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ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

ARTFULLY DRESSED

Women in the Art World Portraits by Carla van de Puttelaar

Volume VI: Dealers & Gallerists 5


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Unless stated otherwise, copyright in this catalogue (including content and design) is owned by Carla van de Puttelaar and The Weiss Gallery. All images Š 2018 Carla van de Puttelaar You may not reproduce, adapt, modify, communicate to the public, reproduce or otherwise use any part of this catalogue without the express written permission from Carla van de Puttelaar and The Weiss Gallery. All rights reserved. 2


ARTFULLY DRESSED: Women in the Art World

CONTENTS Frances Beatty PhD, 243 Virginia Brix, 245 Wendela Burgemeister, 247 María Cortés, 249 Anna Cunningham, 251 Molly Dorkin PhD, 253 Florence Evans, 255 Francesca Fiumano, 259 Tamara Green, 263 Rachel Kaminsky, 267 Emma Kronman, 271 Eva Langret, 273 Nera Lerner, 275 Susan Morris PhD, 263 Agnieszka Prendota, 277 Sophie Samuelson, 279 Peggy Stone, 281 Charis Tyndall, 283 Burcu Yüksel, 287


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Frances Beatty PhD A native New Yorker, Frances majored in Art History at Vassar College and received her PhD from Columbia University. She wrote her dissertation on Surrealist Imagery in painting and poetry in 1920s France. While working on her PhD, she wrote art criticism and taught Art History at Columbia University and Ramapo College. After working with the legendary Surrealist dealer and collector Julien Levy, Frances joined Richard L. Feigen & Co. in 1980 as Vice President and later President. Over her thirty-six years at Feigen, she curated numerous exhibitions and was an active art dealer specialising in painting, sculpture, and drawings from the 16th century to the present. In 2017, Frances started her own art dealership and advisory firm Adler Beatty with her son Alexander Adler. She is Managing Director of The Ray Johnson Estate and was the Co-Executive Producer of the internationally acclaimed film on Ray Johnson, ‘How to Draw a Bunny’. Frances and her husband Allen Adler, both avid art collectors, have together built an extremely wide-ranging collection which includes Renaissance and Baroque medals, sculpture, prints and drawings from the 16th through the 20th centuries, and 20th century assemblage, collage, photography and video art. Highlights of their collection include 17th century artists Guercino and Abraham Bloemaert, 19th century artists Victor Hugo, Henry Fuseli, Adolph Menzel and Odilon Redon, through 20th century and contemporary artists Lee Bontecou, Jean Dubuffet, William Kentridge, Ed Ruscha, and Bill Viola. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am a professional, a patron and a participant in the art world – an art historian, art dealer, art collector and a supporter philanthropically of art institutions. I have a PhD from Columbia University, where I also taught art history and worked as an art critic. I have been an art dealer for thirty-eight years and have organised many exhibitions and catalogues. I have contributed to the health and success of the Drawing Center in New York. With my husband, I am an avid collector of 'transhistorical' work – from Renaissance to today. We participate on the committees of many art museums, including The Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Morgan Library & Museum and the Frick Collection. I am on the Board of Directors of the Art Dealer's Association of America and on the advisory Board of TEFAF. I am above all a voracious and appreciative ‘consumer’ of art from the ancient world to the contemporary. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I think Carla van is a magical person and a great artist and photographer, so it was such a privilege to be part of her process – and fascinating. What is your earliest memory involving art? I visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art often as a child. My best friend's grandfather was the Director of the Department of Egyptian Art, so we played in the tombs at the MET as children. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The late great Linda Nochlin was my mentor at Vassar College, where she created Feminist Art History, and I was there at its inception. I feel that since 1972, when Linda wrote ‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’, the role of women in the art world has strengthened and increased exponentially. Sometimes it is two steps forward and one back. Just when I think women have reached some kind of parity in the way they are treated, I realise it is not true yet. We have come a long way. There are women leading major museums, galleries and certainly great women artists, but there is still a way to go. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I love this embroidered jacket – I have had it forever. The designer is Palmer Jones.

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Virginia Brix Virginia was born and raised in Lincolnshire. She graduated from Bristol University with B.A. Joint Honours in History of Art and French. Her first job was with Bonhams Auctioneers where she ran the Picture Frame sales and trained as an Auctioneer. She has been with Rollo Whately Ltd., antique and reproduction picture frames, since 1998. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I work mainly with antique picture frames, advising galleries, museums and private clients on all aspects of framing paintings and works on paper. I love the challenge of trying to find the perfect frame for an artwork. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It was fun working with Carla. I’ve always loved antique textiles so this was a fantastic opportunity to wear some of my vintage clothes! Do you have a favourite artist? That’s a tricky question as I have quite an eclectic taste in art, from Dürer to Turner to Freud! What is your earliest memory involving art? Visiting the British Museum aged seven with my father to marvel at the Egyptian Galleries. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The art world has traditionally been a predominantly male world and I think it’s great that so many women are now running galleries and museums. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? The dress is 1930’s crêpe and lace - bought in a vintage clothing shop in New York, while the chinoiserie coat was bought in an online auction.

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Wendela Burgemeister (right) & Anne-Alice Rondeau Pinson Wendela was born in Amsterdam and studied Art History at Leiden University, with internships in the archives of The Museum of Modern Art (New York) and at The Caldic Collection (now Museum Voorlinden in Wassenaar). Since 2000 she has been working part-time at Salomon Lilian Dutch Old Master Paintings in Amsterdam. In 2005 she completed her training in restoration of paintings at The Academy of Fine Arts in Anderlecht (Belgium). She is a registered valuer of Old Master Paintings and lives in The Hague with her husband and three children. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? My role in the art world – my role as an art historian, covers several aspects such as dealing, research, valuations and curating exhibitions. Besides this, I regularly do restoration projects. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I feel honoured to be part of this project because I feel surrounded by admirable colleagues and it is great to be a subject of in a contemporary art project. Do you have a favourite artist? In my area of expertise, the seventeenth century, many painters are sublime but if I have to choose one, Johannes Vermeer is my favourite because he was able to create balanced compositions with an amazing light and atmosphere, representing a great era. What is your earliest memory involving art? Art history and drawing were among my favourite subjects at high school. My grandmother, who played an important role in my life, owned some beautiful paintings, which impressed me. I started to professionally look at art by working with original sources and paintings during my internships. Salomon Lilian has taught me how to identify real quality. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think there are a great deal of us, doing really well, enjoying life and we are very lucky. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I borrowed the clothes from a friend. The brand of the dress is Ba&Sh.

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María Cortés María was born into a family of antique dealers in Madrid and grew up surrounded by art. As soon as she graduated from university in the US she ran a publishing enterprise with her sister. The company was based in Madrid but oriented internationally. They launched the headline Mas Arte The World Art Magazine, as well as Mas Arte Madrid Top City Guide. After fourteen years, in 2012 she started working at Coll & Cortés. She was director of the gallery in Madrid for over two years before she became director of communications and institutional relations at Colnaghi, the renowned old master gallery, when it was acquired by Jorge Coll and Nicolás Cortés, her brother, in 2015. She has now moved into the business side of the company working with collectors and sourcing works of art. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? The art world is the place which has always been most familiar to me. It’s my place of work, but it has always felt like home, from when I was growing up surrounded by antiques and old masters to when I was publishing Mas Arte, and of course now, working with Spanish and Italian old masters and classical antiquities. I am determined to promote classical art to a young generation, and attracting young collectors into this area of the market. The most rewarding of all is to see and work with people as they become enthused and fall in love with old masters for the first time. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? When Carla first told me about her project, I was captivated. It was last October in London and we were at The Wallace Collection where Colnaghi were hosting a dinner launching the Colnaghi Foundation. When she told me that she would like me to be involved, and that she wanted to do a photoshoot with me, I could only say yes. We did the photoshoot in Maastricht during TEFAF 2018. It’s the busiest time of the year and I was so tired with bags under my eyes, but I knew it would be worth it. I’ve just seen all of her photos and I think they are just fabulous. Do you have a favourite artist? When I was very young my favourite was El Bosco. Then when I was running Mas Arte, I fell in love with Pablo Picasso. Every time I visited Barcelona I just had to go to the Picasso Museum. Even if I was in a crazy rush, I’d always have to find a moment and even if it was just five minutes, it would make the world seem better. Since I’ve been working at Colnaghi my taste has broadened and I have so many more favourites, including Velázquez, Ribera and Murillo. I think Velázquez is one of the best ever; whenever I’m in London, I try to see the ‘Immaculate Conception’ at the National Gallery. It is an extraordinary work of art. What is your earliest memory involving art? I can’t single out the very first memory because ever since I was a little child my mother would bring me to the Prado Museum, to antique fairs and of course, to her gallery. So, I grew up immersed in art, and it’s carried on ever since! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Today’s art world is not a man’s world in the way it has been in the past, but there is still a lot of work to be done. It is encouraging to take a moment and think about the large number of successes, with so many empowered women in this world working as artists, in museums, as art dealers and as academics and critics. I hope we see a near future with more women directing the best museums across the world, and with even more representation at the top levels in galleries and fairs, as well as female artists breaking records at the auction houses. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I’m wearing Delpozo, a luxury prêt-à-couture Spanish fashion brand under the creative direction of Josep Font, which is one of my absolute favourites. I think that Josep is one of the best designers working today, with a great international reputation. Every outfit is like a piece of art and anything fits me perfectly. I feel very connected with the brand as Josep Font is always inspired by nature and art, and that resonates with me. Exhibited at The Weiss Ga"ery (16 - 31 May 2018)

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Anna Cunningham Anna was born in London and grew up in South Wales. She studied at Trinity, Dublin, with a BA in Art History and an MA in 17th century Spanish painting, before moving back to London to complete a second MA in Art Business from Sotheby’s. She has been working in the art world in London for seven years, and is now Gallery Director at Agnews. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? When Agnews was taken over by new ownership in 2014, Anthony Crichton-Stuart and I were brought in to revive the brand and run the company with a new vision. As well as running the townhouse gallery at 6 St. James’s Place, my role is primarily to plan and execute our yearly calendar of art fairs, exhibitions and events, with a focus on sales and the branding of our gallery, which deals in works of art from the 15th to the 20th century. Our three big art fairs of the year, TEFAF Maastricht, Masterpiece London and TEFAF New York, as well as the busy sales and exhibition weeks in July and December, mean that for me the whole year is spent planning one exciting event after another. As we strive to always do something different each time, with a wide range of styles of art, it makes for a challenging but extremely stimulating role with plenty of possibilities for creativity and variety, which I love. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I enjoyed working with Carla and allowing her creativity to run free, it was very interesting to see the various results of the shoots, both my own and my fellow women in the art world, and I was just honoured to be part of such a beautiful project. Do you have a favourite artist? I’ve always been drawn to somewhat dark and disturbing works, which was what first attracted me to the 17th century Spanish Baroque, and artists such as Ribera. However, recently I am starting to become fascinated with the storytelling power of 19th century paintings, which are often large-scale, dramatic, fantastical, sexy, full of decorative opulence and overflowing with imagination. What is your earliest memory involving art? I remember seeing a picture of Zurbaran’s St. Francis in a book, and thinking it was a photograph, and being completely entranced. It is still my favourite painting in the National Gallery as it reminds me of the moment I realised I wanted to work with Old Master paintings forever. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? When I first decided I wanted to be an Old Master paintings dealer I was told by some that I would find it very hard, being a woman, however I am very proud to work for such a wonderful company, and in such a great team, that I have always felt my highest ambitions were, and still are, fully supported. I am happy that this old stereotype, of the world of Old Masters being an exclusive boys club, is lessening now, and feel incredibly lucky to work with so many amazing, strong, successful women in the art world, many of whom I would call dear friends. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I love a bit of old Holywood glamour, so I am wearing a vintage backless black satin gown.

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Molly Dorkin PhD Molly pursued a PhD at Magdalene College, Cambridge focusing on late 18th century plein-air sketching by British artists in Italy, and began her career in the Old Masters department at Christie's New York. Her BA and MA degrees are from Harvard and the Courtauld Institute of Art. Presently she is Associate Director and Head of Research at Dickinson Gallery, London. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am Associate Director and Head of Research at Dickinson Gallery, where I oversee the research and writing of all our scholarly catalogues, and help to represent the gallery at four international art fairs each year. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Helping to bring attention to the exciting work done by private galleries – much of which takes place behind closed doors. Do you have a favourite artist? Turner, without question! I especially love his watercolours, which are sublime. What is your earliest memory involving art? Finger-painting at an easel in my grandmother's kitchen. I am told that my early work tended towards Abstract Expressionism! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I've been fortunate to have worked with a number of strong female role models in the art world, across the academic, curatorial and commercial fields. Some specialisations within the commercial world still have more hurdles than others, but we've clearly come a long way in terms of female leadership opportunities in the past decade. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? The dress is by Alexander McQueen, and I bought it (at a Chelsea consignment shop) just after seeing the stunning McQueen exhibition at the V&A. It has enormous pockets which makes it ideal for art fairs.

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Florence Evans Florence has been Director at The Weiss Gallery, the leading dealer in Tudor, Stuart and northern European portraiture, since 2010. She was a Specialist at Christie's UK in the Early British Pictures and Old Masters department from 2004 – 2010 and assisted curators at Tate Britain and Dr. Johnson's House Museum before entering the commercial art world. Florence studied English Literature at Brasenose College, Oxford, receiving her MA in Art History from the Courtauld Institute of Art. She has contributed to publications including Apollo Magazine, and has appeared on television as an expert in portraiture and costume for the BBC. She is a member of AWITA, the Association of Women in the Arts. Her rather immersive hobby is mudlarking the River Thames for historical artefacts which she researches and reproduces on her instagram, @flo_finds. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I specialise in historical portraits, mainly 17th century. I’d like to think I’m in a unique position to pass on my passion for portraiture to collectors and enthusiasts alike. Most people are captivated by the personal stories attached to portraits, and to their rich historical context. They encapsulate the sitter’s aspirations, as well as the artist’s unique vision and perception of their subject – that’s exciting. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I’ve sat for Carla before, when she photographed a series of red-heads. The way she uses natural light to focus on her subject is delicate, feminine and astonishing. I’ve had the pleasure of curating this exhibition, and of working on the catalogue – an ever growing – potentially infinite body of work! Of course, dressing up and being photographed by Carla amongst flowers was a joy. Do you have a favourite artist? I adore the eerie quality and precision of early Netherlandish art – think of Hans Memling or Gerard David. The naivety of Tudor portraits has always fascinated me, and I’m drawn to Modern British Art. There were some wonderful pieces from this period in my grandparents’ home, including works by C.R.W. Nevinson, John Armstrong, Graham Sutherland and artists from the Bloomsbury Group like Duncan Grant. My father’s family were literary publishers and moved in that world. At work, one of my favourite paintings I’ve ever handled was a life-size engagement portrait of an unknown woman by Sofonisba Anguissola – the girl’s exquisite costume, the expression on her face – only a woman could have painted that portrait! Of contemporary artists I admire Susan Hiller; she appeals to the story-teller, the historian and the mudlark in me. And I find great beauty and poetry in my partner’s photography of crumbling Soviet architecture and industrial landscapes (www.rossmcross.com). He has an unerring, unsentimental eye, unlike me! What is your earliest memory involving art? I have so many! My mother is a musician and polymath. Aside from filling my world with music and stories, she was always taking me around galleries or trawling junk shops, for which I was a very willing companion. I remember being bowled over by the intense blue in the robe of Sassoferatto’s ‘Virgin in Prayer’ at the National Gallery, London. I must have been quite young as the painting was enormous in my mind’s eye, a flood of colour. I later became obsessed with Yves Klein blue! Other artists that captured my early imagination were David Hockney, Beryl Cook (!), Marie Laurencin, Edgar Degas and Agnolo Bronzino. When I was about seven my mum sent me a postcard of Bronzino’s portrait of the little princess, Bia de’ Medici, from the Uffizi. I went on to collect as many postcards of his portraits as I could, and stuck them up at the foot of my bed. I still have them all today. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The world of Old Master paintings is traditionally very much a ‘Man’s World’, much more so than say, in Contemporary Art. Thankfully, women are beginning to have more of a collective voice. But I don’t think there is absolute parity by any means, especially when you consider how many women gravitate to this field – in fact, that makes it more shocking! We too often hit a glass ceiling that just isn’t there for men, and are expected to juggle work with domestic life in a way that men don’t have to. This leads to so many compromises. I long for women to get the opportunities and salaries they

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deserve, and the support they need in childcare, without having to fight for or demand these things. If women were paid as well as men, they would have the means to succeed in the same way. We still need Virginia Woolf ’s proverbial Room of One’s Own. Why don’t we have it yet? I want to shatter that glass for my daughter. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I’m in a 1960s Laura Ashley dress, an early hand-printed corduroy design. I’ve always enjoyed wearing vintage clothes, especially the few pieces from my mum’s wardrobe that she kept for me – and I love the fabrics and patterns of 1960s fashion. The nostalgic nature of vintage chimes with my day-job looking at historical portraits too, I suppose! Here, my intention was that this dress would suggest an early Renaissance aesthetic. I imagined a Pisanello profile portrait, but the wonderful thing about Carla is that she subtly manages to steer you into her own landscape. In the end, I think she has evoked a Pre-Raphaelite sensibility.

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Francesca Fiumano Francesca was born in Southend-on-Sea. She graduated with a 1st class BA (Hons) and MA in Art History, and began her career in the arts, aged twenty-one. Born into a family of antique dealers, it was a natural progression for her to open her own art gallery, which she did in 2001 as part of a partnership, moving on to take the reins of Fiumano Fine Art in 2007. Over the past seventeen years, Francesca has successfully exhibited across the UK and internationally including New York, Miami, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brussels, and Amsterdam. In 2013, the gallery was firmly established and continued to evolve, with Francesca becoming increasingly drawn towards more adventurous and ‘difficult’ works. Her enthusiasm for painting and sculpture remained, but she began to focus more on photography, installation, video and performance art. This led to the creation of Fiumano Projects, to run alongside Fiumano Fine Art. Fiumano Projects has introduced Francesca’s collectors to exciting new artists. The central ethos of Fiumano Projects was to work collaboratively with artists, giving them the time, space and opportunity to develop their artistic practice unhindered by any commercial pressure. This is an ethos Francesca and Andrés were keen to echo in the launch of Fiumano Clase in November 2017. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? In the years that I have had the fortune to be involved in the art world I have enjoyed taking on the role of gallerist and curator, working closely with artists in order to promote and champion what I consider to be the very best work being created today. In addition to this I have worked closely with Ca'Foscari University in Venice, running a fully mentored and supportive internship programme. Working closely with young people with a passion for the arts has enabled me to share my experience whilst at the same time continue to keep a fresh outlook on the ever-changing contemporary art world. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It was a pleasure to meet Carla and I was delighted to be invited to be part of this project. Aside from the thoroughly enjoyable experience of being part of a photoshoot, the most enjoyable element of being part of this project is knowing that its sole focus is to champion women in the art world. Do you have a favourite artist? That is an impossible question to answer. My academic training is firmly rooted in the history Western Art, so I cannot help but be taken by great past masters including Renaissance greats such as Masaccio, Piero della Francesca, and 19/20th Century trail blazers Degas, Picasso, Duchamp, Pollock, Judd, Wilke, Hesse, Bourgeois. The list is endless... What is your earliest memory involving art? Having grown up surrounded by beautiful antiques due to my parents’ business I was fortunate to be exposed to a wide array of art from an early age. I have a striking memory of seeing Michelangelo's Pieta aged around six or seven years old and being moved to tears. I don’t think I made the link to the biblical story, but the sorrow on the young Madonna’s face, cradling the body of her child is not something that anyone can see without being overwhelmed. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I think that women in the art world are still very much positioned on the side-lines, the gallery or studio assistant, the sales-woman positioned to deal with a certain type of client. However, as is the case in many other areas, the art world is modernising and the gender imbalance is slowly being addressed. There are more and more women gallery owners, working across all levels of the art world. Similarly, women artists are finally achieving similar success to their male colleagues. There is still a long way to go, not just for women but for anyone outside of the traditional white, male club, but I certainly feel that the collaborative and open approach of many women in the arts is forcing an otherwise closed and often wildly competitive world to re-examine hitherto accepted behaviours and practices.

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What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? Being almost 20 weeks pregnant made dressing for the photo shoot somewhat challenging. The two dresses chosen are not from an exclusive designer, but they make me feel beautiful and proud of my changing body. The blue lapis lazuli necklace was a gift from my mother. It is a piece that I wear when I need a little confidence boost and a reminder of the close bond I am lucky to share with the most important and influential woman in my life. I have been fortunate to have had Bruno since he was a puppy. In a constantly shifting world he has been my constant; a faithful companion, a quiet confidant, a good listener and above all else a judgment-free friend. His character has always been rather soft and very aectionate, typical of the cocker spaniel breed. Having grown up with dogs I always knew I would be able to care for him and shower him with the aection he deserves, but the power of my protectiveness and profundity of the love I have for him came as quite a shock. He comes to the gallery with me most days and has become something of a fixture, Bruno the gallery dog, the boss but also the first to welcome people through our door!

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Tamara Green Tamara (right) studied painting at City and Guilds, London. Later in her career she studied History of Art at Glasgow University. She specialises in Modern British art. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? My role in the art world is being part of my family’s business at Richard Green, London. In 1936 my great-grandfather James Green set up a gallery in St. James’ and my grandfather Richard Green established his gallery in 1955. I am the first of the fourth generation to enter the family business. We deal in paintings of the highest quality, dating from the 17th to the 21st century. At Richard Green I run the PR department and I also assist clients in forming collections. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It has been thought provoking. Women working together is always a wonderful experience. Do you have a favourite artist? Barbara Hepworth. She was a powerful woman in the art world, which at a time was dominated by men. I love the tactility of her forms and her relationship with the Cornish landscape. What is your earliest memory involving art? Repeated trips to the British Museum, London. As a child, ancient Egypt fascinated me. And always being surrounded by beautiful art because of my family’s galleries. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? There could be more female voices in the art world and there is still a long way to go for total gender equality. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a red dress from Joseph. I love this dress because it’s a ‘70s-inspired wrap dress. The colour and the shape are powerful.

Susan Morris PhD Susan (left) was born in London and studied English Language and Literature at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, before going to the Courtauld Institute of Art to do an MA on 18th and 19th century French and British art. She had an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship at the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven to research the work of the Romantic watercolourist Thomas Girtin, as part of her studies for a Ph.D (1984). A second Fellowship took her to the Humanities Research Centre, Canberra to work on Australian and European landscape painting. She returned to Yale to do an exhibition on Thomas Girtin (1986). Subsequently she worked for Sotheby’s Preview magazine and for seven years for The Antique Co"ector magazine, latterly as its Editor. She joined Richard Green Gallery as a Researcher in 1996. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? As Senior Researcher at Richard Green, I investigate paintings that the gallery is thinking of buying and, once they are bought, write or commission an essay on each work. I also write and edit many of the dozen or so catalogues that the gallery produces each year. It is fascinating to get to know an artist’s work, dig into provenances, consult experts, for example on costume in portraits or the objects in a seventeenth-century still life, and try to present the material to clients in an accessible, lively way. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It was fun dressing up and being photographed, and also seeing the other photographs of such an amazing variety of influential women in all areas of the arts.

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Do you have a favourite artist? There are many I could pick, but I would have to say John Constable, as I own the small studio in East Bergholt, Suffolk where he painted from 1802 to 1816. The countryside is a joy and Constable’s exquisite, naturalistic oil sketches conjure up a landscape which is, happily, largely unchanged. What is your earliest memory involving art? When I was five, I excavated a lion, part of a frieze in a Roman house in Verulamium (today’s St. Albans in Hertfordshire). It was thrilling to hold in my hand something so old, but appealing and domestic. It set off a craze for all things archaeological… Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? We’ve come a long way, but there is still a long way to go… What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I chose red because I like bold colours. The shawl was bought at a craft fair and made in India – we should treasure the depth and diversity of ancient crafts because so much of what we encounter is industrialised and homogenised.

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Rachel Kaminsky Rachel is an accomplished art dealer specialising in Old Master, 19th century and early 20th century fine art. She has thirty-five years’ experience in the field. Her business, Rachel Kaminsky Fine Art LLC (Est. 2006), also acts as an advisor and agent, brokering high-end art transactions for an international clientele of collectors and museums. She started her career at Christie’s, where she rose to head the Old Master Paintings Department in New York. During this time she made several important art historical discoveries, including Paolo Veronese’s ‘Saint Catherine’, now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. In 2002, following her eleven year tenure at Christies and seven years as Director at Otto Naumann Ltd., the foremost New York gallery for Dutch and Flemish 17th century paintings, Kaminsky was recruited to become the Managing Director at Colnaghi, a historic London art gallery specialising in Old Master paintings. During a four-year tenure at Colnaghi, she curated the exhibition ‘In the Company of Old Masters: Julian Schnabel, Tina Barney and Eve Sussman’. Rachel is an ‘Ambassador’ to the art fair TEFAF Maastricht and a member of the TEFAF New York Advisory Board. She also serves on the selection committee for the TEFAF Showcase and the Museum Restoration Fund. She is a Trustee of the Worcester Art Museum (Worcester, MA) and serves on the museum’s Collections Committee. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I’ve had numerous professional roles in the art world including auction house department head, art dealer, art advisor, agent, museum trustee, expert witness in a London high court trial, as well as art fair advisory board member and art fair exhibitor. These various roles have led to an equally important and rewarding one – mentor to young women looking to pursue a career in the Old Master market and succeed in a male-dominated field. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? As the first female Head of Old Master Paintings at Christie’s New York and the first female Managing Director of Colnaghi, established in 1766 and 1760, respectively, I am proud to participate in this landmark exhibition featuring women in the art world – and to be in the company of so many accomplished professional women. Do you have a favourite artist? Rather than favourite artists, I tend to have favourite schools, although the list changes as my career and interests evolve. Right now, I am particularly excited by British Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite paintings, Belgian Symbolism and artworks produced in Germany and Austria during the interwar period, a time of extraordinary creativity, social change and crisis. What is your earliest memory involving art? My earliest art memory comes from my mother. During childhood museum visits, I would stand in front of paintings by Edgar Degas and imitate the ballet step. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? My background is in the commercial world of Old Master paintings where historically few women have held prominent or senior positions. Professional women have made great strides in so many areas, including some sectors of the art world – as witness by this exhibition. Yet, remarkably, in 2018 there are almost no Old Master dealerships owned and run by women, and it was twenty-nine years before the most prestigious art fair for Old Masters, TEFAF Maastricht, named a woman to its board.

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What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a floor-length white organza shawl by a Chinese designer and friend Han Feng, who I first met in are Shanghai in 2007.and Likeismuch her work, it features geometrical shapes and an asymmetric What you wearing, thereof a story behind it? design. These aabstract fabricwhite flowers are hershawl signature design and featureand in much her Feng, work. who Han IFeng I am wearing floor-length organza by a Chinese designer friendofHan launched her first ready-to-wear collection in 1993 and made her costume design debut with Anthony first met in Shanghai in 2007. Like much of her work, it features geometrical shapes and an Minghella’s Butterfly at the English National and design Met Opera. Her clothing asymmetric Madama design. These abstract fabric flowers are herOpera signature and feature in muchdesign of her and installations havelaunched been featured in major exhibitions at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Neue Galerie work. Han Feng her first ready-to-wear collection in 1993 and made her costume design and Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum, amongst others. debut with AnthonyNational Minghella’s Madama Butterfly at the English National Opera and Met Opera. Her clothing design and installations have been featured in major exhibitions at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Neue Galerie and Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, amongst others.

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Emma Kronman Emma is a Director of Murphy & Partners, an art advisory firm based in London. After earning her BA from Yale University in 2009 with Distinction in the Art History major, Emma began her career at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she undertook a year-long Kress Fellowship in the Robert Lehman Collection. She subsequently completed her MA in Art History at the Courtauld Institute in London, where she graduated with Distinction on her dissertation on the 14th-century Paduan painter Guariento d’Arpo. Emma joined Christie’s in 2011 as a specialist in the Old Master Paintings department, where she remained until May 2017, serving as Head of Sale for the New York office. Emma has also worked in Florence, Italy, at Villa La Pietra and in New York at both the Guggenheim Museum and the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? As an art advisor, I help collectors think about how and in what directions their collections can grow and develop. I love working this way because it allows me to build meaningful, long-term partnerships with collectors and to help them navigate all aspects of collection management. My focus is on Old Master paintings, but I work with collectors who buy across multiple categories, which keeps me learning something new every day! What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I loved Carla's idea and I am honoured to be a part of this project. It was such a pleasure to have some fun with the amazing Watts of Westminster fabrics and to understand first-hand what actually goes into creating an image captured in light! Working with Carla and getting to chat with her throughout an afternoon of pose-prompts was a special treat. Do you have a favourite artist? That is a really tough, if not impossible, question to answer! It depends on the day (both for me and the artist!). Some days it's a gold-ground painter that inspires me, like Duccio or Giovanni di Paolo or Fra Angelico. Others, it's a dramatic Caravaggist painter or an incisive and compelling portrait. And some days it is some fabulous but unattributed object I have been lucky enough to unexpectedly encounter! What is your earliest memory involving art? When I was seven years old my father, who is a professor, had a sabbatical year and our family picked up and moved to Florence. I still remember vividly my early encounters with Italian art during that time. It would be hard to imagine that this experience did not inform my decision years later to study Italian Renaissance painting! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? It is a truly exciting time to be a woman in the professional art world. We are achieving greater successes and recognition for our accomplishments each year, and it feels as though the art world is broadly establishing a greater equality in opportunity for women and men. I am grateful to Carla for shining a light on this topic and proud to be pictured alongside such a strong and powerful group of women. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing two pieces of strategically-draped fabric from the amazing Watts of Westminster, which Carla had selected and borrowed for her project. I was simply the beneficiary of her brilliant eye. The final touch to pull it all together was the photographer's own 19th-century cameo earrings, which she kindly let me borrow for the shoot!

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Eva Langret Born in Paris, Eva is a Director for the London-based gallery, Tiwani Contemporary. Prior to this, she held curatorial positions at the Delfina Foundation, the Wapping Project and 198 Gallery. Langret also regularly organises exhibitions as a freelance curator. Curated exhibitions include KIN at HANGAR Centro de Investigação Artística in Lisbon (2016) and The Zone, Basel Abbas & Ruanne Abou-Rahme, at the New Art Exchange (2011). She regularly contributes to artists' talks and publications. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I'm a Director in a London-based gallery called Tiwani Contemporary. I work closely with artists on exhibitions and projects. People think it's a glamorous job, and parts of it are, but it's actually quite hands on. There's lots of time spent busting logistical problems, which is what happens when we turn an idea, into a reality. This is actually the core of the exhibitions-making process: making the intangible, tangible, extracting an idea from an artist's head and making it real, a thing of this world. I enjoy the closeness to artists, and the knowledge that they share with me. They each are an expert in their own field of making and researching, so every time we work together, I get to learn more about something. It might be a new printing method, or an historical event I knew little about. I'm a little bit smarter after each encounter. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? When I heard about the project, I thought women, art, fashion, and I instantly pictured a fussy shoot, with frills, assistants, make-up, lighting etc. I was surprised at how simple and intimate the set up actually was: Carla, her camera, her partner, the bleak London light of a snowy morning in March and me. The opposite of artifice, in a sense, and yet the resulting photograph is so sophisticated and polished – it’s a kind of magic. Do you have a favourite artist? No, I would not say that I have a favourite artist. Perhaps favourite artworks would be more accurate: Sonia Boyce’s ‘Big Women’s Talk’; Romare Bearden’s ‘The Conjur Woman’, Alice Neel’s ‘Benjamin’; David Hockney’s ‘Mr & Mrs Clark and Percy’; Kerry James Marshall’s ‘De Style’, for instance. We have recently started working with Mequitta Ahuja at the gallery and I’m obsessed with one of her new paintings called ‘Crossword’. I’m mentioning mostly paintings because I’m in the middle of working on a painting exhibition and this is where my mind is at the moment, but I’m equally interested in other media. What is your earliest memory involving art? Painting with my grandmother. I had a little easel as a child, and I copied Impressionist paintings! Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? It's great to see more women involved in senior positions, as museum directors, fair directors and curators of major artistic events, but as a black woman myself, I have to ask: where are the women of colour? The struggle for gender equality in the arts, like in other professions, must be intersectional: it's also about race, about class, sexuality, disability... What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? It's a Cedric Charlier dress I bought in the sale this winter. I've recently had a baby, clothes fit differently now and so I've had to rethink my wardrobe: items that used to be super flattering no longer work, and vice-versa. I'm no shrinking violet when it comes to fashion, I've always liked bold colours, prints and patterns. My partner thinks I might have gone overboard with this one, but I really love it. It's got a ‘70s vibe that makes me want to put my party shoes on!

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Nera Lerner Nera is the Director for the New York–based Danziger Gallery. She has spent the last five years supporting and growing the gallery's long history of exhibiting contemporary photography and building space for the interpretations of the medium. With a dual degree in Economics and Art History, Lerner has organised over thirty exhibitions in the last five years in Boston and New York. She was previously at Sperone Westwater and worked as a researcher at the Frick Collection in New York. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am the director of Danziger Gallery in New York. As a gallerist and curator the heart of my role is research and presentation. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I loved seeing Carla work! To be dressed by her and photographed by her was a very gentle and meditative experience. Do you have a favourite artist? J.M.W. Turner, if I had to pick just one. What is your earliest memory involving art? Staring up at Zubaran’s ‘Jacob and His Twelve Sons’ - at the time only noticing the details of their feet – this was my eye-level, my early perspective of these large works. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I believe women have always played an interesting role in the Art World. Today much of the staff in institutions both public and private are composed of women. Many of them young and passionate. I think the position of women must be one that looks forward and builds an inclusive community. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am in vintage lace. It is from the precious collection of vintage costumes and fabrics that are part of Carla’s own collection.

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Agnieszka Prendota Agnieszka is from Gdansk in Poland, and holds an MA in History of Art from Glasgow University, specialising in the creative development of Louise Bourgeois, Paul McCarthy and Lucian Freud. After graduation, she went on to work with several non-profit and commercial creative organisations including Association of Art Historians and SWG3 in Glasgow. She organised and co-curated pop up exhibitions in London, Manchester and Glasgow. She has been the Creative Director of Arusha Gallery in Edinburgh for four years, where she is responsible for developing the gallery’s portfolio of artists, its brand and their exhibition plans, both locally in the gallery space and internationally. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? Ha! I suppose my main role would be that of facilitating. The aim is to find work that the public will find interesting and to organise shows in which artists will be proud to take part. On a more micro level nothing brings us more joy at Arusha than being able to work with artists and allowing them to flourish and focus in their practice making a living out of art and introducing new people into their worlds. Nurturing someone’s bold choice to be an artist or inherent necessity to create and watching them succeed is a pretty special feeling. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Being around Carla of course! She makes you feel beautiful and at ease, she honestly charms the light (we shot on a Monday after my birthday weekend, so needless to say it truly needed charming!). It is an honour to be part in an exhibition which draws attention to the roles, achievements and paths chiselled out by women in the arts through the lens of history and in the context of today’s affairs. Do you have a favourite artist? I do get enamoured with artists but one steady favourite has always been Louise Bourgeois. I am an absolute sucker for personal truths told through mediums which range from grand, unforgiving and difficult to most intimate and shy. From the younger generations I love the work of Claire Tabouret and Caroline Walker. What is your earliest memory involving art? I grew up in a Buddhist household and as a seemingly liberal niche in catholic Poland, by default it attracted a lot of creative people. I used to go for walks with my mother and visit friends, in the sunny days of no mobile phones when one would simply pop in. We spent a lot of afternoons in studios (which usually doubled as flats) so I believe they are my earliest memories involving art. We spent summers in France and to keep the children occupied – and as a contribution to the community – artists would spend time running workshops with us. My earliest memories are of visiting and being in studios, which is where I still spend quite a substantial amount of my time. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? I have met a lot of incredible, strong-minded and driven women in the art world. I’m not sure if it is a special thought, as I have a feeling a lot of people might answer similarly, but I do think the ratio of men to women seems pretty even in my day-to-day, and we see more big institutions headed by women. But by no means am I saying the work is done, of course. I think what makes women particularly successful is the ability to nurture, multitask and appease. I don’t want to contribute to stereotypes here but I do find these qualities create opportunities and space for growth and when combined with strong vision and integrity make for the most inspiring outcomes. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing an antique lace mantilla and a 1920’s lace dress. After quite a few changes Carla draped me in them and made me feel very ‘Lady Macbeth’ – perhaps a slightly problematic association, but Royal nonetheless!

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Sophie Samuelson & Georgina Hilton Sophie (left) was born in London. Graduating in History of Art from the University of Leeds, she went on to complete a course in Entrepreneurship and Economics with Close Brothers. Her passion for Modern art led her to Sotheby’s where she gained work-experience in their Impressionist and Modern Art department. She has also assisted on exhibitions at Portland Gallery, shadowed various departments at Cheffins auction house and worked on a number of volunteer programs at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Sophie joined Seymours in 2013 where she runs collection management for clients and certain client-related projects. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? In addition to working for Seymours Art Advisory, Georgie [Georgina Hilton] and I arrange events with an aim to create a body of young, exciting professionals within the Old Master market. It is important to us to gather likeminded individuals who are passionate about their subject and want to assist one another in their trade. The events are often very informal and do not promote a particular company in order to keep them beneficial for all attendees. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I really enjoyed meeting Carla and participating in an exciting project which celebrates women in the art world. It is empowering to feel a part of this collection. It was also lovely to meet other ladies who have taken part in this experience and learn about their role within art. Do you have a favourite artist? I’m fickle and change my mind constantly! But I often return to Pierre Soulages, Peter Doig and Bernini. Right now, I am learning more about Jacob van Ruisdael and Leslie Marr, who I love! What is your earliest memory involving art? When I was 10 years old I visited the Villa Borghese with my family. Seeing The Rape of Prosepina by Bernini - particularly Pluto’s hand on Daphne’s plump thigh – and the dramatic works by Caravaggio – started my never ending slew of questions wanting to know more... Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? From working within the walls of a male dominated office, it is important to me to see the influential roles woman have taken up within the art world. I feel that there is a strong female influence on my day to day working life which inspires me to have the confidence to speak up and aim high. However, it would be nice to see more equality within the director levels of larger companies. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I am wearing a black polo neck and an Alexander McQueen embroidered skirt. The black polo neck is a go-to in my winter wardrobe and I probably have about ten sets of identical pieces. I find them elegant and versatile whilst black is a colour I most often wear. The Alexander McQueen skirt was a purchase I made after selling an artwork. I like to invest my money into clothing I wear everyday – therefore mostly work attire. Alexander McQueen is a designer I admire for his brave style and career. I own a few pieces by him. I chose the skirt for its intricate floral embellishment which is juxtaposed with the harder leather fabric. I like my clothes to have structure and often play around with different textures and patterns. The gold chain has a guinea on it which was given to my mother by her mother and passed onto me. I wear it every day.

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Peggy Stone Peggy’s father was an art dealer who specialised in 19th century European paintings. After receiving an MA in Art History she began her career working for him, followed by ten years in the auction houses at Christie’s and Doyles in New York. In 1989, along with her husband Lawrence Steigrad, their gallery Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts dealing in Old Master paintings was founded. This past year she has published two children’s books about a dog who becomes involved with old master paintings. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? We have been most gratified by, to date, our thirty-one museum sales of often rediscovered masterpieces. Many others have been placed in important private collections. As I am the researcher of the firm, it is in the finding and resurrection of these forgotten works that I regard my most important contribution to the art world. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? Although I have known Carla for quite some time, I had never seen her on a shoot. Her consummate professionalism, vision, enthusiasm and passion combined to present a formidable talent at work. Do you have a favourite artist? I do not have a favourite artist. For me it is about continually falling in love with an individual work. What is your earliest memory involving art? There were always paintings around the house growing up, but in 1961 The Metropolitan Museum of Art purchased Rembrandt’s ‘Aristotle with a Bust of Homer’ for $2,300,000. At that time it was the most expensive painting ever sold. The whole family went see it, and although I did not like it I was very impressed with the price. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? There are very few female Old Master dealers, which I always felt was to the field’s detriment. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? My dress was inspired by one that I saw in the ‘Grace Kelly: Style Icon’ show at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London in 2010. It was executed by Dean in Shanghai. The earrings are costume jewellery from the 1950s that belonged to my mother. The maker’s name is no longer legible. When my mother discarded them in the 1960s I grabbed them, and have cherished them ever since. The incredibly strong painting of a snarling dog protecting its meat from a here unseen cat, is by the Dutch 17th century artist Jan Baptist Weenix. I feel it portrays the essence of the will to survive. The painting further played an integral role in my first children’s book ‘Leyster the Leading Star’.

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Charis Tyndall Charis was born in Edinburgh and first introduced to the ancient world at the age of nine when she began studying Latin. From that point she was hooked, and as her education progressed from the study of myths and legends to more academic arenas spanning Ancient Greece and Rome, her desire to remain in this sphere increased exponentially. At Warwick University, Charis read Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, going on to take a Masters in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome. Here, she was able to adopt a more hands-on and intimate relationship with artefacts and ancient works of art that would eventually lead to a career with the world-renowned ancient art dealers, Charles Ede. She gained invaluable academic experience at the British School in Rome and the Archaeology department of the National Museum of Scotland, which has led to longstanding associations and friendships with many museum professionals. Immediately after graduating she began working at Charles Ede, becoming a director in 2017. She has been an active member of the antiquities trade ever since, both as a member of IADAA and as treasurer of the ADA. Charis currently exhibits with Charles Ede at TEFAF Maastricht, and TEFAF New York Spring and Fall fairs. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I am a director at Charles Ede, a gallery which deals in ancient art from around the Mediterranean. I help to source, research, buy and then sell the objects. With such a small team there are very few decisions which do not involve all of us, and we have an all-hands-on-deck approach. I work closely with many museums and private individuals, facilitating the growth of collections for their historic, academic and aesthetic appeal. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? It was the opportunity to work with a living artist. The artists and artisans who created the objects I deal with have been dead for thousands of years. It is hard to express how wonderful it is to talk to and learn from an artist who is creating a beautiful piece in that very moment. Feeding off each other’s energy and working together with the objects which I brought to the sitting was exciting and thought provoking. Carla and I managed to incorporate elements of both our worlds, and promote the importance of women in both. The Egyptian mask which she photographed me with was created for a wealthy woman in one of the first cultures which was not only the most advanced the world had seen, but one where some women could have equal or more influence and power than the men. I felt it resonated with us in that moment, as it would for all women in the 21st century. Do you have a favourite artist? It is impossible to choose just one artist as my favourite. My tastes are constantly evolving, and I rarely find that there is any artist or period, which once understood, is not a marvel. It also doesn’t help that some of the pieces which I most admire were made thousands of years ago. The identities of their creators, if ever known, are now lost. What is your earliest memory involving art? It must have been when I was three or four. Growing up in Edinburgh, it was my favourite weekend activity to go to the National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street. They had a series of Samurai armour which at once terrified and intrigued me, with their snarling faces, intricate detail and other worldliness. My earliest memories must be either these functional and foreboding forms of art, or of the many rooms of taxidermy. I remember thinking how incredible it was that someone managed to get such wild, exotic creatures to appear so life-like. Even now, when I visit my hometown, I like nothing more than meandering through these rooms which are yet to cease provoking excitement and awe. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? The position of women in the world itself has changed so greatly over the last century, but the art world has been one of the pioneers in this change. It is an industry in which I am proud to be a part.

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However, there are still many attitudes which need to be changed. With time, I believe that people will stop being judged on their gender, but purely on their merit. What are you wearing and holding, and are there stories behind it? I am wearing Horseupcleugh tweed, a pair of Roman gold earrings, a Hellenistic gold and carnelian necklace, and am holding an Egyptian female sarcophagus mask from the first millennium BC. When I was fourteen my grandmother took me on an incredible journey down the Nile, showing me ancient Egypt for the first time. It was during this trip that I fell in love with the ancient world, which, many years later, led me to this career. My grandmother is an inspiration for all women; she is exceptionally strong, independent and kind, and has always taught us that regardless of gender we can accomplish whatever we set our minds to. The tweed I am wearing is that of my family, and represents my Scottish roots; the country I grew up in and one which still holds my heart. The earrings are the first antiquity I bought for myself, once I had become a dealer; I just fell in love with them. The emotional significance of this photograph resonates on so many levels; my life in Scotland, the ancient world, family bonds and the strength of women.

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Burcu Yüksel Burcu is a London-based art consultant with a unique mix of expertise in old master paintings and contemporary art. She graduated from Brandeis University, Cum Laude with a double concentration in History of Art and Economics, and holds an MA in Visual Arts Administration from New York University. Currently she is the Director of Gaia Art Foundation and acts as an advisor to the renowned London Old Masters gallery Derek Johns where she was Director 2009 – 2016. She was part of the founding team of London’s new performance festival Block Universe, which debuted in June 2015. Burcu is also involved in a select number of non-profit arts organisations. She is a founding member of the Young Patrons of the Royal Academy where she served 2011 – 2018. She was Co-Chair of the Future Unit of the Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, 2015 – 2017. She is a patron of Istanbul-based SAHA Organisation, a member of Outset Young Patrons Circle and patron of Chisenhale Gallery in London, and one of the Visionaries of PERFORMA, performance biennial in New York. She is a member of AWITA, the Association of Women in the Arts. Could you tell us something about your role in the art world? I believe strongly in the power of culture and arts in contemporary society, how they have the potential to encourage debate and understanding and help us become better citizens. I try to support and get involved in initiatives and projects with this in mind. I also enjoy making connections between the different fields of the art world, from Contemporary and Old Masters to Performance. What did you enjoy about being a part of this project? I loved being part of a group of inspirational women across different backgrounds and ages. I feel passionate about art history so it was also great to be part of a contemporary project that takes inspiration from it. Do you have a favourite artist? It is so hard to answer this question; I have many favourites. I can pick a period; I think Florence in the 15th and 16th centuries was a very special place with great artistic production. What is your earliest memory involving art? Growing up in Istanbul, I was always fascinated by history and my first memories involve family visits to Classical sites in Turkey and Ottoman landmarks in Istanbul. Do you have any special thoughts about the position of women in the art world? Like most industries, the art world is male dominant, especially in the commercial sector. But I think the issue is more about diversity and not only specific to women. Education and mentorship are extremely important for guidance, encouragement and to overcome difficulties. I’ve had the pleasure of having a few mentors who were truly inspirational not only with their careers but attitudes towards life. I owe a lot to them. What are you wearing, and is there a story behind it? I wore a beautiful dress by Alex Noble who was commissioned by Cirque du Soleil and designed the dress for Paloma Faith. I love that it has this story behind it.

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The Weiss Gallery 59 Jermyn Street London SW1Y 6LX +44(0)207 409 0035 www.weissgallery.com

"Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", Volume VI: Dealers & Gallerists  

An online edition of the catalogue published for The Weiss Gallery's exhibition "Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", featuring portra...

"Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", Volume VI: Dealers & Gallerists  

An online edition of the catalogue published for The Weiss Gallery's exhibition "Artfully Dressed: Women in the Art World", featuring portra...

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