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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

ARTFULLY DRESSED

Women in the Art World Portraits by Carla van de Puttelaar

Volume VII: Culture & Beyond 5


ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Unless stated otherwise, copyright in this catalogue (including content and design) is owned by Carla van de Puttelaar and The Weiss Gallery. All images Š 2018 Carla van de Puttelaar You may not reproduce, adapt, modify, communicate to the public, reproduce or otherwise use any part of this catalogue without the express written permission from Carla van de Puttelaar and The Weiss Gallery. All rights reserved. 2


ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

CONTENTS Katrina Aleksa, 291 Alice Aurand, 293 Ana Balestra, 295 Anna Brady, 299 Princess Marie-Séverine de Caraman Chimay, 301 Anne Miriam Cockx, 305 Minister Ingrid van Engelshoven, 307 Fariba Farshad, 309 Kate Gordon, 311 Frieda Gustavs, 295 Miriam Guttmann, 313 Iris van Herpen, 315 Amelia Higgins, 317 Micky Huijsmans, 319 Melanie Keen, 321 Sigrid Kirk, 323 Sophie Macpherson, 325 Annie McGrath, 327 Susan Moore, 329 Delphine Munro, 331 Aurore Ogden, 333 Cinzia Pasquali, 335 Kathy Ryan, 337 Valentina Salmeri-Bijzet, 341 Freya Simms, 345 Fatoş Üstek, 347 Marthe Vanoverbeke, 349 Wieteke van Zeil, 351 Sitter Index 352


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CULTURE & BEYOND

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Katrina Aleksa Katrina was born in Latvia and lived, studied and worked in the UK, Italy and Spain by the time she was twenty. Katrina has an infectious passion for all things art. Since completing a degree in curating and art business at Sotheby's Institute of Art in London, she has provided Fine Art consultation and brokered Fine Art deals for a number of years. Katrina now travels and consults across the world, with contacts in America, Asia and Australia. To compliment her career as an art dealer, she founded Predella House, an institute committed to supporting artists and encouraging new buyers in contemporary art. Katrina is a co-founder of Association of Women in the Arts (AWITA) – a nonprofit networking group established to advance the careers of women in the visual arts, and to promote change in the cultural landscape. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? My role is about making connections and bridges between people. These connections take multiple shapes, whether connecting a buyer with an artist and their work or making connections myself, such as building relationships to form and mould event programmes. I prioritise forming connections that allow new people to access art and the art world. My day generally consists of organising art events which take a variety of forms. I regularly work on independent curatorial projects, organise events for the Association of Women in the Arts (AWITA), and develop programmes for ArtSocial and ArtSocial Foundation. I try to work with as many charitable causes as possible and I am currently organising an Art Gala in New York to raise money for the rehabilitation of schools in the British Virgin Islands in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? In every project that I undertake, professionally or personally, I’m motivated by seeing an end goal. It was fantastic to gain an insight into Carla’s own vision for the project and be taken along the journey to see through its completion – and, of course, it was even more exciting to see it executed with such talent. Being a woman working in the art world, it is impossible to ignore the association between feeling unguarded and being at the end of the camera lens. Carla teases this and pulls it apart, prompting her subjects to feel a sense of power in our unity as working women in the art world. It is magical to be part of this disruption. Do you have a favourite artist? I am lucky that my professional life in the art world allows me to encounter new artworks and artists on a daily basis, which, in turn, allows me to fall in love over and over again. During these encounters, whether that be researching an Old Master work or visiting a contemporary artist’s studio, in that moment the work becomes my favourite. I would find it almost impossible to choose. What is your earliest memory involving art? Whilst growing up in Latvia, I recall being at primary school and my teacher actually telling my mother off for not taking me to every optional after-school art lesson. I was in my first year of school and I’d already experienced that magnetism and curiosity towards the arts; I haven’t looked back since. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? For me, working in the art world as a woman is about holding collaboration as a priority over competition. If someone in the art world is doing something similar to you – invite them for a coffee, start a conversation, see if there’s something you can do together. We have an immense power when we come together that we should never take for granted – particularly in this moment when gender equality in the workplace and the art world is in the news. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? The dress that I decided to wear is by Self-Portrait. I wore it at the launch of Unfold, the art festival I ran in collaboration with three other women in October 2017. It matched our branding for the festival in colour – the pale pink is fresh, approachable and fun. Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Alice Aurand Alice, born in France, is a conservator of paintings based in Paris. She graduated with a joint BA in Asian, African and European Art History from the School and Oriental and African Studies and University College London and then undertook an easel paintings conservation diploma at the Courtauld Insitute of Art. Alice worked in the CSMVS museum in Mumbai, India, and at the National Gallery in Copenhagen, Denmark where she worked on the conservation of northern old masters such as Brueghel. Since moving back to France in 2016 she has worked with Cinzia Pasquali on conservation projects based at the Château de Versailles or the Musée d’Orsay, but also worldwide. She has been focusing particularly on a collaborative European initiative investigating the materials and techniques of paintings by Leonardo da Vinci. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Conservators are concerned with the material history of the art world, making sure art can withstand the test of time. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I was fascinated by the representation of textures in Carla’s photographs and it is an empowering project for women. Do you have a favourite artist? No; there are too many that I like, from Fra Angelico to Rothko! What is your earliest memory involving art? Making medals from polyester packing material in the storage room of the Louvre shop with my sister when I was a child. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The art world is mostly composed of women. Yet it is often men who hold the top positions. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I wore the dress at my first TEFAF in Maastricht which I attended with Cinzia. I wore the hat at Royal Ascot in 2017 which I also attended with Cinzia and Cecilia Frosinini. It was made in Italy under the supervision of Cecilia and belongs to Cinzia.

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Ana Balestra Dutch soprano Ana (left) grew up in Amsterdam. She started singing in a children’s choir when she was eight years old and played her first role in the musical of ‘Joseph and the amazing Technicolor dreamcoat’. She also loves acting and in 2008 she played in the theatre company, Toneelgroep Amsterdam in the performance of ‘Don Carlos’. In 2016 she began her studies at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam with soprano Valérie Guillorit. She's currently studying with baritone Don Marrazzo and receives vocal coaching from pianist Nathalie Doucet. Ana has taken part in masterclasses in the Netherlands, Austria, Italy, and Switzerland with renowned teachers including Margreet Honig, Pierre Mak, Paul Triepels, Adelisa Tabiadon and pianists Jeff Cohen and Hans Adolfsen. This February 2018 she won the incentive price at the Prinses Christina Concours. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I started singing in a Dutch children’s choir when I was eight years old (Nieuw Amsterdams Kinderkoor). This brought me a lot of great performances, for example we performed in the biggest opera hall in The Netherlands, and I was so lucky that I could sing a solo in this beautiful hall. I concentrate on classical music and I love to work together with other musicians and artists. My ideal world would be that people would live without animosity and I believe that the arts and especially music can play an important role to make this dream come true. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Frieda, the composer of the music that you will hear during the exhibition, has been a friend of mine for a long time. It is a pleasure to perform this piece and especially to work together with Carla. It is important that women can have a voice in the art world and I feel that especially in leading roles women are underrepresented. I am proud to be part of this strong and talented female art group. Do you have a favourite artist? My favourite artist by far is Maria Callas. She was such a special woman – she had everything for a great soprano. The way Callas performed is tremendous; she had a wonderful charisma and with her sound she could impress everybody immediately. What is your earliest memory involving art? My first memory is during an art exhibition of John Everett Millais at the Van Gogh Museum in 2008 where I performed during the exhibition with improvisations. This was a wonderful experience because it was the first time that I had interaction with the audience. They were so close to me that I could have touched them. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think that women are very important in the art world, everybody should be equal and have the same rights. In my opinion nobody is better because of their gender, everybody should work hard to get what they want and I hope that more and more women in this world get the opportunity to be free and get the freedom to work hard. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a bridal kimono for the photoshoot. It gave me a special feeling to wear this robe; pure, elegant and fragile at the same time.

Frieda Gustavs Frieda (right) was born on the shore of the Baltic sea, in Stralsund. She studies composition at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Her musical being was born and grew up in a choir, in the midst of the voices of people, her dearest instruments.

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Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I write music that weaves together my enthusiasm for the music that surrounds me: world music, new music, ancient music, it holds my joy for singing, it samples my past and always contains a glimpse of my future. I play with the expectations of the listener, who has distinctive associations and their own sense of time. When to sustain? When to transform or even break? Pure acoustic sound combined with the possibilities created by electronically bending the spectrum thrills me. I collect sounds from this world to force them into a new context. I believe in the power of simplicity, the power of a single musical line or a single musical gesture. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? At the age of three months I was photographed by Carla van de Puttelaar. Now, many years later, this act is repeated. Do you have a favourite artist? Björk. This woman makes me cry and smile and understand and puzzle. It is almost impossible for me to calmly listen to her work, since immediately I feel I have to make my own. What is your earliest memory involving art? I was curled up in the womb of my mother during her performance in Grünhufe. Percussionist Gottfried Röszler played, she danced and I had no other choice than to join. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? ‘People shouldn't say things, and pretend they are living’ said Elfriede Jelinek. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I was wearing a skirt of raw silk that has been in my family for multiple generations. It originally belonged to Ina Albert, a cousin of my great-grandmother. She was a secretary at the University for Music in Dresden, the school where I will be studying for a few months next year. Ina was a singer as well. When her mother died she moved to a small apartment where she had to dispose of a few items. My grandmother took on a green velvet sofa and this skirt, both accompanied by a roll of its fabric.

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Anna Brady Anna has been a journalist specialising in the art and antiques world for more than a decade, first at the trade weekly, Antiques Trade Gazette (ATG), then as a freelance journalist writing for publications such as Apollo, The Art Newspaper, House & Garden, World of Interiors and wallpaper*. Now, via a surreal stint in Dubai working as features editor at Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, she is the deputy art market editor at The Art Newspaper. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? It is my job to attempt to make sure the good, bad and, occasionally, ugly of the art market is reported, analysed and commented upon. Or at least try – the scope is vast. Journalists are the observers, with a bird’s eye view, both in the thick of it and one step removed from the coal face of the business. That is both an advantage and a frustration. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I hate having my photo taken, and my natural instinct is to shy away from this sort of thing. But then I thought, I have written about how women are not visible enough in this industry – most industries – so time to stop being pathetic and have a photo taken. I enjoyed watching Carla work, and then seeing how much the photographs varied from person to person – in those of others I knew. Being at the end of a lens is quite unnatural for a journalist; we are used to being the observer, not the observed. Do you have a favourite artist? Many, impossible to pick just one. In no particular order; Velasquez, Tintoretto, Manet, Alice Neel, Eric Ravilious, Lee Miller, Cecily Brown, Louise Bourgeois, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Winifred Knight…Glyn Philpot. Every woman that Manet ever painted is brilliant – the sort you aspire to be, even the Absinthe Drinker. What is your earliest memory involving art? I drew obsessively, from as long as I can remember, scribbling away from pictures, memory and life. So that’s my earliest memory. I grew up in a small village and I only started going to galleries as a teenager. But I vividly remember visiting the Guggenheim in Venice and Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge for the first time were particularly special – they showed me that art is something to be lived with, not stuck in a clinical white box. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Unless it is all talk and no action, I think we’re in a period of change – never has so much attention been focused on the role of women in the art world. It won’t be fast, but it will be irreversible. There are many influential women who have started galleries, but one thing that continually depresses me is that, despite the masses of brilliant female artists, barely any feature in the top results at major auctions. Money is no measure of quality of course, but that speaks volumes about how warped our perception of value is. That must, and I believe will, change. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? The designer of the dress is Jenny Packham.

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Princess Marie-Séverine de Caraman Chimay Princess Marie-Séverine, known as ‘MS’, read Classics at the Sorbonne. She studied Art and the Building Arts at the Prince Institute of Architecture in London and in 2001 finished an MA in Cultural Management, writing her thesis on sponsorship in architectural heritage. She worked in Belgium raising money for cultural projects and was involved in various cultural European networks. She has always has had a foot in her family business, first on the Ecclesiastical Furnishing side, and now at Watts of Westminster, Chelsea Harbour Design Centre. An iconic company of British decorative design, Watts of Westminster is a fifth generation family firm that was founded by three leading architects in 1874. They produce fabrics, wallpapers and passementerie using traditional as well as avant-garde methods to bring their library of historical designs into the 21st century. Guardians of a genuine archive, Watts specialises in bespoke designs that celebrate their gift of period pattern. They generously provided Carla with an abundance of fabrics for this project. MS is married and has three children. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? My grandmother, Elizabeth Hoare, took over Watts after the war. Times were hard but one big project brought the company back to life, the Coronation of the Queen. ‘God save the Queen for many reasons’, my grandmother used to say! Being 5th generation Watts, I have been immersed in art since birth. As a child, I was given hand-blocked wallpaper pieces supplied to the House of Parliament to play with… Fiona Flint as Creative Director brought our timeless archives in to the 21st century with passion and beauty. Thanks to her immense talent, we still work today on the most prestigious architectural buildings from past and present throughout the world. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Carla is such a talented, interesting and fun person! She has embraced our silks, textures and colours with a remarkably creative approach, and has created a real sculpture. What I most enjoyed about being part of this project? Spending time with a ‘genuine Artist’, very rare... Do you have a favourite artist? I was always attracted to paintings by Romney, drawings by Rassenfosse or the wonderful elevations of the streets of Paris by Albert Laprade. Architecture and architectural history have always been part of my life. And my little secret garden would be Cycladic sculptures and the Inca mysteries. What is your earliest memory involving art? My father used to give us paper and pencil to draw our front door from memory. How many thousands of times have you passed yours? Try it and you’ll see how difficult it is to get the proportions right! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The reputation of women within the art world is too often ignored. I have read recently that only a third of the artists represented in London galleries are women. Whether true or not, this shows there is much more to be done! Historically women have been marginalised but roles are changing. As Tracey Emin says, female art ‘is slow-burning and has greater longevity’.

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What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? Amongst the Watts of Westminster fabrics Carla chose, the Memlinc, c.1870: this pattern was originally painted on a robe in ‘The Presentation in the Temple’ by Michael Pacher. G. F. Bodley, one of the founders of Watts, (a friend and relation of my great-great-grandfather George Gilbert Scott), adapted the design and used it frequently in many of his commissions including in the Blue Drawing Room at Powys Castle. It was used recently in a bespoke light blue and gold for curtains in Abu Dhabi’s Presidential Palace. The Bellini, c.1850: the origin of this stylized geometric floral has been traced to a tapestry in the early Flemish painter Roger van der Weyden’s ‘Madonna And Saints’ (c. 1450). It was adapted by Augustus Pugin into a wallpaper during his collaboration with John Gregory Crace (whom he had also worked with for the Houses of Parliament) on the decoration of the great Victorian Abney Hall in Cheshire in the 1850s. It was woven in silk blue for the Coronation of the Queen in 1953 (we found the remaining meter in our archive and gave the Queen a cushion for her Jubilee), and lately can be found at Mercers Hall in London.

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Anne Miriam Cockx Miriam was born in Siegburg, Germany and studied History, History of Art and Spanish at the University of Bonn and Cologne with the main focus on art market studies and modern art. During her studies she worked for the auction house Lempertz in Cologne, where she mainly undertook research on artworks for different departments. She was also trained in the restitution department at Sotheby’s in London and joined the Art Loss Register as provenance researcher in 2016 after her Masters degree. Besides publications about the historic context of art looting and provenance research, her thesis about the Jewish art dealer Max Stern was selected to be presented at the University in Cologne. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I’m a provenance researcher specialising in World War II losses and working mainly with museums, auction houses and art dealers. Thus, clients are getting in touch with me to find out more about the history of an art work and of course to exclude any kind of claims for potential WWII losses. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? In my current job I actually never see the original art work while I’m doing my research. To be part of an actual art work and to participate in the development together with Carla was a unique experience. Do you have a favourite artist? I wouldn’t say I have one favourite artist. But I was always fascinated by the works of Frida Kahlo. The way she expressed emotions in her paintings and its impact on female identity, as well as the mix of surrealism and indigenous culture, makes her work really special for me. There is also Joyce Pensato, whose work is on the one hand so humorous but can be also very dark and sinister. What is your earliest memory involving art? As far as I can remember art was always around me. I was lucky to grow up in a mixed cultural home, since my mother is Peruvian and my father German. My Chilean grandmother was a dancer and my grandfather a musician. Also my German grandmother loved to paint. It was more a hobby than a profession, but I watched her for hours. Nowadays I’m fascinated to look over the shoulder of my father-in-law, who is a professional artist, and to see the formation process of his still lifes. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The art world has changed and there might be more chances for women now than a few years ago, but I wouldn’t say that we are on a level playing field. I think we’re at a point where we can clearly see that women in the art world are in good job positions in different institutions, but that it is still very difficult to see women in decision-making positions. In fact, this gender inequity is also remarkable for female artists, since the art market is still more in favour of male artists. In my opinion there are not enough female voices in the art world, so we need to try our best to fill these gaps and to make opportunities. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I'm wearing a Reiss dress, which I wore during the press conference for a recovery of a Balthasar van der Ast painting at the Suermondt Ludwig Museum in Aachen.

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Minister Ingrid van Engelshoven Ingrid began her career as a policy officer for the Democrats ’66 (D66) parliamentary party in the House of Representatives and served as its secretary from 1994 – 1996. She then worked as an adviser to the Netherlands Bar Association and at Pauw & Van Spaendonck, a communications consultancy. From 2000 – 2004 Van Engelshoven was Head of Strategy at the Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management and Director of the Foundation for Responsible Alcohol Consumption from 2004 – 2008. She went on to become a partner at Dröge & van Drimmelen, focusing on public affairs and corporate communication. In 2010 she joined the municipal executive of The Hague for D66, where she was responsible for education and public services. From 2014 – 2017 her portfolio covered the knowledge economy, international affairs, education and youth services. In March 2017 she became a member of parliament for D66. Her work in the House of Representatives encompassed home affairs, the police, the civil service and copyright. In October 2017 Ingrid was appointed Minister of Education, Culture and Science in the third Rutte government. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I have been serving as the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science since October 2017. In this role I am politically responsible for national cultural, arts and heritage policies in The Netherlands. My principle aim is to make sure the Dutch cultural sector flourishes like never before: this of course includes enhancing the roles of arts and heritage in society. Part of this aim is to enable a new generation of artists to break through and to encourage children to embrace arts and culture from a young age. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Working with Carla was a great experience. I felt very at ease with her as we had a lot of fun during the photo shoot. Do you have a favourite artist? Two artists – in every sense of the word – spring to mind: the Belgian fashion designer Dries van Noten is a favourite of mine, just as the Spanish/Catalan sculptor and painter Josep Bofill. Their works never cease to amaze me. What is your earliest memory involving art? My earliest memory is a visit to the magnificent halls of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts (Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten) in Antwerp, Belgium. As a little girl I couldn’t believe my eyes. It was all so beautiful. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Like many other sectors the art world is – unfortunately – a male-dominated world. As women we can and must change this by uniting and supporting each other. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am pictured here in a beautiful dress by Dutch designer Mattijs van Bergen. Carla picked it for me. It was love at first sight, especially because of its wonderful colours.

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Fariba Farshad Fariba is an award-winning curator and pioneer of creative education. Born in Iran, she moved to Paris in 1983 and subsequently to London in 1986. As a renowned champion of Iranian artists, her ground-breaking exhibitions Whispered Secrets, Murmuring Dreams (2008), Masques of Shahrazad (2009), and most recently the globally-touring exhibition, Burnt Generation (2014), have introduced many young contemporary Iranian artists to a Western audience. Along with Michael Benson, she is Co-Founder of Candlestar, a company that specialises in the creation and development of major new international cultural initiatives including the Gulf Art Fair (now Art Dubai) and the Prix Pictet. Candlestar also produces Photo London, the leading international photography fair launching its fourth edition at Somerset House in May 2018. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am founding director of Photo London which was launched by Candlestar in 2015. I am also a founding director of Candlestar which since inception in 2003 has produced a sequence of major arts projects including a European Painting Prize and the Prix Pictet. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? The realisation that so many women are now in senior positions in the art world. It was also a great adventure – both in finding the right dress to wear and collaborating with Carla to realise such an intriguing project. Do you have a favourite artist? This changes on a regular basis. I have just returned from Mexico where I was reminded that Frida Kahlo is a constant source of inspiration. I have been enormously privileged to work with the two great Masters of Iranian art – Parviz Tanavoli and Abbas Kirostami – and, again, they are both immensely important touchstones for me. I am also enormously proud that young Iranian photographers such as Newsha Tavakolian and Azadeh Akhlaghi have been so well received in the West. What is your earliest memory involving art? I spent a lot of my youth sitting in my father’s studio watching him sculpt, draw and paint. I remember when I was seven years old, he had been away for a long time and returned with this extraordinarily beautiful portrait of my mother that he made from his memories of her. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Although there is much work still to be done I am broadly encouraged by the progress that women have made in the art world in the UK. I only wish that progress was reflected in other spheres of professional activity worldwide. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? My dress is by Peter Pilotto. There isn’t a particular story. I bought it to celebrate the launch of Photo London 2018 at the home of a major London collector.

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Kate Gordon Kate was born in New York, and moved to London when she was a child. After St. Paul’s Girls’ School, Amherst College and University of Moscow, Kate returned to London where she has worked in the art world for over twenty years. She is the Founder of London Art Studies (an online learning platform for the arts), a co-Founder of the Association of Women in the Arts, and the arts columnist/writer for Evening Standard Homes & Property section. Kate currently serves as an Ambassador for Arts Alliance, is on the Tate Patrons Executive Committee and is Chair of Foreign Sisters, which raises funds for Cancer Research UK. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I started at Sotheby’s in Client Advisory, then realised I wanted to combine my love of the art world with media/communications. I first joined Carlton Television, then moved to CNN where I worked as global arts producer. I then freelanced in television for a couple of years, before ending back at Sotheby’s Institute where I headed up their Public Programmes department. On leaving, I then set up London Art Studies in 2011, which combines art and filming to bring online courses in art to a global audience. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I enjoyed the collaboration with Carla, and found it interesting to see how she saw me. I’m more used to being behind the camera, producing the films (first for CNN, and now my own films with London Art Studies) – and I enjoyed seeing it from the other side. It’s made me much more sympathetic to the on-camera talent, when filming now. Do you have a favourite artist? So many, but currently eyeing up the Picasso soon to be in the Christie’s Rockefeller sale. I would certainly say Picasso, but that could change next week, or next month. What is your earliest memory involving art? Sunday afternoons at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York with my parents. There’s even a photo of me in my pram at the Met... Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think it’s an exciting time for women in the art world; we’ve had great leaders such as Frances Morris coming to the forefront, and there are a great number of women coming through the ranks who have been inspired by their stories. It’s important to have role models, and also to celebrate what’s been achieved thus far. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I’m wearing an old favourite Giambattista Valli coat, which comes out every winter, plus a Loewe shirt from the 2018 collection. I do like mixing things I’ve had for ages, with something new. The earrings, they’re inspired by the Renaissance, made in Italy and are a particular favourite of mine.

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Miriam Guttmann Miriam is a photographer and ambitious young documentary maker, currently based in Amsterdam. When she was seventeen, her photography series ‘Young Masters’ and ‘Loss’ attracted the attention of the press and of a number of curators. Her photography has been shown in FOAM, Fotofestival Naarden, Corrosia Almere, DoubleTree Hilton Hotel and Art’otel 5&33 in Amsterdam. In her work she approaches difficult subjects, such as a death, female sexuality and the tragic but often abstracted story of displacement. Her graduation film ‘Seeds of Deceit’, about fertilisation, will be screened in EYE Filmmuseum, Amsterdam, in June 2018. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? By treating difficult subjects such as death and female sexuality with an open approach I feel that through my work I have a role in changing the lives of my subjects and hopefully those of my viewers. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Carla’s work emphasises the importance of women active in the arts by shining her light on them. I hope that this series will encourage other women to feel empowered in their passion too. Do you have a favourite artist? Many artists from different disciplines inspire me. Recently, photographers such as Paulo Resvari, Rahi Rezvani, musicians such as Jim Croche, Bruce Springsteen, and directors Greta Gerwig and Joshua Oppenheimer. What is your earliest memory involving art? When I was only two years old, I went to a theatre performance of Charles Dickens’ ‘David Copperfield’. I remember clearly standing for the whole show to experience it as close by as I could. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The #Metoo discussion stirred up a lot in the film business. The Oscar nomination for Greta Gerwig as the 5th female director is a good example of the positive change that is already happening. Now it’s our duty to keep striving for a ‘50/50 by 2020’ initiative, which aims to have male-female parity in the film industry in two years. I’m confident that that shift will come much quicker now. Not only because businesses ‘should be equal’, but merely because it’s just good business to make women’s stories and their inner life experience be told by women. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I’m covered in 35 mm celluloid film. I have a deep appreciation for this material. Shooting on celluloid film urges you to make choices, to be focused and prepared, unlike digital film which allows you to have unlimited chances on getting the right shot.

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Iris van Herpen Iris is a Dutch fashion designer, creating women’s wear collections. Her designs incorporate unique treatments of material and the creation of completely new materials, often involving interdisciplinary research and collaborations with other artists. Van Herpen studied Fashion Design at ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in Arnhem and interned at Alexander McQueen in London, and Claudy Jongstra in Amsterdam. In 2007, a year after graduating, she established her own label. She is a guest member of the Parisian Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, part of the Fédération Française de la Couture. In 2017, Iris received the Johannes Vermeer Award, a Dutch state prize for the arts. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Looking around me, I consider what I can't see as much as what I can see, and that transformative focus creates freedom in my work. It’s my search for new forms of delicate craftsmanship and innovation through collaboration with other artists, architects and scientists. The art of fashion, this delicate place where innovation and craft are perfected at the finest possible level, is creating new terrains for collaboration with other disciplines, and those will shape the future of fashion. To me, fashion is a form of art that is so closely related to me and my body. I don’t think of fashion as clothes, or even as a discipline. I think of it as much more; a dialogue between our inside and our outside. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I am a big admirer of Carla’s work. The way she captures the fragility, beauty and sensuality of the female body, and the softness and intimacy within her work, speak to me, so it felt special to be at her studio, to work together and to be captured by her. Do you have a favourite artist? There are so many artists that inspire me intensely. Right now, I am especially drawn to the work of David Altmejd – the way he invents new forms and mutations. What is your earliest memory involving art? My older brother is exceptional at drawing, and was so even from a very young age. I remember looking at his drawings and feeling amazed, wanting to do the same. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Fashion, music and art are three very strong channels for women to empower, to reinforce our communal vision towards a new femininity. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing my Imprint dress, from my ‘Between the Lines’ collection. The optical manipulation of this dress is based on hypnotic repetitive patterns in a minimal palette of black. The dress feels special to wear, because the touch of it is so 3-dimensional. We made it from a fine black silk that is shaped with soft 3D hand-cast PU lines, that are hand-painted.

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Amelia Higgins Amelia was born in London. She feels passionate about making historical art more accessible to the younger generation, and to new buyers who tend to lean more towards contemporary works. Amelia began her career working for the Dutch and Flemish Old Master dealer, Johnny van Haeften and is now the Project Manager of London Art Week. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am Project Manager of London Art Week, a biannual event which takes place in around forty of the top galleries in Mayfair and St James's, selling works from Antiquity up to Modern Art. These two week-long events are showcases for the amazing spaces and world-class works of art on display and sold all year round. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Supporting women in the arts, and in particular in the Old Master world. It is an honour to be involved and photographed by Carla. Do you have a favourite artist? I work with a huge variety of art, covering seven millennia – I learn more and more with each gallery visit, and I honestly seem to have a new favourite artist/movement/medium every week! Currently, it is the British landscape artist, Algernon Newton (1880 – 1968), who I have recently discovered. What is your earliest memory involving art? As a child I remember looking through one of my father's books on Albrecht Durer and being completely intrigued by ‘Melancholia I’. I had probably been sent to my room or was sulking at the time, which is why it resonated so much... Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The Old Boys club is certainly changing, and there are more and more women in high powered positions. I am sure the incredibly impressive women in this room, whose work speaks for itself, will inspire much confidence in those starting out in the art world. Can I say that I feel like a complete fraud amongst them..?! What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I always enjoy the beautiful materials and drapery in Old Master portraits and still lifes, and I am lucky to be friends of the family-run Watts of Westminster, who kindly lent some incredible material to wrap myself in. Their wallpapers and fabric adorn several museums and historical buildings around the world, covered with paintings, so I felt this was also an appropriate connection.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Micky Huijsmans Micky was born in ’s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands. After graduating as a fine arts restorer, she decided to pursue her dream of being a successful musician. She currently studies music at the Metal Factory in Eindhoven. She works as a vocal teacher and as a singer with her bands ‘End Of The Dream’ and ‘Porselain’. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I’ve always had a big passion for art and things of historical value. That is why I started studying restoration of decorative and fine art painting. I wanted to contribute to the world of art by helping to preserve it. After my education and all the valuable things that I got to learn during my internship, I decided to pursue my music career, which to me is definitely no less of an art form. Besides doing my own musical projects, I am also teaching vocals to others. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I loved that it was very spontaneous for me to be a part of it. I came to talk to Carla about another project and suddenly she asked me if she could take some pictures. Of course I said yes! But besides it being spontaneous I also really like the concept of bringing attention to the women in the art world. Do you have a favourite artist? My favourite painters are Caravaggio and Michelangelo. In music, one of my favourite artists is Amy Lee from Evanescence. What is your earliest memory involving art? I remember going to church with my grandmother on Christmas and being completely mesmerised by all the paintings that represented the crucifixion of Christ. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I find the people in music and art to be much more open minded and accepting in general. In the metal genre there are still more male musicians but that doesn’t bother me at all. It’s much more accepted to be a female metal musician than it was twenty years ago, so that’s definitely a good thing. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a silk nineteenth century opera coat from Carla’s collection.

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Melanie Keen Melanie was appointed Director of Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts) in 2015. With the Stuart Hall Library acting as a critical and creative hub for its work, Iniva works predominantly with British-born and British-based visual artists of African and Asian descent supporting them at different stages in their careers. Melanie is an Independent Advisor to the Government Art Collection, sits on the British Council’s Visual Arts Advisory Group. She is part the Mayor of London’s Suffrage Commission Group which selected Gillian Wearing’s sculpture for Parliament Square – it is the first sculpture by a woman of a woman in the square. Most recently, she was on the British Pavilion Selection Committee for the 58th Venice Biennale. In a career spanning over twenty years, Melanie has also worked as an independent curator and consultant. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I’m the director of Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts). It’s a pioneering visual arts organisation with history spanning over two decades ensuring overlooked and underrepresented artists and art histories are recognised for their significant contribution to contemporary art and culture. I see my role as challenging the status quo. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Being seen alongside my peers. Do you have a favourite artist? I have lots of favourite artworks. What is your earliest memory involving art? Making art at school aged eleven and realising that I really enjoyed it. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Today women occupy high-profile positions in the art world, especially in the public sector in the UK, though we must never be complacent. However, the more urgent question of positions in the art world is to do with equality of race and class. The issue of diversity is complex and women have the power collectively to bring about profound change. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I bought the dress for a friend’s wedding some years ago but on my right wrist is a bracelet intricately made, out of black and gold threads, by my eldest son for Mother’s Day this year.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Sigrid Kirk Sigrid was born in New Plymouth, New Zealand, and has an MA in Art History. She is Co-founder of ARTiMBARC, a platform to amplify the stories of cultural organisations. Prior to this Kirk cofounded and ran Arts Co – a cultural production agency. She is also Co-Founder of the Association of Women in the Arts, and advises clients on collecting art and design. Kirk is a Trustee of the Drawing Room, IKON Advisory Board member and on the Development Board of the Victoria & Albert Museum. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I think of myself largely as a connector and amplifier. Through AWITA I connect women across the large and fragmented arts ecology. ARTiMBARC was created out of the belief that museums need to tell their stories better and communicate with their audiences in a more dynamic way, and my work in the commercial and non-profit sectors allows me to see trends and identify opportunities. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Watching Carla work, the tiny subtleties of moving the fabric an inch, tweaking a crease, asking me to turn my head or move my hand just a twist further and all the while watching the sun and its imperfect light. The beauty in the accretion of tiny details achieved without props or lighting or assistants was very special. Do you have a favourite artist? Goya - especially his extraordinary black paintings. What is your earliest memory involving art? Experiencing the kinetic sculptures of Len Lye at the Govett Brewster Art gallery in New Plymouth where I grew up. Arguably one of the twentieth century's most original artists - after stints in London in the pre-war years and then post war New York Lye worked in multi-media and when in his seventies re-connected with his home country, New Zealand and left his work and archive to the Gallery. 'Flip and Two Twisters’ is a work that consists of three eighteen foot strips of steel that hang from the ceiling, wriggling and twisting to create a loud clashing and crashing kinetic dance. Lye called it 'a piece of sperm, and on the other side is an equivalent spermatozoa wiggling and waggling and in the middle is a great female loop king of shape, a vulva shape, and you’ve got the whole malefemale symbolism” something I didn’t know at the time. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? History is male and the future is female. I think structurally we are going to see huge changes in the art market. It feels like there is more than ever an appetite for women not just be to heard, but also to think collectively about our personal and professional agency. What we can all do to support market and pay parity, develop industry best practise and continue to have the conversations that need to be had. What are you wearing and is there a story behind it? I am wearing Canadian born British designer Edeline Lee. In this collection Lee pays homage to artist Georgia O’Keeffe and ventured to New Mexico for spring.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Sophie Macpherson Sophie is a headhunter for the international art world, focussing on recruitment and placement of members of staff within galleries, museums and institutions, auction houses, collections, financial institutions and artists’ studios worldwide. She has a team in London, a team in New York and is currently launching in Hong Kong. She is a connector of people and of ideas, helping businesses transition through periods of change and growth through her wider consultancy services. She grew up in London and in Spain, studied languages at university and started her business after working for an art dealer in London for the first few years of her career. She was awakened to this fascinating industry through her time at the gallery and has adored every moment since, learning through experience of working with the people who make up this incredible art world we live and work in. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I help businesses and organisations grow and flourish by placing important members of staff and advising on development. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I loved the idea of us women in the art world being the subject matter. We all look at artists, at paintings, at products all the time, and being the focus of something important was really interesting. Do you have a favourite artist? Klimt, for his use of colour and warmth. What is your earliest memory involving art? My mother selling paintings in the arcade on Portobello Road. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think there are a great deal of us, doing really well, enjoying life and we are very lucky. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? Diane von Fürstenberg, I loved this palette and the way the dress flows.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Annie McGrath Annie was born in London and she initially did an Art & Design Foundation Course at Camberwell (UAL) where she specialised in painting. She then studied English Literature and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds and began performing sketch comedy shows with the Leeds Tealights, before setting up the University’s Comedy Society. Her first role in the art world was as sales assistant at the Rebecca Hossack Gallery, then at Cawdell Douglas (now Golden2 Consulting) where she works on press and media relations for a number of clients, including The Weiss Gallery, and contemporary galleries such as Sims Reed and Fiumano Clase. Annie continues to write and perform stand-up and sketch comedy at gigs and festivals up and down the country. She has been in numerous critically acclaimed shows at the Edinburgh Fringe and appeared on ITV2, Channel 4, Sky Sports, BBC Radio 4, and BBC Radio 4 Extra. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? At Golden2 Consulting, I work on press and media campaigns for various clients, as well as managing the company’s website and social media channels. I have led press campaigns for one of the UK’s leading prison charities, The Koestler Trust and assisted on PR campaigns for International art fairs such as Paris Tableau and TEFAF Maastricht. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Working with Carla has been a brilliant experience; her photographs are striking and she manages to capture something unique about each of the women she photographs. In what is often considered a very male-dominated industry, this exhibition seems more timely now than ever before, and gives an important insight into the influential women behind today’s art world. I have had the pleasure of being part of this project in two different roles: firstly, running the press campaign for the exhibition, and secondly, being one of Carla’s sitters, alongside some amazing women. Do you have a favourite artist? Jenny Saville would have to be one of my favourite artists – I love the way she applies paint to create dark, slightly grotesque portraits and fleshy nudes. I am also a huge fan of Tom de Freston’s work. His figurative paintings are beautiful and disturbing and often inspired by literary or mythological sources. I bought a series of Tarot cards he created in collaboration with poet Helen Ivory, but I hope one day I’ll be able to afford one of his paintings! What is your earliest memory involving art? My parents encouraged me to draw and paint and I always loved it. Having worked in television, my mum retrained as an osteopath when I was little, so she could spend more time with me and my brother. I remember a few occasions when I went with her to osteopathy lectures; I would sit at the back with a big gold and red biscuit tin full of crayons and felt-tips and colour-in for hours. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? This exhibition has demonstrated how many women in senior positions there are in the art world. Though, there is clearly still a long way to go. Female artists are still underrepresented in galleries, despite the fact that more women study art than men, and unfortunately the gender pay gap remains. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I’m wearing my friend’s dress, the brilliant comedian, Lolly Adefope. She bought it to wear on her birthday last year and I broke into her house and stole it. It’s not her birthday anymore! The necklace I’m wearing is a special one as it was given to me by my granny. I think of her whenever I wear it.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Susan Moore Susan graduated from London University with a BA in the History of Art. After working for Country Life as architectural secretary, writer and arts editor, she began writing for the Financial Times as an art critic and art market correspondent in 1986. A long-time London Editor for Art & Auction, she also had saleroom columns in, among others, the Spectator (1998 –2013) and the Evening Standard (2000 – 2002). As Associate Editor of Apollo since 2004, she writes regularly on the art market and profiles international collectors. Moore founded the non-profit Slow Art Workshop in 2017. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Over the years my career in publishing has involved editing, commissioning and writing. Unusually, I have been both art critic and art market columnist, and in both have attempted to champion works of art of all periods, media and cultures. For the last seven years, I have also been collecting collectors. In 2017, I launched the non-profit Slow Art Workshop to allow everyone the opportunity of engaging closely with, and handling, all kinds of works of art. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I can’t say I ever enjoy being photographed but I was intrigued by the process and watching Carla work, and by being the subject of a portrait, rather than directing the photography of existing works of art. Do you have a favourite artist? No. What I have are favourite works of art, but the only one that has ever made me burst into tears was Bernini’s Apollo and Daphne. What is your earliest memory involving art? As a child seeing what I now realise was a Monet seascape of the 1880s in the house of a friend and marvelling how anyone could interpret what they saw in this astonishing way. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The first is a general point. I am heartened to see that women starting their careers no longer have to presume that they should be given a less interesting job than a man with the same qualifications. Now there is also greater solidarity and support: I have only been sacked twice, both times by women. As for the art world, I hope I am not too cynical in suspecting that part of the reason why so many women now hold prominent positions has something to do with the fact that fewer men are prepared to accept the relatively low salaries associated with careers in the arts. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I had long admired Alexander McQueen and its brilliant creative director Sarah Burton, and thought it appropriate for this project to be wearing clothes masterminded by a woman. While I initially opted for the spectacular texture and colours of an oversize Wishing Tree tweed and leather jacket, the glamour of this petal-print, gossamer-fine evening gown was irresistible. It achieved what couture is meant to do - make the wearer feel fabulous.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Delphine Munro Delphine was born in Paris and studied Economics and Finance (Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris – Sciences-Po) and Art History (Courtauld Institute, London). She is married with three children and is Head of Arts & Culture at the European Investment Bank, in Luxembourg. Delphine is responsible for the management and enhancement of its extensive and unique contemporary art collection, the development of a mentoring/artists in residence programme and the preservation of cultural heritage. She has over twenty years’ experience in the management of culture – for museums, private institutions and foundations. She is President of the Board of Casino Luxembourg, Forum d'Art Contemporain; board member and Secretary of IACCCA (International Association of Corporate Collections of Contemporary Art) and also board member of Les Amis des Musées Luxembourg. She has received the French honorary title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I see my role as a facilitator and a mediator. I facilitate as a promoter of budding talent (through my residency scheme) and I mediate, as a curator and manager of an art collection. Art is the ultimate communication tool. Artistic production is at the core of mankind’s individuality and mission. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I really appreciated the unique dialogue with Carla when I was posing. It also prompted a reflection on my position and the way I would like to be perceived and understood. It was both an exhilarating and humbling experience. The vast array of women who posed for Carla is a testament to the vibrancy and richness of the female art scene. Do you have a favourite artist? My favourite artist is Nicolas de Staël for his distinctive abstract landscapes and his series on footballers. His use of the spatula and thick impasto, his block-like slabs of colours, his playfulness with light, his low skies really appeal to me. Nicolas de Staël’s life – from Saint Petersburg to Paris, via Brussels and North Africa, tragically ending in Antibes – is a testament to resilience. What is your earliest memory involving art? When I was four, my mother took me to see the series of tapestries, ‘La Dame à la Licorne’ at the Musée de Cluny in Paris. It was both a unique artistic and human encounter. Artistic because I discovered a new medium (tapestries) and message (an allegory of the senses), and human because the museums’ guard took me by the hand and engaged with me for a long time, testing my knowledge of animals and history. I still reflect on how instrumental this guard was in awakening my interest in and passion for the arts… Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Women are uniquely positioned, as producers, messengers and facilitators. I engage with art by female artists who explore the feminist cause, although I do not wish to be reduced to this label. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing ‘Pleats Please’ by Issey Miyake. I bought this outfit in Japan some fifteen years ago and wear it regularly. I love his garments for their timelessness, their versatility and functionality.

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Aurore Ankarcrona Ogden Aurore was born in London and serves as Director of Art at The Arts Club on Dover Street and as a Consultant for Roberta Moore Contemporary. She is responsible for curating the Club’s art events programme – speakers include Frances Morris, Don McCullin, Cornelia Parker and Theaster Gates – in addition to overseeing all other art partnerships, serving as the face of ‘Art’ at The Arts Club. Aurore is also co-chair of the Tate Young Patrons. Previously she worked as a Director at Hiltzik Strategies, New York, specialising in strategic communications for high profile individuals and companies, in the fields of media, entertainment and philanthropy, including Katie Couric, Alec Baldwin, Dreamworks and The Weinstein Company. Prior to that Aurore worked for three years on CNN New York’s Breaking News Desk where she produced packages for CNN’s domestic daily shows including Anderson Cooper and American Morning. Aurore graduated from University College London with a BA in History of Art and a minor in Anthropology. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? The beauty of my job is that I am given virtually free reign to organise events that I, and hopefully by extension our members, will find interesting. If there is a topic I am longing to hear debated, an artist I am eager to meet or an exhibition I am excited about I am in the hugely fortunate position whereby I can pursue those threads and in so doing, try to create a topical, diverse programme for the Club. Co-chairing the Tate Young Patrons is a huge honour, one which enables me to do a better job for The Arts Club by virtue of the wonderful people and experiences I am exposed to on a regular basis. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? There is something hugely empowering about any project which gathers and focuses strong women, not just in the art world but across all industries. Giving those women an opportunity to wear their own clothes, clothes which they feel best represent them, offers a unique insight into each personality. Carla made the process a very natural, organic one and in so doing has extracted elements from her sitters which others may have struggled to. Do you have a favourite artist? It would have to be Helen Frankenthaler, the American abstract expressionist painter. Her show at Gagosian in Paris last year was beautiful, for me in particular ‘The Red Sea’, 1959. She experimented tirelessly, in a range of media, but it’s her use of colour which resonates with me the most. What is your earliest memory involving art? My earliest memory is not necessarily a positive one – I displayed such little aptitude or interest in art class that I was ejected on more than one occasion… The rules of perspective I seemed particularly to struggle to grasp! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? As an Executive Committee member of AWITA – The Association of Women in the Arts – one of the topics we always return to in our discussions – and rightly so – is how far we have (or have not) progressed towards equality in the arts. There are still significant pay gaps between men and women, and leading non-profit institutions and women artists still get far fewer solo shows in major museums than their male counterparts. That is a balance which needs to be redressed, and soon. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a skirt suit by Italian designer Stephan Janson and a blouse by Diane von Furstenberg whom Stephan actually worked with in the ‘80s before opening his own business in Milan. His tailoring is exquisite but it was the colour which immediately attracted me, with its hint of bright pink lining inside. You cannot have a bad day in a colour combination like that. My bespoke Hattie Rickards Jewellery pieces never leave my neck and wrists. As one of my dearest friends, Hattie has created things with so much meaning for me personally that I feel quite incomplete without them. Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Cinzia Pasquali Cinzia graduated from the Central Restoration Institute of Rome (ICR) with a joint degree in painting and sculpture, and obtained a master’s degree of Sciences and Techniques at the Sorbonne in Paris. Cinzia Pasquali has led several significant in-situ projects in Italy, such as the restoration of the Donna Regina Nuova church in Naples and Santa Barbara dei Librari in Rome, as well as carried out treatment on large format paintings, including the large copper works by Domenichino and Ribera at the Royal Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro in Naples. In 2017 she was made a Knight of the Legion d’Honneur for her services to the arts in France. Established in France since 1990, she has led complex monumental projects at the Louvre with the Galerie Apollon, the Galerie des Glaces and Salon de la Paix at the Château de Versailles or the Grande Singerie at the Château de Chantilly. She works for the Research and Restoration Center for French Museums (C2RMF) where she restored iconic works such as Bronzino’s Lamentation (Musée des Beaux Arts et d’archéologie de Besançon) or the Virgin and Child with St. Anne by Leonardo da Vinci (Louvre) and Ucello’s Saint George Slaying the Drago. She is currently restoring Giovanni Bellini’s late career masterpiece, The Drunkenness of Noah. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? My role is to examine and pass on knowledge about cultural heritage. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? To belong to a community of women: works of art amongst works of art. Do you have a favourite artist? Leonardo da Vinci, my only love. What is your earliest memory involving art? Visiting the Vatican Museums when I was a teenager. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Women have a sensitive connection to creation. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I wore the Pucci dress and YSL coat for a charity gala in the Château de Versailles which was given by the Italian home affairs minister, a woman. The hat was made in Florence under the supervision of Cecilia Frosinini, a prominent art historian and friend. I wore it for Royal Ascot last year.

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Kathy Ryan with her daughter Sylvie Thode The long-time director of photography at the New York Times Magazine, Kathy has been a pioneer of combining fine art photography with photojournalism in the pages of the magazine. She has worked with the world's best photographers, across all genres of photography. Ryan regularly brings new talent into The NYTimes Magazine's pages. During her time there, the Magazine's photography and videos have been recognised with numerous awards, including National Magazine Awards, SPD Gold awards, and Art Directors Club awards. Ryan was chosen by Creative Review magazine for their Outstanding Contribution to Photography recognition for 2016. In 2014 she won the Vision award from the Center for Photography at Woodstock, and in 2012, in London, she won the Royal Photographic Society's annual award for Outstanding Service to Photography. In 2007 she won a lifetime achievement award from the Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester, MA, and in 2015 and 2003 she won the Lucie Award for Picture Editor of the Year. Under Ryan's leadership, the Magazine commissions the world's best photographers, a selection of whose work was published in The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture, 2011), edited by Ryan. An exhibition of this work, co-curated by Ryan, opened at the Rencontres d'Arles in 2012 and traveled to FOAM Museum in Amsterdam, Palau Robert in Barcelona, and other venues in the U.S., ultimately finishing its run at the Aperture Gallery in NYC. In 2012, Ryan began posting on Instagram her images of the poetry and beauty to be found in the office life at The New York Times. She currently has 110,000+ followers. A book of these pictures, Office Romance, was published by Aperture in 2014, and an exhibition of this work was shown at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in NYC in May 2016, the SpainMedia Gallery in Madrid in April 2017, and in Bologna, Italy in October 2015 as part of the Foto Industria festival. Ryan has twice served as co-curator, with Scott Thode, of the Look3 photography festival in Charlottesville, VA. An exhibition sponsored by FOAM Museum and curated by Ryan, Dutch Seen, opened at the Museum of the City of New York in 2009. Ryan also cocurated the Myths&Realities exhibition at the SVA Gallery in 2012, with Scott Thode. She also lectures on photography. She gave the 2012 Karsh Lecture in Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She serves as a mentor at the School of Visual Arts. She is represented by Howard Greenberg Gallery. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I have had the pleasure of commissioning many artists to work for the The New York Times Magazine over the years. It is always thrilling to see what an artist creates in response to an editorial assignment. I am fortunate to work in a building with extraordinary light, designed by Renzo Piano. This light lends a cinematic mood to our workplace, due to the lines of light and shadow that move throughout the building on sunny days. I am drawn to make pictures of this light as it sculpts the people and objects within The New York Times building. It is always a quickly moving light so it imbues the pictures with a sense of time passing. I like the cold, crisp light of the morning on the east side of the building and the moody, warm light of the late afternoon on the west side of the building. The more I have to wrestle with the light, the more I like it. This is particularly true during a portrait sitting. I want the light to be hard to work with. When it does work out, the results are stronger and more surprising. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? The thing I enjoyed most about being part of this project was seeing Carla van de Puttelaar at work. It was inspiring to see her at work in the magical north light of Manhattan. Do you have a favourite artist? I have more than one favourite artist. It is not possible to narrow it down to one. What is your earliest memory involving art? My parents used to buy old rolls of wall paper that we would roll out across the floor, with the blank, reverse side facing up. Then my sister Maureen and I would spend hours drawing on this paper, scrolling it out further whenever we needed more paper. I also have vivid memories of my third grade teacher, a nun named Sister Mary William, teaching us about paintings. She would hand out

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small reproductions of famous paintings that we would paste into our notebooks as she talked about the painting and what the painter may have been thinking while he was painting it. I fell in love with art history in that class. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I am happy to see that more women artists are finally getting the recognition they were denied in the past. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a simple, classic Paul Smith jacket with black jeans. This is more or less my uniform. I am most comfortable in this look.

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Valentina Salmeri-Bijzet Valentina was born in Turin, Italy. After a degree in European Public Law from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and an MA in History and Business of Art and Collecting from Warwick University and the Institut d'Études Supérieures des Arts in Paris, Valentina joined Sotheby’s Private Client Group in 2012 assisting international high-net-worth individuals with building their art collections. In 2013 she moved to the Contemporary Art Department where she was put in charge of Sotheby’s newly created private sales space, the S|2 Gallery, offering curated selling exhibitions throughout the year. In Spring 2016 she relocated to the Netherlands where she joined Unseen Photo Fair in Amsterdam. As the Head of Development & External Relations Valentina was responsible for fostering productive long-term relationships with Unseen’s key external relations, including private collectors and donors, professionals and artistic institutions, as well as developing the international partners and sponsors strategy of the fair. In January 2018 she joined the Rijksmuseum, where she has been responsible for the Rijksmuseum Fund and the private donors of the museum. Valentina holds a Classical Ballet Diploma from the John Cranko School in Stuttgart and is fluent in Italian, German, English, French and Dutch. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Throughout my career I have been attracted to roles that involve connecting people. Establishing these relationships is what I enjoy most, from exciting a patron for a young artistic talent, to pointing a collector towards an ancient work of art. I have recently joined the Rijksmuseum, where I am responsible for the Rijksmuseum Fund and the private donors, and I look forward to applying the same enthusiasm to this position. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Seeing the way Carla works, in a very natural, almost instinctive way, and witnessing how she allows herself to discover organically where her work is going to take her, has been a real experience. She is not afraid to try things out and doesn't take herself too seriously, something which I very much appreciate and relate to. Do you have a favourite artist? There are too many to name them all, so I will only mention the three that have marked me the most. James Turrell – he was the first artist to introduce me to an art that doesn't require canvas, paint or any sort of materiality to offer the viewer a full-on physical and psychological experience. In a way his immersions in light are boarding on performance, whilst strongly relating to nature and the elements around us. One of my big dreams is to go and see his Roden Crater in Arizona one day. Max Beckmann – growing up in Germany, Expressionism has always been very close to me. I used to live in Schwabing, an area of Munich not far from the Pinakothek der Moderne. This museum has a fantastic collection with some of the best examples of Beckmann triptychs I have ever seen, so I spent a lot of time there in my student years. Francesca Woodman – I admire her delicate sensitivity and the way she dealt with her deep suffering in the most beautiful and poetic way. It astonishes me to think that she was so young when she was taking all those pictures of herself. She makes me think of Cindy Sherman, or Marina Abramovic but then in a much more private, introvert way. She definitely left this world too early. What is your earliest memory involving art? My parents love the arts so I am quite blessed to have been raised with a lot of classical music, ballet and art around me. I vaguely remember a trip to Venice when I must have been around four years old. Seeing beauty from a young age has a huge impact on you, even if you don't realise it until much later.

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Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? There are many women in the art world these days, and many of them are fierce. I think what we are truly lacking is a sense of camaraderie amongst women, in all professions. There is hardly any mentoring and if a young woman is ambitious and eager to learn she is often seen as a threat. I think this is a huge shame and extremely counter-productive. My first boss was a woman - she was tough, but she taught me everything I know and she let me fly when she saw that I had the potential to grow. I always remembered that and I try to do the same with the younger girls I get to work with. I strongly believe that if you are generous and kind, you will receive generosity and kindness back, it's that simple. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? My dress comes from the Viktor&Rolf Haute Couture Collection ‘Boulevard of Broken Dreams’ Spring Summer 2017. I absolutely love how they utilise vintage cocktail and eveningwear from various decades as their base material. Existing dresses are taken apart; then their fragments are pieced back together as surreal collages, restoring their components into new ensembles with unexpected shapes. Repairs are accentuated with gold according to Kintsugi, a principle of Japanese pottery in which beauty arises from imperfection. The focus is placed on finding value in missing pieces, cracks and chips – bringing to light the scars that come from life experiences. Acknowledging the beauty of imperfection as a positive reinforcement and ultimately rendering the original into something more beautiful and more valuable, is a philosophy I very much align with.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Freya Simms Freya studied English Literature at university where she consumed hundreds of books and thoroughly enjoyed it, but has worked almost exclusively in the art world since, except for a stint when she lived in Rome, working as a tour guide. Christie’s South Kensington is where she earned her spurs, starting the bids office – which was an excellent all-round introduction to the auction world. From here she moved into the press office and has worked on the PR, Marketing, Event and Business Development side of the art market ever since. This has included stints at Bonham’s and Sotheby’s, Masterpiece Fair and as Fair Director for the Olympia and NEC fairs. In May 2010, she founded Muse, a communications consultancy for the arts, luxury and design sectors, which won the PRCA Award for Consumer Campaign of the Year in 2012 and the Queen’s Award for Excellence in Enterprise in 2014. Standout highlights of her career to date include working on the rediscovered Rubens painting, the ‘Massacre of the Innocents’ at Sotheby's, speaking about the rich contribution the UK makes to art and antiques alongside American ambassador Robert Tuttle at his UK private residence, Winfield House and finally, meeting the Queen to receive a business award and having a private tour of Buckingham Palace with the Duke of Edinburgh's private secretary. In April 2018, Freya was appointed CEO of LAPADA - The Association of Art & Antiques Dealers. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Specialising in communications and business development, I am the co-founder of Golden Squared Consulting – a boutique consultancy for the arts and heritage sector (created by merging Muse and Cawdell Douglas - founded by Diana Cawdell). We advise a number of arts and heritage businesses from art fairs (TEFAF, Masterpiece, Collect, Frieze Masters) to galleries (Mark Weiss, Daniel Crouch, Wartski, Agnews), museums (Mary Rose Museum, TERRA foundation) and art businesses (Art Loss Register, Gander & White). I am also a Board director of trade association PAIAM. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It is a privilege to be photographed alongside such an exceptional collection of women in the art world who are leaders in their field as well as to be photographed by Carla who has a mesmerising style marrying Old Masters with Contemporary. Do you have a favourite artist? This is such a tricky one – there are too many, but when I think about the works that really resonate with me they tend to be early Renaissance frescoes. So, I’m going to cheat and say Fra Angelico, Massacio and Piero della Francesca. What is your earliest memory involving art? My mother was a single working mother and when she trained as a guide, I sometimes had to go too. Aged about five, I remember very clearly being at the National Gallery and she had to present Paolo Uccello’s ‘Battle of San Romano’ to the group. She talked about perspective and fore-shortening and I looked up at the picture and thought ‘I want to work in that world’. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think it is an area where we are making great headway and even smashing through some glass ceilings – although this is more apparent in the contemporary sector, both commercial and institutional. We still have some way to go in fine art and old masters. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a maxi-dress by on-line retailer Baukjen. I also have an electric blue fur jacket from a boutique in Winchester, Hampshire and a pair of earrings I bought on a trip to New York from the costume jeweller, Gale Grant.

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Fatoş Üstek Fatoş was born in Ankara, Turkey and is based in London. In March 2018 she was appointed as director of DRAF (David Roberts Art Foundation), to lead its celebrated programme of exhibitions and performances. Prior to this she was an independent curator and writer. She was curator of miart Talks 2018, Milan; Art Night 2017, East London; and fig-2, 50 projects in 50 weeks, 2015, ICA Studio, London. Üstek was chief-juror for the Celeste Prize 2017, and jury for the sculpture section at the 2017 Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice. She is a founding member of Association of Women in the Arts (AWITA); an Art Nights Trustee, a member of Block Universe Advisory Board, and a member of AICA UK, and ICI Alumni. She curates, lectures and publishes internationally. Ustek acted as associate curator for the 10th Gwangju Biennale in South Korea, has curated an opera in five acts at DRAF, London; an exhibition trilogy entitled Now Expanded that took place at Kunstfabrik, Berlin; Tent, Rotterdam and DRAF, London among various group shows in Europe, the Far East and Turkey. She was founding editor of ‘Nowiswere’ Contemporary Art Magazine (with Veronika Hauer) 2008 – 2012, is the editor of ‘Unexpected Encounters Situations of Contemporary Art and Architecture’ (Turkish, 2012; English, upcoming); and is author of ‘Book of Confusions’. In 2008 Üstek received her MA at the Contemporary Art Theory Department at Goldsmiths College London, after completing her BA in Mathematics at Bogazici University, Istanbul, where she also acquired a degree in Film Studies. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I have been an independent curator and writer and I have recently become the director of DRAF. I am interested in statement-generating productions that may manifest themselves as exhibitions, festivals, publications, articles, and lectures. I like activation, and am curiously drawn to elaborate ways of being. I’m thrilled to commission artists for new works, to initiate new forms of dialogue and expand the boundaries of cultural, sensorial and intellectual stimulation. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It was interesting to receive Carla’s projection of myself into the canon of the women in the art world adorned with patterns and luscious textiles. I enjoyed that she could think out of the box and create an impromptu sculpture for my portrait. Do you have a favourite artist? I like many artists, and collect differing impressions from a lot of artists, curators, writers, thinkers. What is your earliest memory involving art? I was trained in ballet when I was six. Otherwise literature is my first entry point to arts. Writers who also include their impressions of art in their novels, books and theories inspired me. Moreover, I used to collect poetry zines when I was in high school/college – they were always accompanied by drawings, which inspired me to draw, then paint. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I do encourage women and men to take strong positions in the world in general, I would wish everyone to feel supported in their beliefs and intentions, their potential and force of action. I think freedom of speech, movement, action with respect and tolerance to others is a primary quality for a healthy and striving society. We live together, and this is important to pronounce in every gesture and engagement with the world. I strive to play a role in voices being raised and heard. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a Macka dress designed by Hakan Yildirim. I bought this dress to wear at the opening of the 10th Gwangju Biennial in South Korea, where I served as associate curator.

Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Marthe Vanoverbeke Marthe was born in Bruges. In 2015, she started her studies in film, television and video in Brussels. At high school she took art courses in Bruges, aimed at verbal arts and drama, and participated in a youth theatre group. In her spare time, she takes on free-lance jobs filming and assembling videos. She grew up in Blankenberge by the sea, but having been in Brussels for her studies for the last three years, she has begun to feel a true citizen of that city. In Blankenberge, during the holidays, she has interned since 2013 as an animator at the Stedelijke Speelplein. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? In recent years I have been immersed in the world of filmmaking. I like the idea of working hard on a film project and finishing and perfecting everything in detail and all of this for a moment of relaxation for the viewer of the film. I cannot yet say much about my role in the art world, since I am still looking for my own style and form. As artists, it is important to keep looking for boundaries and to be prepared to cross them into something new, daring to leave the comfort zone. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I had no idea what I was in for, because I’m not familiar with this sort of project; it was a step towards the unknown. But I trusted Carla knew what she was doing, which made me feel that I had to try it. Do you have a favourite artist? It’s hard in film to have a favourite artist because so many films have a quality of their own, which make them difficult to compare. But I do have a favourite artist in another discipline – I’m in love with the street art of Slinkachu. He makes wonderful little stories on the street with small toys; every small work tells us such a big story, just wonderful! What is your earliest memory involving art? It must have been with photography, because my dad, being a photographer, took us to many galleries. It’s just wonderful how you can tell a whole story in just one picture. Besides, I was also fascinated by the fact you could to the same with 25 images per second, which brings us to the art of film. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I don’t see lot of difference between men and women in this respect. It seems to me that they’re treated fairly equally. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? The dress I am wearing is a vintage American dress from the 1950s. Yellow is my favourite colour, so I immediately felt attracted to it. Due to my pale skin and somewhat dark hair, I feel that yellow contrasts favourably with my looks.

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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

Wieteke van Zeil Wieteke is an art historian and art critic. Every week she focuses on a detail in a work of art in her column Oog voor Detail in the newspaper De Volkskrant. Her book Goed kijken begint met negeren: de kunst van opmerkzaamheid will be published in June 2018. She has also written Dichterbij, kunst in details and curated the accompanying exhibition Ik zie, ik zie in the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem. In 2015 Oog voor Detail was awarded a European Newspaper Award. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am an art historian, writer and journalist. Before this, I wrote as a critic about exhibitions on behalf of the viewer, for twelve years until 2014. Today my focus is on sharing the experience of looking at art with a wide, diverse audience. I have written about details in art in my series for the national newspaper de Volkskrant in the Netherlands since 2014. My writing is a mixture of art history, context and connecting the details to our present lives. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Carla is a wonderful photographer and art historian with a fantastic eye. I felt comfortable posing for her, it was a joyous experience. My seven-year-old daughter was there as well and she loved seeing the beautiful costumes in Carla's studio. Do you have a favourite artist? Sofonisba Anguissola, Maria van Oosterwijck, Rogier van der Weyden, Fra Angelico - too many to mention, really. Also contemporary. What is your earliest memory involving art? My parents were not familiar with art, so it came to me in other ways. It started with my love for hip hop music and visuals, like graďŹƒti and design. At high school, I wrote an assignment about Keith Haring, who had then just died of AIDS. After Keith, I was introduced to the impressionists in Paris on a school trip and started researching Monet’s oeuvre for a school project. Then I knew I wanted to study art history. Now my parents love coming to the museum with me. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I found it discouraging during my studies in the nineties to see that at least 70 percent of the students were female, while there were no women professors at the university of Amsterdam nor were there any female museum directors in the Netherlands. Women did seem to have success in the gallery world. The first woman professor of art history was installed during my time at the university, Claudine Chavannes-Mazel, and I was very impressed by her speech in which she addressed this issue. It was all so self-evident to us students that there was no place for women at the top - there was a lot of internalized sexism - and this really empowered us. Now I am very happy to see that in Holland, there are at least ten female museum directors. In the world of old master paintings, it took me a long time to notice that it is just not true that there were no good female artists. There have been fantastic women, and they were praised in their time by artists and biographers. It took a century of white male art historians to write many of them out of the books. There has never been a monographic exhibition about Maria van Oosterwijck or Sofonisba Anguissola in any museum, for example, which is a bloody shame. These are not artists 'for women', just like Caravaggio is not an artist to be admired only by men. But also in this, things seem to be turning around, luckily. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? For the first shoot, I wore my wedding dress, which is a marvellous timeless Prada dress fully made of thick Bruges lace in four colour threads: light blue, pink, silver and white. I will forever cherish it, my mother gave it to me and I hope my daughter wants to wear it in the future. For the final picture, Carla dressed me in Iris van Herpen, a multidisciplinary designer that I admire very much. Her approach to fashion is completely open and she experiments with fabric like the best old masters did with their media. I had just interviewed Iris for the newspaper and was taken by her autonomy and determination.

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SITTER INDEX (* = exhibited at The Weiss Gallery, 16 - 31 May 2018)

*Acevedo, Loie DeVore 167 *Aleksa, Katrina 291 *Al-Senussi, Alia 145 *Anderson, Kate 171 Anderson, Nola 149 Asser, Saskia 173 Attah, Mariama 177 Aurand, Alice 293

*Eliot, Georgina 113 *van Engelshoven, Ingrid 307 *Evans, Florence 255 *Evelein, Floortje 69

Balestra, Ana 295 Baer, Ronni 179 Baker, Alexandra 109 *Balshaw, Maria 181 *Baring, Jo 183 Beatty, Frances 243 Bodin, Céline 15 Boström, Antonia 185 *Boswell, Phoebe 17 Boyiazis, Anna 19 *Brady, Anna 299 *Brix, Virginia 245 De Buck, Isolde 187 Buchanan, Lilias 21 Burgemeister, Wendela 247 *Butchart, Amber 65

*Gertler, Candida 151 *Gertler, Natasha 152 *Golovteeva, Maria 71 *Gordenker, Emilie 203 *Gordon, Kate 311 *Green, Tamara 263 Gustavs, Frieda 295 *Guttmann, Miriam 313

van Caldenborgh, Yvette 187 *de Caraman Chimay, M-S 301 Carlucci, Lauren 111 Cockx, Anne Miriam 305 Collares, Sabrina 23 *Cortés, María 249 *Crichton-Stuart, Flora 67 *Cunningham, Anna 251 *Dale, Lotte 25 *Davies-Strodder, Cassie 195 den Dekker, Annemarie 197 van den Donk, Claire 199 *Dorkin, Molly 253

*Farshad, Fariba 309 Fiumano, Francesca 259 Freestone, Clare 201

*Halls, Roxana 27 *Hearn, Karen 73 Herpen, Iris van 315 Herrera, Magdalena 75 *Higgins, Amelia 317 Hilton, Georgina 115 Hospes, Laura 31 *Howard, Louisa 117 *Howie, Ana 77 Huijsmans, Micky 319 Huizing, Cathinka 79 *Jaskot-Gill, Sabina 205 Jongerius, Marie-José 33 *Kajioka, Miho 35 *Kaminsky, Rachel 267 *Keen, Melanie 321 *Kirk, Sigrid 323 Klarenbeek, Hanna 207 *de Koekkoek, Lidewij 209 Korijn - van der Borgh, Ann 155 352


ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

*Krijnen, Marloes 211 *Kronman, Emma 271 *Lambrechtsen, Martine 119 *Langret, Eva 273 Lefebvre d’Ovidio, Flavia 121 Lerner, Nera 275 *MacLeod, Catharine 213 *Macpherson, Sophie 325 de Maintenant, Elvire 123 *Malcolm-Davies, Jane 81 van der Mark, Jade 37 Markovic, Maja 125 Marples, Hannah 85 *Martinez-Russotto, Amparo 215 *van Meene, Hellen 41 *McGrath, Annie 327 Mikhaila, Ninya 87 *Moore, Susan 329 *Morris, Susan 263 Munro, Delphine 331 *Muller, Sofie 43 Mussai, Renée 217

Samuelson, Sophie 279 *Salmeri-Bijzet, Valentina 341 *Scarisbrick, Diana 91 *Scott, Jennifer 223 Schulz, Isabell 51 *Shafranek, Heidi 163 Simms, Freya 345 Sinclair, Clementine 133 Small, Lisa 225 Speelman, Lucy 135 Stead, Chloe 137 *Stone, Peggy 281 Stoop- de Meester, Harriet 93 Sund, Judy 95 Tamis, Dorien 97 *Teves, Talita 139 Thomassen, Sophia 227 *Tiramani, Jenny 99 Trijzelaar, Ingrid 229 *Tuqan, Salma 231 *Tyndall, Charis 283 *Üstek, Fatoş 347

*Napoleone, Valeria 157 *Ogden, Aurore Ankarcrona 333 O’Reilly, Jonquil 127 van Otterloo, Rose-Marie de Mol 159 Pasquali, Cinzia 335 *Philippens, Marij 161 *Plum, Marie-Louise 45 *Prendota, Agnieszka 277 *van de Puttelaar, Carla 47 *Reynolds, Anna 221 *Ribeiro, Aileen 89 Romito, Sandra 129 Roos Rosa de Carvalho, Fleur 191 Rosa de Carvalho, Trudie 193 *Rottink, Manja 131 Ryan, Kathy 337

Vandivere, Abbie 101 Vanoverbeke, Marthe 349 Veldhoen, Venus 53 Verlinde, Albertine 141 Vinogradova, Tatiana 55 Vrbaški, Mirjana 57 *Weiss, Debra 61 *Weiss, Marta 233 *Wepler, Lisanne 103 *Whitley, Zoe 235 Wieseman, Marjorie E. 239 *Yüksel, Burcu 287 van Zeil, Wieteke 351 *Zoller, Rahel 105


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The Weiss Gallery 59 Jermyn Street London SW1Y 6LX +44(0)207 409 0035 www.weissgallery.com

"Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", Volume VII: Culture & Beyond  

An online edition of the catalogue published for The Weiss Gallery's exhibition "Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", featuring portra...

"Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", Volume VII: Culture & Beyond  

An online edition of the catalogue published for The Weiss Gallery's exhibition "Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", featuring portra...

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