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WEBB

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 By Design: The Innovative Educational Experience By Design: Learning Beyond the Classroom

Magazine

SELECT COURSES SELECT COURSES Evolutionary Biology Evolutionary Biology American Idea The American Idea Advanced Advanced Studies Studies in Biotechnology Biotechnology

Literature && Leadership Leadershipininthe theWilderness Wilderness

HABITS & SKILLS KEY LEARNINGS Intellectual Rigor Intellectual Rigor Analytical Mindset Analytical Mindset Field Study Field Study

Experiment Design Design

Honors ConstitutionalDebates Debates HonorsModern Modern Constitutional

Historical Case Historical Case Studies Studies

Integrated IntegratedMathematics Mathematics II & II II

Advanced Lab Lab Methods Methods

Honors Affairs HonorsEthics Ethics&&Modern Modern Global Global Affairs

Global Fluency Global Fluency

Advanced Courses in ComputerScience Science Advanced Courses in Computer

Academic Partnerships

Advanced Studies Studies in in Paleontology Paleontology Advanced AdvancedStudies Studies Existentialism Existentialism && Advanced the theHuman Human Condition Condition Honors Orchestra Honors Sinfonia Sinfonia Orchestra New NewMedia MediaCulture Culture & & Communications Communications Advanced Studies in Anatomy & Advanced Studies in Anatomy & Physiology Physiology Statistics

Statistics

Integrated Physics & Chemistry

Integrated Physics & Chemistry

Advanced Studies Faith Narratives Advanced Studies Faith Narratives of of Holy Cities Holy Cities Advanced Studies The Long Novel Advanced Studies The Long Novel Performance Workshop Performance Workshop Honors Technology, Technology, Society Honors Society &&Self Self AdvancedStudies StudiesCreative CreativeNon-Fiction Non-Fiction Advanced Advanced Studies Studies in in Organic Organic Chemistry Advanced Chemistry Advanced Studies Studies in in Linear Linear Algebra Advanced Algebra World WorldLanguages Languages

Creation Artistic Creation Collaborative Research Collaborative Research

Presentation Skills Interdisciplinary Interdisciplinary Expository Writing Writing Literary Analysis Literary Analysis Leadership && Community Community Media Literacy Media Literacy Ethical Reasoning Cultural Exploration Cultural Exploration Political Analysis Independent Research Blended Learning Learning Close Reading Close Reading International Relations International Relations

learning by design


OCTOBER 12-13, 2018 All classes ending in 3s and 8s

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Alumni Authors and Archive Display

Breakfast in Price Dining Hall

Webb Student Store

Campus Tours

VWS Chapel

Alf Museum Tour

Back-in-Class Program

Alumni vs. Students: Water Polo, Soccer & Basketball

Lunch in Price Dining Hall

Robert A. Hefner III ’53 Observatory

Classroom Tours

Dorm Crawl / Visits

Information Session: Admission, College Guidance & Summer Programs

Class of 1968 50th Reunion Presentation

Alf Museum Reception & Peccary Dinner Off-Campus Reunion Gatherings

Lunch at the Pool Alumni Awards Reception Alumni Dinner Celebration

Babysitting is available with an advanced request for Friday and Saturday evenings 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Contact Anne Stewart to make arrangements at (909) 482-5245 or astewart@webb.org.


Meet our writers... Debbie Carini is a writer and development professional. She has been a liated with The Webb Schools since 1999 as a writer for the magazine as well as various campaign and fundraising materials she is also a successful grant writer for the schools and aymond Alf

.

useum of aleontology. She is a

contributing writer to the Claremont Courier and Straus ews including newspapers in ew or , ew ersey and ennsylvania with the monthly humor column “ ut of

y

ind.�

John Ferrari has experience as a newspaper journalist and as a writer, editor, communications strategist and public outreach specialist in higher education. e has written feature articles on topics ranging from astrophysics and genetics to theme par s and, of course, the Alf

WEBB Magazine

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

FEATURES

useum. e also serves as a public

a airs o cer in the avy eserve.

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From the Head of Schools By Design: The Innovative Educational Experience By Design: Learning Beyond the Classroom

WEBB TODAY

28 32 34 38 42 46

Robotics Debate The Weekend Program The Alf Museum Faculty Giving

NEWSNOTES

50 54 62 72 74

Alumni Profiles Events & Highlights Alumni News In Memoriam Final Word


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R THIS CR A Z Y G A M E W E PL AY

ecently, when on a conference call with fellow board members of the World eading Schools Association, we were asked to brainstorm a theme for our upcoming conference in rague in the summer of . There was a small but important group of educational leaders from all over the globe on the call representing schools such as arvard Westla e and Webb from the west, roton from the east, Eton ollege from the , and top schools in hina, Africa and India. As we started to bat around ideas for the world educational summit, we tal ed about the changing nature of the wor place given advanced technologies what it means to be a global leader how to retain school culture while embracing this new world. These were all rich topics we agreed, and ones we should and must be addressing. But then the conversation too an interesting turn.

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Student health and wellness the impact stress plays on a student today was o ered up to great discussion. We began to name the many pressures students now experience in a world that feels undependable at best, and violent and out of control at worst. ind you, this wasn t just a group of American educators. t was a group of leaders from all corners of the world. We were all seeing it the impact and downside of unrealistic performance expectations on students, oversi ed parental ambitions and finally the fren y over college admissions. Students worldwide are so good at putting up a brave front, and yet often they are in turmoil underneath. We landed on a conference centered on the human condition student health and wellness in a highly stressful, unrelenting world. What began as a conference call ended in catharsis. As educational leaders at the world s most venerable institutions, we suddenly new that first and foremost we shared a deep concern for the well being of our ids.

S O, W H AT E X AC T LY I S T H E G A M E I ’M S P E A K I N G O F? Well, it goes something li e this. n , the maga ine US News and World Report began a poll to ran colleges and universities according to a number of indices far too complicated to mention here . The net result of this was that colleges and universities began what was at first a rather subtle competition, but over time has exploded into a virtual industry in which colleges and universities have entire o ces devoted to doing everything possible to ensure their institution is ran ed as high as possible. f course, there are institutional categories, from small private colleges to major research universities and everything in between. ut, again, the net result is everything that each of the roughly , ran ed colleges does is distilled down to a number, a ran ing, a spot on a list. This ran ing is then either celebrated widely, or spun as a challenge for the next year. The game, year to year, seems to get more insidious, more overt, and more damaging. Americans, and as it turns out people around the world, are infatuated with rankings, even though in our hearts we now a single number doesn t


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come close to capturing what a given institution does in changing the life of a student. A primary measurement tool used by US News is admission selectivity. n other words, what percentage of applicants a school accepts. The lower the number, the more competitive it is, and the higher the ran ing. So here s the game. olleges and universities do as much as they can to get as many people as possible to apply to their institution, and then turn around and reject as many of those applicants as possible all the while touting inclusivity, etc. The more applicants they can deny, the better. t is never framed in this manner, but this is the game. titled this letter “This ra y ame We lay,” because am loath to tell you that prep schools have gotten into this game as well. We, too, are now being rated and ran ed by multiple sources, many of which ma e little sense to us. or example, one prominent ran ing relies almost exclusively on the percentage of ids who ta e A tests. The ran ing doesn t even consider how the ids perform on these tests, just the mere number of tests ta en. ther metrics are even more mysterious. now that rivalries among close competitors arvard vs. ale, T vs. altech, Andover vs. Exeter, etc. are as old as the institutions themselves. But none of them, and that includes Webb, were built to serve a ran ing number over the uality of an educational experience in which the mind, body and soul are nurtured and challenged to ma e a better world for those who will follow. m not writing this to call for a revolt against the ran ing machine, but more as a reality chec . What we stand for is far more than a ran ing. n fact, would argue it is far more than even a prosperous and successful life. ll conclude with a message of hope. t is derived from a boo recently read entitled Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism and Progress by Steven in er. t s a great read and reminded me again about

the important work we are doing here at Webb wor that will have a lasting impact on mankind through our graduates. In his boo , in er tac les the pessimist s eternal uestion, “ s the world falling apart ” With unbridled enthusiasm he answers “ o ” elying on a rich storehouse of historical data parsed out over some pages and an astonishing graphs , in er argues that life span, prosperity, safety, peace, nowledge, happiness and more have been on the rise in one manner or another since the last two thirds of the th century to today. Why irst among his answers are education and literacy of various types education has led us to democracy and prosperity. n a nutshell, following in er, it will be places li e Webb that will ensure our progress and momentum continue. In this issue of WEBB Magazine our major features describe in detail our new, innovative curriculum. The first piece describes how we use technology and educational design as tools to better e uip students for higher level learning. n the second feature, we describe how we ve also held onto teaching foundational s ills and habits of mind, including our time tested, whole student programs in honor and moral courage, leadership, teamwor , community building, and more. We count on and use the best of both the old and new here at Webb all of it flowing from those “timeless ideals” begun in the Enlightenment. Again, thin , why would anyone ever want to reduce this serious and complex wor to a simple ran ing Taylor . Stoc dale ead of Schools


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Webb Students at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory


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BY DESIGN: THE INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT WEBB BY DEBBIE C ARINI

INNOVATIVE THINKING. SELF-ASSURED LEADERSHIP. BOLD CREATIVITY. THE ABILITY TO TRUST AND BE TRUSTED. WHAT ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE COULD INSPIRE SUCH TRAITS? ONE THAT IS INTENTIONAL. BY DESIGN. AND PERHAPS ONE THAT INCLUDES THESE COURSES: HONORS ECONOMIC THOUGHT IN THE MODERN AGE; ADVANCED STUDIES AFRICAN IDEOLOGIES AND REVOLUTIONS; ADVANCED STUDIES EXISTENTIALISM & THE HUMAN CONDITION; BIOTECHNOLOGY; ADVANCED STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY; NEW MEDIA CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION; AND MORE.


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T

he philosophical underpinnings of the academic experience can be found in The Webb Schools’ Course Selection Guide. Webb’s program promises to foster “thinkers who learn and understand traditional and emerging disciplines, master skills essential to achievement in college and beyond, and embody vital attitudes and qualities of mind including curiosity, love of learning and a commitment to what is right and true.” Webb s methods focus less on traditional pedagogies of memori ing information, “one si e fits all” lessons, or teacher centric also nown as chal and tal classrooms, and more on providing students with a broad based liberal arts and sciences education where learning transpires through authentic discovery and rigorous scholarship. “ ur curriculum emphasi es student agency,” says Tracy iller, h , director of studies. “ t empowers students to ma e decisions about the path they re going to ta e, especially in the th and th grades. This is something they will need to do when they get to college.” nnovation has been at the core of a Webb education since its founding days. ay Alf, whose eponymous museum would establish a ground brea ing precedent at a high school, once said of school founder Thompson Webb s attitude towards educational ingenuity: “teachers were encouraged to develop their own ways of instructing their students, and the result was a lively diversity from class to class.”

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arvard nnovation Education ellow Tony Wagner, the author of The Global Achievement Gap and Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change The World, seems to agree with this approach.

“Today knowledge is ubiquitous, constantly changing, growing exponentially. ... Today knowledge is free. It’s like air, it’s like water. It’s become a commodity. ... There’s no competitive advantage today in knowing more than the person next to you. The world doesn’t care what you know. What the world cares about is what you can do with what you know,” writes Tony Wagner. ow did the redesign happen Again, by design and over a number of years. Webb s plus faculty members wor ed in curricular teams, often across academic disciplines, to develop the new program. nspired by nbounded ays, which has grown from a one day symposium to a three to five day immersive experience, the faculty sought to match the mission of that extraordinary event while staying true to the goals of providing a strong academic foundation.


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O N LY AT W E B B:

Core Curriculum – 9th & 10th Grades “We wanted to ma e sure that students in th and th grades develop the tools they need to succeed in the th and th grades,” explains Theresa Smith, h , assistant head of schools. “We also wanted our students to learn how to be master learners, a learner who can develop and maintain lifelong learning s ills and nimble thin ers.” ne of the five pillars of The entennial Strategic lan is “to re imagine the schools liberal arts curriculum with the goal of fostering bold, unbounded thin ers ready to lead and serve a global community.” ather than an outcome oriented curriculum, Webb s new curriculum is based on the notion of developing the intellect for substantial expression and is meant to fuel “unbounded thin ing” the food of innovation. n th and th grades, students experience a core humanities program that emphasizes foundational skills to serve as a launching pad for rigorous academic wor centered on real world applications in th and th grades.

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY This laboratory and field study course introduces students to the world of the life sciences. It is a fullyear course that builds foundational science practice skills, teaching students how to properly frame and test scientific questions—how to think like scientists. They also gain fundamental knowledge in the areas of evolution, paleontology, cell structure and function, DNA and RNA structure and function, genetics, classification, biodiversity, and bioethics. The first semester emphasizes content from Earth’s history, the history of life and evolution in geological time, and modern genetics practices and theory. The second semester includes fundamental and advanced laboratory skills and techniques used for genetic research, a curriculum created in partnership with the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory at the University of California, Riverside. These skills and techniques are explored and applied in real-world settings. All students in this course participate in a paleontology field trip in conjunction with the Alf Museum and other field study along the coast of Southern California. The first year of a two-year

n fact, all students in their first two years at Webb experience single sex core classes such as ntegrated ath , Evolutionary iology, Spanish or rench, as well as Foundations of Civilization and Fundamentals of Composition. In addition to giving students an insightful overview of those subjects, the classes serve as a bulwar from which students advance to co educational learning in an intentionally interdisciplinary curriculum that focuses on critical thin ing, applied nowledge and hands on experiences.

program, this course forms part of the preparation, tools, skills and knowledge to move into upper-level science courses at Webb.


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Director of Experiential Learning Webb also established a new administrative position to oversee experiential learning in the curriculum. Today, the director leads all summer programming coordinates nbounded ays, oversees the trips program and helps to build partnerships with local institutions such as the laremont olleges. The director of experiential learning also helps to ensure that as new classes and programs are developed, they bear the hallmar s of what experiential learning is immersive and engaging. Additionally, a “bloc schedule” was introduced, which delivers three longer periods of daily engagement and discovery. “ ew research in education suggests that extended class time provides for sustained study. And students aren t running from class to class,” Smith says. urther enhancements to the academic program include increased o ce hours, providing boarding and day students with opportunities to engage one on one with their teachers, and evening labs, which occur four to five times a wee from Sunday through Thursday. The evening labs, which

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are sta ed by a faculty member and encourage peer to peer collaboration are also “a nice way to bridge day and boarding students,” says Smith. enry apteyn , h , a research physicist, is recogni ed as a world leader in the development of a new generation of lasers. e has also been a professor in the epartment of hysics, and a ellow of A oint nstitute for aboratory Astrophysics , at the niversity of olorado at oulder since . is niece, essica oder is now a senior at Webb.

“My experience as a professor has focused primarily on graduate education, which is virtually 100 percent about an ‘active learning environment’,” he says. “Our physics department at Boulder is very prominent in activities to reform the undergraduate physics curriculum to replace as much passive lecturing as possible with various active learning activities including more use of laboratories, activities such as concept questions during lectures and small group problem-solving—along with activities to monitor the efficacy of these activities,” says Kapteyn.

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THE AMERICAN IDEA This course, required for all 10th grade students, is one half of the interdisciplinary American Studies program, which encourages a rich, holistic, and humanities-style investigation of American culture, society and ideology. While both courses consider the many narratives, identities, values and cultural phenomena that are the driving forces and products of American experiences, The American Idea focuses particularly on the ongoing relationship between literary and artistic expression, and American culture and history. While engaging in critical analysis of a variety of texts and primary sources, students consider questions such as: What makes an American text or work of art so “American”? How can we read a social or historical moment through an artist or writer’s reaction to it? What are Americans afraid of, and what are they reacting against? How do artists and writers make social and historical change with their work? Students practice many skills vital to the humanities, especially literary analysis and writing. Students who display exceptional achievement in this course may be eligible for Advanced Studies electives in 11th grade.


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“...small group discussions...� Students gather with faculty during Wednesday Flex-Time to discuss questions surrounding the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca.


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Interdisciplinary Coursework O N LY AT W E B B:

ADVANCED STUDIES IN BIOTECHNOLOGY Understanding life at the molecular level is the key to answering some of nature’s greatest mysteries. This course provides students the opportunity to learn and apply lab methodologies usually only available to science students in an advanced undergraduate or graduate school experience. Using cutting-edge equipment in the biology lab at Webb, as well as the facilities available at the Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory at the University of California, Riverside, students investigate various research topics in biotechnology, explore the ethical implications of these fields of study and apply learned lab methods to student research projects, in collaboration with UCR scientists. Topics and lab skills include DNA isolation, gene cloning, DNA analysis by electrophoresis, DNA barcoding, bacterial and plant transformation, DNA forensic analysis, genetic modification and DNA ancestry analysis. Students who are interested in biological research, molecular biology and genetics are encouraged to take this course. This full-year course includes occasional field trips to the University of California, Riverside. Independent research projects are an integral part of the learning process in this class. Completion of this course prepares students for college level laboratory courses including biology, biochemistry and molecular biology.

essica isher and reg er en are teachers in the humanities at Webb an interdisciplinary study of human history, cultures, and creativity. As they wor ed on the new curriculum, they identified foundational s ills writing, thin ing, creating and collaborating that they wanted to impart to students. “We wanted to sca old them into the curriculum,” says isher of the faculty s e orts. And so, freshmen and sophomores are introduced to the subjects through classes like Foundations of Civilization and Fundamentals of omposition. y the end of their sophomore year, students have a shared “toolbox” of s ills in humanities and are prepared to study in advanced classes that cover everything from classics to contemporary topic studies classes that call for curiosity, close reading, clear and creative thin ing, spea ing and writing, while exposing students to many cultures and monuments of human endeavors. Erin Smith , h , has been an assistant professor in the inance epartment at the niversity of ochester, Simon School of usiness and is currently a financial economist in the ce of itigation Economics at the .S. Securities and Exchange ommission in Salt a e ity, tah. “The main thing for success in graduate school and in your profession is to be able to figure out how to solve your own problems. A lot of ids come out of high school and they ve only been taught to the test. ou need to be able to have an independent perspective in the world,” she says.

Academic Advising– Advanced Studies “Students pic their classes in th and th grades, just li e they will in college,” says isher. “And just li e college, our electives o er depth rather than breadth.” Advisors also play a big role in helping students pic classes. “ ou want them to create a schedule that balances their interests. ou want them to challenge themselves, but not tan . Advisors loo at the schedule and help students reali e if it s a good mental health balance, too,” explains isher.


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Andrew ar e, h , Augustyn amily urator and director of research and collections, wor s in the Alf useum and is also a student advisor. e explains the process has di erent components, starting with the first point of contact, one teacher with six to seven students. “ help students navigate the system and resources at Webb,” he says of his advisees. “ irst of all, want them to now that there are so many opportunities to engage with faculty on campus. want to help students reali e the resources that are here and say to themselves, ey, can go to my teacher The second point is helping students navigate the course selection. tal to the students, their families, the director of studies, and the college guidance o ce. don t want them to become over extended. want to ma e sure they have balance and stay healthy.”

Critical Thinking– Student Engagment er en stressed that the curriculum encourages critical thinking. “We want students to loo across disciplines, to see things from multiple viewpoints and perspectives, to understand subjects and be able to spea about them in an educated and informed manner,” he says. “We want them to see themselves as intellectuals, not just students in a certain class to trust themselves as thin ers,” adds Fisher. And, also, to build good habits: “Students have a planner that they fill out,” says er en. “They learn that if they stay focused and stay on trac with their wor , they ll get to do all the other things they want to do. t helps them navigate their freedom, an important uality as they move towards college.” n mathematics, computer science and the sciences, teachers are also innovating courses to re uire a high level of student engagement. “We want our students as ing uestions, designing experiments, trouble shooting,” says isa lomberg, incoming science department chair. And Webb s science labs are equipped to handle the boldest inquires.

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ADVANCED COURSES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Advanced courses in computer science are offered in partnership with faculty from Harvey Mudd College. Students may move on from our computer science course to take CS5, HMC’s introductory course. From there, they have access to other advanced offerings. Harvey Mudd faculty and students support Webb students in their studies, both on our campus and at HMC’s facilities. Specific course offerings are dependent on interest, and the schedule with HMC is worked out each spring. Students who have not taken Webb’s computer science course, but who have advanced knowledge, may apply for consideration to enroll in our HMC partnership program in writing through the chair of the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science. Webb’s goal is to enroll an equal number of Vivian Webb School and Webb School of California students in this program, in keeping with HMC’s commitment to gender diversity in the sciences.


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“...advanced research and field study...”


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e have three fume hoods protective lab e uipment that exhausts vapor away the from the wor area for organic chemistry. ve never seen that in a high school chemistry class,” o ers lomberg. The science labs also feature multiple printers and an ultra cold free er that can reach temperatures of degrees below ero to eep cells alive for a project in genetic engineering that lomberg is conducting with students. “ t s ama ing that have access to that ind of e uipment in my lab,” she adds.

Extraordinary Academic Partnerships n classes li e Advanced Studies in iotechnology, Advanced Studies in Experimental hysics, and Advanced Studies in aleontology, students are provided the opportunity to not only learn, but also to apply lab methodologies usually only available to science students in an advanced undergraduate graduate school experience. lomberg also ta es her students to the eil A. ampbell Science earning aboratory at the niversity of alifornia, iverside, where they investigate research topics in biotechnology, explore the ethical implications and apply lab methods to student research projects in collaboration with scientists. Topics and lab s ills include A isolation, gene cloning, A analysis by electrophoresis, A barcoding and more. And in the hands on experience most readily identified with The Webb Schools wor ing at the aymond . Alf useum of aleontology right on campus students are practicing the s ills they will need throughout their college educations.

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ADVANCED STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY This course engages students in advanced, original research on fossils in the Alf Museum collection, under the direction of the museum director or curator of paleontology. All projects involve exploration of topics and questions that have not been addressed in the scientific literature, and many students formally publish their results in peer-reviewed academic journals and/or present at a professional paleontology conference. Students review relevant paleontological literature; collect, analyze, and interpret original scientific data; write their results in a formal scientific manuscript; and present their work to a variety of audiences. Students are expected to work both independently and in teams, and have the opportunity to learn advanced research and documentation for two years when possible, and most participate in a professional conference (depending upon scheduling). To enroll in the course, students must have successfully completed Honors Museum Research at a high level of performance, with recommendation of the instructor.


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“We re preparing students to be deep, critical thin ers through their wor in paleontology,” says ar e.

“I expect my students to look at all sides of an issue; to determine where we get our information from and how it was created. We’re also asking students to gather evidence in the field, to collect fossils and measurements, to study their findings and then articulate their thoughts in writing and orally. They present on scientific topics at regional and national conferences such as the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology annual meeting, and many publish co-authored papers in peer-reviewed journals,” he adds. Smith says her time wor ing at the museum involved her in something most students don t experience until college: research. “The research process can be very tedious,” she explains. “The satisfaction is from the certainty of the wor you produce. The research did at the Alf useum while was a Webb student set me up to do careful wor in my graduate studies and as an economist now. omputing a derivative can be done with automation today, but having a creative perspective and embracing unbounded thin ing will decide the leaders of tomorrow.” f course, the resources available to student researchers go beyond the laboratories at Webb. According to isher, “ ar u la, h , in the library, has incredible resources. or example, there is access to the New York Times for everyone on campus,” she says. “And ar can pull up numerous digital resources and boo s.” ar e points to ST , a digital library containing digiti ed bac issues of academic journals, boo s and primary sources, plus current issues of journals. t provides full text searches of almost , journals.

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ula, director of teaching and learning resources in the library, has to continually define, and redefine, what an academic resource is. The changes that have occurred in just the past years especially technologically in research, teaching and learning have created a very di erent context for the missions of academic libraries. The plus side is that technology has opened learning to venues previously unavailable to high school students. “We have a partnership with the onnold udd ibrary of the laremont olleges,” ula says, where students can access vast collections in the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences. ula also helps secure sites for field study including recent excursions to the obert . ernard ield Station, an academic resource of the laremont olleges, and to the wealth of resources in the Southern alifornia area such as the E ational ay and esbian Archives at the niversity of Southern alifornia ibraries, and the Watts Towers Arts enter. “We re close to a lot of powerful resources and am continuing to develop those relationships,” he says. n his role as a teacher of journalism, ula continues in the realm of information more precisely, he helps students to recogni e the problem of disinformation and their relationships to media. As the faculty advisor to the Webb Canyon Chronicle the student newspaper, which is available in print and online at www.webbcanyonchronicle.com and to numerous student podcasts and videos, ula helps his young journalists navigate the ever changing definition of what constitutes news. “ ow does a newspaper become a place for discourse That s the capacity we re building,” he says. “ help my students to do that in a fair and balanced way. And tell the sta : f you want to be the voice of the students, you need to get them tal ing. ” And that, in turn, helps them master the self directional s ills that will get them through college and help them flourish in an ever changing wor force.


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A LUMNI PER SPEC T IVE

n my areas of specialty (cancer research

and regenerative medicine), collaboration and communication are critical — indeed, the most seminal advances in these fields are emanating from interdisciplinary partnerships that tackle key questions using multi-pronged approaches. Without significant independence and exceptional communication skills, productive collaborations do not occur. During the summer of 2017, I spent three months as a visiting professor in the Department of Cell Biology and the Ludwig Center at Harvard Medical School. This position was funded by the American Society for Cell Biology, so that I could maintain our research operations at Cal State Northridge while forging new collaborative partnerships with faculty and junior trainees on the other side of the country. The Ludwig Center (directed by Drs. Joan Brugge and George Gemetri) epitomizes collaborative science, tackling some of the most challenging issues in oncology using disciplines including physics, mathematics, computer science, engineering, molecular biology and medicine. However, each participating investigator must have and train their own research mentees in independence and communication. To say that these skills are essential for success in college and beyond is an understatement.” —Jonathan Kelber ’93


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Colleges Embrace Curriculum’s Engagement & Rigor ector artine , director of college guidance at Webb, says that colleges li e tradition as much as Webb does, but they also li e it when schools do something out of the box. “ ur teachers design their classes li e they re professors,” says artine . “This isn t a curriculum that was purchased from the ollege oard. The traditional A curriculum is good, but we wanted to be better.” As artine describes it, an A curriculum is standardi ed, with little room for teachers to personali e it. Webb wants its curriculum to be relevant to this generation of students a curriculum that is meaningful and rigorous and one that teaches young adults to thin , analy e and criti ue with intelligence and curiosity. e also says that colleges are impressed with the changes: “ o one is saying, h, you got rid of A s We would never institute a program that would hurt our students.” artine stresses that colleges “love our new classes there s lots of reading, writing and critical thin ing. And hands on experience. n science, our students and teachers are partnering with professors and students from Western niversity of ealth Sciences in nearby omona . They re watching real science unfold in real time, not just pictures in a boo .” artine also notes the example of the Alf

useum.

“There is no school that has what we have on campus in the Alf useum. ou d have to go to ale,” he says, citing that institution s eabody useum of atural istory.

“There is a select group of secondary schools in America that have a curriculum that’s interesting and meaningful to students,” says Martinez. “You can get an ‘A’ at a lot of different high schools and not have the confidence it takes to be successful in college. Every student at Webb is going to be prepared. They know how to study and what to look for.”

artine says the Webb student body is smart enough to now if they are in a class that isn t interesting or challenging. “They challenge us,” he says. e has even had a college admissions o cer tell him, “We love the classes you o er at Webb. our students can put those s ills into place as soon as they get to college.” onathan elber , h , a biology researcher and professor at alifornia State niversity, orthridge, says of Webb s academic program, “ would suggest that the principles of discovery learning that enable students to in uire and investigate were a cornerstone of my own education at Webb as both a student and teacher . As to whether these s ills tools are valuable to students beyond Webb, absolutely t is these s ills tools that drive innovation and progress in any field. Entering college with a firm grasp of them and an ability to thin critically only helps students navigate the rigors of their undergraduate training.” ltimately, for students to be successful in a fast changing world, the instructional practices of their high school must engage them in learning and o er opportunities to learn and demonstrate mastery in di erent ways. And, the curriculum must support those instructional approaches, meeting students at their level and providing ade uate sca olding to get them to the next level. Alfred en , , the associate dean of faculty and a professor of law at oston ollege aw School, says unbounded thinking and honorable behavior help to answer the big questions in life. “We live in a time of fascinating technology with big data and A artificial intelligence, including self driving cars , but ultimately, anything that happens with these are human problems and we have to ask ourselves, ‘how do we want to live our lives ” he says. The answer, he believes, cannot be given by someone who only has competence in one field, such as a lawyer, or doctor, or scientist. A solid grounding in regular old fashioned thin ing, writing, and uantitative reasoning is very valuable but, he finishes: “ eople who can thin at the intersection of many ideas will be extremely valuable.”


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“...every kid at Webb is going to be prepared...� Webb students canyoneering durring Unbounded Days 2018 in Zion National Park.


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BY DESIGN: LEARNING BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

BY JOHN FERR ARI


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OVER THE PAST DECADE, WEBB HAS INVESTED A LOT: A NEW AQUATICS CENTER, RETOOLED MUSEUM RESEARCH AND FOSSIL PREP LABS, A NEW PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, NEW SCIENCE LABS, AND NEW HIGH-TECH CLASSROOMS (TO SUPPORT NEW SCIENCE AND HUMANITIES CURRICULA). THIS ARTICLE IS NOT ABOUT THOSE INVESTMENTS. THOSE INVESTMENTS HAVE PREPARED WEBB TO EDUCATE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY, BUT THEY ARE, IN THE END, A MEANS TO AN END. WEBB’S FACILITIES AND ACADEMIC STRUCTURE ARE VITALLY IMPORTANT, BUT THEY ALONE ARE NOT WHAT DEFINES WEBB. THE CORE OF THE WEBB EXPERIENCE HAS REMAINED THE SAME SINCE THOMPSON WEBB FOUNDED THE SCHOOL IN 1922. THE CORE OF THE WEBB SCHOOLS IS THE STUDENTS. THE CORE OF THE WEBB EXPERIENCE IS LEARNING.


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Learning Beyond the Classroom Classroom education is a big part of the learning experience at Webb, but as a boarding school that experience has always extended outside the classroom and beyond class hours. Webb’s faculty is mindful of the fact that they’re not only teaching today’s students; they’re also preparing tomorrow’s leaders. “A good school prepares you for success,” says Head of Schools Taylor Stockdale. “A great education prepares you for adversity.” Preparing teenagers to meet success and overcome adversity, as students in college and as leaders after graduation, means focusing on the whole person, developing character as well as building knowledge—independence,

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determination, perseverance… ultimately, self-confidence and grit.

ow do you learn ” muses humanities teacher and head bas etball coach ic u ue. “ ou fail.” u ue doesn t li e the term failure: failure, he says, is giving up. Failing a test, or losing a bas etball game, doesn t mean giving up, he explains. t means figuring out what didn t wor , fixing it, and moving forward. ailing and learning is part of Webb s learning experience, on the athletic field and in the classroom. “ t s really hard not to fail sometimes in our curriculum,” says irector of Studies Tracy iller, h , “and thin that s deliberate.” The intent is not to give students the experience of failure, though the intent is to give students an authentic, real world learning experience, something that has always characteri ed learning at Webb. Webb s model of experiential education traces its roots bac to ay Alf, a towering figure in

the history of The Webb Schools. Arriving at Webb School of alifornia in , Alf taught biology, geometry and English, coached trac and football, and established the tradition of ta ing Webb students into the world to learn, leading peccary trips into remote areas to hunt for fossils, giving students the opportunity to learn by doing. Today, Webb s cross disciplinary curriculum is characteri ed by student centered, problem based learning. Students aren t simply led to answers they are engaged with the problem solving process to discover answers. This re uires more than memori ation: students must thin critically about problems and issues, collaborate, and understand the process of discovery. n science courses, there are no canned labs, iller says. “ ids and teachers don t always now what the solution is going to be.” n humanities courses, students are challenged to consider and evaluate di erent points of view. Throughout Webb s curriculum, there s an emphasis


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on creative, hands on assignments that re uire students to thin , rather than simply turn to the internet for answers. “ ur students are really challenged to thin critically to arrive at an answer,” says ivian Webb School ean Sarah ant . “We re loo ing for ow did you get to the answer more than the answer itself.”

“Problem-solving is an exercise in tenacity,” adds Assistant Head of Schools Theresa Smith, PhD. “It’s really easy to memorize information… It’s a lot harder to, for example, design a lab for a question you’ve asked.”

On the Field of Play or some students, notes irector of Athletics Steve Wishe , designing a lab may be the easiest part of their time at Webb. Their challenges may lie on the athletic field. At Webb, “athletics is part of the totality of education,” he says. t s one way the schools encourage students to explore the edges of their comfort ones. t s also something alumni remember best, Wishe says, and the experience of arly aris isn t unusual. “ played softball at Webb,” she explains. “ wasn t very good, but Webb taught me to be better. Team sports taught me a lot about discipline and wor ing with teammates School was really good at, but softball wasn t good at. t taught me to enjoy myself even when m not the best and how to stretch myself. That was a s ill needed to learn.”

O N LY AT W E B B:

LITERATURE & LEADERSHIP IN THE WILDERNESS At the core of this course is a hands on, experiential approach to exploring ideas of leadership, decision-making, community building, and character. Students read both fiction and nonfiction texts and examine historical case studies of events and individuals that involve the course’s major themes. Writing includes journal entries, expository essays and persuasive essays, and culminates in a research-focused project that examines a major theme of the course. An integral part of the course is student expeditions into the California outdoors, where students practice and refine skills and concepts discussed in class, in addition to learning basic navigational and camp craft skills.


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Everyone likes to win, but winning is not the only goal of Webb’s athletics program, Wishek explains. He wants students to experience what he calls the crucible of competition; to build their strengths in teamwork, the ability to face challenges with grace, and to recover from failure.

O N LY AT W E B B:

HONORS ETHICS & MODERN GLOBAL AFFAIRS This course explores the complex relationship between ethics and the actions of state and nonstate actors in the modern world. Students who take this elective will grapple with contemporary topics such as immigration and refugee crises, environmental degradation and global warming, genocide, terrorism and nuclear proliferation. Students will practice critical 21st century skills to formulate policy recommendations, for the U.S. and other nations, supported by ethical principles. They also research and review both current and historical literature and other forms of media as a basis for class discussions and debates and to provide the inspiration for shorter written assignments as well as a summative and substantial written piece. This course is perfect for students interested in international relations. This course includes at least one field trip to relevant sites in the greater Los Angeles area.

any of today s high school students have been raised in curated environments designed for success, Wishe says. or many students used to academic success, athletics may be where they learn what it is li e to struggle, and to develop empathy for others who are struggling. Athletics gives students the opportunity to succeed not a guarantee. “ ne of the most important things we teach in the athletic arena is how to fail,” Wishe says, “and failure is a powerful learning tool for future leaders.” Webb focuses on the whole student, he adds, and challenges inside the classroom and out are where education and character intersect. Sometimes students fail, Smith says, but “there s nothing about failure that s about defeat it s about learning and recovery. ids are with failure when they re with a teacher they now wants them to succeed.” That s the ethos of the Webb faculty. “There s a tremendous amount of care” for students, says iller. “We consistently believe ids can do hard things.”

Supportive Community The challenge of doing hard things, in and out of the classroom, is bac ed up by a supportive community. “ need these students to be able to fail in some way, and to pic themselves up from it,” says Webb School of alifornia ean en arrell. “ ut there are a lot of people here to help students pic themselves up.” When students fail, “the whole community is here to support them” so they re not constrained or defined by failure. “ want them to ma e mista es here and learn how to fail here.” “We build di erent layers of teams” to support students, from peer mentors and tutors to dorm heads and faculty advisors. “ ur ids are not alone.”


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hat, says The Webb Schools irector of ounseling and ealth Education elanie auman, is at the heart of the school: caring for each other, and it follows from Webb s enduring sense of community. The school chooses faculty to enhance Webb s sense of community and community values, notes arrell, and that sense of community is passed from teachers and students to every new class that matriculates at Webb. “ ommunity creates the foundation for dealing with challenges,” adds auman, and it s something all alumni remember. “ new that wanted to go to a high school that would challenge me and set me up to go to a really good college,” recalls aris. “That s what made me loo to Webb ut what made me choose Webb is that it seemed li e such a tight nit community.” “ ommunity to me was the most important aspect” of Webb, agrees isa iller , vice president, national director of marketing, foundation & institutional advisors at Northern Trust orporation. There is, she says, a value system on campus: treat others as you want to be treated, do the right thing, and learn from your mista es. “That guided ids in how to behave, and found that most students too it really seriously.”

The Honor Code esides the value system and community, Webb s onor ode also had a lasting impact on iller. “Wor ing with the onor ode, you learn it s better to admit to mista es and solve them, rather than try to hide them,” iller says. “ don t thin could wor for a company that doesn t share these values. t influences where m comfortable and also who m friends with.” The underlying principle of Webb s onor ode is simply to be considerate of other people, she says an idea that s “absolutely a benefit in my career.” The importance of community, and Webb s shared value of giving bac to the community, led oe Adler to join the onor ommittee, an experience he found rewarding then and in the years since. “Webb is a very tight nit community,

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so you now everyone on the onor ommittee, you re not only upholding the rules of the community, you re not only loo ing out for the community, you re also loo ing out for the people who come before the onor ommittee.” ust as important, he adds, it was an opportunity to build empathy. “ ou were involved in a decision that a ects a person s life.”

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HONOR CABINET & HONOR COMMITTEE

nstilling ethics and a sense of values “is in everything we do,” says arrell. “ t s imbued in the community.”

Academics, athletics and extracurricular activities, the sense of community; these are the scaffolding

As a long-standing tradition essential to Webb, members of

around the core of the Webb experience: fostering

the VWS Honor Cabinet and WSC Honor Committee work to

students as they become adults as leaders,

educate and inform the school community and its individual

and encouraging learning across an array of

members about the nature and function of the Honor Code on campus. Both work to encourage in all students the highest standards of personal integrity and responsibility. On the occasion that violations of the Honor Code occur, members of the Honor Cabinet and Honor Committee and their faculty advisors convene to hear such cases and to recommend appropriate responses and follow-up actions.

experiences. That takes reflection and intentionality, Farrell says, and a lot of thought goes into school

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decisions, on everything from student leadership positions to class curricula.

y continually creating an active, supporting learning environment, Webb promotes nuanced messages and thin ing. “Students have conversations here that most students don t have until college.” any of those conversations center on the students themselves: their character and their role in the world. “ y main purpose is to have them thin ,” says u ue of his humanities courses. “ want them to have a better understanding of who they are they have to do a lot of deep thin ing and reflecting.” or themselves, u ue encourages students to challenge their own limitations. or the world in which they will become leaders, u ue reflects that the opportunity to attend an elite school comes with responsibility. “We are here to help other people.”


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THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY


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ADVANCED STUDIES EXISTENTIALISM & THE HUMAN CONDITION

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The Chapel Talk Those conversations are formali ed in Webb s chapel tal s, which give seniors the opportunity to reflect on their own time and growth at the school, and to pass along what they ve learned from the Webb community to other students. “They re emblematic of what ma es Webb special,” says ead of Schools Taylor Stoc dale.

“When Thompson Webb built the chapel, he built This course examines the rise and influence of existentialism, the literary and philosophical movement that came of

it by hand. He made the adobe bricks himself and

age following the Second World War. After a study of the

everyone in the community helped lay the bricks

basic principles of existentialism, especially as espoused

and watched the chapel rise. The chapel talks are

by the French philosopher Jean Paul-Sartre, students read

just like that – every student can add another piece

representational authors such as Samuel Beckett, Albert

of learning and experience that gets passed on.”

Camus, Simone de Beauvoir, Tom Stoppard, Kurt Vonnegut, Margaret Atwood, Jerzy Kosinski and Banana Yoshimoto. Students study the formation of Feminist Existentialism, and trace the influence of existentialism in some very contemporary works such as Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag. Students should have a foundation in literary analysis, close reading, Harkness-style discussion and expository writing including the thesis-driven essay. Utilizing these skills students should be prepared to engage in comprehensive and detailed research with an eye toward preparing papers of significant length and weight; these MLA-documented papers will further facilitate students’ ability to synthesize materials and to make university-level arguments. More broadly speaking this course asks students to read and consider deliberately philosophical literary works, to formulate their thoughts on those texts both in written and oral form, and to push the boundaries of their own world views, particularly when it comes to questions of meaning and existence.

Webb s focus on the student and on providing a holistic learning experience has remained the same since Thompson Webb founded the school on a philosophy of plain living and high thin ing. At Webb, there s no distinction between classwor and the greater world, says ant . And it has never been an easy place to get through, notes Smith. “Even building the school was a challenging adventure for Thompson Webb and his family.” “Webb taught me perseverance,” recalls isa iller. “ ou re learning all the time at Webb. Things might not always go your way, but you learn from your experiences. That ma es you a lot more apt to ta e on challenges.” “Webb gives you enough room to explore,” agrees aris. “ t inspired me to be more curious about the world, and to see out new experiences and expand my mindset and become a more well rounded person Webb gave me the confidence to put myself out there and try new experiences and eep up with them. Webb definitely laid an excellent foundation to be hardwor ing and resilient and also to give bac to the community. Those values are so important to have to overall be a good person.” As Stoc dale notes, “the best way you can lead is to lead yourself. That s what Webb has always been about.”


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O N LY AT W E B B:

THE CHAPEL PROGRAM The Vivian Webb Chapel was constructed by the founding headmaster, Thompson Webb, in honor of his wife. There one can find plaques and stained glass windows which honor outstanding personalities and events in the schools’ history, including memorials to Webb School of California’s war dead. The chapel is a solemn place of reflection. Weekday Chapel: Vivian Webb School and Webb School of California meet for chapel twice each week to sing together, to hear music, and to listen to speakers. One of Webb’s cherished traditions is that of the Senior Chapel Talk, and most members of the senior class accept the privilege of delivering a meaningful address to the members of their school. Sunday Chapel: The combined boarding schools often gather for Sunday Chapel in the evening before dinner. All boarding students attend Sunday Chapel. Student dress for Sunday Chapel is the school uniform. The chapel programs and services, which are non-denominational and which feature speakers from both within and outside of the Webb community, are organized and led by a coordinate student group: the Chapel Council.


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todayrobotics

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s an after-school program, robotics could almost be called a sport for the mind. It combines the excitement of athletics with the rigors of science and technology. There are competitions, coaches, teamwork, dramatic moments, equipment failures, losses and wins.

atthew u explains the process of the competition: “Every year, ST releases a new game for us to play, with a new set of challenges. ften, there is a simple challenge collecting and scoring balls, for example , a complex challenge li e lifting a yoga ball feet o the ground, last year , and a field challenge two years ago, the Webb robot had to climb a mountain and suspend itself from a bar .”

“Most kids don’t have the remotest idea of what engineering is,” says Will

“ have always loved creating things,” says oder. “When was in middle school participated in my school s robotics club, but Webb was my fi rst competitive robotics team. The current team captain implored more girls to join, because at the time she was the only girl in the program, was completely certain that would be spending all four years of my time at Webb on the robotics team. We now have seven girls, which is more than there have ever been during my time at Webb.”

Wal er, math teacher and advisor to the robotics team. “ t s a subject you can t put in a box. t could be anything from building power plants to designing the front of a dishwasher.” Each year, to students ta e part in the program o ered in after school sessions five days a wee . Andrew amilton teaches ntegrated hysics and hemistry and is an advisor to the team he says the program provides a place for anyone who is interested, from students who want to build the robot, to others who might be more interested in programming or electronics. The Webb teams participate in ST or nspiration and ecognition of Science and Technology competitions which were founded by ean amen, inventor of the Segway and portable dialysis and automatic injection machines. amen famously says, “ ou have teenagers thin ing they re going to ma e millions as A stars when that s not realistic for even percent of them. ecoming a scientist or engineer is.”

Some students join the team because they ve always been interested in building things, li e essica oder .

The team came into being years ago. Wal er describes himself as “one of those ids who was always ta ing things apart,” and with a bac ground in electrical engineering it was a natural fit for him to lead the new program. The group started with eight to students, enough for one team. Today, Wal er and amilton mentor upwards of participants, nearly a third of which are girls. The challenge from the ST organi ation is sent out in September and then the teams start wor ing on prototypes. “A lot goes into deciding what the robot is going to do,” explains Wal er. “Students are as ing themselves, What systems will create to accomplish this ”


29 One of Webb’s robotics teams,

FTC Team 359, a.k.a. WEBB.exe,

was invited to compete at the FIRST Tech Challenge World Championships in Houston in April 2018—the second invitation for a Webb team in five years. This was an amazing opportunity for a hard working group of students, which included Jacob Borello ’19, Kit Caldwell ’18 and Wing Chow ’19.

“Scientists investigate that which already is; engineers create that which has never been.” – Albert Einstein


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Students learn to use hand tools, to mill and lathe. There is a band saw and a drill press and what amilton describes as “ smaller tools.” Everyone finds their niche on a team. Andi elgado joined as a freshman with no discernable skills pertaining to robots. “ learned about the various tools and how to use them, but come sophomore year, was overseeing our business relations as well as maintaining our engineering journal a documentation of everything we do on the team,” says elgado. “ n my sophomore and junior years, acted more as a liaison between our team and the outside world, making our team nown to the public via multiple social media channels. n my senior year, however, became more involved with mechanics. spent a great deal of time modelling di erent designs via A computer aided design . y designs were among the many prototypes that were tested on our robot.” acob orello describes himself as a “curious freshman without any athletic talent” when he signed on to the team. owever, he was always interested in the STE science, technology, engineering and math fields. “ used to thin robotics was a far o reality, which would only be available to me later in life,” says orello. e says he felt he had very little to o er the team, other than enthusiasm, but was able to learn uic ly through hands on experience. n addition, he s ac uired a lot of capabilities that transfer to other important aspects of life.

“ uring my three years on the team, have learned very important lessons like what kinds of builds were above our reach, and what we can accomplish if we wor hard enough. ve also learned to apply geometry and trigonometry in a real wor environment, which thought d never have a need to do,” he says. elgado also tal s about lessons learned through robotics: “ ve learned the importance of nowing and ac nowledging when something isn t wor ing. There were so many moments when something you ve spent a lot of time ma ing and have become almost emotionally attached to doesn t wor the way you want it to, and at that point, it s better to just scrap the piece and go bac to s uare one.” onathan unn said that participating on the robotics team inspired him to study math while he was in college. Today, he is a trading analyst at Ameri ome ortgage ompany, .

“I majored in economics, but I also double minored in mathematical finance and computer programming,” says Gunn, who graduated from the University of Southern California, which he attended on a fulltuition academic scholarship. “If I had not done robotics I would never have realized my passion for math and programming. In my career, I am constantly using my programming skills to analyze large data sets and to automate complex calculations. I work on a mortgage-backed securities trading desk, which involves a lot of time-sensitive calculations, so these are invaluable skills that I use daily.” roo lyn lynn is currently pursuing two degrees at niversity of alifornia, rvine, one in mathematical biology and the other in biological sciences. “Although these college paths might not seem li e they relate to a high school robotics team, my time as a aulbot gave me a sample of wor ing with applied math, computer science,


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important everyone s role is. When you re wor ing on a team, everyone has di erent strengths and you have to figure out each person s strength or passion.” As part of her undergraduate studies, Spangler has had the opportunity to wor on a project for ewlett ac ard. “ was part of a larger team. ou re just in awe of everyone else and you reali e that none of us could finish the project by ourselves,” she says. ne of the main ta eaways from her time on the robotics team is that she s never afraid to tac le any problem. and robotic design, while exposing me to professionals who used these fields daily in their careers,” says lynn. lynn s ultimate goal is to conduct research in mathematical modeling of dynamic biological systems.

“Modeling involves a lot of calculus, di erential e uations, linear algebra, numerical analysis and coding experience,” she says. “ am currently conducting research on algorithms which will help me in my career. Even though did not learn advanced math on the team, being a part of robotics showed me what could do in research beginning with the basics we used.” n the simplest of terms, engineers identify a problem, and come up with a solution often creating something completely new in the process. That is the basis of building a robot. elissa Spangler is an engineering major at arvey udd ollege at Webb, she was a member of the robotics team for her entire tenure at school. She was co captain and captain of the team. And in , she was the only woman on the Webb team that traveled to the world championship in issouri. “ always new wanted to go into the sciences or math,” says Spangler. “ ut never thought about engineering. eing part of the team made me comfortable building things with my hands.” Than s to her experience on the robotics team, Spangler says she s had confidence and nowledge from the get go at arvey udd. “ learned how to as for help,” she adds. “ also learned how many parts of the project there are to put together and how

Throughout the decade long history of the program, students have also created an engineering noteboo where they document their successes and failures. ast year s contribution was nearly pages long.

Beyond the STEM aspects of robotics, there are additional benefits to joining the team: learning to cooperate with others, improving social interaction skills and learning the highs and lows of competing. There’s also leadership, community involvement and something the FIRST competition calls “gracious professionalism.” “All students who are involved in the robotics team are there to do their best,” says amilton. racious professionalism is defined on the ST website as “a way of doing things that encourages high uality wor , emphasi es the value of others, and respects individuals and the community.” “Webb students are already primed for this through our culture of honor,” he says. The senior, u, says he s also learned one more valuable lesson from his time on the team: “ atience. ve learned to be much more patient. don t now how teachers can stand to teach freshmen,” he jo es. “ respect my teachers much more now. Wor ing with freshmen taught me patience.”


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N TODAY’S INFORMATIONSATURATED WORLD, everywhere you turn someone is presenting evidence and making an argument: in opinion articles, on TV news networks, on your Facebook stream… that’s one reason why Webb emphasizes critical reasoning skills in its curriculum. For 10 years, Webb also has offered an opportunity for students who’d like to put those skills to use by building their own arguments:

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todaydebate

debate.


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“You have to be able to, not just understand facts, but wield your evidence,” explains debate team coach Jessica Fisher.

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n debate, you bring in the critical thin ing s ills from your classes and use them,” says team co captain ictoria iu . ecalling information and using it logically to support an argument is the essence of debate, adds co captain ridgid orbin . “The most important s ill is bringing in nowledge uic ly and e ciently.” Webb’s emphasis on critical reasoning in the classroom builds a foundation for debate; debate team practice builds the skills needed for competition. Critical reasoning is a complex set of skills, notes Fisher. In debate, critical reasoning requires the ability to evaluate sources and identify biases, and expertise using evidence in support of an argument, not to mention a certain rhetorical flair.

udging by the numbers, that s an appealing combination for Webb students: from less than members a decade ago, the team has grown to more than members, a number isher says is just about right. ebate is available to students as an afternoon activity those interested in competitive debate can ta e part in interscholastic tournaments. Webb s team competes in the igh School ublic ebate rogram, a parliamentary style debate league founded by the laremont olleges ebate nion. The program organi es seven debate tournaments each year each tournament includes debate competitions in two preannounced and two impromptu topics. Wor ing in teams of three, Webb debate team members prepare beforehand, developing arguments and testing them in moc debates held during practice sessions. There are two to three practice sessions of two to three hours each before each tournament. Students come prepared independent research on the preannounced debate topics is a must.

Typically, orbin says, the first three debates of the year are focused on developing s ills in new team members. “ ur debate team is about community and support.” That philosophy wor s well with the igh School ublic ebate rogram, which emphasi es education over competition. Team coach isher sees debate as an opportunity to explore ethical and moral considerations, too. As students build their argument for or against a proposition, isher as s them to use only arguments they do agree with, even when they re arguing the side they disagree with overall. “ t s important that when they argue for a side, they stay true to their own beliefs.” The students’ belief in their positions, and the research and practice they put in, comes out in tournament results. “In the last two years, we have had four students win the coveted First Place Speaker award – an actual gavel: Will Abersek ’17, Bridgid Corbin ’19, Renny Jiang ’20 and Nick Martinez ’18,” says Fisher. “Each time, that’s out of approximately 120 debaters. We also had two teams win the ‘first place team’ award this year alone.”

Webb debate team members have gone on to compete at the collegiate level, at universities including Stanford, eorgetown and S . Tournament wins and collegiate competition are not the end all mar ers of success, though. “ ur successes,” isher says, “have been getting students to love engaging with current events and the nuances and techni ues of using evidence to argue about those events.”


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Location, location, location. Some weekends are for skiing and some for frolicking at the beach … and the beauty of going to school at Webb, in beautiful Southern California, is that some weekends, you might have to choose between the two. After classes, labs, formal meals, study hours and team practices are done, the next important part of attending a boarding school is the opportunity to relax and have fun with peers and faculty on the weekends. These shared experiences not only enrich student growth, they also help foster relationships that last a lifetime. On the weekends, students have the chance to try new things and challenge themselves as individuals through a wide variety of activities. Rick Duque is the dean of campus life at Webb and says that the weekends are a good time for students to “get off the studying track” a bit and out into the world, not just sit in a dorm room playing video games.

“There are so many things to do and see in Southern California,” he says. “And part of high school is having fun.”


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todaythe weekend program

n an effort to best serve the interests of all students, a new weekend committee was formed, SWAG – Student Weekend Activity Group. Comprising 10 students from WSC and VWS, the group meets every Monday to discuss topics as wide ranging as food served on weekends to on and off campus activities. According to group member Victoria Castro ’18, SWAG’s mission is to “serve the community by providing and responding to requests to visit popular outside destinations, while also maintaining on-campus activities. We needed this committee to provide communication between clubs, leadership, students and faculty to develop an exciting weekend schedule.” The group employs word of mouth suggestions and their own ideas for brainstorming sessions to determine possible trips and activities. “ y mentality about the group is li e as ing myself, where would li e to go or where haven t been, or where would li e to explore, ” adds astro, a boarder on campus.

Boarding and day students are invited to enjoy a wide range of on and off campus activities. According to Duque, this year the group has planned excursions to, among other places, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Broad Museum, Hollywood Bowl, Santa Monica Pier, a Dodgers game, Knott’s “Scary” Farm (to celebrate Halloween), laser tag and SMORGASBURG LA—a weekly Sunday market in downtown Los Angeles for food, shopping and drinks. The group even arranged for students to participate in the January 20 Women’s March, which was held in downtown Los Angeles. loser to home, there is the Webber run where students sign up to visit locations nearby the school the movies, laremont illage, the olonies a retail and restaurant center in nearby pland , and ontclair lace mall, for example, so boarding students can go out and have fun or get errands done. And there are lots of activities on campus, too. The group has initiated riday night student choice dinners with the dining hall ta ing suggestions from the group, including po e bowls, chic en tenders, brea fast for dinner and more , brea fast brunch runs, and even a music jubilee during which students perform on their instruments. ill Anapoell , a trained hypnotherapist, visited campus last fall. e hypnoti ed several students and tal ed about the benefits of hypnotherapy for test anxiety, sleep disorders and more. “The wee end activities blend the interests of teachers as well,” says u ue. aculty members have led night hi es to nearby otato ountain s mores were crafted and consumed and science teacher ohn awrence too students to a olla ove to swim with and maintain a respectful distance from nonaggressive leopard sharks. The group also strives to maintain a healthy school fun balance in providing activities.


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is going to feature a lot of fun events on campus for boarders and day students. We plan on doing a wet slide on Alamo lawn, which has been done before with a lot of success, and a lot more.” The wee end activities also provide opportunities for teachers and students to interact with each other away from the classroom for faculty members to meet di erent students, and for students to interact with peers of all ages. “ f there is a major exam on onday, then it would be best to have more snac runs and library study places,” explains astro. “ f it is a more relaxed weekend then we might have a Six Flags or isneyland run.” The group meets almost every onday to discuss ideas and vet student suggestions. They then create a list on a whiteboard and start planning. “We have been coming up with a lot of our ideas based on what s happening right now and what students want to do,” explains hristopher onte . “So, if there is a big food event that a lot of people want to go to, we put that on the list and see the feedbac . We repeat some events based on how successful they were. We balance the educational and recreational activities based on student interest. We have set up visits to popular art museums, such as the road and A A, because a lot of people wanted that. We have had many suggestions for future museum visits, it is all just up to scheduling.” The group is also loo ing at opportunities for students to volunteer in the community. And there is a lot of cooperation with on campus clubs, student leadership and faculty. “We have a SWA wee end event that is being planned, in which we will probably collaborate with a lot of clubs and let each of them set up a little booth, and present whatever they want to whomever attends,” says onte. “The SWA wee end

Webb students are in uisitive by nature and eager to learn. “ grew up exploring my surroundings to the maximum,” says astro. “ ve lived in many di erent places and the first thing do when move or stay in a new environment is to explore. m usually up to date with travel and food reviews. n fact, started my own food blog because of it.” And, the group has also initiated a Fun Fund so that all students are able to participate in activities. SWA encourages students to ta e advantage of the cultural, educational, historical and recreational activities a orded in the Southern alifornia region and on campus at Webb. “These ids are living it right now,” says u ue of the group. “ t s all about the students. t s their wee end, their free time.”


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ALF

News from the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools

museum at webb

Raymond Alf: A Life in Full (A New Biography Coming This Fall!) The Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology was named in honor of its founder Dr. Raymond Manfred Alf, a man who established a museum devoted to paleontology on a secondary school campus, one now nationally accredited and world-class in status.

Ray Alf hanging from overhead pipes during his biology class to illustrate the use of the opposable thumb.


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Ray Alf and Webb students pointing to a trackway found on a peccary trip to Arizona in 1950.

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aymond Alf had a life full of rich experiences. e was born to a hristian missionary family in hina and moved to the states, where he attended oane ollege ebras a . There, he became a nationally ran ed sprinter, who set a national record and narrowly missed ualifying for the American lympic Team . Alf came to southern alifornia to run for the os Angeles Athletic lub in and got a job teaching at a country boarding school called Webb. While here, Alf developed into a teacher whose methods were revolutionary for their time and that had a life long influence on his students. To Alf, teaching paleontology was more than just an academic subject. t was a call to action to be creative and thin deeply without constraint about the larger uestions in life, as each student was as ed to consider what they would do with their little moment of time, in relation to the vast universe. Also, he melded his classroom activities with fossil collecting expeditions called peccary trips. o other high school teacher in America too their students on a search for fossils on wee ends, school brea s, and summer vacations. Alf s loosely organi ed group of fossil enthusiasts was called the eccary Society. n the new aymond Alf useum was built to house and display the fossils found by the eccary Society, and the rest is history, as the museum Alf created is thriving today. The life of aymond Alf is such an ama ing story that it warrants a boo length treatment. Moment of Time: The Life of Raymond Alf and the History of the Peccary Society by on ofgren, with ennifer iu is nearing the final stages of production and should be available for distribution in the fall of .

The book is filled with interesting Alf facts, such as: • In 1926, he scored the fastest touchdown in the history of football when he fell on the ball in the end zone of the opposing team, after his Doane College team kicked off in the second quarter (thus, no time elapsed on the game clock….making it the “fastest”). • Before finding a job at Webb School in 1929, he was new to Los Angeles and “starving,” so he applied for a job to play the French horn in a band on cruises to Hawaii (he could also play trombone and piano). • He established a small natural history museum at Webb in the spring of 1936, six months before “The Peccary” was found, a discovery always thought to have inspired Alf to establish a museum at Webb. • He took all the undergraduate courses for the geology major and then completed a master’s degree in geology, all in less than one year at the University of Colorado in 1939. • The Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology was dedicated to him on November 3, 1968, in a ceremony on the front steps of the museum (the golden anniversary of the dedication will be celebrated on Alumni Weekend 2018). • He hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon 50 times, the last with the Class of 1970, who asked him to be their commencement speaker. • He received three honorary PhDs in the 1970s, from Lewis & Clark College, Claremont Graduate School, and Doane College.


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Thompson Webb, Robert Reynolds (president of the Webb Board) and Ray Alf in 1966, with Millard Sheet’s sketch of the new museum that would soon be built and dedicated to Alf.

Patrick Muffler ’54 pouring Ray Alf his morning coffee and Dick Lynas ’55 lighting his cigarette on the 1953 Summer Peccary Trip.

Alf passed away in at the age of , having lived of those years on the Webb campus, many of which were spent in a house built specifically for him in . ver former students and faculty were interviewed for the boo , as well as members of the Alf family. Their ay Alf stories and experiences are woven into the text of the boo to capture the essence of what he was li e. Also, the boo documents the “ eccary Experience,” the impact ay Alf had on his students in the classroom and on peccary trips, a powerful one as these quotes attest. Roger Millar ’61: ay enriched the lives of all he met. is passion for discovery was contagious, his charisma inimitable, his energy boundless, his integrity nonpareil a unique and unforgettable man who will forever remain in the

hearts of all his students. f one had to pic one truly pivotal, transformative experience in one s formative years, invariably it would be that of the peccary trips. Peter Plaut ’60: eccary trips were fun escapes to a di erent world with no classes, no deadlines . when loo bac , recogni e how meaningful those trips were in learning to be independent, responsible, in uisitive, and how important they were in answering ay Alf s challenge of what to do with your moment in time. Sam Zemurray ’61: ay Alf was the greatest teacher ever had .his real classroom was the great American West where he led young boys li e me on adventures of discovery. What we discovered were fossils, earth history, the beauty of our vast country, and many times ourselves. ay had an unbounded


News from the Raymond M. Alf

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Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools

A peccary trip group in Arizona pose before they prepared a slab of sandstone with trackways for removal in 1960. Front (kneeling) L to R: Bob Warford ’63, Bob Mixon ’63, Bob Baum ’61, Jim Hall ’59 Back (standing) L to R: Sam Zemurray ’61, David Procter ’63, Bill Schulze ’63, Dwight Ray Alf was captain of the Doane Col-

Morgan ’65, Ray Lindquist ’59, Thad Smith ’56

lege Track team and led them to two state championships.

intellect that could soar and inspire all around him. Through the study of fossils, he instilled in his students a profound reverence for life. Dale Boller ‘63: eccary trips bring personal engagement with roc s, mountains, sore muscles, a stac of dirty dishes, and the thrill of discovery and infinite reflection life serving experiences you ll never get in a boo or lecture. t s Experiential earning at its best, ay Alf and Webb School style. Mark Anton ’74: The eccary trips were the ultimate adventure for a young boy .ta ing the cue from the indomitable spirit of r. Alf. is life force was o the charts and has moved so many in purposeful directions.

inally, as with most great educators, ay Alf was an entertainer. e li ed to hang from the pipes in his classroom while lecturing about the opposable thumb in primates, or do chin ups while waiting for his students to fi nish a ui . n his peccary trips, he would ta e a raw egg and crac it on his bald head and then swallow the contents, or climb over a fence in a cattle pasture and taunt a bull to chase him. When a fossil was found, he would shout “ utay ” When students entered his classroom, they would often as him, “are we going to have a test today ” Alf s reply was that “every day is a test of a man s character.” ay Alf weaved honor and integrity into everything he did at Webb. As ard ameson said, “on the planet there are a lot of great men and women, but there are few giants. ay Alf was a giant.”


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Lisa Blomberg Incoming Chair of the Science Department

Lisa Blomberg, the incoming chair of Webb’s science department, is excited to be a member of such a collegial, dedicated group of teachers.

“Teachers at Webb are encouraged to pursue and share

their passions with students,” says lomberg. “ any of our teachers are pursuing research and field study as part of their continuing education and they bring that bac to Webb. t s a very stimulating, collegial environment.” The recent transformation of the curriculum and moderni ation of the science labs also give her reason to be enthusiastic. “ t was a teacher dream come true,” she says of the improvements. n addition to classroom wor , lomberg is appreciative of Webb s philosophy of exploration and experiential learning. “ enjoy being in nature as part of my job,” she says. lomberg, along with elanie auman, recently led a group of students to ion ational ar this past spring. lomberg holds an S in biochemistry and conducted graduate wor in microbiology at ohns op ins niversity.


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“ t was a great way to learn science. We practiced all the classic methods,” she says. Even while putting her studies on hold to start a family egan lomberg , a junior at laremont c enna ollege who is currently studying abroad in Spain, plus three sons: hristopher, an accountant in os Angeles Sam, an Ameri orps teacher in oston and ac , a senior at assar ollege she ept up with current research in A bar coding and bioinformatics, and always new she wanted to teach molecular biology. At Webb, lomberg helped to redesign the science curriculum and is enthusiastic about the potential for students to engage in scientific wor with advanced e uipment and scientists in the region.

“The new curriculum of 9th grade Evolutionary Biology and 10th grade Integrated Physics and Chemistry focuses on giving students the knowledge, mindset and confidence to take one or more of the dynamic, challenging electives that are offered for 11th and 12th graders,” she says. n those th and th grade classes, students e orts are focused on ac uisition of s ills collecting data, as ing uestions, critical thin ing and communicating information. eyond that, in their junior and senior years, students can explore a number of dynamic, hands on o erings including A classes and newly designed courses such as Advanced Studies in Anatomy and hysiology, Advanced Studies in iotechnology and Advanced Studies in rganic hemistry. “A lot of the lab wor we need to do for these courses we can do in house,” says lomberg, but students also have access to ama ing resources nearby. ancho Santa Ana otanic arden is less than two miles away in laremont the garden also houses the graduate program for botany at laremont raduate niversity. “They have a A se uencer,” explains lomberg. “And can easily drive my students and their samples there to wor on experiments.”

n addition, lomberg has utili ed the resources of niversity of alifornia, iverside, where she wor ed in partnership with scientists on new classes for the Webb science department and where she also brings Webb students to collaborate and share data with graduate students and professors in the labs. “ ur students are able to spend the day there, and they re also contributing to the data of wor ing scientists,” she says. lomberg lives on campus, where she has been dorm head of South utchinson she oversees afternoon outdoor activities, including energetic pursuits li e roc climbing at angar ndoor limbing ym in pland . She s also an advisor and travels to osemite every year with the WS senior class. ow in her sixth year at Webb, lomberg is still enthused about the possibilities for growth and development in the sciences she s not resting on her laurels. nstead she s still wor ing to expand young minds as she develops new courses li e euroscience and Engineering to name a couple.


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Howie Kalter: Force of Nature

Webb is a community. Students and faculty interact throughout the day, every day: in class, during afternoon activities and athletics, in clubs and on weekend excursions. Every faculty member is involved, but few can match math teacher Howie Kalter. Since arriving at Webb three years ago, he’s been a water polo coach, volleyball coach and freshman lead class advisor. He’s also so enthusiastic about the year-round outdoor opportunities at Webb that recently he was named to a new position, outdoor programs advisor.


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t The Webb Schools, alter says, “we use the outdoors as part of our identity. m super excited to strengthen that.” eyond ta ing students into the outdoors, Webb s outdoor programs should be as purposeful as the schools curriculum. utdoor education, alter explains, can give students practical, experiential learning in outdoor s ills, but also in areas as diverse as group dynamics, self discovery and sustainable interactions with nature. Each year s class retreat has learning goals, culminating in the WS senior trip to the rand anyon and the WS senior trip to osemite as the students capstone Webb experience alter hopes to articulate those goals and expand outdoor learning opportunities for Webb students, ta ing advantage of the schools location in Southern alifornia, between the San abriel ountains and the acific cean.

Moving from the East Coast, where he taught at Phillips Academy Andover in Mass., Kalter immediately appreciated Webb’s location. “We live in the mountains… I can go out my door and be hiking in five minutes.” Complementing Webb’s student-centered learning in the classroom and athletic program in the afternoon, those hikes are more than they seem: they are opportunities for students to challenge themselves, build self-confidence and develop self-reliance. “ stayed away from the outdoor hi ing trips that r. alter planned my first two years at Webb because didn t thin could do it,” relates Anne ofgren . “ ut once did the t. aldy summit, ept signing up for it. r. alter and his trips showed me that could do it also learned that sometimes it s if things do not go as planned. ur nbounded ays trip to osemite changed course, but our entire group would all agree that it was just as fun, if not more, to have had to do other things, such as snowshoeing, having snowball fights and staying at a resort. e made that possible is trips have allowed my Webb experience to truly be unbounded ve had the opportunity to learn more about myself and also about nature.”

“So many of the memories have made here at Webb have come as a result of attending di erent outdoor trips,” agrees Will artine , who also traveled to osemite ational ar with alter s nbounded ays course. “As well as leading the hi es, r. alter is as much a teacher on the top of a mountain as he is in the classroom. Any opportunity he gets, he teaches us terminology or techni ues to solve di erent problems that may arise.” roblem solving is a big part of alter s other role at Webb: math instructor. sed to teaching a traditional mathematics curriculum, alter says Webb s problem based learning program ma es it easier to interact with individual students and enhances student retention of sometimes di cult material. “ f you re discovering something on your own, you re more li ely to latch on to it.” e brings his natural enthusiasm from the outdoors to the classroom, too. “ had r. alter as a teacher his first year at Webb, which was also my first year at Webb,” recalls ofgren. “ sually it s an adjustment for new students to get used to Webb s problem based math program, but I found it was not a huge adjustment and thin that has a lot to do with r. alter and the energy he brings to the classroom e just made math class exciting e would celebrate with us when we understood the material, and when we did not he would wor hard to help us.” alter s camaraderie with students comes from shared experience: he graduated from Andover before attending uc nell niversity, where he majored in math, and returned to teach. “The general thing that helps is that ve been through it,” he says. “ ve gone through the same pressures myself.” Those shared experiences extend to the swimming pool: before coaching water polo at Webb, alter played water polo in high school and at uc nell, and professionally for a season in ew ealand. e s not afraid to coach by example, jumping into the pool to demonstrate a point. is enthusiasm in the pool, in the classroom and on the trail has a point: eeping everyone engaged and interested. “ don t want my ids to be idle during practice. The more involved the ids are, the better. “ ot a lot of adults choose to live surrounded by teenagers,” alter reflects. “ ut it s easy to give percent here.”


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Class of 1961’s Extraordinary Gifts They were the last class to call Thompson Webb “headmaster” for a full four years, and the first to watch an American, Alan Shephard, rocket into space. The Class of 1961 experienced the school as an upsurge of cultural changes was overtaking the nation and yet their bonds of friendship and commitment to the school have never wavered. “We were in a transitional period. The world was changing from the world of the s to whatever it s become now, and we were sort of on the front end of that wave,” said ichael udnall in a interview for WEBB Magazine. “When went to Webb it was very traditional. r. Webb was still there, the values were extremely strong and extremely helpful, and then we saw a lot of major change in the world, just a few years after that. thin one of the real values to me was absorbing the values that we did and having those to move forward into a very di erent ind of world.”

Times have changed. There have been girls on campus for decades now. And the years have passed to be exact but the lass of still holds dear Thompson Webb s exhortation to be Principes non Homines: “ eaders not ordinary men.” Today, the Class of 1961 has taken their bonds of friendship one step further by honoring each other through extraordinary gifts to the school.

odd ischer , who recently passed away, established the Alamo und with a leadership gift in honor of his classmates, Andrew ranscome , twin brothers on and ohn irard , and Samuel emurray . n turn, emurray made a leadership gift, which was split between the odd ischer Endowment und which odd funded in to provide unrestricted support to Webb and the Alf useum. en e ault is also a champion of the aymond . Alf useum of aleontology and has made numerous leadership gifts to support museum operations. ay Alf and his eccary trips were an important part of Webb when they were students and later as alumni. pon avid awcett s retirement as a dedicated Webb teacher, ischer was instrumental in establishing the avid . awcett and iane . Wilsdon Scholarship und in honor of avid and his wife iane, teachers at Webb for a combined


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“This place, these people, that principle are the things which seek to take a boy and help make him a man. It works, and it is a debt we can never repay.” plus years. Several other class members contributed to the e ort including ic unham , Webb trustee oger illar , hris eynolds and ohn Erving . awcett has created a future gift to insure the legacy of the fund for future generations of Webb students. And, in bridging the eras from the days of the schools founding to the students of tomorrow arry rice , a great nephew of Thompson and great grandson of Sawney Webb founder of the Webb School in ell uc le, Tenn. , has made a future gift intention to honor his family s legacy his father Edward, was a teacher of English and atin at Webb from to and also served as assistant headmaster. n , on the occasion of the group s th reunion, ohn “ rad” Springer said, “ thin we have a remar able bond. When go bac and visit my friends now, they all have a great fondness for the time they spent at Webb. We wor ed together and had respect for each other and each other s particular abilities.” Head of Schools Taylor Stockdale said of the Class of 1961’s dedication: “Through the community of Webb and the bonds of friendship established here more than 50 years ago—connections unlike the relationships formed in any other parts of life—this group of graduates has crafted an enduring legacy of service. As a group, in current and future philanthropy, they have contributed more than $5.5 million to support Webb students and teachers.”

Today, they honor a legacy they could only begin to understand in when they wrote in their yearboo of Webb and its tradition of honor: “This place, these people, that principle are the things which see to ta e a boy and help ma e him a man. t wor s, and it is a debt we can never repay.” t is a debt they honor through their continued generosity and unwavering loyalty.


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How do you Webb? WEBB GIVING DAY

When The Webb Fund launched its inaugural Giving Day Campaign in April, Webbies from around the world joined the hour campaign to celebrate The Webb Schools learning environment. ur goal was simple: raise awareness about The Webb und, which provides a significant source of revenue necessary to support the ongoing operation of the schools, and encourage donors to give bac in honor of the current student body. The response from the community was astonishing

Trustees, Alumni ouncil members, class agents, parent and student volunteers reached out to their peers as ing them to show their Webb pride by ma ing a gift on iving ay. articipants were also as ed to show how they “Webb” es Webb is now a verb on social media by tagging us or by using Webb .

onors from states and eight countries answered the challenge n iving ay, students gave bac during lunch and alumni gathered at the ac house estaurant to commemorate the event. A huge than you to harles ung for hosting Webbies responded until the last minute resulting in donors and raising over , , helping The Webb und surpass its goal of donors in hours The community s enthusiastic response is a testament to the personal impact of The Webb Schools and its community, and to the fact that alumni continue to “Webb” long after graduation. Than you to everyone who participated during iving ay f you missed the Webb campaign, there is still time to ma e your Webb und gift. lease visit webb.org giving before the une deadline. Than you for helping eep Webb .


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THE WEBB SCHOOLS

a half minutes with

Television Writer Tyler Bensinger ’80 B Y J E S S I C A R I C E ’12

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lumni who have watched Cold Case, Parenthood, The Good Wife, or recent fan-favorite, This Is Us, have likely seen some of Tyler Bensinger ’80s work. He has worked on 16 television shows during his 30-year career as a professional writer. Although the former Webb athlete earned a BA in English from Yale University and his MFA from University of California, Los Angeles, he credits the inspiration for his career and his love of English to his experience with two Webb teachers nearly four decades earlier. Here, Bensinger reflects on his career and the impact of his Webb experience.

Tyler Bensinger ’80 with This Is Us stars Susan Kelechi Watson and Sterling K. Brown.


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q&a How did you get into entertainment? When left Webb, went to ale and had no idea what I wanted to do. But became a projectionist for this film society at ale. That s how it all started. became a projectionist and started watching movies over and over. ou project a movie three times in a row each night, and then you reali e, “That s not an accident. They did that on purpose.” rom there, sort of new what I wanted to do. When applied to film school after graduation and went to A film school, wanted to be a director, not a writer. ut to become a director, you have to write something. No one is going to write anything for you. started writing scripts and then actually directed a movie, but it was really bad and wasn t very good at it. So learned how to write and just kept writing. How did you end up working in television? wor ed in features feature films for years, and then television too over everything and became the medium to be in. Everything good was happening in television and the feature business was drying up at the time, so made the transition to T . t was a better place to be, as it is now. There is just way more opportunity in television right now than there is in features. ve been luc y. thin ve wor ed on three of the best shows in the s Parenthood, The Good Wife, This Is Us . Do you think Webb had any impact on your career path? y education at Webb was better than my education at ale. And wor ed harder and learned more at Webb than

spoiler alert: Questions about This Is Us may contain key plot points. did at ale. had two teachers, namely a teacher named ohn eyes and a teacher named e ast, who were the whole inspiration for my writing career. They were two English teachers and they were remar ably great. thin they just really loved teaching and were so passionate about what they taught. t all started with that. There s nothing li e your first time reading a great boo , and it was really about understanding that literature is so much more than meets the eye. Webb was the start of it all. You worked most recently as a co-executive producer for the show This Is Us. What does the role of a co-executive producer involve? That title basically means you write episodes and you brea the episodes, meaning you come up with stories for the episodes in a room with nine other writers. ou come up with what the whole season is going to be. This Is Us has become one of the most successful broadcast TV shows in years. What do you think sets it apart? The writing and the acting. t s a beautifully acted show and it has one of the best casts ever. ou can t beat that. What was it like to be a part of the show for season two? ou now as a writer, you spend up to hours a day, every day in a writers room with nine other people, and it can get very emotionally fraught in there because people are telling their own personal stories and crying. t was a very intense show to wor on, and a lot of fun. ut mostly a very intense experience. With the content of the show, you re dealing with such big

tic et items of ac dying and dealing with the aftermath of all of these traumatic events. t s a show that really wants to tell an emotional truth, so it was a lot of wor . t was a lot of heavy lifting, because the showrunner, an ogelman, would not accept anything but the truth. You had to dig as deep as you could. How did you and your team approach Jack’s death? We new what it was going to be from the get go. So it was a real balancing act because the audience new he died right away, but you didn t want to fa e the audience out. thin they tried to deal with it as honestly as possible. ne of the great things about This Is Us is how emotionally raw it is. They don t hold bac . They peel bac all the layers, so it was really about exposing the raw nerve at the root of all that pain. t s pretty uni ue in that way, in that it doesn t hold bac at all. We just laid it all out there. What has been your favorite show to write for so far? The first season of Parenthood was probably my favorite, because was able to help set the tone for the entire series. What’s next for you? ight now am ta ing time o to pursue my other career, which is photography. Writers get hiatuses, so every hiatus go and ta e pictures. hotography is something that ve always been interested in. ve always been ta ing pictures, and it just came naturally for me. m hoping to get a photography boo published soon.

Bensinger resides in Los Angeles with his wife of 30 years, Sascha, who teaches law at Loyola Law School. His daughter, Emily, is a screenwriter and his son, Ethan, is earning a PhD in vision science from University of California, Berkeley. His brother, Kerry, graduated from Webb in 1978.


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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Sarah Sun ’10

Senior Financial Analyst in Corporate Real Estate at the Walt Disney Company

“At Disney, we’re storytellers. Every building, space and facility has its own beautiful story and I get to be part of that remarkable journey from start to finish.” B Y J E S S I C A R I C E ’12

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or Sarah Sun , the power of real estate extends far past selling someone a home. “ t s such a phenomenon, that one building can not only change an individual but change a community,” she says. “ don t now anything else that can have that ind of impact on a person.” Sun is a senior financial analyst in corporate real estate at the Walt isney ompany. She handles the financial side of multi million dollar real estate projects when isney wants to improve or create spaces including o ces, screening rooms, animation studios, on site theaters and soundstages on the west coast or internationally. What she loves most about her job is the impact these projects have. “ am a part of something that s bigger than me,” she says. “ am helping create a space for people that they will spend eight to hours in, five days a wee . t better be incredible, because this is going to be li e their second home.” When Sun and her team create a space, each element from chairs to lighting is considered with great detail. Especially after the onset of

tech companies creating campuses and o ces filled with collaborative spaces and ping pong tables, Sun believes the value of one s wor place is becoming increasingly important. “We need to dream, design and build to uphold those high standards to attract millennials,” who are more and more focused on having the best wor experience possible, she said. rom her time at isney, Sun thin s the design of o ce spaces in urban areas such as os Angeles and San rancisco will continue to become more collaborative in nature. nstead of maintaining an image of grayscale o ces with outdated cubicle design, companies today “see to enhance experience and e ciency by creating flexible wor spaces for their employees,” she says. “ t allows a wor force to wor how they want on their own means.” Although Sun s passion for real estate and its capabilities is clear, she never thought she would work in the industry until she too a class focused on real estate planning and development at the niversity of Southern California. “That really opened my mind,” she reveals.


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It was at Webb where Sun believes she became more aware of how her brain works. She had always thought with logic, reason and numbers, but realized she was attracted to color, beauty and things that were aesthetically pleasing.

Sun went on to receive an Award of Excellence in eal Estate inance and graduated from USC with a BS in Business Administration with an emphasis in real estate finance and a minor in real estate development after graduating from ivian Webb School in . t was at Webb where Sun believes she became more aware of how her brain wor s. She had always thought with logic, reason and numbers, but reali ed she was attracted to color, beauty and things that were aesthetically pleasing. “ thin what do at isney is a beautiful combination of both,” she says. “We have to believe in the vision and the place where people are going to spend time every day, but also have to thin logically with numbers and things that ma e financial sense.” Aside from her time as a student at Webb, Sun s family has been a part of the Webb community for decades. er father, eorge and brother ordon attended Webb. er younger sister ara is a sophomore and half a dozen of her cousins went to Webb as well. “ thin

ara is number

,” she says.

As a result, the onor ode has become one of Sun s biggest ta eaways from Webb, a ecting both her personal values and career. “ t s so integrated into my family and has been for generations,” she says. “ ut even in business, the onor ode comes into play every day. ou don t want to deal with people who seem unethical or don t seem to have the same values as you do.” She ac nowledges the onor ode did not seem cool when she was a student, but now loo s at it with a di erent perspective. “ never thought would say this,” she admits, “but it is such an integral part of my life.”


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EVENTS & HIGHLIGHTS HONG KONG

Parents and alumni gathered in Hong Kong in November to welcome Assistant Head of Schools Theresa Smith and Bob Fass from the advancement office. The event at the Conrad Hotel was co-hosted by Yankun Hou and Ningfang Chen P ’21, and Steven Chang and Cisy Lam P ’15, P ’19. Andy Wu ’89 was a featured guest speaker.

BEIJING

Parents welcomed Theresa Smith and Bob Fass to Beijing at a reception co-hosted by Karl Wu and Lan Lin P ’19, P ’21, and Yu Yan and Helen Yang P ’19 held at the Westin Beijing Chaoyang Hotel.


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EVENTS & HIGHLIGHTS Reunions, regional events, and more! Alumni, parents, and friends reconnect. Find more event photos at webb.org

SHANGHAI

Parents and alumni enjoyed harbor views with Theresa Smith and Bob Fass at a gathering held at the Oriental Riverside Bund View Hotel in Shanghai. The event was hosted by Elina Xu P ’20 and featured guest speaker Joanne Goh ’99.

SEOUL

Eunyoung Rim P ’18 organized parents and alumni in Seoul to welcome Theresa Smith and Bob Fass. Chris Kimm ’86 and Robert Kim ’87 represented the alumni.


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EVENTS & HIGHLIGHTS

WEBB15 IN NYC

Over 30 alumni gathered with Director of College Guidance Hector Martinez, Alumni Director Laura Wensley and industry mentors David Loo ’79, Eric Pauwels ’79, Dr. Sonal Sura ’99 and Nkonye Okuh ’02 at Cask Bar + Kitchen in New York City at the end of November.

WEBB15 IN BOSTON

In December, over 20 young alumni met for dinner in Boston with Director of Counseling Melanie Bauman, humanities teacher Michael Szanyi and Director of Experiential Learning Sally Mingarelli.


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WEBB15 IN WASHINGTON D.C.

Webb also stopped in Washington, D.C., where over a dozen alumni had brunch with Hector Martinez and Laura Wensley at Mission Restaurant in Dupont Circle.

HOLIDAY PARTY IN SAN FRANCISCO

More than 40 alumni and friends joined Head of Schools Taylor Stockdale for a holiday reception at the home of Webb Trustee Michael Chang ’92 and his wife, Alicia. Director of Admission and Financial Aid Jamila Everett, Hector Martinez and Director of Institutional Advancement Dutch Barhydt were there to commemorate the holidays with San Francisco Webbies and several Alumni Council members.


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HOLIDAY PARTY IN LOS ANGELES

Dozens of alumni, parents and staff attended Webb’s annual holiday party at the Jonathan Club in Los Angeles. Many thanks to our sponsors for the event, R.J. and Laura Romero P ’12, ’15, ’20, for giving Webb’s community such a gorgeous venue to celebrate the holidays.

HONG KONG

Dutch Barhydt and Bob Fass were pleased to meet with WSC alumni this February in Hong Kong, arranged by Timothy Sun ’89, regional representative for the Alumni Council. Those in attendance included Timothy Sun ’89, Michael Kwon ’87, Joseph Poon ’88, Patrick Ma ’87 and Ben Olmsted ’89.

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EVENTS & HIGHLIGHTS

YOUNG ALUMNI HOLIDAY PARTY

More than 70 young alumni, parents, faculty and staff gathered on campus in December for Webb’s annual young alumni holiday gathering. Members of the classes of 2013-2017 congregated in front of Price Dining Hall, where they caught up with friends and teachers over Webb cookies and cocoa.


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tudents Learn From Alumni Firsthand During Sophomore Career Evening

ver a do en alumni returned to campus in ebruary to spea at The Webb Schools th annual Sophomore areer Evening. ver the course of the night, alumni spea ers shared their experiences with students, leading them in discussions about entrepreneurship and creative mar eting, law careers, energy services and solutions, business and real estate and how to follow their passions into a career path that will be a good fit for them. Each student participated in two sessions. uring Sarah Sun s presentation on real estate, Sun led students in a handsha e contest to teach them a few basic tips to help when they apply for internships or jobs in a few years. n the “ ollow our assion” session, students peppered alumni with uestions about how each person discovered his or her career path. Shelby o ric y enjoyed learning about what alumni were li e as students. “With all that they have accomplished, hearing about their Webb experiences made them more relatable,” she says.

o ric y attended the law careers and ollow our assion sessions. The second session was her favorite because alumni “were the most open and honest about their Webb careers and how that has a ected them,” she says. When as ed about what she learned, she says, “follow wherever life ta es you. f you aren t on the right path, then change lanes and try to use your s ills to figure out how to get there.” After both sessions, students headed down to ooper Student enter to connect with alumni over Webb coo ies and cocoa, giving students an informal taste of what it is li e to networ . o ric y and other sophomores say they found the night helpful. “ t was reassuring to now that you don t have to have a set life plan and career choice for the future,” o ric y notes. “As we experience more throughout life, we will learn more things about ourselves that will help us ma e those decisions.” Sophomore areer Evening is sponsored by Webb s Alumni ouncil. any than s to the Alumni ouncil for their help, and to each of our alumni spea ers, who are listed on the right.


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Entrepreneurship & Creative Marketing Sandra Lee Rebish ’88, a a r. imple opper, ermatologist and osmetic Surgeon, and Kevin Lee ’93, E of S in

S rands. Business & Real Estate Ed Ratinoff ’83, anaging artner of ames nvestment artners, Douglas Lee ’96, ro er Associate at er shire athaway omeServices, and Sarah Sun ’10, orporate eal

Estate Senior inancial Analyst at The Walt isney ompany. Energy Solutions and Sustainability Nihar Shah ’04 ,

egal at etros, and Dylan Sittig ’09, ommunity ocused rban and Environmental lanner.

Law Careers Maame Ewusi-Mensah Frimpong ’93, os Angeles ounty Superior Court Judge, Nicholas Lee ’98. Attorney, Arnold orter aye Sholer, and Noreen Bárcena ’05, awyer,

The

ce of oreen . arcena.

Follow Your Passion Jason Brooks ’99, ead of pper School for The Episcopal School of os Angeles, Janay Kong ’05, ostdoctoral

esearcher at

A and o owner of et a ed, and

Jonathan Ying ’07, ame esigner.


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1938 Cal Murphy will be celebrating his th reunion from his home in Sequim, Wash. e sends his regards to Webb and his classmates 1943 Jeff Arnett is pleased to be celebrating his th reunion and calls on his classmates to join him at Alumni Wee end on ctober , . ontact ob ass in the alumni o ce for details. 1

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1948 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact Bill Montgomery for more details. 1

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1953 alf oon ay... Cambria... Sonoma... and now it s time to return home to Claremont. Jack Sutro, Ben Benjamin, Cleve Baker, and Scott Evans welcome their class to join them for Alumni Wee end on ctober , on the Webb campus to celebrate the th reunion. ontact the reunion committee above for details.

1954 Patrick Muer and his wife at attended the holiday event in San rancisco. Although he retired from his career as a geologist a career inspired by his mentor, ay Alf atric has been busy volunteering with the nited States eological Survey. e carries on Alf s legacy each year with his family on the annual Alumni riends eccary Trip. t is a special moment in time for the whole family. 2 1958 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact Sherwood Kingsley for details. 1960 Michael Moore and his wife inda leming live in enecia, alif. with their two dogs and keep busy ma ing art in studios across three states. They are looking forward to a relaxing wee in enice followed by a visit to his brother in Chianti later this fall. 3 1963 Alumni Wee end is uic ly approaching, which means that Turtle is bac in the saddle. lease save the date ctober , for the th reunion celebration. ontact Dale Boller for details. ver the hristmas brea , Tom Butterworth and Geoff Adams got together for lunch in San rancisco. 4

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1968 Blake Brown and Al Davies invite all classmates to join them on the occasion of the th reunion for Alumni Wee end on the Webb campus. Save the date, ctober , . etails will follow. ontact la e or Al for information.

1969 Rick Robertson reports that in recent years he has been pleased to see Hugh Pitcher ’68 on winter s i trips to Wyoming. owever, this year ugh failed to materialize so here is a photo of ic with ugh s sister i , a great friend of ic s sister olly. 5 1971 Rob Stephenson is eeping busy with his landscape architecture business and now he s an investor in a new luxury bouti ue hotel in c innville, re. The Atticus otel, which is run by ob s daughter Erin and two partners, opened in April. t is located in the heart of regon wine country. 6 1973 We hope to see the lass of in laremont for their th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact Stuart Stevens for information. 1978 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact reunion chair Geoff Sturr for details. 1979 Everett McKay is proud to announce his latest boo : Intuitive Design: Eight Steps to an Intuitive UI, which is now available on Ama on. t s for anyone designing an app, website, or product who wants to ma e it intuitive so that users can understand it immediately. While many people believe that intuitive design is personal and subjective, the Eight Steps framewor that Everett invented ma es it principled and objective. t s a fun, practical, easy read, with over real examples. 7


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1980 Jim Demetriades gave a Sunday chapel tal to ic o the nbounded ays symposium. e tal ed about several tough issues facing the world including famine, school shootings, climate change, and disease, but turned it around by showing how innovation can counter each problem. e drew on his own experience, explaining how he feels blessed to be in a position to invest in and lead cutting edge companies whose products are changing the world and making it better. 8

1981 Kip Konwiser is busy producing a feature film in uerto ico called The Same Sky and a T series he created and wrote called Harlem Code in arlem, . . is finance company will also provide funding to about six films around the world this year 1982 After years of tal ing about a ac son ole trip, Jason Keyes, John Wirum, Robbie Warner, and Sam Gregory finally made it in ebruary. 9 1983 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact a member of the reunion committee for details: Derek Deskey, Michael McDermott, John Powell, Ed Ratinoff and Chris Riggio.

After five years abroad two in hina, three in Singapore , Chris Riggio and his wife are happy to be bac in alifornia. hris is busy overseeing construction of their new house in Winthrop, Wash., which is part of the Eastern ascades region. e stopped by campus recently and looks forward to seeing classmates at the th reunion in ctober. 10 1985 Stephanie Riggio continues to wor in voiceover for commercials, films and audio boo s from her home studio based in os Angeles. er latest wor includes voicing the computer of the uinjet in the arvel film Thor: Ragnarock thin “strongest avenger se uence” . She recently travelled to taly and had a mini reunion with Claudia Marcus and Janel Henriksen Hastings ’87. Stephanie has also been enjoying her new pastime as a watercolor artist, with work being featured and sold via the oshua Tree ational ar Association s art shows and other shows around .A. 11 1987 Tom Comfort and his daughter Kendra stopped by campus for a tour. Tom and his family have recently moved to end, re. 12

1988 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact Alicia Ahn, Sandra Lee Rebish, Eugene Whitlock, and Lionel Yang for details. Sandra Lee Rebish, also nown as r. imple opper, has been busy ma ing headlines After starring in her own T special and talking about skin confessions on the Rachael Ray Show, T announced they will give Sandra her own show, which should start airing this summer 13

Steve Shenbaum spent a week working at the entagon this fall. Steve said he discussed gamification and experiential learning with the Sergeant ajor of the arine orps and presented to various units as part of the Army s Sexual arassment Assault esponse and revention rogram. 14 1989 n ebruary Bob Connolly spoke to student athletes at Webb. “ was honored to speak with a group of Webb freshmen and sophomores at the nbounded ays event. The topic was the psychology of sports and how to mentally prepare and sustain your focus in athletics. Webb sports had a profound impact on my life, than s to several juniors and seniors who helped me along the way when was these ids age. Steve Shenbaum ’88, Sanjay Dholakia ’87, Rich Martinez ’86, Derek Baggerly ’86 as well as several others taught me a great deal about e ort, leadership and sportsmanship.” 15

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1991 Sameer Dholakia rang the bell at the New or Stoc Exchange last November to mark the initial public o ering of startup Send rid. Sameer joined the company as E in . ongratulations on this huge milestone 22

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Yosh Han stopped by campus in anuary and later too a moment to reflect on her Webb experience on nstagram. “ oo ing bac , see that my mind set, wor ethic and self confidence got fi ne tuned here. ... A terrific place to dream about the life m now living.” 16 f you see a giant floating flamingo or unicorn this summer, think of Vincent Lau ased in ong ong, incent is the E of Sun leasure roup of ompanies, which produces the popular giant floating islands that are selling at Sam s lub. 17 Jenn Louis coo boo The Book of Greens was nominated for a James eard Award The boo , which focuses on how to coo di erent inds of leafy greens, was nominated in the category of vegetable focused coo ing and also won an A Award in ebruary. enn is executive chef and owner of ay restaurant in ortland, re. 18

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We enjoyed seeing Timothy Sun at Webb in ovember. e also caught up with James Sun ’87 for dinner. 20 21

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Alix Rosenthal is now the of compliance at yft. She is also a proud new mom to her daughter Bowie, born uly . 1992 Seanna Crosbie is the director of program trauma informed services at Austin hild uidance Center, where she oversees therapy sta , projects, training and community collaborations. She is the Founder and Chair of the Trauma nformed are Consortium of Central Texas, which comprises over organi ations committed to educating the community about childhood trauma. Seanna also has a private practice where she provides evidence based treatments for adults and children. She has trained over , professionals on trauma informed care and has been featured in various news interviews on topics related to mental health. In arch, Seanna appeared on ox Austin to discuss how to tal with children about the Austin pac age bombings.

Matt McRae was named chief executive o cer of Arlo Technologies, nc. in ebruary. The company is focused on Smart ome oT technology and is the mar et leader in based, wire free cameras for remotely monitoring your home or small business. att will lead the company forward and is targeting an initial public o ering before , depending on mar et conditions. e previously served as chief technology o cer and head of mar eting at , nc. 23 1993 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end is ctober , . ontact Ed Lin or Michael Wanderman for more details. 1995 Jenna Gambaro and her mom Susan a ittus attended the Webb holiday party at the Jonathan Club. Jenna is still with reative Artist Agency and serving her eighth year on The Webb Schools oard of Trustees. 24 1997 When the time came to teach students about popular cryptocurrency itcoin during nbounded ays, Will Allan ’94 knew who to call. Charles Hung, a former investment banker turned restaurateur, spoke to students about how itcoin and other cryptocurrencies wor , explaining their volatility and answering students uestions. e even gave students itcoin at the end of his tal A big than s to Charles for also hosting the iving ay event at his ac house estaurant. See page . 25


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Lance Williams wedding was featured in an issue of Martha Stewart Weddings! e married rant retchi in une , and the maga ine called their destination wedding in enya “breathta ing.” ongratulations to you both 26

1998 The big th reunion is coming up on ctober , . ontact the reunion committee for details: Preston Clarke, Niti Gupta, Jamie Larkin, and Keating Leung. Charles Hadsell has recently started a company called e andlord in the greater Boston area. e andlord is developing a mobile web platform to help landlords and homeowners save time and money in property maintenance, while also taking a proactive approach to preventative maintenance. e andlord o ers an alternative to property management through a usage based model and a hand pic ed networ of service professionals and partnerships. f you live in the greater Boston area or are connected to the real estate ecosystem, he d love to spea with you. ou can reach him at charles elandlord.co. 27 1999 When a wor trip brought Rita Forte to ong each, she reunited with her Webb roommate, Emi Hayakawa Ichikawa They caught up and remembered how they bonded over music in high school nearly years ago. “She taught me about her orean boy bands and schooled her on all the hip hop,” ita wrote in an Instagram post. 28 29

Megan McCosh and her husband ason welcomed their first child, son Aidan raco an s on ecember , . 30 2000 Congratulations to Lilly Coye and her husband, ichael, who welcomed their second son, iles, on August , . e joins big brother, rant, who is and a half years old. 31 Kelly Fayne and her husband, ach, welcomed a baby girl, aomi, on ebruary , . ig brother, Ethan, is enjoying having a little sister 32 The enn State Alumni Association recogni ed Neil Goldman with the Alumni Achievement Award. Neil, who graduated from enn State in from the ollege of ealth and uman evelopment, is the founder and E of otels for ope, a company that brokers and manages hotel inventory for large consumer events and brands. is company s technology allows clients to white label hotel boo ing solutions that capture valuable consumer data, create incremental revenue streams, increase attendee experience, and generate significant cost savings. urrently, otels for ope works with brands like AS A , ormula ne, ollapaloo a, arrett ac son, and Inc. magazine. 33

Albert Walsh and his wife, Jordan, are the proud parents of Augustus, born last une. e joins big sister, Eli a, who is and a half years old. Albert and Jordan are looking forward to another summer at astle oc anch amp in daho. Webbies interested in attending can visit castleroc ranchcamp.com for details. 34 2002 After graduating from the niversity of ennsylvania, followed by an eight year procurement career in ew or ity, Ann Huang returned to os Angeles and is launching her own designer handbag brand, a. dorée. She is learning volumes from her journey as an entrepreneur and enjoying life with her fianc and their rescued pup. 35 Nkonye (Okuh) Soetan, Nina Samberg and Thea Hinkle ’05 attended the Webb event in ew or in ecember. onye is head of structured product distribution for private ban s wirehouses at organ. ina is a senior project manager at hase , and Thea is a research engineer at ody abs. 36 2003 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end will ta e place on ctober . etters with details about the reunion have been mailed. lease let us now if you haven t received yours. For more information or to volunteer to help, contact the reunion committee: Lauren Epp, Christina Kon, Griffin Miller, Danny Smith, Julia Villasenor and Richard Yao.

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Vivian Wang is doing a fellowship in allergy immunology at A West os Angeles A edical enter until une . Lauren Epp and her husband, Clinton, attended the Webb holiday party at the Jonathan Club. 37

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2005 it er ollege has recogni ed Noreen Barcena with the oung Alumni Achievement Award for her work with underserved communities. it er Alumni Association resident Tim ampos stated, “This year s recipients stood out because the wor they are doing is not just benefiting a local community, but also a larger population. As a lawyer, oreen has been advocating for fair and humane immigration reform, while providing a handful of helpful resources for her clients, many of whom are part of the immigrant community. er tireless wor to serve a community that has been disenfranchised really shows her commitment to ma ing a di erence.”

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Scott Shiokari got married to hrislynn hew in ay . Several Webbies were at the wedding: Justin Shin, Tomas Yoo, Joseph Lu, Daniel Bay ’06 best man , Kevin Lee ’04 groomsman . 38

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2006 Jon Geleris and his wife, arissa, welcomed their first child, son abriel aul, on ebruary , . 39

2007 Congratulations to Chris Gregory and his wife, evin, who welcomed their son, Alden Isaiah, on anuary , 40 2008 an you believe it t s been years since graduation and that means it s time for your year reunion ar your calendars for ctober , and return to campus for the celebration ontact Gabe Romero, Juan Martinez-Hill, Lisa Valera, or Lexus Beaman with uestions. See you there, And here s a throwbac photo from your year reunion to get you excited. 41 Congratulations to Alexandra (Shultz) Emery and her husband, James, on the birth on their son, Emmett, on ctober , . 42

It was great to see Jarel Hill and Willie Wang at the Webb holiday party in ew or . Willie was visiting from hina. Also pictured Sonal Sura Girgis ’99. 43

2009 Bianca Arreola married ichael c rew on uly , at W anch in lamath alls, re. Alya Ahmad was the maid of honor. ther Webbies in attendance were John Dey ’69, Georgia O’Brien ’97, Andrea Karikas, Noor Kalkat, Wint Thu Saung, and Thomas Wray ’10. 44 Kevin Groh has been busy in anhattan After wor ing on illary linton s presidential campaign, evin wor ed as campaign manager for ew or ity ouncil ember orey Johnson until he was reelected and became city council spea er. ow, evin serves as digital director for the council and spea er e too this picture with Chelsea Clinton when she met with the speaker about issues in New York ity, including expanding education and opportunities for kids. 45 2010 Eshaana Sheth s short film, The Butter Knife, won est omantic omedy at the os Angeles ilm Awards and Top Shorts online film festival She describes it as “a snapshot of modern, intercultural dating.” t was the first time Eshaana directed something that she wrote 46


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If You Give an Alum a Cookie... Over 300 boxes of homemade

chocolate chip cookies were shipped to Webb’s young alumni in college this spring, just in time for their midterm exams. Dining hall staff member Lupe Perez baked the cookies between 4:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. one morning, sending about 117 sheet pans into the oven. With two dozen

cookies on each pan, she baked more than 233 dozen cookies in nine hours. Then the Advancement Office’s Anne Stewart, Lexus Beaman ’08 and half a dozen parent

volunteers packed up 2,800 fresh dining hall cookies for our young alumni in college across the United States. Once packaged and addressed, 312 boxes of

cookies were shipped to 127 colleges and universities in 28 states across the country and in Washington D.C. Throughout the next week, over 40

young alumni shared photos of their cookies on snow-covered campuses, in dorm rooms or at late night study sessions. These are some of our favorites.


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2011 Abigail Bereola is a freelance journalist and has written articles for publications including GQ, The Paris Review Daily and Shondaland. She is also trying to get involved with audio podcast production, and said she has a few things in the wor s Chris Jusuf is bac in Washington, . ., wor ing as a communications director at the .S. ouse of epresentatives for Congressman Steve Knight. e is also pursuing a law degree at atholic niversity of America s night program. 47

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Cameron Lutz, who works for aceboo s usic artnerships team, went to ew or for rammy Wee e spent the wee wor ing with nominated artists to help them engage with their fans on aceboo and bring those fans closer to the action leading up to the rammy Awards. ameron is pictured with recording artist Sir the Baptist outside the awards o cial after party. 48

2012 It was a mini reunion for at the Webb holiday party in Washington, . . with Austin Plyley, Diana Escalante, Jack Childress, Ryan Au and Luke Lee. 49 Jordan Burns was selected for a graduate student researcher position with aterials Science and Engineering at niversity of alifornia, er eley This fall he will start working in the ersson group, which does computational research into renewable energy materials. Stacy Chen worked behind the scenes of the American usic Awards Stacy, who is a des production assistant at ABC News, helped with everything from conducting research before stars hit the red carpet, to noting interview highlights and sending footage to os Angeles and New York ity. She also helped with winners interviews and A s Good Morning America. 50 Ivie Tokunboh s paper, “ isual Aids for atient, amily, and hysician ecision a ing About Endovascular Thrombectomy for Acute schemic Stro e” was published in the journal Stroke in anuary. ne of her figures was also chosen to be on the cover. 51

irector of ollege uidance ector artine had dinner with Bill Wei in New York last ecember. ill wor s in wealth management at organ Stanley. 52 This ebruary, Rachel Lee Zheng held her fi rst solo exhibtion in New York ity. sing monofilament and E spotlights, she created a s uare foot site specific installation titled “un obscured echoes.” achel said it reflected her style of “creating sculptural and site specific installations to immerse her viewers within a meditative space.” ongratulations, achel 53 2013 Save the date for the th reunion Alumni Wee end will ta e place on ctober . etters with details about the weekend have been mailed. lease let us now if you haven t received yours. For more information or to volunteer to help, contact reunion chairs Michelle Huber, Chloe Soltis, Mallory Thompson, or Davis Tsui. 54 uring our Webb dinner in oston, irector of ounseling elanie auman caught up with Alex Faura, Lauren Shue, Rachel Sang and Kates Eyvazzadeh ’14. Alex works as a legal assistant at erner olmes, , auren is in her fi rst year of an SA A program at Northeastern niversity, and achel is a legal assistant for the ce of the overnor at Commonwealth of assachusetts. ates graduates from Berklee ollege of usic in ay. 55


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Over 165 Join Effort to Establish Adam Cave ’12 Scholarship Fund More than 165 alumni, parents, faculty, staff and friends stepped up this winter to help establish the Adam Cave ’12 Scholarship Fund. As you may know, Adam Cave ’12 unexpectedly passed away after a motorcycle accident in December 2016. During his time at Webb, Cave made his mark on campus through his leadership, spirit, inclusive attitude, warm smile and booming laugh. After his death, members of the class of 2012 initiated the Adam Cave Scholarship Fund in his memory as their class gift. In January, Abby Hess ’12 and Henry Xu ’12 organized a happy hour to remember their classmate ahead of what would have been his birthday. But what started as a happy hour to celebrate his and Hess’ birthdays and raise money for the fund ended up prompting something much bigger. Alumni including Natalee Cruz ’12 and Elena Scott-Kakures ’11 gathered to celebrate Cave in New York City, but the event also sparked an outpouring

Wilson Parnell is completing his master s degree in international global studies at Chapman niversity. n ebruary he earned utstanding All Academic honors from the Association of ollegiate Water olo oaches. Student athletes in this category earned a cumulative A of . . .

2014 Dolly Bai, who is majoring in economics and philosophy at Williams College, is working on her senior thesis in economics on information asymmetries in the antiquities trade. ext year, she ll wor for an economic consulting firm called E A in their ew or ity antitrust practice while she applies to law schools.

Meredith Hess avidson ollege supported Jeainny Kim at her art opening at u e niversity s ower lant allery. eainny became the first undergraduate student to exhibit a solo show at the gallery er exhibit, “ as Thic as Thieves,” showcased scanner wor s created with “a uni ue camera less photography techni ue” from the last two years. ongratulations, eainny 56 56

of love and support from around the globe. The Cave family decided to match all donations made before Cave’s birthday up to $5,000, and Henry Xu’s family launched a $5,000 matching challenge as well. Donors from 21 states and as far away as London and Hong Kong met both challenges and raised the fund’s total to over $47,000. Many of those gifts came from young alumni making their first gift to the schools, and the Class of 2012 broke a reunion giving record when more than 50 classmates made a gift. “It just shows how amazing Adam was,” Xu wrote in a social media post. To become an actual fund, the Adam Cave Scholarship Fund must reach $50,000 by June 30. With just over $2,000 left to raise as of April 1, it looks like the class of 2012 and the Webb community will support future Adam Cave Scholars who demonstrate extraordinary leadership and character, just as Cave did, for years to come.


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news

notes

THE WEBB SCHOOLS

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Anthony Palacio eorgetown niversity studied abroad this semester at the niversity of St. Andrews. Maddie Gaumer arvey udd ollege and Adam Holiday olorado ollege were also studying abroad and they met up in ondon. 60

Adam Lawrence ensselaer olytechnic nstitute joined a seed stage venture capital firm called ontrary apital as a venture partner. “We have over student venture partners at top universities around the U.S. that invest , to , in seed stage university focused startups ” he said.

Rena Patel Scripps ollege wrote and directed her own show for omona ollege s annual inute lay estival er short play The Noise of the Storm, told the stories of six people preparing for a disaster. She invited the Webb community to attend because Webb was the first place where theater became a home for her.

It was great to see Abhi Mantha S , Kienan Dixon ic inson ollege , Josh Vincent abson ollege , Katie Dickins uniata ollege , Anthony Jusuf S , Katherine Rice niversity of uget Sound and Stephanie Rapoport oston niversity at the young alumni holiday party at Webb. 57

2016 Hailey Arteaga was named EAST layer of the Wee this ebruary for her performance on the Seton all niversity softball team At Webb, ailey served as captain of the auls softball team for three years and helped lead her team to two league championships 61 Photo credit: Seton Hall Athletics

After four years of playing volleyball for the niversity of uget Sound oggers, Katherine Rice wrapped up her volleyball career during her senior match last fall. er family, including her sister Jessica Rice ’12, was there to cheer her on. The former WS volleyball captain will graduate in ay 58 2015 Cole Albert returned to campus for nbounded ays . e joined the “Things ou Should now ow To o” group to teach students some athletic s ills including how to throw a football, hit a golf ball and play bocce and risbee golf. 59

Gio Tyndale stopped by the rep eague prelims during her spring brea to cheer on her sister Ali a . io is studying anthropology and pre med at the niversity of irginia. 62

Than s to our young alumni panel who spoke at the anuary A liates meeting: Dillon Kim ’17 a e orest ollege , Laurel Benjamin ’17 averford ollege , Ethan Reznik ccidental ollege , Apollo Thomas ’17 it er ollege , Alexis Helgeson ount olyo e ollege , Jackie Withey ’15 on aga niversity , Michelle Lee Tufts niversity , Bonnee Nie rown niversity , Sarah Tinsley ’17 niversity of San rancisco . 63 2017 Emma Ng er eley and Sarah Renfrew niversity of San rancisco attended the Webb holiday party in San rancisco. 64 Dylan Wensley was a freshman starter for the ccidental women s soccer team, scoring two goals in her first season with the Tigers. 65


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FACULTY & STAFF Young alumni loved visiting with Sergio Alcaraz at the annual Young Alumni Holiday gathering. 66 Donald Ball and his family are now living in Miami Shores, Fla. Donald is the head of the upper school at Miami Country Day School. 67 Greg Lawson (Webb faculty from 1990 to 2005) is nearing the end of his 13th year as Assistant Head at The Harker School in San Jose, Calif. “Retirement is looming in the not-too-distant future, and am definitely loo ing forward to it,” he says. “Funny side note to my job: I’m the PA announcer for Eagle football a job first too on at Webb after the football field and bleachers were constructed.” When not working, Greg enjoys life in Cambria with his wife, Kathleen, their dog, Rosie, and friends and former Webb colleagues Susana and golfing partner Richard Hartzell. Greg still talks to his best friend and former Webb colleague Paul Tipton and occasionally hears from his students. This photo was taken in Monument Valley in Utah during an annual 7th grade tour of western national parks. “Not quite the backpack trips we used to take with the Webb freshmen, but every time we visit the Grand Canyon I walk down a section of the Bright Angel trail and remember those pre-graduation hikes to the river and back with the seniors and wonder how I ever did it! Oh to be young and fit again ” 68

Daren Starnes is the math department chair and a master teacher at The Lawrenceville School in New Jersey. Daren and his wife, Judy, were at Webb from 1999 to 2006. “It’s hard to believe that I have been at Lawrenceville for nearly 11 years now. I’ve held the master teacher position the entire time, which comes with the expectation to co-teach with di erent members of the department each year, as well as to promote e ective teaching and learning within and beyond our campus.” Since he left Webb, Daren completed several new editions of statistics textbooks and has presented at numerous conferences throughout the U.S. each year. The 6th edition of The Practice of Statistics was just published, and is the marketleading book for AP Statistics. When summer rolls around, he heads west to lead AP Statistics summer workshops and spend time at his home in the Colorado Rockies. “Our three sons are all married, employed, and blessed with two children. We enjoy spending time with our six grandkids, though not necessarily all at once. Taking the leap to boarding school when we came to Webb in 1999 was definitely the right move for us. Now we’re approaching 20 years in a residential environment, where the relationships extend far beyond the classroom.” Jinx Tong, VWS dean from 1991 to 1996, and director of residence from 1983 to 1991, enjoyed catching up with alumni in Hong Kong: Michael Kwon ’87, Patrick Ma ’87 and Timothy Sun ’89. 69

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In Memoriam 1937

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Kingsbury Pitcher, fondly nown as itch, passed away at his home in Santa e, . . on ecember , . e was . ingsbury was nown for his leadership at Webb, serving as president of the student body and onor ommittee. e was an active member of the glee and dramatics clubs, was on the El Espejo sta and was a driving force behind the Blue & Gold. e was a horseman who won the final ym hana of his senior year, earned a varsity letter in football, two letters in trac , and also received two stars for scholarship. ingsbury earned a degree in economics from Stanford niversity and taught s iing before he enlisted in the .S. Army Air orps. After the war, he followed his passions for flying and s iing, and remained involved in the s i business for the rest of his life. ingsbury was a ew exico S i all of ame inductee and was dubbed the ing of the ountain by many. e is survived by his six children, nine grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Kenneth Fiske passed away of natural causes in Austin, Texas on une , . At Webb, en focused his time on music, providing a “mellow voice” to the baritone section of Webb s glee club and drumming in an instrumental ja trio. e later graduated hi eta appa, cum laude, and hi appa hi from the niversity of Southern alifornia, with a A in and an A in . en served in the .S. Army from to and was honorably discharged at the ran of corporal. n , he joined the art faculty at the niversity of Texas where he taught painting, design, and life drawing until the late s when he retired as professor emeritus. Throughout his tenure, he participated in over a hundred art exhibitions, winning awards and purchase pri es in several museums. is wor is included in various private collections. en is survived by his wife, atricia, and their two children.

1943 Harley Higbie Jr. died at his home, surrounded by family on arch , . e was years old. At Webb, arley was involved in several varsity sports and clubs including football, the Blue & Gold, camera club and loc W. e went on to serve in the Army eteorology Service as part of the Army Air orces and later earned a bachelor s degree in industrial administration from ale niversity. is career too him from ban ing, to natural gas, citrus groves, the stoc mar et, and his own investment company before he retired from aul ins il o. as vice president in oil operation investments. A lifelong s ier, arley was also one of the original founders of ail, where he served on the oard of irectors for years. e established the igbie Endowed Scholarship und at Webb and will be remembered for his warm spirit, acceptance and generosity. arley is survived by his wife of years, orraine, their four children and eight grandchildren.

1945 We recently learned that Allan Rau Jr. passed away in

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1948 Klaus Lehmann passed away on anuary , after a battle with ataxia. escribed in the El Espejo as a man of “highly diversified talents,” laus spread his time among many arenas. e was on the sta s of El Espejo and the Blue & Gold, serving as editor of the newspaper his senior year, and participated in the rifle club and various dramatic productions. e was also president of the incoln ebating Society, charter member and secretary of the Will ogers hapter of uill Scroll and assistant chairman of the Webb committee for the World Student Service und. After Webb, laus earned a A in communications from ichigan State niversity, and an A from A in telecommunications. e then served in the .S. Army Special Services from to . After his academic and military career, laus returned to his love of the arts. e wor ed in television productions and syndications for numerous networ s, as well as his own firm. e was also a world traveler and a judge for the nternational Emmys. laus pri ed being a “wor ing alumnus” of Webb, hosting events in New York and helping alumni in Asia and South America maintain their connection to the schools. e is survived by his brother, ans ehmann , and his companion of nearly four decades, enriette.


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A celebration of life 1949 Donald Brady passed away at his home in os Angeles, alif. on une , . e was . At Webb, on wor ed on El Espejo and the Blue & Gold. e earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford niversity, conducted post graduate wor at the niversity of Southern alifornia s nstitute on ederal Taxation, and later earned his from oyola aw School. uring his accomplished professional career, onald was a former assistant nited States attorney, owner and founder of on ar inancial ompany, a financial planner, fiduciary estate planner and investment advisor. e is survived by his wife, ucia, seven children and grandchildren.

1954 Anthony von Teuber, nown as Tony, passed away at his home in hannel slands, alif. on arch , . Although Tony only attended Webb through his sophomore year, he will be remembered as a gifted student and athlete. e is survived by his wife, renda, his four children, seven grandchildren and two brothers.

1958 Jan Gustafson passed away on April , . While at Webb, an participated in peccary trips, played bas etball and football, and was on the trac and field team. e served in the .S. Army for two years including one year in ietnam as an aircraft mechanic and manager of the post exchange. e loyally wor ed in sales and mar eting at eech Aircraft for years. an volunteered with countless organi ations and was an active member of his church. Throughout retirement, he was also a member of the West Wichita iwanis lub and the eech Silver oxes.

John Hathaway passed away on ovember , . According to the El Espejo, ac was “famous for his determination bordering on ferocity on the playing field.” e played varsity soccer and bas etball, of which he was honorary captain, “ ” football and lettered in baseball. utside of sports, he was involved in the choir and the drama club, was sports editor of the Blue & Gold and contributed to the yearboo . After Webb, ac attended olorado ollege and A, where he studied journalism. e went on to serve in the Army and ualified for o cer s school. is service included time in ietnam, an experience that inspired him to wor in ietnamese orphanages and sponsor students attending the niversity of anoi. ac s scholarship students were chosen on their eagerness to learn, not just boo smarts, as he highly valued common sense and drive.

1967 N. Price Paschall, nown to the Webb community as rice, passed away on anuary , at age . rice died at his family s home in illbroo , . . after battling cancer for a second time. aschall was born in asadena, alif. and came to Webb in the fall of . e told the Alumni ce in that he remembered pic ing Webb because he was not re uired to attend a dance. As a student, he played soccer, served as layout editor of the school newspaper and was an active member of the hapel uild, responsible for physical arrangements for Sunday chapel services. e earned a business degree from alifornia State olytechnic niversity, omona, and later founded ontext apital roup, an investment ban ing firm, in . is uncle William oeing and brother oeing aschall both attended Webb as well. is father, athaniel aschall was a Webb trustee from to . is father s indness and generosity helped sponsor Webb projects, including the creation of The aschall ouse, a faculty home on campus. rice is survived by his wife, ise, his two brothers, his son, and three stepsons.


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The Final Word We begin the journey to examine our origin story and how it will inform the future.

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he origin story of an idea or a place often bends as you approach it, particularly after 100 years have passed—particularly after stories of stories have been told and re-told from generation to generation. The flexibility of human memory and the irresistible desire to tell a good story don’t help much either. Webb is a good story. Its founding. Its struggle. Its persistence. Its long years of thriving success. The facts and fictions are equally satisfying. And now, as Webb approaches The Centennial, in fact, as it has just enrolled The Centennial Class of 2022 for the fall term, we begin the journey to examine our origin story and how it will inform the future. Pictured above is a set of images of the fi rst school catalogue Thompson Webb published—a book of some 20 pages given or mailed to families that showed

an interest. It is without a date, but researching the cost of tuition noted in the book, it is likely from the second or third year—either 1923-24 or 1924-25. The cost of tuition for the year was $1,000— to be paid as follows: “Six hundred dollars on or before the opening day of school, in September, and four hundred dollars on or before the re-assembling day after the Christmas vacation.” This fi rst catalogue begins with a short biography of Thompson Webb, followed by descriptions of school philosophy, location, buildings and grounds, health, outdoor life, horseback riding and more. The Claremont Colleges are mentioned, for providing Webb students the opportunity to hear music and lectures of the highest type. There is a section on discipline, one of the lengthier entries actually, which begins with this simple opening: “The ordinary rules of morality and honor

are in force, not as rules of the school, but as rules of civilized life. Every boy is expected to be a gentleman under all circumstances.” Expectations clarified. And fi nally in this fi rst school catalogue, and most fitting for this issue of WEBB Magazine highlighting our innovative curriculum, Thompson Webb’s Course of Study open above. It takes up some four pages, the lengthiest section in the catalogue. Reading it now you can see the care and attention Thompson Webb invested in the intellectual life of the school. He certainly valued and counted on his faculty. “Each instructor is allowed some latitude of choice to give vent to his personal enthusiasm, and to suit the course to the students concerned.” Ray Alf, of course, immediately comes to mind. And still today, this is a sentiment shared and built upon.


ADMINISTRATION

CREDITS

Taylor B. Stockdale Head of Schools

Editor Joe Woodward

Theresa A. Smith, PhD Assistant Head of Schools

Contributors Lexus Beaman ’08, Debbie Carini, John Ferrari, Don Lofgren, Jessica Rice ’12, Laura Wensley

Dutch Barhydt Director of Institutional Advancement

Design Shari Fournier-Oleary

Jamila Everett, EdD Director of Admission & Financial Aid Donald L. Lofgren, PhD Director, Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology Hector Martinez Director of College Guidance

Janet K. Peddy Director of Finance, Planning & Operations Joe Woodward Director of Strategic Communications

Sanjiv P. Dholakia ’87, Chairman David Loo ’79, Vice Chair Christina Mercer McGinley, PhD ’84, Vice Chair, Secretary R. Larry Ashton ’70, Chairman, Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology Board, ex officio Blake H. Brown ’68 Michael M. Chang ’92 Deval R. Dvivedi ’00 Jenna Z. Gambaro ’95 Janel Henriksen Hastings, PhD ’87 John F. Holliday ’84 Julia Marciari-Alexander, PhD ’85 Roger J. Millar ’61 Rahmi Mowjood, DO ’90 David C. Myles, PhD ’80 Mickey E. Novak ’70 Janet K. Peddy, Director of Finance, Planning and Operations, Chief Financial Officer & Secretary, ex officio RJ Romero Miles R. Rosedale ’69 Wendin D. Smith, PhD ’89 Taylor Stockdale, Head of Schools, President & Chief Executive Officer, ex officio Denis Yip

LIFE TRUSTEES Hugh H. Evans Jr. ’49 Anne Gould Wayne L. Hanson ’59 H. Earl Hoover II ’52 Murray H. Hutchison Claire McCloud Susan A. Nelson Paul Reitler ’54

Photography Andrew Hamilton, Howie Kalter, Kevin Kang ’19, Don Lofgren, Nancy Newman, Scott Nichols Printing Dual Graphics

Tracy Miller, PhD Director of Studies

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2017-18

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 2

ALF MUSEUM BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2017-18 R. Larry Ashton ’70, Chairman Gretchen J. Augustyn Terry W. Baganz William Baldwin Richard H. Clark Sanjiv P. Dholakia ’87, Chairman, The Webb Schools Board of Trustees, ex officio Daniel Gluckstein, MD Jay Greening Ronald P. Hagander ’66 James E. Hall, PhD ’59 F. Gard Jameson, PhD ’71 Sherwood C. Kingsley ’58 Carl W. R. Lachman ’86 Donald L. Lofgren, PhD, Director, Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, President, ex-officio John R. Lynas ’55 David P. Mirkin, MD ’66 L.J. Patrick Muffler, PhD ’54 Douglas F. Myles Michelle Plyley Mary W. Rose, PhD Charles Steinmann, MD Taylor Stockdale, Head of Schools, ex officio Page W. Thibedeaux Monica Atiyeh Whitaker ’96 Lance C. Williams ’97 Tammy Zipser

LIFE MEMBERS

Anne G. Earhart Michael O. Woodburne, PhD

Nondiscrimination Policy The Webb Schools admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by state or federal law to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the schools. The Webb Schools do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by state or federal law in administration of their educational policies, tuition assistance, athletic, and other schooladministered programs, or any other basis in law. Memberships The Association of Boarding Schools; National Association of Independent Schools; California Association of Independent Schools; Western Boarding Schools Association; Western Association of Schools and Colleges; National Coalition of Girls’ Schools; Independent Curiculum Group; College Entrance Examination Board; Educational Records Bureau; Association of Independent School Admission Professionals; National Association of College Admission Counselors; Council for the Advancement and Support of Education; and the Cum Laude Society. Publication Information WEBB Magazine is the official publication of The Webb Schools. Postmaster: Send address changes to: The Webb Schools 1175 W. Baseline Road Claremont, CA 91711 PH (909) 626-3587 FAX (909) 621-4582 EMAIL: alumni@webb.org webb.org THE MISSION of The Webb Schools is to provide an exemplary learning community that nurtures and inspires boys and girls to become men and women who: Think boldly, mindfully and creatively, Act with honor and moral courage, • Lead with distinction, • Serve with a generous spirit. • •


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WEBB Magazine Spring/Summer 2018  
WEBB Magazine Spring/Summer 2018