on the ship. "The food was very fancy; three big meals a day," she said. Alaska is often referred to as the "land of the midnight sun." While Ms. Biener was on the cruise, though, it got dark at II PM. Although the weather was very cool and rainy at times, she found the night skies beautiful and optimal for star sighting. On one sunny day that the ship docked sightseeing was encouraged. Some of the things Ms. Biener did were "hike in a lush green rainforest," take a train ride through a valley famous from the age of the gold rush, and visit Glacier Bay National Park, which holds old blue glaciers and is a home for harp seals. Among the:< other wildlife she caught a glimpse of were bald eagles, bears, whales, and otters.

Ms. Biener did many other things during her sabbatical. Like all teachers who take time off, she earned required academic credits. She studied women's history, one of her favorite topics, and wrote two extremely long papers relating to it, (about 20 and 46 pages in, respectively). "I've never enjoyed writing so much," she noted. "I [also] got smarter, which is what you are supposed to do on your sabbatical," she added with a laugh. Ms. Biener also traveled within the United States. She went to Florida and Delaware to see her nieces. Overall, these past few months were路 quite exciting for Ms. Biener. "I felt so fortunate to be off (from teaching] and have these opportunities to expand my horizons," she said. But, how does she feel to be back? According toMs Biener, she was at first "very happy, energetic, and rested, but then went through a period of fatigue, in which she was even unable to exercise." However, she is currently "back in the groove." "There's 路 always Christmas vacation [to look forward to]," she said with a grin.


-· The Classic

14 Season ends on a roll for Boys' Bowling November 2000

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by Josh Fox & Arielle Frost After a slow start, the Boys' Bowling team made a big comeback and ended its season with a record of 7-3. The team finished third in its division, missing a playoff spot by only one win. "It was nice to be part of a team that made a complete turn-around, " said Student Union president Eric Trager, "but it was disappointing to not make the playoffs." The most important win of the season came against previously undefeated Edison High School on October 20. After the A team won the first match, the B team faltered, falling behind early. However, sophomore Clarke Gradinger and junior Anthony Casale battled back

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Girls to bowl in Quarter Finals by Arielle Frost After triumphing over Van Buren High School in the Round of Sixteens on November 16, the Girls' Bowling team is now headed for the Quarter Finals. The team, which is among the top eight in the city, will battle Curtis High School at Gilhodges Lanes on November 21. The team finished the regular season with a ~ecord of 7-3, placing second in its division. Ellen Schwartz, who coaches the Bowling team, explained that "this season's success came as a surprise." Six of the eight starters graduated, leaving the team with only two strong returning players. However, senior Danielle Lord, sophomore Megan Davidow, junior Shekhinah Jay, and junior Cassie Chan combined their skills to form a strong A team. Lord Jed the team, bowling approximately 150 in at least three games, and 168 in the se<;ond match against Van Buren. Concerning the Quarter Finals, Ms. Schwartz said, "I know that we're going against a very strong team, so the match will be tough. But, if everyone bowls very well, we can be competitive with Curtis."

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to narrow the deficit and keep Harris in the game. Going into the final bowler; the score was tied, but the match slipped through their fingers, ending with a score of 599 to 594. With the competition now tied at one match apiece, the A team proceeded to bowl again. Freshman Benjamin Harson and senior Christopher Chu led Harris to victory in this match, bowling 182 and 174, respectively. "The kids showed a lot of character in that match," said physical education teacher Larry Ceraulo, who coaches the team. "It was a very big win." This season was considered a success by the team, especially compared to last season's disappointing record of 3-7.

Part of this success can be attributed to the fact that powerhouse John Adams High School was replaced by uncertain Jamaica High School in their division. Another key factor was the performance of the A team. The A team was led by Chu, who maintained an average of 176. Sophomores Alvin Gattoc and Joseph Miller were also significant scorers, bowling 148 and 142. The play of Harson was a pleasant surprise to the 2000 squad, and Mr. Ceraulo feels that he will continue to be a valuable part of the team in the future. Both Chu and Harson competed in the Individual Borough Championships on November 9. This competition featured the best bowlers in the city.

Harsh field conditions block boys' goals by Arielle Frost ·The Boys' Varsity Soccer team finished its season with a disappointing record, obtaining only two wins through forfeits. "We knew it would be tough. We were a rebuilding team with a young roster," said senior co-captain Michael Giacopelli. Some of the new players included juniors Steve Kheyfets, Ian PogueMohammed, Gabe Villar, and freshman Joe Kresse. Global studies teacher Chris Hackney, coach, feels that these players will help it do better in the future. Giac_opelli led the team in scoring and assists, and seriior co-captain Angelo Marino scored the second most goals. Juniors Arthur Goulian, Andrew Galmer, and Marc Florman also returned, and are all potential captains for next season. Giacopelli, Marino and Florman play for the Auborndale Soccer Club outside of school to further improve their skills. Also, Giacopelli played with a knee injury all season. One of the team's biggest problems continues to be its field. The team's home field for games is Flushing Meadows Carona Park, which is among the worst fields in Queens. Mr. Hackney

described it as "a hard layer of beach sand." Needless to say, there is no grass as there should be on a soccer field . Adjacent to the field is a body of water which Mr. Hackney described as "a lake of sewage." These conditions pose numerous difficulties for the team, one being that the field and lake ruin soccer balls. The team had a $100 ball, with a three year warranty, that only gave them 18 months of use because it was destroyed by the rough surface of the field. In addition to these horrible conditions, the team does not even have a ~oc­ cer field to practice on. The boys practice at Kissena Park, which has no fields or goals. Mr. Hackney said, "Most of the boys have never played before, so we're trying to teach them the game without a field. This makes it very hard to visualize things." Under these circumstances, the team cannot practice certain plays, and the goalies never get to practice with a real goal. The team has been unable to obtain permission to use the Queens College field. "Most of the guys started the season with no clue how to play soccer," said Mr. Hackney, "but everyone improved and finished the season with the ability to play."

Girls race to first place

by Arielle Frost .· Success engulfed the Girls' Cross Country team's season, as titles were won and records were broken. Math teacher Joseph Horn, their coach,.said, "Everyone did such a good job this year that it's hard to even name standout players." The varsity team, Jed by senior captain Mel ani Sherman and junior Arica Wade, . finished sixth in a city-wide competition. On October 25, the team captured the Varsity Queens Championship title and the Queens Junior Varsity Championship at Cunningham Park. The Junior Varsity girls also placed third at the city level. The sophomores, Jed by Vicky Brigis, grabbed second place in Queens and finished seventh in the City Championships. The freshmen, Jed by Rosalind Adams and Shanay Freeman, also contributed by winning the Queens Freshmen Championship and placing fourth in the city on November 4. Aside from the team's joint successes, there were individual accomplishments as well. Adams finished seventh in the City Championships, a feat which Mr. Horn described as "quite impressive." Sherman broke the school record for the two and a half mile run. She completed it in 16:51, replacing the previous record of 17:02, which she also set. Both Sherman and Wade qualified for the St&te Championships. Mr. Horn said, "As a team and as individuals, we did extremely well."


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Varsity volleyball team bumped out of playoffs by Arielle Frost The Girls' Varsity Volleyball team's dreams of a championship title were crushed when defending city champion, Newton High School, defeated Harris in the Quarter Finals on November 15. After losing the first match 15-8, Harris responded by winning the second match 16-14. However, Newton won the decisive match 15-13 and took the win. "We didn't play especially well," explained Wanda Nix, who coaches the team. "We made key mistakes and they outplayed us." This playoff run began after the girls clinched first place in their division by defeating Flushing High School on November 1, and finishing their season with a league record of 9-1. This win came easily as the girls crushed the opposition 153 and 15-0 in the first two matches. Sophomore Nicole Wauters contributed five service aces to this win. Though beating Flushing landed the team a first place fin-

ish, the most important wins of the season came against Francis Lewis and Cardozo high schools, which are tough competition for the team every season. Harris defeated Francis Lewis twice during the regular season and split one game apiece with Cardozo. These wins gave the girls the opportunity to steal first place in their division. The success of this season is especially sweet because the girls worked against the odds and overcame many obstacles. In the beginning of the season, Wanda Nix, who coaches the team, predicted problems. The team had lost six experienced seniors. With an inexperienced team, Ms. Nix had to work hard · to get the girls used to each other so they could play as a team. Senior captains Mary Giouroukakis and Tracy Kirschen worked hard to help make the younger players more comfortable. However, Kirschen suffered a knee injury during the second game against Francis Lewis, and missed the

last three games of the regular season. She may need surgery, and will not be able to play in the playoffs. Another predicted problem was the team's lack of height. This always seems to be a disadvantage for Harris, especially when facing other teams with much taller players. Overcoming all potential problems, the girls accomplished their main goal: to make the playoffs. A large part of the team's success can be attributed to its starters. Two new sophomores, Wauters and Kristen Newman, stepped into the setting positions and "played with maturity," according to Ms. Nix. Giouroukakis and junior Mary Pipinias started in the middle positions, while senior Emy Kuriakose and junior Chi Wan Ma contributed as outside hitters. This year's team completed its season with a better record than last year's second place finish. "We were a new team," said Giouroukakis, "but the talent was there."

15

Boys'·Cross Cou;ntry ru.ns away with·fl.rst by Erie Trager The B-oys' Cross-Country team finished in fmt place in the Queens B divis:ion with an uruief-eated record of 5-0. T.bis season accomp;li:shed the team •s goal to reclaim its spot in theAdivisioa, whic:h was last after a disappointing seventh place finish in the l~~~ season. Having completed the r<egular season d:ual meets, the boys wili now g.o on to compete in individual competit:ions. "Thi,s year's team showed much improv~ment over last year's. Everyone has run his personal best,'' said physical education teaehe·r George Rio. The team was led by junior captains Jon Schwartz and Alejandro Gonzalez, last year's Queens and New York City sophomore champion. Senhtrs Patti Mendez, Armand.() Oroz.co, and sophomore Carlos Gonzalez

combined to form a strong varsity team. Last season's team consisted of only five boys runni.ng regularly. This season, there were 14 runners. The additions, whom coach Rio referred to as "outstanding,'' included quite a few underclassmen, who provided the team with "more depth,., according to Rio. Sophomore Carlos Chinch.a and the strong core of freshmen, inc;luding Chri-stian Cansino, Andrew Danilivoc, Da'Vid Bas'S, and Matthew Yu, impressed Rio, and led him to believe that the Harris CrossCountry team may finish in the A divisi,~m for years to come. This succe.s sful CrossCountry season was described by Orozco, who said, "The strength of tire newcomers combined with the consistency of the veterans proved to be a lethat combination."

Sawicz, freshman swi·mmer, creates waves by Carolina Chang Lining up along the edge of the pool at the beginning of their season, the members of the Girls' Swim team began to worry. As usual, the Turtles had lost quite a few of last year's experienced seniors. However, their anxieties vanished as soon as freshman Dorota Sawicz made her debut splash. With over 10 years of swimming expertise, Sawicz is already one of the leaders of the team. According to the Turtles' coach, I.S. 227 gym teacher Jim Jordan, "[Sawicz] is extremely enthusiastic, coachable, and willing to make the team successful." Sawicz's efforts helped lead the team through the playoffs until its undefeated record was ended in the City Finals on November 15. The Turtles competed against Bronx Science and Curtis high schools in a three way meet for the City Championship title, and finished in third place. This playoff run began after the team won its 11th straight Queens Championship and proceeded to compete in the City Finals. The girls breezed past La Guardia High School in the Quarter Finals on November 9.

They then pulled out a close win against Stuyvesant High School in the Semi-finals on November 13, beating them 5249 in Stuyvesant's home pool. Sawicz's success in swimming did not come magically. As a young child, her parents exposed her to dance classes and gymnastics in addition to swimming. She began taking group swimming lessons at the Community House in Forest Gardens at the age of four. "My parents wanted me to do everything, and then to narrow it down," she said. Following in her older sister Kasia's footsteps, she joined the Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) team Tri-M, and will "graduate" from it this year. However, she still remains on the prestigious Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) Flushing Flyers swim team. Sawicz's best stroke is now butterfly, one of the most difficult and grueling strokes. She currently swims 100 yards in a little over one minute. At one time, breaststroke was her forte. Mr. Jordan usually believes that there is room for improvement, no matter how great a swimmer is. However, he was not too concerned about

to attend a couple of practices. "If she's honest and keeps her priorities, she could take a leave ~ of absence to raise her grades. ]' But, if she doesn't want to sac:E . rifice for the team, she can't be ~ on it," he said. Sawicz finds ] great relief in Mr. Jordan's atti!:l.. tude about priorities. "I'm happy to know that he values school work before the team," she said. The team has helped Sawicz feel welcomed in Townsend Harris. "The people are very nice. They don't care what grade you're in; they're just nice to everyone," she said. She feels comfortable walking through the halls and being able to say "hi" to a familiar face. Sawicz looks forward to swimming in college, but her dreams do not stop there. "My long term goal might be the Olympics," she said. However, Freshman Doroa Sawicz pooled her efforts with teammates senior Lauren Katz, it all depends on how well she sophomore Katarina Kristic, and freshman Kristin Angelopoulos to break a PSAL record in the 400 relay at the swimming Opens on November II. does in college competitions. She believes she can reach her Sawicz's stroke. "If it works, As the season continued, goals by being both physically don't mess with it. She's that and the workload gradually in- and mentally strong. Sawicz good, I wouldn't change her creased, both school and swim- has this advice for other swimstyle. [She] bring[s] a wealth of ming demanded more time mers: "Mental strength is very talent and experience to the from the girls. However, Mr. important. If you don't have it, team," he said. "I can use her Jordan made it very clear at the you can work on it. Invision in all strokes at all times. She first team meeting that "grades yourself swimming and doing will [be able to] fill in any comes first." He will not cut a your best time. [And of course] weaknesses of the team." girl from the team if she fails beat the person next to you." ... ]


16

The Classic November 2000

Fencers bring home winning banner by Ashley Pillsbury & Arielle Frost Capturing the Public School Athletic League (PSAL) Championship title on November 10, the Fencing team capped off its perfect season with a perfect ending by defeating Hunter High School 7-2. Senior captain Larry Manis won the PSAL Individual Fencing Championship on November 12, winning seven out of eight bouts in the final round. Senior Jarvis Lagman finished third and senior co-captain Brian

Cooperman placed fifth. From the moment the special guest official, Olympian Erin Smart, said, "Ready? Fence," Harris was out to win. Lagman showed total control in his first bout, beating his Hunter opponent 5-1. After his overpowering win, the Harris fans, which included parents, teachers, and students, did the wave, which quickly became the tradition after each win. Cooperman and junior Richard

Junior Richard Cupolo parries a blow from .his opponent in a match against Long Island City High School.

En Garde:

Cupolo followed with two more commanding victories, expanding the lead to 3-0. Junior Patrick Clark then faltered early, falling behind 3-1. After Manis took a moment to speak with him, Clark responded with a quick point, narrowing the lead to 3-2. However, he was only able to hit his opponent once more, and he lost the bout 5-3. Manis then stepped in and put his competition away quickly. He was followed by senior Dena Schumacher, who competed in the closest bout of the match. With the score tied at 4-4, Manis called a time-out to give Schumacher some advice. However, Hunter's fence!r scored the next touch, and the bout slipped away from Schumacher, ending 5-4. Lagman and Cooperman proceeded to fence again and they both won their bouts. With Harris now only one win away from the championship, Cupolo beat his competition 5-1, and was overwhelmed by a jumping and cheering team of champions. "Yes! They deserved it," exclaimed English teacher Debra Michlewitz immediately following the victory. "They're so talented and they worked so hard. They out-fenced everyone,'' she added. Ms. Michlewitz describes fencing as "physical chess" because of the intellectual and athletic components of the sport.

Michlewitz takes stab at new coachif1_Q position by Anna Olson "Advance, advance, lunge!" Debra Michlewitz calls out, ping her hands. The memclapthe fencing team raise hers of preparing to extheir heads, move. Ms. ecute the 1e a p s Michlewitz cally, as along enthusiastitwo fencing team managers cheer from the sidelines. Ms. Michelwitz, English teacher, is a recent arrival to the position of fencing team coach. With over 28 years experience in the classroom, Ms. Michlewitz, who has a firm commitment to physical fitness, eagerly volunteered to coach this year's fencing team. However, this newcomer to coaching is no stranger to the sport of fencing. "I became interested in fencing six years ago," Ms. Michlewitz says, "My son was captain of the fencing team the year Harris went to nationals. I would go to all the matches, and at that point, I started to learn about the sport." Thanks to her son's leadership, as well as rigorous fencing lessons during the summer, Ms. Michlewitz now feels she is prepared to lead fencers in their quest for victory. "I want to see my students improving, and at the same time, having fun," she said. In an effort to help fencers achieve these goals, the team has participated in such activities as "fencing

for apples and grapes,'' which engage participants in the joy of the sport. However, coaching the fencing team carries its own burdens. "I can hardly think. This position keeps me so busy,'' Ms. Michlewitz said. In addition to preparing students for competition, the task of coach requires main-

equipment and setting up an organized routine. " Of course I try to motivate the fencers to work hard," Ms. Michlewitz added.

of the classroom is very different. As a coach, I'm now relating to students on a ~ much more personal \ level." ., While Ms. ...,. · ~-..7·, :~ Michlewitz con1'P" ~.1 tinues to teach En..

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glish, her profound interest in history has led her to accept a position as a U.S. History and Government teacher this year. Ms. Michlewitz, a member of The Gilder Lehrman Insitute, an organization offering seminars in U.S. History, has spent seven summers studying history at various universities and visiting various historical sites. Last summer, Ms. Michlewitz helped to run a Guilder Lehrman seminar on political rhetoric, which she says, "is a valuable way to engage students in history." Currently teaching two history classes to Harrisites, Ms. Michlewitz is enjoying the opportunity. "After all,'' she says, "you'll never know anything as well as when you the chance to teach it."

Sophomore Steven Torem, of this year's team, commented that Ms. Michlewitz is "the queen of our chess board because she's a fantastic coach." Ms. Michlewitz's interest in the sport was sparked by her son, who was on the Townsend Harris Fencing team for four years. During his years on the team, she supplied the Gatorade and Nutra-grain bars. "That was my job," Ms. Michlewitz said. "Even after he graduated, I continued to bring the Gatorade and Nutra-grain bars. So, when I heard that the team needed a coach, I immediately asked Ms . [Wanda] Nix and Mr. [Harry] Ratti en for the position. I love the sport." "Ms. Michlewitz's passion for fencing combined with the team's athletic talent was a solid combination. She even brought home a championship as a rookie coach," said senior Dena Schumacher.

HawkTawkto bolster sports awareness by Alice Lee Hawk 'Cawk, the new sports newsletter devoted to Townsend Harris teams, is now officially in production. The first issue, which came out on October 4, focused on t:f:te Girls' Varsity Volleyball team. Hawk Tawk promises that subsequ~nt issues· will' s,p otiight other teams. .Acli:ording to Ardhony Ciolli, its founder and edltor-in,.cruef, the purpose of Hawk Tawk is not only to report on the activities of THHS' teams in a timely manner, but also to help increase supp<?rt for these teams here at !:lchaol. ·~cup:eptly, ther~ is. a great need f~r mor,e ~eho0J .spirit and s.uppert foro.u r teams;'' Anthony said. ''AttendaJtee at ,home games· has been extreJ:nely .Jt>w~ mainly since people ei:th,er don't know wb:en the games are, ot they just don't care. Hawk 7;awk hopes to ehange this attitude so that teams ,get the su.p~ort the,y deserve.'' In additi$n t0 Hawk Tawk, An~

tb;ony, whO is also Senior Class Rresident !tnd' an edit-or.~in..chiet of

the scienc.e magaZine, the Q'itt}nturn Cat, is working on0~ganizing:a'pep ralliy to rais-e supp0rt for Harris t\'ams. It is whed:uled f~r lanuary 22': Anthony ttt1quests that all who are ihten3s.ted in hel~ing out with Hawk Tawk. or with· the .. ~P rally please cantact bim. He can be re~t.cbed by l~avbfg a oote in his maiJ.box in the Seniot Office. 'Editor positj.ons are stiH available at Hawk Tawk. These interested in belng qheetleaders for the pep rally can also eo11tact Drana Escuder by leaving a note in fier mailbox in the Senio.r Office.


The Classic newspaper Volume 17 Issue no. 1