Page 1

., ., ..

,

' _•

, .

.- : . .. c. ..

'

.

Vol. 9, No.3, May, 1993

,.

~

,

\

• 75-40 Parsons Boulevard. Flushi ng, NY 11366

Townsend Harris High School at Queens College

Safety measures prove successful by Diana Tuite "Back to normal," said Assistant Principal of Organization Malcolm Rossman of the apparent cessation ofviolent incidents that had threatened student safety earlier this year. Largely through a recent Safe Street, Safe City Grant from the Board of Education, administrators hav e taken steps to safeguard the school and its surrounding area. There have been no reported incidents for the last four and a half months. This grant, whose funds must be channeled specifically towards safety, provides for Safety Officer Leroy Howard to remain after school until 6 PM. Leroy patrols the building, making sure no unsupervised groups linger. In the past, problems arose when students did not head directly home. "I stay around in front to make sure that when kids leave, they go where they're supposed to

go," said Leroy. In accordance with the grant, administrators took other steps to insure safety, especially after school. Every day at dismissal, Officer Michael Matthews of the 107 Precint directs traffic outside. The library now remains open until 4:00 on Wednesdays and Thursdays, providing students with a place to go if they must wait for a ride . Newly designated Security Coordinator Arthur Boulanger remains sometimes until 5:30. "My job is basically supervising the security force that is available in the building after school hours, "he said. Teachers who run afterschool activities are encouraged to ensure everyone has a ride home. However, the faculty did not neglect morning activites. Spanish teacher Ilene Marcus supervises the cafetorium breakfast program. In addition, teachers organized tutorial programs, of-

fered as yet another morning activity. School officials also extended precautionary measures for seniors on the Queens College campus. They appointed Marion Rutigliano, a new school aide, as daily supervisor in the college office through 3:00. Staff members recently formed a Safety Committee co-chaired by Mr. Rossman and Assistant Principal of Guidance Sheila Orner. They intend to update security plans for such extracurricular events as dances and performances, and tomonitor ticket sales more closely. Eventually, this committee will expand to include parents and students. Even now, parents assume an active role in the situ ation . A PTA Safety Comrnitee, headed by James Morrison, father ofjunior Ryan Morrison, keeps in contact with the police and area politicians. They seek to maintain the current level of

police cooperation. Past incidents prompted administrators to set aside blocks of time for peer mediation before and after school. According to Ms. Orner, these sessions, scheduled to start soon, are aimed towards "peaceably resolving conflicts." Under the terms of the grant, two faculty members, Dean Wanda Nix and Coordinator of Student Affairs Judy Biener, must attend classes which train them to be peer mediators. There have been new deve lopments involving arrested assailants . Most recently, one youth, the chief instigator of attacks earlier this year , was sentenced to 18 months in prison. At this point, the school community has banded together in the name of safety. Mr. Rossman feels their efforts have succeeded. "I think we' re back to the same sense we had where people can go to school and feel they 're safe outside," he said.

Construction on new building runs smoothly h h been ad? Wh by"H Ther ese Ferguson . . . .. ow muc progress as me ere are we the new building ready hfor now? What th ldIS bnotildi . S happens ber if1994' " entry m epte m smce e 0 ill mg as

-

., . already been leased out? These were some of the ques. • • . by the Schoo l Connons raised at a meeting sponsored

"

said . Assistant Principal Malcolm Rossman. These acuviues . .. mc . 1u de'instal lin g heating and cooling pipes . plumbmg, and the concrete cinderblock in the internal' w all s on th e 1ower 1evels.

-

concrete declcing has been poured on fue In addrtion, . OOT, fifth fl halfa f w hi c h iIS fitn1S . h e d . N'mety-mnepercent .

,;.,' • "1 "

strucnon Authority held on April 2 at the Queens College site for the new Townsend Harris building. During the meeting, which was open to parents and school members as well as other members of the com-

of the stillwork has been done. This includes tigh tening the bolts on the balance of the metal decking. Ducts, which will allow air conditioning and fresh air to circulate throughout the building, have been installed in the

munity, it was stated that the present schoo l building has alreadybeensignedoutforSeptember,1994.Butworkers and members of the SCA are confident that everything will proceed as planned. Louise Shapiro, of the SCA's community Relations department, said that construction is progressing "on schedule" and the new building should be open as planned.

lower level of the building. Although Mr. Rossman does not foresee any problerns, he does say that the Townsend Harris staff and students will face a big challenge in September of 1994. "We will have to start from scratch. We will need new materials, anew bell schedule, have to practice fire drills because of the new exits, and other thing s,"he said. "The

,

Much work is going on at the site due to multiple

scen~. "This means

u

••

o~

"

WI

key is having all the materials in place by then . But I

...

Vovcabljiary Month challenge·s':·savants

contractors on the

that a lot of

STEEL SKELETON IN PLACE, the new building is on its way towards completion

by Jessica Steinmetz

don't think it's a problem, I think it's kind of fun,

Assistant Principal of Humanities Lynne Greenfield, who coor-

lary Month enriches the mind. It's a fun way of learning vocabu-

Thirty-one students achieved a perfect score on the April Fool's Day Vocabulary Challenge test .They, along with 97 others whose scores were "almostperfect," received a certificate ofachievement from Principal Malcolm Largmann, and a certificate for a free candy at the candy store near the gym. For this annual event, all faculty , staff, and members of the Parent-Teacher Association are asked to contribute vocabulary words which they think would be challenging for the students. The Humanities Department then makes a list of 25 of the "best" words. Each day in English classes, the students are given a new word from the vocabulary list. At the end of the month, there is a mandatory vocabulary quiz givenin English classes, which covers

dinated this event, felt that "it is fun to have a school-wide activity such as this, where everyone is involved. We're so fortunate to be able to do things like this, as no other school can. Vocabulary Month is an opportunity to focus on vocabulary and to provide a fun and exciting way to leamnew words, to think about words, and to share words." According to Ms . Greenfield, Vocabulary Month evolved from this school's commitment to vocabulary and precision of language. Administrators wanted this to come across in a unique and pleasant way. So how do Townsend Harris students feel about this event? "Vocabulary Month enhanced my vocabulary skills tremen-

lary and it will prepare me for the SAT's," she said . Other students feel differently. "I think Vocabulary Month helps me, but I do not particularly enjoy it. I hate having to leam words and memorize definitions for no apparent purpose," said junior Natalie Krauser. Jesse Lieberman, junior, said , "I could study vocabulary words on my own time." Danielle Fishman, jnnior, who once scored 100% on the Vocabulary Month Quiz, reported, "It felt good to get 100% on the quiz, but I think our school should create a better incentive than a free candy bar in order to promote our vocabulary skills." Sophomore Elena Coleman added, "Since the quiz they make us take doesn't count, it's just an extra burden for us, in addition to the 50 required vocabulary words we have to

all 25 words from the list. The scores students get on these quizzes have no effect on their class grades.

dously. Hopefully, this year I'll get 100% on the quiz," said Ron Zaidman, sophomore. Adrian Muzich, junior, agreed. "Vocabu·

i

i

Career Day

Trade Center Bombing

p.4

p. 13

-'-)1 >"~ ~" _._~ ••

•••

study in English class ." Continued on page 4

' i

I


'I' - "

,2'

- ,I"

"

.. .'

. .', '. ~

"

~

.

~

The Classic

May1993

_. In'~e'~astfew 'years,~ehaye~witne'~ '~il~t6nes in theN~W York-qty School' system. The Rainbow Curriculum was established, whereby students learned about alternativelifestyles,suchas thoseof homosexuals. Condomsweremadeavailablein high ' ''-'--_ _--schools,along with information about safe sex from teachers and other faculty members:,~,'-d ---,''''';'':..:: . New YorkCityChancellor Joseph A. Fernandez,1he man who implementedthese pro-i-.-. " r; grams, wiD be let go in June when his contract expires,due to a decision of the Board of ,S'':' ", J Of': Education.Where does that leave the city's schools? • ~~ Former schools chancellor Frank J. Macchiarola will head a.seven-member search 5"0" committee for Femandez'sreplacement.This committee faces the difficult task of selectinga personcapableofrunningthe schoolsof thenation's largestcity.It is a daunting task, and only someonewho has had experiencein the city school system wouldbe wellequippedfor the job. Withouta doubt,thenew chancellormusthavebeena part of theNew YorkCity schools, v \ as a teacheror principal.He or she must know how to deal with children and be aware of ',?, the countlessproblems we face. Just as we wouldexpect this person to look at people of ~ \ . .Iilo-\ differentraces and religionsin the same way,he orshe must be acceptingof aD lifestyles. The Rainbow Curriculum should be continued and expanded upon. Only when we are taughttorespectoneanotherfromthebeginningofouracademiccareerswiD webe capable of doing so as adults.New Yorkis a city of diversity;the schoolsmust not ignore this fact. Instead,thenewchancellorshouldusethemanydifferentethnicitiesfoundhereas anasset - a means of promotingthe peace and equality which is desperatelyneeded in this city and in the world. Condomdistribution should also be continuedbecauseit is a realistic methodof dealing with the problemsof teenagepregnancyand AIDS.By admittingthat teen sex will occur whetherparentsapproveof itornot, a giantstepwastakentowardscontrollingtheproblem. To the Editor: Thecounsellinggivenby teachersalso helpstoanswermanyof thequestionswe mayhave, I would like to express my anger on behalf of many students. If Townsend Harris is supposed to and thus help bridge the gap between teens and adults. be a multi-cultural school, then why, on Friday, January 22, was there a Black-out Day on which While socialissueslike theRainbowCurriculumand condomdistributionare important, students were supposed to wear all black? Little did they know it was Chinese New Year's eve. This the new chancellor should not forget about his or her first priority: education. Most was supposed to be aday of happiness, but instead, the school turned it into a day of mourning. Please, importantis the educationof the city's studentsin order to prepare us for the future. Once the nex t time the student government plans a spirit day, check the calendar and make sure that it the materialsneededfor teachingare acquiredand educatorsare preparedto do theirjobs, doesn't coincide with any other holidays! social issues can be dealt with. But only then. (What good is giving out condoms if there I hope that the student government will be more aware of the people's holidays and give them the are not any health textbooks available?)In order to find the funds for textbooksand other same amount of respect they give American holidays. I also wish that the school would publish a necessarymaterials,the new chancellorshouldhave ideas on how to get more money for multi-cultural calendar which would include all the holidays observed by students of different ethnicities. the schools. ., :~ (~, ·"i' ~- .,~~ ~" ~ tib~Chin · ·~ While the new chancellor must come from a background in education, it would be desireable for him or her to have some qualities of a politician, especially the ability to compromise. By never giving in, it is ensured that nothing will get done and no changes wiD be made. The new chancellormust know how to deal with administrators, teachers, To the Editor: and most especiallyparents. One of Fernandez's great mistakeswas not consultingparents whenhe implementedhis I am pleased to see the column on health questions included in The C lassie. It will help to better . plans.The school system will not work if parentsand educatorsare not workingside-by- disseminate health information. Many students have health-related questions but may not currently side.Together,theycandecidewhatis best for thecity's childrenand find waysto educate be in a health class, so this provides another avenue for making information available to them . us both academically and also morally.The chancellormust respect parents' opinions in A statement was made concerning the use of lubricants with a condom that needs to be clarified. order to gamer their support.Only then will he or she have a viable chance to succeed. When lubricants are used with latex condoms (the only type that prevents mv from getting through), The committeehas much to considerin finding a candidatefor chancellor. If the Board they must be water -based so as not to disintegrate the latex. Petroleumjelly, baby oil and body lotion of Educationwantstoavoida similarsituationseveralyearsfromnowparentsandstudents are oil-based, for example, and should not be used. should beconsultedbeforea decisionis made.Thebest waytodo thisis by havinga parent Ellen Schwartz and a student serve on the committee. After all, these are the people who will be most Teacher of Health Education (Letters continued on next page) affected by the new appointment.

,. ":"

, ':"

-

I......

I.......

1i~·1

Respect ethnic holidays

Condom effectiveness clarified

SAT preparation in school

glassic t::m:: : : : :j: : tn: : : : :nm: : : : t: : : : : :t: : : mt: : : : :t~

When encountered separately, the letters S, A, and T seem harmless. However, put mmt:m::m:m:r:::::i:::m:::m::::tm:n::::i:m:t::::::::::::m:ntrm together they spell out something every high school junior dreads, the Scholastic I Apititude Test (SAn. Every year in the spring, many race to sign up for preparation SeniorEditor. Randl Korobelnik T........nd llarrl. High SChool.t Queens Col.... Editcr-in-Chief: Jennifer Sorowitz 75-40 ParlOns Blvd. Fl..hlng, Ne.. York UJ'(; classes. Other schoolsprovidethis valuableservice.Even though the SAT is importantin Diana Tuite Stacey Gluck, Sally Magdi determining which colleges accept us, our school does not provide a free after-school Ne... EdItor Featur. EdItor. preparatory program for its students. Francine Rich Kristina Olson Seth Cohen Sporlt EdItor Computer Coordlnator A....lant Sports EdItor Especially in this small and academically competitiveenvironment,students are presReaders are inv~ed to submit lettersto the ed~or. LettersshoJld be placedin Ms. sured into scoring high on the SAT. To many, this means doling out $595 for Stanley Joanna Drescher, Lina Kim Ann Carroll Timothy Nolan Cowen's maillox Inthe generaloffice.The Photoeraph)' Edltors BuoIn... Manage r Art EdItor Kaplancourses,or $695forPrincetonReview.Notonlyis thisa lotof moneywhencollege Cluaic r96erves the rightto ed~ allletters. Leners mustInclude nameandofficlalclass. tuition lurks just around the comer, but it is also time-consuming. Since students must Terese Ferguson, Neftali Serrano Nameswill be w~hh!,1d upon request, S.nlor Conlributlllll EdItors devote so much time, their schoolwork may suffer. As a practicalapproachto thisexam,studentscouldbe instructedby teachers after school Writers : Aleema Bacchus, Stephanie Bernstein. Erik Bloch, Jennife r Chin, Erika DiSanzo, Nada Elkhashab, These classes should begin once juniors have taken the PSAT, so as to avoid cramming Johanna Fausto. Alison Gabriele, Luiza Girlea, Laura Hummel, Ian Katz.Veronica Lee, Olga Mazyuk, Beth right before the March,Mayor June exams.Wecould set up two sessionseach week, one Mellow, Shalene Moodie, Michael Munoz, Eleni Passias, Phyllis Pei, Jesse Robinson, Sarah Tremrnl, Gina math and one verbal.Studentsdesiring to take the course could contributea minimalfee Tufaro , Stacey Winkler, Anna Zwierz to pay teachers. Thischargewouldbe nothingcomparedto thatof commercialpreparatory Photographers: January Angeles, Dionne Frasier, Susan Hong, Sarah Kim, Olga Mazurkiewicz, Ki Yon courses. Asanotheralternative,moneycouldbe allocatedfromCOSAfundsor elsewhere Parle, Vicki Soffer, Anna Zwierz in the school budget. Artists: Erik Bloch, Jeshurun Breach, Ruby Chan, Karen Chang, Cannon Chu, Daniel Gingerich, David This arrangment will save time for those who-would otherwise travel to faraway test Iankelevich, Alvaro Ibarguen, James Kim, Bikkei Law, Vinh Nguyen, Lizabeth Nolan, Maria Skrepetos, centers. Also,studentsare alreadyfamiliarwithteachers,so no timeis wastedestablishing Jennifer Tam, Teresa Tse, Ritzel Tuazon, Rena Varghese, Cynthia Wong, Amy Yan, Stephanie Yee a relationship with them. Business Staff: Tara Balabushka, Akiba Smith In school, wherewe are taughtto strive for what is perceivedas success,we should also ITyping Staff: Tara Balabushka, Massandje Bamba, Jennifer Chau, Nada Elkhashab, Johanna Fausto, Aimee be provio cd with the tools to achieveit Consideringthat we all have to take the SAT, we Shih , Felicia Vinci should all be given the opportunity to improve our scores in a familiar, comfortable Principal: Dr. Malcolm Largmann Advisor: llsa Cowen atmosphere.


, - , - - --'-.-,

. --:r;-r,,.....-;" -~ ,- -

- ~ ,~.~ ,

~

-,-, - -,-

The Classic May1993

Time out for Intramurals

3

Journalism conference examines press coverage of local schools . beat upon the press ..It's even better because they're (journalists] here today." After the film and opening speeches, the forum began. Seven panelists consisting of journalists and educators answered questions from the audience regarding the media's role in education. Several heated arguments erupted during the two-hour forum. Mr. Diaz opened the forum by asking, "Chancellor Fernandez claims the press threw him out of office. What is your opinion?" Lynnell Hancock, an education reporter at the Daily News stated that that is a "gross exaggeration," and Edna Negron, an education reporter atNewsday, agreed with Ms. Hancock. However, Carol Gresser, a member of the New York City Board of Education, whose swing vote forced Fernandez out of office, disagreed. "If in fact I was the swing vote , then I can't say we should blame the newspapers because I didn't base my vote on what I read in the newspapers," she said. Ms. Gresser was recently elected President of the Board of Education. A majority of the audience felt that there was not enough press coverage on the public school system. They believed that the press only chooses to write about the negative aspects of the New . York City public school system. Ms. Negron complained that "as ajournalist, I know that it is very difficult to get into the schools. The principals have this perception that the coverage will be negative. Now I go straight to the parents because they are the only ones who tell the truth." In response to Ms . Negron's complaint, a Queens College journalism student in the audience presented a challenge to Negron: "I challenge you to cover this conference," she stated. At times, audience members and panelists digressed from the topic . In an effort to return to the topic, Townsend Harris junior and journalist for The Classic Francine Rich, asked, "what exactly is the media's role in public education? What is its responsibility?" After the forum , President Kenny said in her closing remarks, "Today we really listened to one another, but we must listen to the students because they are our story. "

Letters to the Editor (continued) Tyran ny of referrals To the Editor: Let us take a minute to ponder the problems of society: drugs, crim e, poverty, lack of values. Funny , I don't see loitering in the hall or going to your locker at the wrong time [listed among those problems]. The first group of problems are the woes of society, those that are detrimental to all of us and ... lower our standard of living. The second group are some of the woes ofTownsend Harris that members of the faculty so eagerly wish to obliterate. Their goals are noble : uphold idealistic values and keep Townsend Harris the utopian island among city high schoo ls it was designed to be. That's just great, but on whose back are they building their utopian school? We all know the answer: the students of Townsend Harris.

rights now except to make a whole-hearted plea to a person whose job it is to make sure our character flaws are recorded in the form ofreferrals. In the workings are many plans to give the... victims of this corrupt system some rights to appeal . Among the plans are an appeal,process including mediation between studentand teacher. Most of all,what we hope for is cooperation and understanding.... It is the character and future of the students...that is on the line. Too many students fear that when they walk in the school, there is a firing squad waiting to assassinate their char acter. This should not be in a school that prides itself on good behavior and a student body with good values . Let's work together to end this tyranny and bring more justice to our schoo l. Together we can set a good example for the future ... and build a real utopia. Jesse Strauss

CORRECTION: In the January 1993 Issue, the Intrarriurals basketball article was written by Ian Katz.


'"

4

.,.

. ...

0>

....

...

.."

.~

'0,'

..

o~

'. '

'..

.....

,~

~

.,.

'Il:

.....

"'

The Classic May1993

Teens contemplate future on Career Day by Wendy Kemp Future. To many teenagers, that concept sends chills up and down the spine . They don't wan t to think about the world twenty years from now, when there is no more time for video games arid goofmg off, when they, the youths of today, are in charge of what happens to the world tomorrow. However, step s have been taken to ease those fears and inform the students of Townsend Harris about multitudes of career opportunities. On the morning of March 26, lawyers, doctors, journalists, engineers, and other professionals could be seen entering the doors of the school. Their purpose was to make known to the pupils the powers and perils of modem day careers. " A colle ge education does not guarantee a job," said Angel Caraballo, a counselor from Queensboro Comm unity Colle ge, who talked to students about different field s of engineerin g. He spoke about ho w important both math and science are in the field of engineering. "E ngineers [ are the ones who] design replacement par ts for the body," said Mr. Carabal lo. "But the techni cians are the ones who actually make them." Thi s is ironic, he explained, beca use "math and science are not required to mu ch [ of an ] extent for a techni cian. " Investigative reporter Joe Calderone has worked for Newsday for over ten years. According to Mr. C alderone, journalism is a highly competitive field, with rivalries between newspapers and reporters. If they become tired of their

area of expert ise, such as sports or Mr. Strauss also po inted out that feature, reporters are allowed to switch television portrays only criminal lawover to another field. Alth ough in yers, and makes their career s appear general, journalists do not have high very glamorous. "You have to underpaying wages, they usually have regu- stand, not everything in the law field is lar hours. However, for special events always honorable, espec ially when you like the World Trade Center bombing, deal with'the government." He added the whole staff goes to work. that "crirninallaw is only a small corMr. Calderone told students about ner of the field. Law, as a whole, is less his life as someone who m ust dig for than 1% criminal." facts in order to hit the pay dirt." ReOne student asked if many criminals porters need to be skeptical of what exact revenge on the prosecutors who they say and hear," he said, "Other- pu t them away. "It's very rare but it has wise they [might] end up printing things happened," Mr. Strauss admitted. Law is not the only subject glamorthat are not true." When asked by freshman Rebecca Mandell ifhe has to ized on television. The police profescover many dangerous stories , he re- sion is often glorified to some extent as plied, " I covered the Crown Hei ghts well. Detective Marquees of the New and World Trade Center incidents. York Police Departrnentrevealed some Risks and excitement are part of the information about being a cop .. There are a lot of benefits , including unlimfun ." Another guest speaker. was Jim ited paid sick leave. When asked how Strauss, who talked about the adv an- long a cop could " be sick," the detectages and disadvan tages of bein g a tive rep lied with a smi le, "You can stay lawyer. The bes t part , in his opinion, is out for as long as you can stay sick." When you are at the age of 16 1(2, "the satis fac tion of knowing your way around the sys tem and being able to do you are eligible to take a test in order to something for your community. The get a job on the police force. If you pass bigges t disadv antages," he said, "are the test, then the police department the long hour s and all the rese arch will hold ajob for you when you are 20. needed to remain on top of cases." Taking the test is not not a commitWhen asked how many cases he ment. If yo u pass, you have no obligahandles at one time, Mr. Strauss re- tion to become a cop. "When I reach the age of being eliplied that sometimes he actually has 75 gible to take the test, I will probably do cases at once. According to Mr . Strauss, when he it so that I have a back- up career in went to law school, there were seven . case there is no job that I can get, " one women in his class. Outofthose seven, sophomore male said. Physical therapy is another career only three of them graduated. "Now," he stated "the [ number of ] female option. Since physical therapists are applicants to law school exceeds the very much in demand, they are being imported to the United States from males."

other countries. Because of their scar city, the job is relatively high paying. Barbara Schad has been a physical therapist at Bellvue Hospital for over 20 years. "I decided to explore [physical therapy] because I [would] be part of a clinical team and the education wouldn't take very long," she said. Although physical therapy was notvery popular when she started her career, it is becoming more popular. "[The profession] has just blossomed," she said. According to the state, physical therapy isdefmed as the "educational treat ment of a disability using physical and chemical methods." When asked by a student whetherchildren or adults need physical therapy more often, Ms. Schad replied, " I think it's about equal, but [lately] older adults have been trying to get a more productive lifestyle. People are a lot fitter these day s, and we are needed [although] everywhere...we're working a lot with the elderl y. Eugenia Krauser whose dau ghter s Natalie and Vanessa attend Townsend Harris, talked about stud ying foreign language s and explained how language is related to different cultures . " When you learn a lan guage, you also learn tha t culture," she said. "You owe it to yourself to do do the bes t you can when studying a forei gn language." M s. Krauser first began her speech with a joke. She asked wha t you call people who know two languages and then what to call people who know three languages. The answers are "bilingual" and "trilingual." Then she asked someone what to call someo ne who only knows one language. No, the

answer is not simply "lingual" - you call these people "Americans"! Many of the guest speakers had a lot to say about college. A lot of students go in to coll ege without the right preparation for taking classes," said Mr. Caraballo. "They either change their majors [halfway] through, or graduate withoutamajorandnotdo well [in the outside world]." Also speaking to students was retired Townsend Harris social studies teacher Michael Manson. He talked about careers in both education and the military. A retired captain of the navy, Dr.Manson served in the Korean War. Afterward, when he began to teach junior high, it was a big change. "It took me three years to figure out which [job] I liked better," he quipped. About the military, Dr. Manson said that it is very hard to get into .an academy nowadays. " Just to get accepted into an academy, you will probably need a grade point average of 95-96," he said. Dr. M anson explained that teachers who teach kindergarten through high schoo l normally get around the same salary. Nowadays, a masters degree is required in order to become a teacher, and according to him, "you don 't get paid a lot, but you don't starv e either." Th e bes t thing about bein g a teacher, he explained, is that yo u work with what is to be the future world. " You can see the rewards of your teaching," Dr.Manson said "through the students you teach."

Members ofThe Classic Enrichment helped to research this article.

Columbia conference draws aspiring journalists by Allison Brant and Gina Tufaro Professionals in the field ofjournalism, staff advisors, and high school students from across the nation me t at Columbia University on March 17-19 for the annual Columb ia Scholastic Press Association conference, Classic reporters Allison Brant and Robert Kim, freshm en, and Gina Tufaro, sophomore, represented Townsend Harris. Here, participants were given oppo rtunities to listen to lec tures, share problems, and play an active role in journalistic matters. Varied workshops, in which par ticip ation was encouraged, were held throughout the three days The workshops tackled a broad spectrum of topics ranging from newsp aper critiques to creating the "perfect" yearbook. Th e

workshops started on the hour and ran for approximately 50 minutes. Speakers for each class were either professionals or newspaper/yearbook advisors from high schools across the Uni ted States.

''This conference was a great opportunity for everyone to get regenerated," said Mary Johns on, a speaker from Montgomery, Alabama. Although several of the students agree that the classes have remained the same fro m year to year, they also confmn that helpful "hin ts" were readily available. "I've been here for the last three years and the workshops are basically the same," commented Laura Sowers of Chan tilly, Virginia," but I have noticed certain.beneficial trends developing

Vocabulary Month challenges savants Staff members who contributed to the official list offered a variety of reasons for selecting certain words. Of the three word s supplied by Program Coordinator Arthur Boulan ger, his favorite is scrofulous. "I chose scrofulous because I like the way it sounded . The word intrigued me, so I eventually looked it up," he said. Math teacher Joseph Hom contibuted his favorite word, syzygy. ''This word is associated with astronomy, which is abig interest of mine. Syzygy is also a great word for Scrabble. You can score a lot of points with the z's," said Mr. Hom Principal Malcolm G. Largmann chose the word

in yearbook design." Students attended the conference for many reasons. "I came to improve my skills in the area of newspaper production," said Dan Cross, News Editor at Churchhill High School in San Antonio, Texas. "To be honest with you, I just came to the conference to see New York. I mean, who would pass up the chance to go the B ig Apple?" said Brenda Starkin of Richmond, Virginia. For a lot of attendees, the high point of the conference was meeting people from allover the United States. "I've never seen so many people from all over," stated Stacey Wilmer of Little Rock, Arkansas. 'The conference was great."

.'

(continued from page 1)

"riba ld," which means "course" or "vulgar." He said, "Ribald is one of the many small words that appe ar in literature. Students usually tend to be able to defi ne large words ; however, they often don't know how to define short words. Ribald is also a very useful term for criticism, perhaps of a play or TV show.' Assistant Principal Malcolm Rossman contributcd two words, one of which was savant. Mr. Rossman explains, "Most people associate this word with an idiot savant. However, a savant represents someone with extraordinary skills. That really impresses me."

Librarian Val erie Billy donated the word "alcov e." "During the orientation trip to the Queens Co llege library, ther e are many references to the law alcove . On e year , when questioned, some students looked blank as to wh at an alcove is. That day, when I wenthome,I asked my children, wh o were in high school and junior high school, if they knew what the word meant. They did not know either! So, I thought it was a word that everyone should know," Ms. Billy explained. Ms. Greenfield summed up the purpose of Vocabulary Month: "The words tend to be words that students don't know, so through this event

we 're fillin g in the missing gaps." Those who received perfe ct scores on the Vocabulary Challenge are: Rhonda Alexander, Alee ma Bacchus , Che ryl Bureck, Emlyn Chen, Gerrie Cho , Marlin Chu, David Co rporan, Sarah Courtney, Je ssica Cruz, Marlon Daniela, Nada Elkhashab, Lina Kim, Susana Kozer, Eric Kurzrock, Andrew Mallios, Alison Moy, Bibi Mukherjee, Tim Nolan, Kimberly Olino, Daniel Reinkopf, Nicolas Skafidas, Joseph Spak, Jessica Steinmetz, Susan Stewart, Veronica Tom, Diana Tuite, Joy Warren, Ron Zaidman, Steven Zaliha, Shimin Zheng, and Brett Zuckerman.


. :'

The Classic May1993

5

Stars shine on International Night by Joseph Cahill ence to be offended by what might be entella" with grace and fluidity, him into the air. The cultural heritage of our diverse considered 'suggestive' movements in Dancers ofan Israeli "Hora" included During three Greek dances, '"Tsarniko," "Pentozali," student body was celebrated at the an- some cultures ." and "Hasapiko," stuSome students reacted nual International Night. The even t, which took place on March 18 in the negatively to this appar dents disp layed some cafe torium, was sponsored by the ent censorship . Still , the acrobatic skills and pride Fore ign Language Department. Stu- festive mood was res tored in Gre ek Independence dents actively participated in all parts by the Spanish song, Day. With her tap-dance from the musical "Crazy of the festive program, while the Pl'A "Mambru Se Fue a La for You," junior Trina aided in organizing the dessert buffet, Guerra" in which junior Cabrijan represen ted whose theme was "Festival ofNations Ron Carroll wore a footAmerican culture. 1993: Continuing Multicultural Tradi- ball (warrior's) helmet Performances intions in the U.S .A." and did his rendition of cluded poetry and art as The evening's program was similar whatappeared to be a fight well. The poem "Black to that of last year. According to Joan scene from "The Three Power," read by junior Walsh, Assistant Principal of the For- Stooges." Danett Bean, held great The evening was full of eign Lan guage Department, the show consisted of "song, dance, poetry and dancing. Bibi Mukherjee emotion and drew attention from the crowd. Junliterature representing not only the Ian- perfo rmed the "Tarana," ior Susan Stewartrecited guages taught in the school, Spanish, a class ical Indian dance. "Las Rendondillas," a French, Latin, Gree k, Japanese and The Indian Festiv al dance poem from an early German, but also all ethnic ities and "Holi" featured multiSpanish feminist. 'The cultures of the student population." colored dus t.The Chinese Right to Pursue Beauty" Most of the event was well -organ- " Silver Plate Dance" feawas recited by junior ized and without problems. However, turedperformers showing DISIllNG UP A SLICE OF CIllNESE CULTURE,juniors Judy Shimin Zheng in Chithere was a controversy over what offtheir concentrationand Chang, Anita Cheung and Mary Tsai perform a Chinese plate dance nese. Several individuhappened during the Spanish dances, skill by balancing plates at the Festival of Nations. als recited Native "Salsa" and "Merengue," The curtain ') on their open palms even American poetry and literature. The Principal Malcolm Largmann in their was closed after the first dance be- when they turned their hands upside Japanese class performed to the acperformance. He sat in a chair in the cause Ms. Walsh "did not want any down. Girls in long, twirling dresses of "Koto Music," and companiment middle of the circle and dancers lifted members of our multicultural audi- performed the Italian dance "The Tar-

Women's voices heard, celebrated ,by ~jana Tuite

In celebration of Women's History Month, women's words, thoughts and emotions resounded within the library on March 30. "Women's Words," hosted by Assistant Principal of the Humanities Lynne Greenfield, con sisted of recitations of works by, for and about women. The presentation commenced with a video of Henrik Ibsen's play, "The Doll House," in which the heroine wants to be treated as men's equal. This play, explained Ms. Greenfield, marked the start ofthe women's movement and the slam ofthe door at the end of the scene shown was "a slam heard 'round the world." In response to Ibsen's play, SusanB . Anthony wrote "A Woman's Right to Suffrage." This piece, read by sophomore Daniela Coleman, charged that denying women the right to vote was unconstitutional. Juni or Alegre Busetti followed with a reading of the face tious essay "I Want a Wife," by Judy Syfers . The speaker views marriage as a means of acquiring a servant. One line , capturing this chauvinistic attitude, reads, "I want a wife who will not bother me with rambling complaints about a wife's duties," The program turn ed to the more serious with a reading of "Ain't I a Woman?" by Sojurner Truth. Fresh man Ruby Chan emphasized that the subject of the poem, a female slave, faced prejudice on two fronts . FreshmenWendy Chan and EunJung

Kim cop1piIl(d a variety of historical her lover. In "My Mother," written by quotations about women and their role Jane Taylor and recited by juniors in society. They quoted former British Aleema Bacchus, Brannie Jones, DiPrime Minister Margaret Thatcher as ana Tuite and Kristy Yu, the narrator saying, "In politics, if you want any- thanks his mother for being a comfort. Taking a different approach, one thing said, ask a man. If you want group interacted with the audience. anything done, ask a woman." AcWhile juniors Robyn Herman, Sally cording to the pair, former First Lady Magdi and Yat-Ming Wong read Nancy Reagan made a striking state"Chant for Dark Hours" by Dorothy ment about the female constitution. Parker, sophomore Natasha Netto ilMs. Reagan once said, "A woman is lustrated the message of the poem by like a tea bag. You never know how pointing at boys around the room. All strong she is until she gets in hot wajoined in for the last line, "All your life ter ." , "Shameless Hussy," read by fresh- you wait around for some damn man!'" Kristina Olson read two untitled man Cheryl Ryder and written by Alta, poems by Hispanic writer Sor Juana dealt with a woman's growing accep• Ines de la Cruz. tance of her gender. Initially whisperThe Bnrichmenr'culminated in a ing the words "I'm female and I'm montage of movie clips taped from the proud," the charactereventually shouts 65th Anuual Academy Awards. In them.

Exploring women's literary legacy, some students from English teacher Paula Weyne's Live Poetry elective deliveredoral interpretations of poems. Juniors Yadiera Brown, Wade Gallagher and Anietra Guzman and sophomore Beth Mellow staged a recitation of"Lisa,"by Constance Carr ier. In this poem, a young girl who is "alone yet not lonely," shields herself from the rest of the world. Junior Yolanda Brown and sophomore Violet Ostafin presented "Aunt Jane" by Alden Nowlan. Later,juniors Susana Kozer and Linea Vega and sophomore Effi Menachemi recited a translation of an untititled Spanish poem. In this piece, poet Rosalia Castro addresses a woman neglected by

exposed the audience to sword-wield ing Samauri. A martial arts demonstration featured Shotokan forms from the Japanese m artial art of Karate, take downs , and board-breaking demons trations. The finale , "Coming to America", featured all performers. All 'foreign language teachers were invo lved in putting toge ther International Night. Until recently, the PTA had co-sponsored and International Night by setting up a desse rt buffe t. Sam Hess, CoPresident of the PfA, stressed the importance of student involvement. He had believed that there would be a greate r emphasis on the program than on the dessert, lessening the role of the YfA.Mr.Hess said, "About three years ago, the focal point was the food and the entertainment was secondary." He believed that the way to make the event a success was to increase attendance and interest. Concerrting parental involvement, Mr. Hess said , "It's individual parents that really supply the goodies." Both Ms . Walsh and Mr. Hess asserted that success for the evening hinged on student involvement.

Barcelona bound:

Group crosses language barriers by Olga Mazyuk & Brannle Jones

to Madrid, stopping off at the Basilira de Pilar and the towering La Seo Cathedral in Zaragosa. In Madrid, students shopped at the Puerta del Sol, the equivalent ofTimes Square. There, they viewed the works of artists El Greco, Velasquez, and Gova in the El Prado museum. During their journey down to Seville, students went sightseeing to Cordoba, where orange and palm trees welcomed them. They visited La Mezquita which became a Christian place of worship in 1236. While cruising by moonlight down the Gadalquir River in Seville. students watched Flamenco dancers. "I liked shopping at the Plaza de Santa Cruz in Seville because walking around every comer was like going through a maze," said junior Lauren Mazzara. On their way to the Costa del Sol, students stopped to enjoy the scenic view of Ronda, "the Cradle o('Bullfighting ," 'The scenery was beautiful," said junio,r Janet Stork. "I can't believe we were standing in the oldest bullfighting ring ." :; ~' Some students spent their final ~., day in Spain on the beach of the Costa del Sol, while others visited Alhambra, a Moorish £ palace known for its breathtaking gardens in Grenada. ''The whole trip was an experience I will never forget. It was SOPHOMORES JENNIl;'ER BERSAMIN AND STAFANiA"IfEiNrseekfor a great!" said juniorStacy Saieva. suitable spot to capture the essence of Seville, Spain.

Twenty-three students who spent April 2-11 touring the exotic cities of sunny Spain made cultural, social and culinary adjustments. From the Gothic quarters of Barcelona, to the cathedrals of Zaragosa, to the beaches along the Costa del Sol, "Coast of the Sun," they appreciated the landscape. Spanish teacher Ilene Marcus accompanied the students on this third annual trip. She was assisted by parents Sharon Christian, the mother of sophomore, Alayna Casanova, and Marie Mazzara, the mo ther of junior, Lauren Mazzara. This year's $1,402 itinerary was no different from that of the past. "I choose which cities to visit by locat ion, and by events," said Ms. honor of ''The Year of the Woman," Marcus. these clips highlighted famous roles "I liked Barcelona the best because I portrayed by women in film . loved the Gothic architecture of the Stacey Winkler contributed to this narrow streets," said junior Becky Lee. article. From Barcelona, students ventured

~

t

--,---,-,-----

.;.~

\


.. ,

6

The Classic May1993

': illlfaii:'~f!~l~jt')tlrMt

:~lli1il"lr"

Faculty undergoes mid-year addition, change by Jennifer Chin Several staff members have changed positions, or have switched from part-time to full time jobs this spring. and Townsend Harris also welcomed some new arrivals. Physical Education teacher Larry Ceraulo is one of those who have changed positions. now serving as Assistant Dean. He said he saw the need for another dean, as Wanda Nix was " swamped" with work. He feels that there are both positive and negative aspects to being dean. He can become acquainted with the students on a one-on-one basis ,but he doesn' t enjoy "disciplining" students, and doesn't like "to be seen as the authoritative figure in the school." He also misses teaching gym, although he does instruct a class of Townsend Harris seniors at Queens College. Craig Buchalter is taking Mr. Ceraulo's place as a physical education teache r in the high school building. He arrived at the beginning of the new term from John Bowne High School in Hushing. He enjoyed working at Bowne, but also enjoys working here. "At Townsend Harris, I can do more teaching and worry less about behavior problems," he said. Are the students here more fit compared to those at Bowne? "That's a tough ques tion. In general, for their age group. students

door is always open to everyone," she at Townsend Harris are no more or no less fit than said students at Bowne," he said. Dime Tregerman served as the secreOnce the part-time band conductor, Adam tary for Assistant Princ ipal of OrganizaAlter is now teaching full-time at Townsend tion Malcolm Rossman until April 1, when Harris. A professional clarinetist and saxophone Jayne Irene returned from a leave. Alplayer, he teaches music appreciation and linthough her position was only temporary. guistics as well as band. He fmds that teaching she plans to con tinue to work here on aper full-time is "more steady," and he hopes that this diem basis, and hopes to return next year. job will be permanent. He fmds music appreciaShe loves working at Townsend Harris, tion to be extremely enjoyable. "It's a good way and says she fmds the faculty "devoted to inflictmy opinions,"he said. He was surprised and warm," and the students "educationto find himself as a linguistics teacher. "I learn oriented." more about language from Ms. [Debra] MichIeSchool aides Maureen Kaiser and Marwitz than I probably learned in college," he ian Rutigliano are also newcomers. Ms. said. Rutigliano arrived here at Townsend HarMillie Toivenen recently became a secretary ris in February as a school aide. She works in the guidance office. She first began her work j on the Queens College campus with the here as a school aide in 1984. In 1986, she >. 'or> seniors. She can be found in the student became a paraprofessional, then went back to lounge, dealing with transportation passes, school to get a secretarial license with the encourattendance, lateness, studentmail, and stuagement of Shiela Orner, Assistant Principal of dent communication. Ms . Kaiser said this Guidance. Observing the motivation of students is her first job " in a whi le." She originally NEW GYM TEACHER Craig Buchalter instructs atTownsend Harrisalsoencouragedhertoreturn worked as a clerk at the Department of his class . to school. To obtain a license, she had to take a Social Security, but wanted a job which test consisting of three parts. She has the same gave her the summer off to be with her duties now as she had before she got her license, family. She says she is very pleased with her only now she has the formal title of "secretary." Townsend Harris. "I see the people in guidance position at Townsend Harris . She believes that "guidance is the heartbeat of as a group of concerned, caring people....The

~.

t

New Enrichments spring into second term by Lulza Glrlea Shall We Dance, Humor in America, Advanced Chamber Music, and the Disney Film Festival are new Enrichment programs introduced into the curriculum this spring. The Shall We Dance? Enrichment, supervised by Coordinator of Student Activities Judy Biener came about after Spanish teacher Ilene Marcus advised juniors Lisa Brando and Trina Cabrijan to organize a dance Enrichment. Ms . Marcus had spotted them performing at a tap dancing workshop on Founder's Day in November. The two girls , who have numerous years of dance training, agreed to it and now they instruct a class of 32 girls. "More people showed up for this Enrichment than I would have anticipated, but I also wasn' t surprised that they were all girls ," said Trina. Th e class is divided into groups of beginners, intermediates, and advanced. This Enrichment focuses mainly on theatrical or Bro adway-style dancing. For now, the girls are concentrating on the basic steps and movements of balle t. Natal ie Krauser, a junior and danc er, stated, "I joined this class because I knew I'd be able to work on my own pieces for an extra two hours a week. Both Trina and Lisa have been accommodating to my needs." If all goes well there may be a performance in June. "It's really a lot of fun being here, I've always wanted dancing lessons so here's my chance. It' s

an hour, it's during school hours, and it's convenient," said sopho- student musicians beyond what is possible in a regular classroom more Eleni Bardis. setting. Mr.Alter stated that "certain students were unable to take Humor in America is instructed by Assistant Principal of Or- music classes and I wanted to work with them." 'The flute is a ganization Malcolm Rossman, who has taught this class as an beautiful instrument and I want to practice playing it so I can elective in other schools. The class deals with diverse types of continue to perfect my skill. " said sophomore Tali Dittman. The humor found in literature ano film and associated with renowned group is presently working on Brahm's Clarinet Sonata and people. "It's interesting [though] some ofthe humoris pretty stale. Bach's Double Concerto for two violins. "I love the idea of But Mr. Rossman does have some good jokes," said freshman hanging out in Townsend Harris High School hallways, playing Teresa Grecseck. So far, they have examined Hal Holbrook's music and having Leroy throw money at me and also having portrayal of Mark Twain, the songs of Tom Lehrer, a folk singer freshm en laugh at me who don't understand the art I'm performin the 1960's, and the work of Stan Freberg, a satirist who wrote ing," said junior Jennifer Borden. many commercials, including the TV ad for Encyclopedia BritanThe most popular offering of the term, the Disney Film Festival, nica. resulted in 300 applicants. Only 40 could be accepted into this new Vanessa Morales, sophomore, feels that " it's fun and the work class supervised by French teacher M ariet D'Souza. 'The ide a of is interesting. Mr. Rossman is really funny , so it makes me enjoy a Disney Film Enrichment came abou t when Beauty and the Beast the class even more. It 's the best Enrichment I've joined so far." . was viewed by students in the Musical Films class during the fall When asked what he hopes to have taught the students by the end term and it had an overwhelmingly positive reponse. I feel that of the term , Mr. Rossman replied , "Basically, that a lot of times Disney films appeal to the child in us. We can identify many of the we're laughing at something we can learn from . Also, to make us characters with people around us. Their mov ies are abso lutely brilaware of things we normally wouldn't have noticed tha t humo r liant," stated Ms . D'Souza. Alice in Wonderland, Mary Poppins, makes us aware of." The Little Mermaid, and Fan/asia will all be shown. "I like the old Anotherrecent Enrichment, Advanced ChamberMusic, stemmed Disney films , and it's fun, relaxing way to enjoy Enrichment," from music teacher Adam Alter 's desire to work with various said junior Julianne Fisher.

a

Math Team masters problem-solving by Laura H um mel What is the last dig it in 7 I OO? Problems such as these, aimed at increasing students' mathematical abilities, have been tackled by the members of the Math Team. Coached by math teacher John Brown, the group of approximately 56 students has achieved nume rous vic tories this year . So far, competition scores have improved with each competition. In the second state competition of the year, junior Daniel Hwang scored a perfect six. In the third state com petition. junior team members Joseph Cahil l, Nada Elkashab, Jon Jannicola, Daniel Hwan g and Chris tine Trilivas scored fives along with sophomore Jan a Zielonk a. In the first city competition of the second term, onl y two schoo ls scored higher than Townsend

Harris. Also, Math Team members participated in the AHSME, a test designed to challenge the mathematical ability of the student. Juniors Tim Nolan and Daniel Hwang both received a score of 277 , three points away from an honorable mention. In addition to being on our Math Team, Tim and Daniel are also members of the NYC Math Team. On Saturday, Apr il, 24, they par ticipated in amath competition. Althoughindividual scores are not given to each par ticipant, Tim Nolan feels that he did his bes t in the relay questions, answe ring both correctly. All in all, Tim feels that this experience "was quite a day ." The Math Team elec ted Zhi Wang as Junior Captain, Roger Belli n as Sophomore Captain, Ray Lay as Freshman Captain and Jennifer Ng as the Math Team Manager who acts as a recordkeeper of scores . Accord ing to Mr. Brown, elected

officials must be both hard-working and act ive, but not necessarily the best scorers on the team. In order to be on the Math Team , studen ts don't necessarily have to exce l in classroom mathematics. "People who normally do well in math don't always do well on the Math Team," said Mr. Brown. "After tackling the problems on the Ma th Team. the SAT math section seems so much easier," said junior Chris tine Trilivas. "M ath Team challenges your mind. You see an example tha t' s really hard and you do n 't think you can get it. When you figure it out it's the best feeling in the worl d," said sophomore Stefania Heim .

~. j

~

t TAKING A BREAK FROM EQUATIONS. Math Team members Doris Chin, Roge r Bellin, Judy Chang , Shimin Zheng and Bibi Mukherjee chat with advisor John Brown.


,

.....

\

". '

..

\

...

I

.f'

I

...

,

. ,.

I

.~

I

.;

...

\

'..

,

"I." .,

,

,

..

~

'

,;,

_....

~

..

' .'

'.

...,......

' ;.0

..

...

1

' .'

,

.,•

• ,

. ,

' .'

l , '

. .•

.• , ., ....., 'r, .. , .. . " , .., ...,

"

The Classic May1993

7

Peers mediate, plead for peace by Gina Tufaro the problem occurred. Themediatorthenallows,theparticipants to willing to take a stand against conflicts." Providing students with a forum to peacefuly settle disputes, engage in brain-storming for solutions. Finally.a solution agreeAlthough all but one of the students trainees have not yet adminis trators have introduced peermediation and negotiation able to both parties is proposed and a written agreement is drawn mediated an actual case, they hope to become official school to the curriculum. Coordinators for these programs include guid- up . med iators. ance counselor James Murray , Coordinator of Student A~tivities In negotiation, the only ones involved are those directly affected Several selected students also attended an outside peer Judy Biener, and Dean Wanda Nix. Peer mediation began in the by the dispute. The two parties try to reach a solution alone, and mediation course in March . fall. without resorting to violence. " Peer mediation allows us [students] to contribute to solving While peer mediation and negotiation share the same ultimate , Peer mediation has already been a part of the school program. problems," commented sophomore Mariella Martinez, who is , purpose resolv ing conflicts they still possess differences, Peer Mr. Murray , coordinator of current morning peer mediation ses- involved in both the inside and outside mediation programs. . mediation, often referred to as-conflict-resolution, invQlyes three sions, said that "Peer mediation is present in all schools as a Ms. Biener will -also be holding a mediation class during lunch parties. In addition to the two conflicting parties , a neUiral fuedia- resJX.>nse to-the growing awareness ofviolence ." Receiving spe- ' periods . "Having students involved in this [mediation] is defitor is involved.Together, their objective is to reach a sOlution. The cialized training in the field ofmediation has enabled Mr. Murray nitely a worthwh ile experience," she said . . mediato r sits between those involved and states the ground rules. to'lead this group, meeting every Tuesday morning at 7:30 AM. The school is also considering integrating lessons on negotiation The parties are then asked if they understand fully the reason they , "Many Iriembers are also involved in Students Against Violence in linguistics, family living, and law classes. are there, the rules previouslystated, 3I)d the purpose of the - Injusticeand Guns (SAVINGS). Mr.Murray believes that "having 'mediator; The parties, one at a time, discuss thesituation and why ; students in both groups shows the student body that their peers are

Kemp' named winner • Ethnicity stressed In multiculturalism in story competition

by Veronica Lee Poise. Does the storyteller appear to be relaxed? Merrwrization. by Sarah Tremml mendations, but they also will be able to apply. However, they Does the participant know the story by heart? Communication. Is Under the terms of two grants awarded by the Queens Superin- , must understand that these meetings are after school and they are there proper pronunciaton, pacing, and eye contact? On the basis tendent's Office, money will be devoted to staff and student multi- making a comm itment," said Ms. Walsh. Members of the Staff! of these and other criteria, judges selected Wendy Kemp, sophocultural development. Thanks to the propos als submitted by Student Development Commi ttee are as follows: Dr. Largmann, more, as the school winner in the 16th Annual School Storytellin g Assistant Principal of the Humanities Lynne Greenfield and Mr. Rossman, Ms. Appel, Ms. Walsh, Ms. Billy , Mr. Murray, Mr. Contest on February 25. Sophomore Jennifer Tam and freshman Assistant Principal of Foreign Language Joan Walsh, new library Morales, Ms. Marcus, Mr. Stessel, Ms. Mandell, Mr. Jones, and Rena Varghese tied for second place . resources will also be provided. Ms . Rotter . Students on the committee are Maryum Khwaja, 1voryThe judges, Librarian and contest coordinator Valerie Bill y, Pro, Ms. Walsh, who drew up the first.grant proposal, said it entails Gleaton, Mariella Martinez, Sally Magdi, Stephanie Strajcher, gram Chairman Arthur Boulanger, Assistant Principal of Humani"increasing sensitivity toward current issues confronting diverse Donna Weiss, Matt Goldstein, Andre Khan, Ishle Ye Park, and ties Lynne Greenfield, Assistant Principal of Pupil Personne l ethnic groups representa tive of New York City high school popu - Mary Tsai. All of the above students are also on the Multi -Cultural Services Sheila Orner, and English teacher Helen Rizzuto , lisCommittee, and some are on the Council of Unity . tened to the students recite their stories, which were each approxilations." " i In an effort to convey their message in a "fun and interesting" Using work produced from these meetings, Ms. Walsh and other mately eight to ten minutes long, in the library during Enrichment, way, administrators have organized group sessions after school. supervis ors hope to collaborate with students to publish a maga - Wendy, who was also last year's schoo l, as well as borough, Three have already met; one that Was centered around a Muslim zine. "As part of the grant, at the end of the session, both students story-telling champion, recited TheSeawoman by Kevin Crossleyhr.') theme on March 30, one that was 'centered on 'an Asian theme on ' and teachers must respond in writing to essay questions centered Holland. TheSeawoman is a story about the love between a man April22,andonewhichwas centered around a Hispanic m'tdBlack onthe theme. Hopefully, we will have a big enough variety of and a seawoman, and their life adventures . theme on April 29. There will be one on May I I which will center responses to be encorpo rated into a magazine," stated Ms. Walsh . Rena's story, TheTalking Tree by Inna Rayersky, was about a on an Indian theme. The last and fmal seminar will be a cross- Also, all sessions have been videotaped, and will be used in future king's quest to find the "Talking Tree" to add to his personal religious group, in an attempt to get different perspectives in order lessons in order to make the rest of the school community aware collection. Jennifer recited TheLivingKuanYen by Carol Wendal of these issues . and Y 30-Wen Li. In this story, a poor man searches for an answer to heighten others ' awareness of the people around them. Ms. Walsh said that the meetings were a huge success so far. A second grant, enti tled the "Multi-cultural Initiative Grant," to his problems. She explains, "I expected this to be an excellent learning experi- : will pay for new library supplies. Librarian Valarie Billy hopes to When asked about any pressure or difficulty during the contest, ence, and it should be fun for teachers and students to learn expand the school's supply of fiction by Asian, Hispanic, African Rena said, "I like the nervous feeling." Wendy said, "l like telling together as colleagues." At these meetings, students, teachers and ' and Middle Eastern authors. One such book the school has already stories to people who have never heard them. Watching their reoutside presentors work to make others aware of different social purchased is a collection of short stories by Gabrielle Garcia Mar- actions is fun." and cultural customs. quez, entitledNoOne Writes to the Colonel. Enrichmentactivities The Storytelling Contest, held every year, is open to all students "These places will be filled with children from teachers' recom- will also be scheduled for presentations made by guest speakers. in grades three to ten. ~,

.

Ballet comes to Colden: Bilinqual Olymics Latest in series of performances by PhylUs Pei to appeal to a variety of audiences. As part of a Through a three-year project with Colden Center, cultural collage, Simon Shakeen's Near East students and faculty can enjoy a series ofQueens Ensemble, The World Kulintang Arts Ensemble College Cultural Grant performances. On March and DharataNatyam's Dancers of Indiapresented 21, the third installation will feature the New the New American Concert Series. Students could York City Ballet in a tribute to Fred Astaire and also obtain free tickets to the performances. During the next two years, students will get an Ginger Rogers. A few months ago,representatives from Colden opportunity to peek behind the scenes. AccordCenter asked Assistant Principal ofthe Humani- ing to Ms. Greenfield, they will be able to meet ties Lynne Greenfie ld and Assostant Principal of performers and view the performing arts from a Sciences Susan Appel if they would be interested different perspective. Ms. Greenfield believes that Colden's extenin a program showcasing musical and cultural sion of their cultural events to the school talents. Within recen t months, students also attended a stems from the realization that youths will one concert by pianis t Vladrnir Feltzman and one day comprise their target audience. "In twenty with cellist Lynn Harrell, accompanied by pian- years, when the current generation is no longer ist Yefim Branfman The schoo l was allotted five going to theaters and concerts, appreciation for hundred tickets for each of these events receive d these arts will not end...One of the greatest gifts we can receive is love of music and art," she 200 for the ballet. In booking these performances, organizers hoped said.

by J enn ifer Chin French, Korean, Spanish and Chinese speakers . comprised a mosaic of cultures at the Bilingual Oratory Olympics on March 11 in the cafetorium. The winners are as follows: juniors Steve Chung and Daniel Hwang for Korean, juniors Steve Chung and Zhi Wang for Chinese (Mandarin), Jennifer Tam and junior Teresa Tse for Chinese (Cantonese), junior Sean Dougherty for French, and junior Susan Stewart, sophomore Antonio Martinez and junior Sandra Rodriguez for Spanish. ; Three or four different students per language, supervised by a faculty advisor, judged their peers' readings. Both contestants and judges, who had to be fluent in the language they chose, participated on a voluntary basis .' Winners will go on to a borough-wide contest. "I loved it!1 thought it was a great experience," said Spanish teacher Michael Piane, advisor for the Korean language. Students who participated in the competition recited pieces ranging from poems to short sto-

ries . Judges based their decisions on a variety of criteria. They took into account the speakers' quality of thought, expression, enthusiasm and fluency, and rated the performance on a scale of one to five, with five designated as the highest. "I thought it was very scary up there," said Zhi. He also felt that the Olympics are a gOOf way for people to be exposed to other cultures. "You don't have to understand the words ; the mo tions and feelings expressed are universally understood," he said. The Bilingual Olymp ics are held in Brooklyn andQueens. High School superintendents from these two boroughs created the contes t to encour-. age involvement in second languages. Assistant Principal of Foreign Language Joan Walsh organized the event within the schoo l. "It [the contest] fosters ethnic pride and multi-cultural sensitivity," she said. As for the Olympics' popularity, she said, "The reponse was contagious. 1 had no idea it would be so good ." Ms. Walsh hopes the contest will expand to include more languages next year.

t


','

8

' .'

..

The ClassIc May1993

Worms join effort to recycle garbage by Rena Varghese In the hopes of reducing the amount of garbage generated by the school each day, Students for the Preservation of the Earth (SPE), under the supervision of biology teacher Richard Tiffen, has initiated a worm composting projec t. When the group started the project in Octo ber, they purchase d two pounds of worms. Due to reproduction, the number of worms has increased from approximately 2,000 to 3,000. Originally, SPE began worm composting to avoid the need less disposal of vegetative food wastes. Now, its recycl ing program has entered a new phase .The worms convert these wastes into a high quality compost produ ct which eventually will be used as a fertiliz er. OdileGarcia, another biology teacher who is involved with thisproject, would like to use this fertilizer for terrariums which members of her Science on the Road Enrichment program could bring to elementary schoo ls. Mr.Tiffen feels

IL':=:>"~''-''', .....,1',. 11 ...:;;--.

' .,.....--~ . ,;

AI I 'I ----"..-:li

that no matter what the compos t is used for, the project can definitel y make a difference. "I t's not so much what you 're using the compost for, but that you're reducing solid waste," he said. Excess plants from fish tanks, old testpapers, coffee groundsfrom Room 216, and buckets of lettuce from the cafetorium are saved to feed the worms. Worms make compost by first eating the organic matter placed in their bin. They grind it up in their gizzards and digest it They then depos it worm castings, called vermicompost , The members of SPE feel that worm composting is a good way to recycle. "I think it's an excellent idea because worms help to fertilize the soil. This

Albany conference improves classroom relations who has been involved with coopera- tation was praised by those there and it by Elenl Passlas Making their debut as teachers of tive learning for many years, a combi- felt good to know that our work and teachers, 35 students from John nation of students wrote the proposal efforts were acknowledged," saidPaFrancis' two English 1 classes pre- which won, despite the rigorous com- tricia Salinas . However, the group did have time sented their suggestions for classroom petition. Sponsored by the United Federation for fun on the excursion. Enjoying a management to a conference of high school and college educators in Al- ofTeachers, the students offered their break between their presentations, they bany on January 9. The group had ideas for improvements in ihe curricu- went to a mall to have lunch, shop, and 'I~': won this trip after submitting a pro- lum, such as a collective way of doing just relax . "I was very proud of them, because posal to the New York State Educa- collaterals. This might include comthey worked together, and between the bining three collaterals into one. tion Department. "I made an introduction and the stu- two classes, they came-up with a wonThe conference, which is held annually , was attended by college pro- dents then spoke for about half an derful presentation," said Mr. Fran cis. fessors, other scholars and many hour ," said Mr. Francis. While 32 out One teacher at the conference told Mr. schools from all over New York State . ofthe 35 students each spoke for about Francis that their project was the "best Interested parties submitted propo sals two minutes, the remaining three were example of cooper ative learning he including their ideas and method s for busy documenting their trip by taking had ever seen." Mr. Francis and his students had met cooperative learning and classroom picutres and handing out the written before and after school for weeks to remanagement. Cooper ative learning ma terials to the audience . "I think that the best way to describe hearse their presentation. "It was a entails students working in groups , correcting each others ' work and of- the Albany trip, and I think all who monumental amount of work, but I I feringsuggestions to one another. With went would agree, was 'rewarding.' would do it again," said Mr. Francis. i the help and advice of Mr. Francis, All of the work we put into the presenIL_ no t only enriches our land, but our environment," said sophomore Neelma Alli. Mr.Tiffen added that " we have to do something about our garbage ....The only other alternatives besides composting are landfilling or incinerators, and composting is by far the best." Research has proven that worm composting is the easiest way to recycle food wastes . It produces com-

pos t at a quick rate, without any pile composting. turning . Worms tunnel through the soil, Mr. Tiffen, the worm 's chief careso it does not lose oxygen and does not giver and the one who thought up the smell. Worm composting is also ad- idea for this projec t, explained that the vantageous since, unlike other forms worms , which he keeps under the sink of composting, it can be done indoors in Room 204, are doing fine and proand continued all year long. ducing compost at a steady rate . This While SPE uses red worms, scient ifi- compost may be usable within a few cally classified as Eisenia Foetida, months. manure worms may also be used for

SAT Prep Courses are Graphically Different

1\>-

10" Ile",e'" "",,0_ ,,0-,&0

• Small Classes

Limited to 8-12 students and grouped by shared test-taking strengths and weaknesses.

• -, Personal Attention

As much as you need to help you attain your

bestscores

• Highly Trained Teachers Backed by over half a million dollars of research each year.

• Guaranteed Satisfaction If you complete our course, we guarantee that you will be satisfied with your score. If not, we will

work with you again,free. \We assume that you will be satisfied with a 100 point improvement.)

PrInceton Reylew Private Tutors ' Also Available

I \'

...-

-.

~


•

'

,

l

,

•

,

~

~

.

,

The Classic May1993

9

Educate II Elevate heightens cultural awareness by Nada Elkhashab After months of rehearsal and hard work, members of Educate to Elevate (E II E) performed in the school's annual show celebrating Black history on February 25 in the cafetorium. The Co-pres idents of the group, juniors Aisha Roberts, Francine Rich, and Roxanne Ryan, managed the committees which produced the show. The rehearsals were supervised by English teacher George tte Wallace. For the past five years, the show had been put on by the "Black History Commi ttee." Members of the newly named E II E stated that they had re-named the group because they did not want to exclude people who do not come from African-American backgrounds. "Our goal is to educate people about other cultures as well," said Aisha. Proceeds from admission raised money for Hale House, an organization for children addicted to drugs or infected with the HIV virus. "Hale House is not just a hospital . The kids get both medical care and love and attention," explained Roxanne. The show commenced with the singing of the national anthem led by soloist Monique Cole, junio r, and followed by junior Desiree Morgan's rendition ofJame Weldon Johnson' s"Lift Every Voice and Sing." Junior Christine Farrier recited a speech reminding the audience of the theme of the show, which was "We've come this far by faith." Unlike some performances, there was no single announcer to introduce all the acts. Playing the roles of an African-American grandmother and her sister, Monique and junior Nicole Reide provided a link between traditional and modem day African cultures. Their comical skits led to laughs from the audience and served as a transition between acts. The audience was first taken to Africa where colorful costumes, choreography by junior Kelly Jones, and drums in the background, played by senior Anthony Mahon and his brother Carlos, all helped set the mood for traditional African dances . Next viewers travelled to the continent ofSouth America. A grOUP of dancers from all three

grades performed the Merenque and the Salsa in pairs to the songs "Rebellion" and "Seca Meca" by Johnny Ventura. Both dances were choreographed by junior David Corporan. The next set of dances were tap and modem dance. Junior Trina Cabrijan performed a tap number to the song 'That's How You Jazz" from the Broadway show "Jelly's Last Jam." Later in

but they also gave their vocal chords quite a workout In a tribute to Billie Holiday, Monique sang "Good Morning Heartache ." Monique later acted as the directress of the E II E choir,which consisted of many members of the group. They began their processional by singing the theme of the show "We 've Come This Far by Faith." The other choir numbers were led by soloists including sophomore Lakita Sanderlin and junio r Ronda Alexander. To add to the church-like atmosphere, junior Roxanne Ryan gave a sermon in which she energetically recited the Maya Angelou poem "Still I Rise." Poems about oppression, racism, and hope played amajorrole in the show. Junior Siriboa Monro recited the poem she had written entitled "Why Have They Taken My Brother?" Langston Hughes' works "Poem to Bigot," "Mother to Son," and "Dreams" were also recited. Other poems recited were Sabrina Dixon's "My Sister" and Wanda L.Robiilson' s "Little Black Boy, Little Black Girl," Another major component of the performance was the fashion show. The participants strutted their stuff as they walked down the catwalk in grand pubas (long sleeveless shirts), and various two-piece ensembles from Nigeria and Senegal . All clothing was donated by Karen Sweeting, who owns Christina's , a shop CUllING LOOSE. Sophomores Joy Warren and in Brooklyn which sells African clothing. lisa Phillpotts and junior Donna Ash dance to the beat The show received positive reviews from in the EnE show. the faculty, parents and students. "I think this .is one of the best shows we have had. It's amazing that they were able to put all this tothe evening , Trina, along with juniors Ronda gether,"saidPrincipalMalcolmLargmann.Other Alexander, Lindsy Miller, Tina Morgan , and 'aculty members also enjoyed the show greatly. Anissa Harris, who choreographed the number, took the audience into the world ofmodern dance with their performance to the song "There' s a Winner in You" by Patti LaBelle. The [mal numbers were the hip hop dances. Thedancers got "stepping"to~'1browYA Gunz" by Onyx, ''Tirne4 Sum Axsion" by Red Man, and "R akin 'in Da Dough "by Zhigee. All hip hop numbers were choreographed by sophomore Joy Personal attention Warren and co-choreographed by junior Terita and guaranteed . Murphy. improvement That's Not only did the participants exercise their feet,

IF YOUR CHOICE Is TUTORING, CHOOSE THE BEST

Powdery hills thrill skiers by Anna Zwierz Despite a heavy snowfall in the New York area, the animal ski trip commenced on Friday, February 13.CoordinatorofStudent AffairsJudy Biener organized and chaperoned the weekend outing. Assistan t Principal of Foreign Languages Joan Walsh and physics teacher Philip Jones also supervised the 65 students. Directly after school on Friday, all those involved boarded two buses and travelled for three hours to the Interlaken Inn located in Lakeview, Connecticut. Following breakfast the next day, everyone headed for Catamount, a ski center located on the borders of New York and Massachusetts. Once there, the students split into groups and turned their attention to skiing. The majority started off with aski lesson. "I thought that it was pretty easy to learn and I got the hang of it right away," said junior Jamie Price. Jon Jannicola, junior, recalled one of his more memorable experiences. "It was my first time skiing and I was trying to get my skis parallel. Just as I had perfect form, [junior] Michael Bergman comes flying down the mountain, tak-

. Judy Biener, Coordinator of Student Affairs stated, "It's incredible how much talent we have in this school." Jose Navarro, father of junior Jennifer Navarro, who participated in the choir, said the show was "beautiful and looked professional." Neva Donalds, mother of freshman Ariana Donalds, who participated in the hip hop dance, said that the show was "good and entertaining." Most students interviewed said that the show was entertaining, but some said it could have been better if it had been more organized. Junior Ryan Morrison found the show educational. "I leame d a lot about the African culture in America," said Ryan. Sophomore Dionne Fraser, who had an insider 's view because she participated in the show, said, "I thought it was excellent except for the technical difficulties which were no one 's fault," "I learned more about the African heritage," said Nicole. Freshman Raquel Agramonte made new sophomore and junior friends. "It was a nice way to spend time in school," she said. At the end of the show, members of E II E thanked Ms.Wallace,who explained that her job was just to encourage and supervise the students. "I was amazed at their dedication," she said. Each one of the Co-presidents gained something from their work. Aisha believes that her greatest satisfaction came fromknowing thatsomebody walked away from the show "enriched and entertained," Francine emphasizes that the show was meant to be educational as well as entertaining. "It's not just a show. It teaches," she said. Roxanne explained that in E II E ,people from all cliques worked together to put on the show. "I learned how to work with other people;" she said.

ing me and my skis with him," he said. Later in the day, the group discovered that one bus driver had broken his leg while trying to get the bus out of a snow drift. Consequently , at 4 PM, all ofthe students had to pile into asingle bus for the ride back to their hotel. Once back at the hotel, the fun resumed . "After coming back to the hotel after a day of skiing, we all ate dinner. I then spent the rest of the night playingvolleyball,"saidfreshmanAllisonLewis. "My nights were cool because I could play ping-pong for a long time," remembers junior Jesse Lieberman. On Sunday, the group again spent their time on the slopes.Because ofroad conditions , the buses arrived back at the school building around 9 PM. Although they experienced several delays over the course of the weekend, the students seemed to remain cheerful. Sophomore Brett Zuckerman "had a good time, especially when it was snowing." The chaperones also enjoyed themselves. ''The trip was fun and much too short to enjoy the perfect conditions and setting ," said Mr. Jones.

and weaknesses. This assures each individual student the most effective program to maximize their SAT scores.

what has made The PrincetonReview the most effective SAT program in the country.

The Princeton Review's average SAT score improveinent is over. 150 points. If your score does not improve by at least 100 points on theSAT, we will work with you in our refresher program until you are fully satisfied .. with your results.

Some students excel in a one-on-one educational setting. Others simply cannot fit the course classes and workshops intotheir already busy schedule. These students require private tutoring with an SAT expert. For these special students we've created TPR Tutoring. .. TPR Tutors are graduates of the finest schools in thecountry. With the combination of vastSAT experience ~'..... and computer analyses, our instructors can pinpointa student's test-taking strengths

With TPRTutoring, the bestin SAT prepjust goteven beuer,

~: -

TPR N G 212-874-7600

718-935-0091 I '

,I

'; J

.1


.'

"

I

\

,

,

.

,

.

~

~

-,:, ,, . . .. , . ... "

~,'

~

• •

10

~J

'_. '

• • •

."

-

•• •'

.~

, .;

_ ;

" l . : • .::

The Classic May1993

Creative spirits come alive at fair by Wend y Kemp An early morning chemistry class usually comprised of approx imately 40 students was in full swing, yet more than half of the wooden seats were devo id of any signs oflife. Classrooms all ove r the school co ntained more empty seats than students. Pupils who were there had an unusual var iety of des igns on them . from flowers drawn on their cheeks to rainbo ws on their han ds. Were the bus es late? Had the majority of Harrisites been abducted by aliens with a craving for teen agers? The answer: none of the above . It was the last day of the fall term, January 28, and instead of sitting in their seats wai ting for the fm al bell to ring, a large number of Harri sites gathered in the gym , where the Creativity Fair was running. For the first tim e in the history of the school, administrators incoporated the Humanities Fair and the Science Fair into one, thus giv ing birth to the Creativity Fair ."It was the first time that all the departments were working together," said Susan Appel, Assistant Principal of Science . "The science department, the language department and the humanities department all worked together to make the fair a success ," she adde d. As opposed to last year ' s fair, whic h took place in the library, this year's Creativity Fair was held in the gym ."It was bigger, better and much more excitin g," said Assistant Principal of Humanities Lynne Greenfield. "We were able to hav e events that were a

were given out 'rebirth certificates'... saidsenior Erica Eisenstein. ' The Creativity Fair was a great exhibition of people's creativity ." Another area of the gym featured a Rube Goldberg. What is a "Rube Gold berg"? Ms . Greenfield explained, "Rube Goldberg was a man who made crazy inventions . One movement would trigger anothe r, which would [trigger] another. and so on." She cited an example from the movie Back to the Future, in which a dog pressed a button which began a ser ies of reactions ending with dog $' food p lo pping do wn bes ide him. " Ever since then, any invention like CREATIVE APPROACH TO RECYCLING. Junior Christopher Musarra demonstrates paper-making at the that has been . Creati~ty Fair. named after him [Rube G oldberg]," said M s. Greenfield tened with your own Greek name. This particular inv ent ion , created by At another booth a grou p handed ou t " rebirth ce rtificates." The repre- juniors Cannon Chu and Daniel Resen tatives running this exhibit inkoph, consisted of many twis ts and trans lated students' names into turns. On e ball activated another, which African and Hebrew equivalents, traveled down swirling slide to acticomplete with definitions of what vate still more gadgets. "It was a really complicated chain reaction," said one they meant. "I really liked the booth where we junior girl. "It must have taken a lot of

little messy. such as the paper-making booth, and ...various foods. It made a big differen ce because you have to be more careful in the library." In one comer of the transformed gym was a booth where you could be chris-

t

a

imagination... Events designed to ch allenge the mind also highlighted the Creativity Fair. TherewasaJeopardy game based on the Greek poem, The Odyssey, and an exhibit called 'The Hero's Journey ." In this game. the idea was to match upobjects belonging to famous literary characters, such as Jane Eyre and Dorian Grey, with the characters themselves. Participants then had to match the characters with the novels from which they came. A map of part of New Yark City hung in one comer of the gym. Students were encouraged to write their name on a sticker and place it on the exact street where they lived . A green sticker was used by those who get .a ride to schoolevery morning, a red one used by those who take the bus . and so on . Although the Creativity Fair was able to ge t off the ground and maintain an aud ience for the entire day, things did not look so bright in the preparation sta ges. 'There was a very slow start, and a lot of people weren't sure whether or not they wanted to participate in the fair," M s. Gr eenfield said. "[Everyone' s] least favorite part is getting organized and making sure that the schedules are lined up properly, But a fewdays befo re the fair, every one got into it and was very bus y preparing activities for the spec tators," she said According to M s. Greenfield, she and Ms . Appel decided not to have two separate fairs because it was repetitious.

There was on e conflict with the fair being held in the gym , and tha t was the fact that the Annual W inter Carnival was to take place a few hours after the Creativity Fair ended. This meant that the clean-up crew's responsiblities included putting thin gs away, in addition to getting other things set up for the carnival."We [the teachers] thought that people would be too tired after the fair. but they weren' t," Ms. Greenfield said. "I t turned out no t to be a problem at all . People were very enthusiastic about the carnival." As the day wore on and the festival approached its end, the students began to liven up. Some organized a game of limbo in one corner of the room, where a circle anx iously cheered their friends on. How ever. this flex ibili ty challenge soon exp anded and became a 'minidance.' Across the room. a groupof girls attacked the make-up table and deco rated themselves with a variety of color, from hand -drawn flowers and· stars on their cheeks to mu lti -col ored sparkles in their hair. "!twas fun watching them [the students] goofing around." said one freshman female. " A lot of people think that high schoo l ki ds are 'supposed to have ' outgrown tha t kind of stuff. but even though we 're teenagers, we still like to let loose and have fun. " "I t was great to walk in and be knocked out by the wild variety of projects ," sai d Ms. Greenfield, "A lot of people came to have a good time. and it was very n ice way to end the term ," she said.

Winter Carnival gets mixed reviews by L a u ra Hummel Games, prizes and ' I do's' highlighted the annual Winter Carnival on January 29 in the gym and cafetorium. The carnival was sponsored by Archon, the school's serv ice society. and the Parent-Teacher Association (PTA), and was organized by Archon advisor Odile Garcia. People of all ages entertained themselves from 6-9 .pM at booths run by school clubs as a means of raising money for their cause. Estimated that about 400 people attended this year 's carnival. Save the Children raised the most money with their "Old English Bottle Game." Participants purchased a numbered ticket for 25 cents and received whatever prize the jar labeled with that number contained. "We did the same thing last year, but people seemed to like it, so we decided to do it again," said junior Nancy Forsberg. A ping -pong table set up in the middle of the gym was run by Puffles. The members of this club teach young children about the dangers of drugs and alcohol by visiting schools and putting on puppet shows. 'That was my favorite booth! I just went crazy and had so much fun playing!" exclaimed sophomore Christine Castillo . Students Promoting AIDS Awareness (SPAA) organized a dart toss, with balloons as the targets.

performed marriages and divorces. in itsis. addition to selling cookies and soda. "All ofthe booths seemed successful and people Besides the interactive games, there looked like they were enjoying themselves. I'm was also entertainment throughout the defmitely going next year," said School Safety evening. Juniors Desiree Morgan and Officer Marlene Lee. Ronda Alexander performed an African dance in the cafeto"·1 rium, and there was a martial arts demonstration in the gym. A live band performed two sets of songs on the cafetorium stage. "I loved their rendition of ' One ' from U2. I had to run r" . to find my best friend so she could hear it too." said sopho,. more Florence Wasserman. Many members of the PTA assisted Ms. Garcia in running the carnival. They sold cotton candy, pretzels, and other foods GElTING A KICK our OF KARATE, senior Man and beverages, and they helped Cretaro illustrates techniques at the Winter Carnival with the assistance of senior Christian Anderson. out with security. PTA CoPresident Charles Puglisi, who read tarot cards. thought the Amnesty International quizzed people's knowl- carnival was "one of the best ever." edge of geography in a Jeopardy! format. Stu"I had a lot of fun. I thought that it was dents AgainstDrunk Driving (SADD) challenged much better than last year." said sophoplayers to race a radio controlled car through an mo re Tara Seary. Some, however, didn't ._ obstacle course. At The C lassie -sponsoredgame, echo this enthusiasm. "It was a waste of I ' MICROPHONE IN HAND, Senior Andrew Kwasny and people threw balls into a hole in a giant clown my time. I spent more time outside than band entertain in the Winter Carnival crowd. face and received a raffle ticket. Some seniors in, " commented sophomore John Gal -

-


-,

'

The Classic May1993

11

Weiss 'seeks new dimensions' for Westinghouse competition does a person look at an object and used to examine students' perceptions by Stacey Winkler Exploring the third dimension may know its width and depth?" came to of three-dimension planes were the seem adaunting task, but senior Donna mind. Perdue Spatial Visualization Test and Weiss has not only done this but anaShe administered many different Ravens Progressive Matrices. A stanlyzed her ftndings as well. She dardized test composed was chosen as one of the 300 of a series of verbal and semi-fmalists in the National spatial analogies was Westinghouse Science Comused to note the differ petition for her project, " An ence between the subExploration of the Third jects' spatial and nonDimension: Spatial Perception spatial problem-solving ... and its Realtion to Problemability . An anonymous .~ Solving Ability." On March questionnaire about sex, ~i;j age, income, ethnicity, 3, she and her advisor, Assistant Principal of Sciences cumulative average, etc. ~ Susan Appel, attended a Sciwas also distributed. ence Achievement Ceremony The Perdue Spatial 1;' hosted by the mayor to recogVisualization Test is a nize New York City Westingmultiple choice test conhouse semi-finalists. sisting of 15 questions. Donna's research was based Subjects, for example, on the theory of multiple inwould see a picture of a DONNA WEISS enters the Third Dimension and Westingtelligences. "Intelligence is three-dimensional object house. mutli -faceted," she explained. such as a cube. The an"Just as an artist would have swer choices A through keen depth perception, other mathe- exams to the students of two senior E consist of flat, two-dimensional or matical abilities require mathematical electives to see if there indeed was a lateral representations. The subject or linguistical intelligence." After read- correlation between problem-solving would have to pick the correct "flating a study on three-dimensional ob- ability and the ability to translate a tened" representation, such as an unjects, she became interested in the three-dimensional object into a two- folded cube, of the object presented in poss ibility that the two mental capac i- dimensional plane. Her hypothesis was the question. Donna used the test to ties for solving prob lems and grasping that "spatial perception is related to measure the subjects' ability to transspatial principles were somehow intelligence, which is linked to prob- late a three-dimensional object into a linked.She said that the question, "How lem-solving ability ." Among the tests two-dimensional plane.

. a

t

Ravens Progess ive Matrices is a multiple choice test consisting of 60 questions. In each question, the subject sees a large box divided into nine squares or a matrix . Each square contains a design, except for one which remains empty. From the answers provided, the studenthas to choose the correct design which would ftt in the box and complete a sequence. Donna used this test to standardize the subjects' spatial prob lem-solving ability . The test results were tabulated using a computer statistical function so that any correlations could be analyzed. Donna explained, "My results were significant even though 1 got a weak correlation, because 1 realized how important each component ofmy project was, and if I had a better threedimensional test, then I am sure my results would have been more supportive of my hypothesis." She believes that the Perdue three-dimensional translational test was faulty because it was possible to use analytical reasoning to answer many of the questions instead of spatial perception. Other spatial exams have supported her hypothesis, so she is not discouraged. Donna conducted her research under the guidance ofMs. Appel, mathematics teacher Joseph Horn, retired social studies teacher Michael Manson, and

Queens College Professor Eleanor Armour-Thomas . English teacher Harriette Blechman assisted in the preparation of the fmal paper. Donna's experience with independent research became important when she was applying to colleges. She said, "Every time I go on a college interview, I ask if they have opportunities for undergraduate research." She plans to continue doing research if the resources are available, but she will probablynot limit herself to the fteldof social scienceresearch. Her other interests include mathematics and economics. Her research experience was especially time-consurning. ''The whole week before it was due I was up to 3:00 AM typing and doing the statistics," she remembered. Westinghouse projects mus t be completed by early December. Despite all the time pressures, Donna was able to serve as Archon Senior President, Arista President, and a member of the school multi-cultural committee. Donna feels that the time spent on her Westinghouse project was valuable. "I t was deftnitely the most worthwhile experience because 1 was exposed to a fteld that 1've become really interested in. I have learned about myself and my capabilities," she said.

Off To Japan: Oulban to follow in Cegelski's footsteps is to encourage students to learn abou t program, and other activities to lessen by J enn ifer Mattucl Japan awaits sophomore Rache lle and better understand other cultures . any "culture shock." After the orientation, Lynette flew to Mr. Rubin considers the trip an Quiban who won a summer tripto that the Tokyo/Narita airport and then took important experience. ''They'll learn country as part of the annual Youth for a half-hour flight to the Understanding (YFU) scholof Osaka, where her city arship compe tition. Rachelle host family greeted her will to follow in the footsteps with a "Welcome to Jaof senior LynetteCegelski who 'pan, Lynette" sign. was awarded a six-week stay ''They live in a suburb in Osaka last summer. Sophoof Osak a, in a large house more Rit zel Tuazon was with a garage and two nam ed as an alternative wincars. I was unusually nero lucky to get such a nice, "I was shocked that I got it, fmanciall y comfortable because I knew the competifamily bec ause I have tion was really hard. Hope asthma and needed to be fully, while I'm there 1 will Kb'LECTING ON HER SUMMER i N JA PAN, in a house with air-conlearn' more of the language, Senior Lynette Cegelski hopes this year's winner has a ditioning. Some kids the culture and get used to the similar experience. ended up living in more food , as if it were my new cramped areas or even on home," said Rachelle. The Mitsu i Corporat ion sponsors that there is a paradox: that people are farms on rice paddies," explained Lythis contest, open to high school stu- the same everywhere and yet very dif- nette . dents who study Japanese .The Corpo- ferent; and hopefully they'll be able to Lynette's host family had two daughration covers all expenses of the six- relate better to these differences and ters, ages 14 and 17, and a son, age 19. week trip, spanning from mid-June to apprec iate the similarities that tie us ''They were really nice. 1 shared a early Augus t, and beginning with a together. This is especially important room with the older sister, Yuka, who three -dayorientation inSanFrancisco. to ensure good relations between the is no w in Utah for the year, and will be Rachelle and Ritzel, both second- world 's economic giants , Amer ica and staying at my house for part of the summer break," she said . year Japanese students, found out about Japan.t'he said. Among Lynette's most memo rable Last year, Lynette spen t from June the program through Japanese teacher Michael Rubin. Representativ es noti- 23 to August 7 in Osaka. Before actu- experiences were the three days she fted them of their ftnalist status in early ally travelling to Japan, Lynette spent attended a Japanese public school and February, and interviewed them at the three days at the University of San the evening she went to a Japanese Francisco in California, receiving "pre- festival. end of that month. "I attended both the cooed public Approximately 240 high school departure orientation." Ther e, she and Japanese students nationwide receive 120 other students participated in cul- school in the neighborhood and a prithis scholars hip trip to Japan annually. tural activities such as orig ami and vate school the older daughter goes to. The main purpose of the YFU pro gram Japanese folk danc ing, a language I had the be st experience at the public

school. A girl in the neighborhood came to pick me up every day and we rode bikes to the public school together," she said . "In the school, students stay in the same class all day and teachers switch rooms . Each time a teacher enters the classroom , everyone bows. You even eat lunch in the classroom; they have no cafeteria. I had terriftc lunches . 1 ate from the Obentoo Box my host mother prepared for me.

RAC HE LLE QUI BAN, winner of the • Youth for Understanding scholarship, will travel to Japan this summer.

You open it up and there are mini sandwiches, sushi, and rice inside. " At both schools, all students wore uniforms and had lockers to put their shoes in before chan ging into the "school" slippers worn in the building. "Everyone wears slippers indoors at places of business [and] in their homes," said Lynette .

One Saturday, Lynette went to a gym where people played basketball, vol leyball, and badminton just like in America. She then went to a Karoke (singing box) with 15 students from her class. ''The Karoke was like a pool hall where you pay per hour, but you go into a little room or "box," with couches that have a TV with laser disks and microphones. You can sing any songs you want and have a lot of fun,' ; she said. Another night , she went with her host family to a Japanese festival that resembled a carnival. "You could ftsh for goldfish, play bazaar games and win prizes. 1 wore a kimono there like everyone else , but I really stood out because of my blond hair. A lot ofl ittlekids pointed at me because I am tall and have very different coloring ,~ she said. "Another person even asked me if they could take a picture with an American." However, Lynette didn 't always enjoy the cuisine, which included raw ftsh . Since my host mother knew 1didn ' t always like sushi, she often made tempura [foods cooked and fried in a type of batter] for me. For breakfast, the daughters and 1 would eat cereal together while the father ate a more traditional meal, similar to a Japanese dinner," said Lyne tte. Rachelle is looking forward to an experience like Lyne tte' s. "I've always wanted to go to Japan. I'm reall y excited," she said.


.'

.\

.

"

" ,

12 Th:8~:::~C 路 11~1~11.Irl~l~lDm~~11[j[~11~~t]lll~!~lril~I~~1~1~~~11IJf*~!~ m:r

SAT spells out stress, anxiety, trauma by Joseph A. Cahill This year, according to Educational Testing Serv ices (ETS), over two million anx iety-ridden college-bound students will set their alarms for a Saturday wake-up and march into classrooms across the country, No .2pencils in hand, to see how they perform academically on the Scholastic Aptitude Test The SAT was not developed by college professors or admissions officers. The inventor, according to (US News andWorldReport), was aNew England psychologist named Carl Brigham, who created the exam during World War I as an "IQ" test for soldiers. During the twenties, he jazzed up his exam, changing its name from the Army Alpha to the Scholastic Apt itude Test. In 1925, Princeton became the first university to require SAT scores from its applicants . Shortly thereafter, the New Jersey-based Educational Testing Service was born. Originally created to administer and score the SAT, ETS now administers approximately 300 other tests, including exams for would-be firemen, barbers, and professional golfers. Howard Wagner aids hundreds ofjuniors and seniors in making key decisions concerning college selection and application. He downplays the importance of the SAT, "It's never the most important part, according to admissions officers. Colleges really care about your three years ofhigh school, GPA and courses taken. These are the best measures of how well you will do in college. However, a poor GPA and super SAT's may put you in great favor withmany colleges," he said.

ords. The third area is the SAT and, in many cases, Achievement tests. The SAT takes three hours and is weighted diffe ren tly by different colleges.

,..

......

/

\0\ \Y\{f\ t )

guage also receive low test scores. In a school where over three-quarters of the student population is female, the issue of a gender bias in the SAT is of special concern. Most individuals, when asked about this gender disparity, were not aware of it, or tended to discount it. Matthew Solomon, junior, when asked about the SAT 's alleged bias in favor of white suburban and city dwelling males, said, "I don't think it is." When asked why, he answered, "Because it hasn' t helpedme.".In a school like Townsend Harris, where the whole student body tends to be relatively elite , a gender gap is less noticeable. Surprisingly, many girls did not feel like vic tims of gender discrimination, possibly because they were no t aware of the nationwide disparity. Doris Chu said , "I don't think it (the SAT) is genderbiased. Even if it is, the end result is minor."

~!~!~!:!:!~!~1:1:1:~~~liI1~~i:iJiJiJi:iJiJi:~i:i:i:i:~i:i:i:~i:~ii:!i:!:~:!:!~i:i:i~!:i:!:i~i~i:!:i~i:i:~i:i:iJiJi:l:l:l:

'I always have problems with the antonyms' In a humanities school likeTownsend Harris, one would no t expect the verbal section of the test to be the key problem. However, a large number of students labeled the verbal section, particularly antonyms and reading comprehension, as a much greater problem than the mathematics par t Vincent Yu, junior, said "I always have problems with the antonyms," a phrase which was echoed by a mul titude ofindividuals. M any believe that the SAT tests obscure and unnecessary language. Do any of your friends use vocabulary words like lugubrious or prescient in everyday speech? If so, do you avoid speaking to these people? Several students expressed problems with time . Jennifer Borden, junior,

said, "the SAT is pretty simple if you can work with speed." One must wonder if-the SAT rewards real thinkers or justhighspeed information processors.

SAT criticized Many lawmakers and educators have continuously argued that the SAT is gender-biased. Since 1972, men have been outscoring women in both the verbal and mathematical portions of the test, this according to public records from ETS. The gap between male and female verbal scores has risen to 13 points; the gap between mal e and female math scores has been as high as 52 points . The grades received by men and women in their firs t yearofcollege do not reflect this gender gap . In college (as in high schoo l), young women come out with higher average grades than young men in every field of study . Claims have also been made by numerous civ il rights groups and test educators thatthe SAT is biased against blacks and otherminorities, where there is over 100 points separating the averagescores of white males from those of blacks. People who live in rural areas and speak English as a second lan-

glimpse of the new format in October onthePSAT. According to Mr. Wagner, changes in the SAT form at will ben efit Towns end Harris students gre atly, "The new test will rely on more cri tical thinking and reading. Townsend Harris students are well trained in writing and other areas which will receive a greater focus. The test will no t benefit good memorizers as much as the old one did ," he said. Mr. Wagner also stated that the new test will be harder to study for.

Boostin g scores If you are willing to spen d a large

amount of money to hopefully improve your SAT score s, several prep courses are offered. St anley Kap lan and the Princeton Review are the two largest opera tions. Both boast score improvements anyw here from 100 to occasionally 400 points.These courses emphasize shor t cuts, time management, and getting into the minds of the tests' creators. These courses report that their matierials are being updated 111111111i11111l11\111111111111111111111111111l11111111Ill l l lllll1J111111111111111111111111111111111111:11Ilili to reflect their upcoming alterations in the test. New York City is offering a free PSA1\SAT preparation course this year which should be simi lar to the aforementioned programs. All aim to make you a smarter test taker. On the other hand, Tim Nolan, junior, performed well on the test by simply using According to Mr. Wagner, Townsend a Barrons study guide. Each individual Harris High School, because of its se- must decide his best way to prepare for lective nature, does not have a signifi- the test. cantgender or racial gap in SATscores.

The new test will rely on more critical thinking and reading.'

"Our girls seem to do as well as our

What colleges look for There are three major areas which are looked at for each applicant to a competitive college. The firstIs a cumulative GP A. Colleges may make up thier own GP A for an appl ican t, excluding "minor" courses. This includes three years ofintense work, where difficulty of courses is also cons idered. An A in Driver's Education. doesn't mean a thing if you have a D in English. The second area of consideration is your personality. Applicants are all unique. How you've spent your time when is vital . Did you work for the summer? Did you participate in community activities? Did you try new experiences? Did you display athletic or academic talent on teams and in contests? Have you won any awards? The essay and interview are useful for distinguishing you from applicants with similar rec-

stated, "I think that everyone should just get more time. They (ETS) give you 30 minutes on the verbal section to do 45 questions. Very few people can think that quickly," while Dor is Chu

guys. The same is true for minority students," he said. Such criticism has in recent years prompted several leading liberal arts colleges, including Bowdoin, Colby, Middlebury, and Union, to drop their requirements that applicants submit SAT scores. This is still a very small minorityofinstitutioris. Many colleges report that they still use the SAT because they have no other satisfacotry means of comparing students. The belief is that an A from Rinky-Dink High is not the same as one from a selective school. The SAT is supposed to distinguish between two applicants "from such schools. '

New test format ETS has also responded to criticism. It has unveiled a new SAT format. In March of 1994, students will begin to take the revised SAT. This test will be longer, but will invo lve slightly fewer questons. There will be no antonym ques tions (considered by most to be the hardest section to study for). Th ere will be more reading ques tions, particularly ones involving cr itical reading. There will be some non-multiplechoice math questons in which you have to figure out and fill in the answer. Calculators will be allowed, and there will not be a mandatory essay, contrary to earlier beliefs. Next year 's sophomores and juniors will get a

~1'111111!11\'1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (1 1 1 11 1 1 ~11111 11 111 1 1 1 111111111 1 'Some kids study for the test on their own; others need to be poked in the back.' Mr. Wagner advocates coaching programs for some students. In his opinion, they benefit a certain kind of student, "Some kids study for the test on their own; others need to be poked in the back. For the latter, a coaching course can be very helpful," he said. He did no t recommend any course, but indicated that programs should no t be judged solely on the bas is of pr ice. There is a gener al attitude among upperclassmen that the SAT is one of the sing le most important events in a person's life . One should not despair . or rejoice just because of SAT scores. Colleges look at much more . A student's GPA, attitude, personali ty, and extracurricualr activ ities can put one into even the bes t universities with mediocre SAT scores. Just a reminder: thenextSATexamwillbegivenonthe first Saturday of June . Remember pencils, candy (for a sugar rush), and a stopwatch to keep time. Oh, your brain too ....don 't forget that.

1,I


~. '.'

"

i3

The Classic May1993

Bombing hits home:

World Trade Center site of terrorist attack by Kelly VUlella They always ate lunch out, but on the fateful day of Febru ary 26, Port Authority workers Steven Knapp, Monica Smith. Robert Kirkp atrick andWilliam M acko decidedtoeatlunchtogether in this office, on the ground floor of the World Trade Center. Now they are dead. Their deaths were caused by an explosion inside the World Trade Cen ter, app arently due to a bomb planted in the underground parking garage which killed seven people and injured over 1,000. Members of the schoo l community reacted with shock, sympathy and sometimes fear. "I first heard on the bus," explained sophomore Vanessa Morales. 'There were two men on the bus . One of them had been trapped in an elevator during the explosion; the other had been in his office.Theman trapped in the elevator had to pry the doors open in order to escape, " she said, adding that she was "very surprised and sad for those caught in this disaster." When she heard the news, junior Jennifer Borden worried about how her father and sister would travel home, since they ride the subway. Freshmen Heather Ward and Zoe Gordon were in amall when they heard kids saying that abuilding in Manhattan had blown up. "I wasn't sure if itwasarumor,so l ranandcalledmydadbecause I didn't know what build ing it was in. It wasn't his building, " said Heather. Though there was no one from the Townsend Harris community inside the World Trade Center durin g the chaos, Heather knows someone who

was caught in the explosion. She related the traumatic experience of Joe Forte, her parents' friend, who was on the 40th floor of the World Trade Center at the time of the blast. Surrounded by smoke, people and darkness, Heather said, it took him two hours to descend the stairs and exit the building. When the blast occurred, he had thought he would die, but managed to escape with only smoke inhalation. Latin and Gree k teacher Margaret Landry said that she had experienced a very severe reaction to the World Trade Center bombing because her daughter used to work there two years ago. ''1can certainly relate to the fears of the families involved," she said. Sophomore Danielle Bolwein wondered what she would have done in the situation. "I espe. cially felt bad for the kindergarten children....How can they know how to act in life and death situations?" she asked. She was referring to the two kindergarten classes from PS 95 in Brooklyn . which were visiting the Tw in

Towers at the time of the explosion. One class was rescued from the observation deck , while the other remained trapped in a dark elevator for five hours (NYTimes, 3n/93). This terrorist attack has made many Americans fearful and watchful because it was the first major one occurring on American land . Jesse Strauss, Sophomore Class President, commented that this "is an example of the real world. In the Unite d States, we tend to be ignorant of national terrorism. If we want to play the world game , we have to be willing to pay the price." Some students interv iewed after the capture of Mohammed Salameh, the first suspect to be arrested in connection with the bombing, expressed fears of further terrorism . Sophomore Vanessa Morales said, "I don't feel safe r be cause I don't think this person is in charge of the terrorist group." When asked ifhe felt safer , sophomo re Themis Millas replied skep tically, "I'm not sure if he 's guilty . If it was really a terrorist act, it is likely there will be more ' surprises.? ' In the aftermath of the bombing, New Yorkers remain cautious. Security has been tightened and guards are wary , especially at important buildings and tourist attractions (NYNewsday , 3/5/93). Sophomore Laura Massaro, however, pointed out a positive aspect of the incident. "It was nice to see the heroism that people showed, because you hear so much about how rude New Yorkers are," she said.

~

~

. T~icks won't help younow .~ ,-.

)...

....

.

,

.

-

路v

~

KaplanWill. Junk bonds are out. So is ocean dumping. So is the method of PSAT prep known as "cracking" the test.

M e e t the ne w PSAT. On October 12, 1993, the College Board will imple ment th e biggest cha nges on the PSAT in 20 years-making it

KAPLAN

The answer to the test question

"

.

-.

:"

~

.

.

much more of a test of your ability to think. Our new PSAT course - PSAT Advantage - is designed to give you all the thinking skills and solid review you need right now for the new test - in small classes that stress personal study planni ng. Sign up and help yourself to the best possible score .

PSAT ADVANTAGE

Sign up for summer classes now

The new course from Kaplan

1路800路KAP路TEST

~,

~


:1

14

The Classic May1993

Ice Cube 路crushes criticism by Erik Bloch and Michael Munoz Hard-core rap has traditionally been criticized as .being pro- . violent and anti-white. But now with the Los Angeles riots behind us, and rap becoming more popular, many people are taking a different look at rap and are re-examining its messages. Indeed, it now seems tha t rap is not the "passing phase" or bringer of destruction it once was perceived to be, but rather,a predictor of things to come if we as Americans do not understand each other's struggles and views. One of the most potentially potent warnings about the anger and alienation that exists in America today is Ice Cube's latest album , The Predator. In The Predator , his follow-up to the smash hit LP Death Certificate, Ice Cube proves that he is still coming on strong. Although none of his albu ms can outdo Death Certificate, this new one comes close. The Predator , Ice Cube's fourth album, has a greater variation of beats than his previous ones. Th is is largely due to the different OJ's who appear on the tracks, such as OJ Pooh, Sir Jinx , and Grandmixe r Mu ggs of the fello w Los Angeles group Cypress Hill . Eas t Coast rappers DAS EFX also make an appearance on the album , add ing their own unique flavor . . "' However, this does not me an that Ic e Cube has strayed in any way from the original formula which made his first albums hits: hard beats and even harder lyr ics that hav e in the past been the cause of criticism from people outside the rap community. In a track called "F-k 'Em," which contains excerpts from a talk show interv iew with Cube, the rapper attempts to clear up som e controver sy surr oundin g past lyrics. Cube downplays the stereotyping ofhimself as violent and racis t, saying, "I do want the white comm unity to unde rstand our community more and see what' s going on .i: " Th e four-l etter word of the track ' s "title is his respons e to those who claim he 's anti-Semitic and anti-Korean , bec ause he had criticized rap group NW A for having a Jewish manager and had attacked Korean store owners in Sou th Central, Los Angles . , In our view , Ice Cube is not really trying to promote viole nce and racism, but sees coming across angry as the only way to get people to take him serio usly. He also points out how he and other L.A. rappers (many of whom have been criticized the same way hehas) prophesied the L.A. riots , and tried to give warnings about them. Many of these warnings were misinterpreted by other people (the media, the government, etc.) as threats. This can best be summarized by Cube himself in one of his more angry tracks, "We Had to Tear This - - Up ." In the song, Ice Cube is quoted as saying, "I told you it would happ en and you heard it, read it! But all you could do was call me anti-Semitic." He also talks abou t the cause of the Los Angeles rio ts: the friction between police and citizens in South Central triggered by the "not guilty" verdict of the officers accused of beating Rodney King. Th is is the basis of several tracks on The Predator. In these tracks , Ice Cube expresses his anger towards the injustice surrounding the Rodney King trial. This is shown in lyrics directed against the officers and jury members involved in the trial. In regard to officer Lawrence Powell, Cube says he would " cut his ...throat and smile." In speaking about officer Timothy Winn, Cube states that Winn "needs to get shipped back to Kansas in a casket." Commenting on Stacey Coon, Cube states that he wants to " shoot him in the face ." Finally, with regard to the jury, Ice Cube sets up a scenario in which he goes to a jury member's house, asks to speak to the "G rand Wizard," and then "makes him meet the [gun] barrel. " Cube also says that he would like to cut out the jury members' hearts. These hard-edged lyrics, althou gh hateful and

IL E

CUBE

angry, should not be looked upon as concrete threats or promotions of violence. They are more like the release of anger at what Cube and many others perceive as the injustice of the verdict. Also, a lot of what he says is in the tradition of violence that exists in all parts of the entertainment industry today. What is different from Ice Cube talking about killing someone and Arnold Shwartzenegger acting it out on screen? Rap music is no longer the "joke" it was to the establishment in the early eighties. ''The Fat Boys" are gone; Ice Cube is here. Rap cannot be dismissed as an "inner-city phase." Las t winter, The Predator debuted at number one on the national Billboard mag azine survey. White ki ds in suburban America are listening to it, so no w, all of a sudden, it' s a seri ous problem . And because of this widespread audience, rap cannot be labeled violent and racist, and then ignored . Even those who do not consider rap a "real" form of music, or those who are offended by its lyrics, mus t become aware ofits content as well as the extent of the audience listening to it. No one should ignore the messages contained in rap songs. Beyond this, rap albums such as The Predator can have a genuinely positive effect, acting as a common link between kids in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Douglaston M anor. Granted, there is a long way to go, and nobody 's trying to paint a picture in which a littl e kid from the ghetto and a little kid from Beverly Hills walk hand in hand down a sunny stree t. Bu t if rap can help unite these ki ds even a little, so be it.

Freedom of Choice revives "classics" by Stacey Gluck Who would have known the 'SO's would be so revered by today's music fans? It was a decade when new wave greats such as the B52 's, Blondie, Elvis Costello and the Attractions, and the Human League began to get some airplay on stations other than college radio. Now in the 1990's, Sonic Youth, Mudhoney, Superchunk, and Dolvo along with a whole slew of other musicians, crank out new wave classics on a smash album entitiled Freedom ofChoice: Yesterday 's New Wave Hits Performed by Today's Stars . The album opens up with ariveting performance by Sonic Youth of Plas tic Bertrand's "Ca Plane Por Moi .' As usual, Kim Go rdon plays the bass masterfully. It closes with an equally intense performance by Superchunk, playing Devo 's "Girl You Want." Superchunk's bassist Laura Ballane also plays with great skill. All of the songs in between are basically good covers, but not revolutionary, nor are they as great as the firs t and last songs. However, they are sure to please mos t rock fans except for music purists. Two songs that could have used some improvement were new wave class ics "Wuthering Heights" and "Don't You Want Me Baby. " Whi te Flag's per formance of "Wuthering Heights" doesn't compare to the original artis t, Kate Bush's rendition . Chia Pet, a group comprised of staffers from the magazine Sassy, doe s not do justice to Human League ' s hit "Don't You WantMe Baby ." Th ese "musicians" should stick to writing ra ther than venturing into the mus ic industry. The album's proceeds go to Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. Inside there is a message by ex-Devo member Gerald Casale. He asks, "What happens when peo ple choose not to be free? Does this mean the spirit of freedo m incl udes the right to be stupid? Doesitmean people canimpose stupid choices on the rest of us? " Although the message gets preachy, the idea of the whole album is clear: whether it be free dom of expre ssion or reproductive freedo m, we mus t take an active role in making sure our constitutional rights are no t violated. This album is not only musically pleasing, but the cover art is also noteworthy. The photography by Michael Lavire shows detai led pictures of SO's new wave/p unk rock no stalgia. Freedom ofChoice is certainly a great value . It 's an excellent ISsong compilation for anyo ne who likes to remi nisce about the pas t and listen to today's gr eates t musicians play ing hard-hitting covers .

Hawks set way to championship by Seth Cohen

"All of our playAfter five ers sho wed dedistra ight los in g cation and hard seasons in which wo rk . T hat 's the Boys' Varsity what got us where we are ," Volleyball team won only one The team go l game, the team off to a quic k start by winning , the finished first place in their division first game of the this year. s e ason .,v er su s Jo h n B owne Although they High Schoo l in los t in the first M arch. round of the playoffs , the te am T ownsend had completed a never before "strong season beaten Bowne . o filled with lots of They did it twice guts and courage," said Coach Elizabeth Dempster. this season. Another highlight occurred in a match versus Long "It 's great to be number U" said team member Kenechi Efobi, Island City High School, in which T ownsend Harris rallied from junior. a 9-1 deficit to win 15-9. Out of 96 teams in the city, the team finished fifteenth overall. "When you practice four days a week for at least two to three Led by seniors Stefan Bilaniuk, Daniel Son. Br ian Krawczyk and hours a day, you're bound to get good, " said Dempster. "I have to Val Daloisio, the team climbed to 6-2 in their divis ion . applaud our players for juggling school work and the team so "A super freshman player on our team is Aris Tsoupros," said well ," When Stefan Bilaniuk and Daniel Son were freshm en, they Dempster. " He was our starting center, which is an accomplishpromised Coach Dempster that the team would be a division ment for a freshm an. He had a fantastic season." "The main reason we were so strong is because four of our five winner by the time they graduated. 'They have made good on their senior players had at leas t three years experience," said Dempster. promise," said Dempster. "I ' Il let them graduate.'

U~


The Classic ' May1993 "

,-

15

"

Indoor Track team FacultyshocksAll-Stars withlateral1yoyetcomes ·· obstacles .

All-Star break down: _'._ , •

_

"

_

A

by Seth Cohen When the Girls ' Indoor Track season ~ erKled last mo~' the teamhad 14 Aftl:rsbOotingalowly 14% from the ', ' "r• •r---~ fewer legs , than it had started with. field throughthe'firsl three quarters of Three runners were sidelined due to play, the Faculty pulled off anincredleg injuries and four were lost due to ible victory overthe stunned All-Stars, bouts with the flu dur ing the season. 55~52, at the Maurice Fitzgerald Despite the many problems created by Gymnasium of Queens College on these misfortunes, the team still enMarch 5. Alumnus Damian Young, joyed success and many player s stood '92, spearheaded a spiri ted Faculty r u, _ out. team that outscored the students 24-7 "The Indoor Track Season is basiin the fourth quarter, providing the cally a season of ind ividual events," margin of victory with three foul shots said coach Joseph Hom. "individuwith under three minutes to play. ally, our team did excellently,"he said. Young led all scorers with 22 points tl A newcom er on the scene , freshman on4 for 17 shooting while seniorRandy '~ Heather Garber, emerged as a budd ing '[1 2 £ S4~ Taylor led the All-Stars with 12 points star as she completed the 600 meter run and eight rebounds. ,::;aos in 1:56 ;7 in the Freshman City ChamThe Faculty rally began in the third ~ pionships. The feat placed her in the quarter when the All-Stars failed to put ,0 top 15 in the city. Her running time in them away after building a 19 point ~ all events placed her among the top lead through the first two quarters. ~ three in Townsend Harris history. Aided by 14 turnovers, five of which Track star Andrea Levine, sophobelonged to senior guard Rob Liff, the ~ more, who performed brilliantly in the faculty cut the lead to 14, despite shootOutdoor season, proved that she was ing 11% from the field . an all-around runner with her accomThe Faculty set the tone for the rest AS HE DRIVES THE BALL, alumnus Henry Hayes is blocked by plishments indoors. She distinguished of the game by running and covering senior Devin Gallagher at the Student-Faculty basketball game. ' herself as one of the top sophomore all easy open-courtbaskets. The fourth distant runners in all of New York quarter provided much of the same as the All-Stars let shoddy refereeing the buzzer by seniorguard Tony Manza. played at a tempo that playedright into City. Her season culminated with a frustrate them as they were shut down ' Both missed and the All -Stars walked the Faculty's game plan. With Ii 14- fourth place finish in the Queens point lead, the All -Stars lacked the Championships in the 3,000 meter to seven points. Senior forward Devin away in stunned disbelief. Gallagher drew a technical for arguing There is no doubt that questionable ' leadership to know to slow the tempo run. a call and never returned to the game. calls by referees Dean Wanda Nix and down and run out the clock. And when , Junior Iris Williams consistently ran With three minutes to play , Young senior Chris Dudin aided the Faculty the game was outofhand, the All-Stars excellent times in the 1000, 1500, and put up a three -point shot and was fouled, effort, but it was the third and fourth failed to make substitutions. Manza 3000 meter runs. Her 1000 meter time although players say Young walked. All-Star units that let this one get away. and Jeffries, two steady shoo ters, of 3:26.5 signified her as one of the top

by Neftall Serrano

..

.~;'"

~

-a.

Young then hit all three foul shots to put the Faculty ahead 55 -52. The AllStars had two more chances to tie via senior forward David Rosenthal's three point attempt and a three point shot at

The fourth quarter unit in particular, consisting of senior forwards Devin Gallagher and Brian Krawczyk, senior guards Tony Manza and Fritz Jeffries, and senior center Steven Bilaniuk,

...

.. _

."

five runners in'Queens at that distance: " If I could ·give yoil 'a star ~f the' "indoo r seaso n," 'sai~f co ach H~, "it would be senior Temika Warner." T emika ran a school record of 7.6 secondS in the fifty-five meter dash ' aftd represented To wnsend Ha,r;is at the New York City championship at tha t distance . She was also a first place fmisher at the "Stony Brook Mac M eet" in the 55 meter dash, and finished in fourth place in the 400 meter at the same mee t. Her times in the 200 meter, 300 meter, 400 meter, and 600 meter run s rank in the top three in T ownsend Harris history, and place T emika as one of the best all-ar ound runners in Queens. "Despite the injuries and illnesses, it was exciting to watch all of our athletes run to the best of their abilities," said coach Hom. " Each runner worked har d to improve and excel," he said. Hom was grat eful to the runners for their commitment and hard work. He said, "Our indoor runners are a dedicated group of athletes because we have to practice at John Bowne High School, which is far away. Many runners had to walk during terrible weather in order to practice. They deserve a lot of credit." When the new Townsend Harris opens on the Queens College campus, the Track teams will be able to practice there . That, and another winning season, is something they look forward to in 1994. '

couldn't create throughout the fourth quarter, while dependable senior guard Gre gg Smith and leading scorer Randy Taylor watched helplessly from the ben ch.

Boys' Tennis team enters Super A division by Robert Kim and Seth Cohen A seas on charged with enthusiasm, hope, and expectations has properly ended with succ ess for the Boys' Tennis team. "When we started the season, we knew we had a shot," said sophomore Danny Katz. It was no long shot. The team finished 6-4 in the Super A Division which placed them third overall in the divi-

sion. The playoffs loom in the near future. "We expect to do well," said Coach Murray. "Our team has heart, and that will take us far." Seniors Rob Liff, Reuben Rosof, Jonathan Strongin, and Kenny Hom make up the backbone of the team. "Reuben plays hard every time out, aned Dave Rosenthal is a sure win every match."

The Boys ' Tennis team has won 45 straight divi sion past championships. Coach Murray hopes that the team 's success willl be carried into the playoffs. "Athletes want the match to be competitive," he said. "You want to be tested, win or lose." Coach Murray and the players feel that this is a test they can pas s - with flying colors.

I::! .~ N os

~

£

i

Girls' Tennis serves up successes by Shalene Moodie Often blowing out the competition, the Girls' Tennis Team is having a " very competitive, exciting" season, according to coach Ellen Schwartz. In the team's first scrimmage, the Hawks knocked out Brooklyn Technical High School. They triumphed in later meets against Francis Lewis, Hillcrest, and VanBuren High Schools, with margins of victory as high as 5-0. Coach Schwartz said the change in

courts, away versus home, had little effect on plays. With the season's start in early March, practices were sometimes cancelled, and one game was even rained out. Team members were not overly concem~ with the loss of time, but found it somewhat annoying. One anonymous team member said , "It wasn't a big deal but it affected some people's moods....We all got changed and we got cancelled." Sophomore Mariella

Martinez added, " I kinda wish for indoor courts." Team leaders include seniors Christine Benedetto and Stacey Hollander,juniors Leslie Kohen and Michelle Ries, and sophomores ElenaColeman and Mariella Martinez. Coach Schwartz is optimistic about the remainder of the season. She describes her relationship with the Hawks as "terrific." "I love working with them," she added.

GIRLS' SOFfBALL STAR KELLY OLINO bunts her way to first in a crucial game against nemesis Bryant. The Harris Girls won the game and currently hold the first place position in the Queens I Division with a record of 12-0. Marylin Paulis, Bemedette Crespo and Jennifer Dull have led the team to success. "We are looking forward to the playoffs. We've got a shot; we're a very strong team," said Marylin.

~


" /

16

.

,

' ,'

The ClassIc May1993

Fast Break broken by Onyxx by Neftall Serrano Led by a triple double from captain Fritz Jeffries, senior, The Onyxx defeated Fast Break 51-49 in the Intramural Championship held at the Maurice Fitzgerald Gymnasium on the Queens College campus March 5. Jeffries scored 14 points, grabbed 17 rebounds, and added 10 assists, while senior guard Gregg Smith led the Onyxx with 19 points. Fast Break captain Adeyemi Mahon, senior, led all scorers with 32 points. The Onyxx led for most of the game, posting leads of up to 14 points until two stretches in the third and fourth quarters put Fas t Break within striking distance. In the third quarter, Mahon became active on the offensive boards, providing FastBreak with muc h-needed second shot opportunities. But despite cutting tha lead down to seven points, Fast Break could not get closer. Smith stifled the Break's rally with a three pointer and a layup off of a steal, to raise the Onyxx lead to 12. In the [mal quarter of play, The Onyxx maintained a solid rebounding edge (48-33), while mounting a 13point lead with just 4:40 left . After a Fast Break time out, a series of turnovers, missed free throws (Jefferies 0-6, Strongin 1-2), and ill-advised quick shots by The Onyxx contributed to a 14-7 run by the Fast Bre ak capped by a Steven Zaliha (sophomore gu ard) three pointer at the buzzer. With just 1:11 to play in the game and the score at 51 42 , the Br eak did no t press or force the action on the offense. M ahon dribbled away m uch of the clock in the final seconds, per haps fatigued after putting up 35 shots and playing what amo unted to a Mahon vs. Onyxx ma tchup. Fast Bre ak actually outscored Th e Onyxx 3 122 in the second half with Mahon contributing 18 of those 31 po ints.

Intramural 'Stats FGA RiM FG 'JIo ITA ITM IT'JIo OFR DFR ST AS ToIPT G PPG Slammlna Uk.. ('-3) s",rm Biloniuk

216

113 5N 52

Ana Toncj.

69

14

2O'Jlo

16

FGA RiM FG'JIo ITA ITM IT 'JIo OF R DFR ST AS ToIPT G PPG Human HJahllghIFlhm (O.9)

23

44... 47

119 14 15 249

9 27.6

Eric Kwzrok

109

2523... 21

7

33'll> 4

13

19 12 62

9 6.9

4

2S'lIo 7

13

16 15 36

8 4.8

Pamc Colcmm

139

48

35% 23

10

43'Jlo 19

77

15 17 114

9 12.7

9 8.4

David lonkclevich 54

13

24'll> 6

4

67'll> 2

9 5.1

Matt Solemoo

127

39

31'll> 30

18

6O'llo

Cecilio PodilI.

86

36

4N 13

1

31... 23

34

2

ZhiWID&

52

20

38'll> 4

2

50'll> 6

13

14 7

SalvatOI' Gioe

34

6.

18'll> 8

4

50'll> 4

10

14 12 17

8 2.1

Wam:nS.biao

63

27

43'll> 12

Rce Ceeell

20

15'll> 2

I

50'll> 3

7

2

1

7

7 1

Lcotcr YCUJII

2

0

O'll>

-

Alesundro Deluco 7

43'll> 0

0

Billy Phil ippide.

20

6

30'll> 0

0

3

Evm Avdoul..

12

4

33'll> 0

0

2

11 76 46

1

3

33

6 5.5

15

7

4

102

8 12.8

4

33'll>

12

24

6

4

58

7 83

0

O'llo

2

2

1

1

0

8 0

2S'lIo 5

11 5

8

8 1

12

9 1.7

3

1

0

6

7 0.9

samuel Gooden

15

3

2O'Jlo 4

1

o

1

0

12

9 13

Oli"", Block

16

6

38'll> 0

0

0

3

0

8

8 1

22

67% 17

38

13 14 128

8 16

11% 23 36% 9

24 17

15 2 47 11 13 64

8 5.9 8 8

Oron. Men (4.5)

11

7

I

Dream Team (].7)

JuooCopoao

135 51

38'll> 15

7

47% 9

27

15 16 III

9 12.3

Rob Liff

Kcncchi Efobi

127

60

47% 28

8

29'llo 66

85

5

8 16

]uooLcdcr

ShirodkFoison

73

20

27% 19

9

47...

CroigArimo

48

19

40'll> 7

98 Manbcw Golds",in 18

39

40'll> 13 28% 0

5 0

2O'Jlo 0

o

Jimmy Soridis

Matthew Soren

R<mniePhilip

2

11

16

16

4

25% 2

0

2

128

166

46

28% 33

53

23

43%

14

15

16 17 49

8 6.1

Manbcw Gilaoff

98

26

27% 33

12

14% 12

22

7

2

39

9 43

QJriJ Cotalbiano

64

18

28% 19

6

3N 27

35

9

1

42

8 5.6

38% 12

22

20 9

85

9 9.4

ReubenRooof

72

25

3S'Jlo 37

17

46%

14

21

11 5

72

8 9

0

o

4

1

0

0

4 0

11

5 0

5

8 0.6

322

8 0.3

o o 0%

9

I

2

15

6 2.5

Subo Ccbdo

6

0

0%

0

3

2

1

2

803

AriJ T SOIIpI'OO

23

2

9%

2

50'll> 7

Aim Dorfman

7

14% 2

50'll> 5

3

4

3 0

8

9 0.8

Wol ve, ln•• (3.5)

Showtlmo (4.5)

Dav id Topper

156

70

45% 48

29

6O'llo 33

59

1921 159

8 19.9 AathooyMama

228

91

40'll> 58

37

64% 21

61

24 40 224

8 28

DavidEbcr

159

72

45% 14

8

57% 32

43

27 18 153

721.9 LonyFricdman

113

28

2S'lIo 14

8

57% 29

33

3

3

97.1

Oscar Cutillo

75

27

36% 18

4

2N 8

7

12 4

58

7 83

Roo Zo.idmm

95

44

46%

16

4

2S'lIo 8

33

9

22 111

9 12.3

Roy Fink

33

7

21% 13

1

8%

4

4

0

0

15

4 3.8

Aron O1izik

73

22

30'll> 14

8

57% 21

69

3

7

9 5:4

Oded Kochovi

39

13

33% 14

4

4O'llo

14

13

6

0

29

6 4.8

Earl Poyse,

12

28'llo 21

6

29'llo 11

Juncs Kim

381129'llo00

o

1

22

8 2.8

Tommy Korogionnill2

7

58% 1

0

7

33% 5

1

0

Alexander Nak..

11

9...

9

7 0

Aathooy Kobo..

Pc..., SilVcmwl

15

7%524O'llo43224

4 1

Somir Puc!

O'llo

2

43

O. 0

21

2O'Jlo 7

64

49

12

3

7

28

9 3.1

5

3

2

13

5 2.6

16

4

0

15

8 1.9

0-

Demon Deacon. (4.5) Onyxx (8-1) Brim Krawczyk

2.56

110 43% 77

39

51% 60

107 20 34. 27:;

9 30.5

Alex Oropeza

27

16

0

0%

16

4 6

WlIdc Gall.abo'

50

QJriJ Dudin

132 58

ICcDncth Hom

78

Enrique Moitlmd

EricHmdlcr FrankO'EliI

Junes Cmovm

14

15

59'llo 2 28% 44% 18

6

19'1lo 14

4

4

75% 0

0

3

33% 2

o

2 6

50'll> 2 2

33% 1

8

24

33% 12

42

10 3

31

9 3.4

33% 12

27

10 5

136

9 15.1

4O'llo 10

O'llo

11

9

18 42

94.6

2

9

4

4

6 1

0

2

023

o o

50% 0 0

2 7

0%

0

o

2

0

6

3 4

9 03

60.2

Fritz Jcffcrio1l

136

56

41% 31

15

48% 29

44

16 33 127

7 18.1

GrcI8Smith

187

54

29'llo 15

10

67% 12

25

27 25 143

9 15.9

AdiIai SiriJinho

55

23

4N 21

6

29'llo

18

28

13 8

53

9 5.9

III

43

39'llo 28

7

2S'lIo

27

43

11 6

103

9 11.4

5

17

9 1.9

Dmicl Soo

BlabEutmm

50'll> 3

2

Joo Strongin

85

36

4N 12

4

33'Jlo 6

40

9

10 95

Gcorac SchWlIl1Z

12

3

2S'lIo 2

2

100% 3

6

1

2

8

90.89

BrimWilcy

7

2

29'llo 1

o

0'Jl0

14

2

0

4

9 0.4

3

9 10.6

Girls' Soccer sets high goals

F••t Break (7.2)

Devin Gallagher

188

ios

57% 23

13

57% 35

66

13 13 230

8 28.8, Adcycmi Mahoo

Khu1id Gele'

87

27

31% 24

11

46%

16

15

25 19 75

8 9A

Doualas Harrison 40

15

38'll> 31

16

5N 15

14

13 6

37

8 4.6

75

25

33'll>

33% .9

273967

8 8.4

An Schulmm

25

AUJtinGma

42

25

2O'l> 0

0

l\O'll> 21

11

o

Jcrcmys..

30

27% 0

Dmicl Ginacrich

5

2O'Jlo

Robert Fuchs

29'llo 2

8 0.5

T.,h•• I. ('-3)

Seth Cohon

28

The key statistics in the game were rebounding, free throw shoo ting, and shooting per centage. The Onyxx controlled the defens ive boards (36 -18) while staying abou t even offensive rebounds (12-15). But 46% freethrowing by the Onyxx kep t the Break in the game at the end. Poor clock management and 26% shooting by the Break salavaged the win for The Onyxx (40% shooting). The win marked the end of senior forward Fri tz Jeffries' championship game drought, as he had been on the _losing side of two championshiops, Unfortunately for him, this win will enter the books with an aster ick as a result of the suspension of regular season and playoff games due to the stolen watch incident. (See "Time Out for Intramurals" on pg. 3 for more information on the watch incident.)

11

2

2

18% 0

5N 8

230

104 45% 64

42

66% 43

27

59'llo 3

5

16 23 154

1

10'll> 27

41

14 7

TcnyHordy

29

28% 14

8

57%21251624

Carlo Cosanov.

4

125

61

8 '.6

CbriotosV .vuis

10 9

16

8 2

Emilio Boehringer 9

11... 0

o

2

2

5 0.4

Dmicl Katz

33'Jlo 0

o

0

4

8 19.2

40% 46

7 1.4

0

8 32.8

4N 10

19

10

o

262

137 55

0

I

15 8

45

6

3

71

SconMcDousaid

8

SO'llo 0

0

S"'""nZoliha

68

o

O'llo

0

0

19

28'llo 2

0

24

o 0'Jl0

5

0'Jl0

1

0 27 4

39

84.9 64

0 0 127

0 49

4

1

2

9 0.2

5

6

16

9 1.8

19 5.4

5 0.8

FGA RiM FG .. ITA ITM IT" OFR DFR ST AS ToIPT G PPG Flaw>, Unll (5-3)

I

69'llo

DavidRoocnthal

ISO 92

61% 32

76

16 17 1J.TI

NefWi Scrrmo

52

17

33% 4

2S'lIo 4

18

10 20 35

6 5.8

Gabriel Dobies

61

18

30'll> 4

2S'lIo 12

27

5

38

7 5.4

OillooCoclIo

247

29'llo0

0

7 2.1

Oren Eiscnbcra

16

2

13% 2

0

O'llo

JoocphSpak

34

11

3N 8

5

63'll> 4

l0n0thmHiralll

4

0

0%

4

0'Jl0

RmdyT.y1or

87

44

51... 24

12

50'll>

4

22

27

2

7 29.5

11 2

15

2

0

4

7 0.7

12

4

4

29

7 4.1

3

0

I

0

0

7 0

14

36

1

13 102

4 25.5

I

by Ian Katz The girls' soccer season is underway, and they are off to a qu ick start. The team's overall record is 4-1 and 2-1 in the division. Coach Keith Hanson's team cruised to easy victories over VanBuren, Flushing and Bayside High Schools. The stars of this year's soccer team are senior Onica Vollezon, juniors Kristen Erichsen and Ingrid Lemmy, and freshman Heather Patterson. Coach Hanson said, "For it to be a good year, our freshmen players mus t do well. Since it is the team' srebuilding year, freshmen who are athletic, aggressive and competitive will be on the team and girls who are afraid of the ball simply won't, I really hate girls who are afraid of the ball." Richmond Hill and Newtown High Schools are the team's biggest competitors. Coach Hanson said , "Both of these teams have South American girls who were born to play soccer. Richmond Hill has a player named Iran Meaj who makes the team impossible to beat." The freshmen and new sophomores will be the heart of the team. Kristen said, 'The new freshm en look pretty good. I just hope they 're taught in the same manner as I was , because coach Hanson's strictness and teaching methods have made the team wha t it is." Las t year 's team was 5-3-1. Al though many of the team's star play ers have graduated, coach Hanson feels that the new freshm an and sophomore talent will lead them to success. " I hope that last year's winning ways will continue into this seas on," he said . "We'll need a lot of hard work, but I feel that we'll be a major competitor this season."

The Classic newspaper Volume 9 Issue no. 3  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you