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health&beauty changing perceptions of beauty ď ł indulging in spa services salon & spa specialties ď ł eating healthier November 2015


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Schedule your remote session today at RemoteWC.com Brought to you by West Chester Computer Doctors, located in the middle of the block at 28 South High Street www.computerwc.com  610.431.0400  support@computerwc.com NOVEMBER 2015 THEWCPRESS.COM

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The

Press

“In every man’s heart there is a secret nerve that answers to the vibrations of beauty.” –Christopher Morley

PUBLISHER Dan Mathers dan@thewcpress.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio nick@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Julie Ryan jryan@mathersproductions.com Daniela Pinto behance.net/danielapintophoto COPY EDITOR Jon Roth jroth@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Andrew Hutchins hutch@mathersproductions.com COVER PHOTOGRAPHER Justin Muir justinjamesmuir.com

COLUMNISTS Becca Boyd bboyd@thewcpress.com Diane LeBold dlebold@thewcpress.com Brad Liermann bliermann@thewcpress.com Jennifer Ozgur jozgur@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions 13 South Church Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463 The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations, visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Worth

Noting 15

19 21 29 39 41 55 63 65 69

Our no-nonsense table of contents

OWNER OF THE MONTH Dr Brad I. Stark, MD of Chester County Eye Care Associates LOCAL TALENT Joey McLaughlin of Symmetry Pilates SALON & SPA SPECIALTY DIRECTORY We figure out what makes every salon unique REFOCUSING THE LENS Organizations working to change the perception of beauty BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Damien Paese of Limoncello Ristorante & Caterers PERMISSION TO INDULGE Where to go to look and feel beautiful in West Chester 8 FOOD-FOCUSED SUGGESTIONS For living a healthier lifestyle in West Chester LOCAL PERSONALITY Theresa Brewer of Ooh La La Salon PHOTO HUNT Find the six differences and win! QUICK Q&A Dr. Geoff Winkley, MD of Doctor’s Best Immediate Medical Care

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From the

Editor

“Beauty is power; a smile is its sword.” —John Ray

I once told a co-worker who was inquiring about my success in sales: “Nothing is more important than looking good.” In the moment, it was a nice thing to say—I was telling my colleague they already possessed the most important attribute for a salesperson. In hindsight, it was one of the most supremely conceited things I’ve

ever said. Still, it’s a motto around which I’ve molded much of my life. I do all the basics: I run, I go to the gym and I have invested in a good wardrobe. I’ve got an entire dresser drawer dedicated to fancy socks (athletic socks go in a separate drawer), and my belt always matches my shoes. Always. But I also go above and beyond… and here’s the part where I really come clean: I moisturize twice a day to avoid future wrinkles, and I shave the back of my neck every time I shave my face to avoid looking like Wolverine; errant eyebrow hairs and nose hairs alike are painfully plucked from my head just about every time I come face-to-face with a mirror. I whiten my teeth. But, above all else, my number one most embarrassing grooming habit is that I’ve been using Rogaine twice a day since I was 28. The habit started after Anthony Giunta of Salon Chemistry was cutting my hair and said, “You’ve got one ugly-ass head. You better hope you never go bald.” And he’s totally right. I’ve got a divot in the back of my head, along with an accompanying 199-stitch scar from a car accident. I’ve got a series of scars along the right side of my head, reminders of the 18 staples used to put my head back together after an encounter with brass knuckles. Born of the fear of losing my good looks, I’ve mourned every hair lost down the shower drain and have spent a significant amount of money on generic three-packs of Rogaine, of which I’m certain I use more than is recommended. Now, before you start writing me emails telling me how shallow I am, I’ll say this: I’m aware that good looks in and of themselves are nearly worthless. Without brains and a personality behind those beautiful eyes, you’re not going far. The real key is in the confidence that a polished exterior imbues, and so it is that aspect we’ve focused on in this issue. The magazine you’re holding is just as much about feeling good as it is about looking good, a sentiment encapsulated perfectly in the final line of my interview with Dr. Stark on the next page, or in the piece by Jesse Piersol on page 29, which is about redefining what “beautiful” means. Even Kate Chadwick’s piece on page 41, which is essentially a spa crawl, is as much focused on feeling good as it is on looking good. Of course, we cannot overlook the fact that, as a species, looks are a driving force behind our choices. Good looking people have a significantly better chance of finding a mate, make more money, and are generally more persuasive. That’s why I always pack my moisturizer, tweezers and Rogaine in my carry-on. Sure, it’s vain, but vanity has it’s perks.

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Owner of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Dr Brad I. Stark, MD of Chester County Eye Care Associates does so much more than prescribe lenses As I understand it, you are one of several owners. We have seven opthalmologists, and four optometrists - a total of eleven eye doctors. Is there a major benefit to a practice of that size? Absolutely. The reason our practice is this size is that we all specialize. There is a lot of interchange between the subspecialists. Say the retina specialist does a procedure, and they end up with increased eye pressure. We also have glaucoma specialists who can deal with that. We have specialists in all areas, so people don’t have to go into Philadelphia for services like that. This really puts us in a unique situation; we’re the only practice in Chester County that covers all the sub-specialities. That’s not to say we don’t have relationships in the city. What do you mean by that? For instance, our doctors have great relationships with Wills Eye and Scheie Eye Institutes. We’re on staff there, attend clinics, train residents. In addition, there are also a number of us who teach courses at the national meetings of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Sounds like you guys do a lot more than just fit people for contacts.We are a multi-specialty ophthalmology practice, and we cover everything from diabetes, to glaucoma, to cataracts, to Lasik, and we even specialize in oculoplastics. Wow, that’s a lot going on, and I have to admit some of it went over my head. Let’s break it down piece by piece. First, you’re saying diabetes impacts vision? Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common cause of visual loss between ages 25-64. There are more than 25 million Americans living with diabetes, and half of them don’t even know they have diabetes. That can be very problematic, because diabetes can cause a profound loss of vision if undiagnosed and left untreated.

And they need to do more than just get their blood sugar in check to try to counter that vision loss? Obviously if there isn’t tight control of blood sugar and cholesterol, you’re going to have problems. You need to get that under control and we always suggest quitting smoking; smoking is the common denominator in most types of visual loss. If you’re already at risk, smoking can really stoke the fire. So, anyone with diabetes should get checked? Oh, absolutely. Those with type II should get checked every year at least. Type I, once they’re just diagnosed, should get a baseline and be seen a couple years later. You really need to

come in for complete eye exams because most of these issues don’t show symptoms until they’re pretty advanced. The next item that surprises me: oculoplastics. We offer a wide variety of services, like Botox, Juvederm and Intense Pulsed Light. I actually specialize in blepharoplasty, which is a surgery that removes excess lid skin from the eyes, both for functional and cosmetic purposes. What made you decide to specialize in oculoplastics? I thought it was a good way to really help people. Any procedure that helps someone feel better about themselves is a great procedure to perform.

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Children in

Tow

Jennifer Ozgur is a mother, wife and teacher who still finds time to get out and about with her family

I grew up on a farm outside Allentown in Pennsylvania Dutch country. I have faint memories of my mother driving to the post office in “town” (one street with lines painted on the macadam) to get the mail because the mail carrier didn’t deliver as far outside of town as our home. When I was a twelve, we moved to a housing development and lived near a strip mall. That was a huge cultural upgrade. I recall summers of “Sidewalk Sales” when the hardware, card and sporting goods stores would peddle their unsold treasures outside on bargain tables. A food truck sold hot dogs and water cooler-sized paper cups of Coke for twenty five cents each. It was the highlight of the season for our family… embarrassing to admit, but true. I went off to college at Kutztown University where horse and buggies drove through campus. I enjoyed getting to know different people from various backgrounds and loved the freedom of walking into town whenever the mood struck. It was exotic for me: a coffee house; head shop/tattoo parlor, falafels. But, after two years at KU, and I yearned for more. That why I transferred to (and graduated from) West Chester University, and I’ve lived here ever since. I’d never realized it before, but it turns out that I had an accent. When folks from Chester and Delaware counties would go, “deewn teewn,” I’d go “daahn taahn.” People spoke at a louder decibel. Fashion and makeup was more progressive. Hairspray and eyeliner was out; pomade and lip liner were in. I was in a wonderland of multiculturalism, and I drank it in. Twenty years later, that diversity continues to flourish. A walk down Gay and Market provides the opportunity for soul food, Cajun, Japanese, Indian, and Mediterranean. There are gourmet shops filled with the finest meats and cheeses from around the world. Gelato, several hookah shops, an eco-friendly bike dealership, community centers that se habla Español, and—most recently—a shawarma shop serving halal meat that is scheduled (at the time of writing) to open soon. But for all that variety, you can find my roots in town during the seasonal West Chester Grower’s Market or on a quick trip out to Booth’s Corner, which is proof enough that Allentown might not have been as one-dimensional as I thought all those years ago. Maybe it was that my parents kept me in a monochromatic box of white bread and mayonnaise, partly due to geography but also partly due to domestic xenophobia. It took me many years living on my own to learn that the surroundings provided for my growing up were only one version of reality. To paraphrase a famous saying, “There are no hick towns, only hick residents.” The original sentiment, voiced by Russian theatre director Konstantin Stanislavsky, addresses actors and, but it seems to apply to a much broader swath of humanity. That’s why I’ve made it my mission to expose my children to rich, diverse cultural experiences, and I am ever thankful that I all I have to do is visit West Chester’s deewnteewn. jozgur@thewcpress.com

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Local

Talent

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Joey McLaughlin of Symmetry Pilates talks about the difficulties of attaining balance So, when it comes to instructing Pilates, how much is talent, how much is hard work? It’s 50/50. You definitely have to possess a good eye for proper technique to make your clients’ Pilates as good as possible, and it’s hard work because you have to keep working on your own Pilates—you never stop being a student—and you have to continually make it exciting and interesting. People come in to be healthier and have a better body, but it also needs to be something that they look forward to. How do you give them something to look forward to? We always try to change up the sessions, make sure that we do something that they will love, as well as something they need. We keep it fun and different by using props or changing the

sequence of what they’re doing, so they always feel like they’re doing something new. How would you explain Pilates to someone as clueless as me? Pilates is working the core muscles in your body, the smaller muscles that work to support the joints of your body. People focus on the major muscles of the body, but Pilates specifically focuses on smaller muscle groups to create a more balanced body. We work with small, controlled movements and with the weaker side of the body to balance it against the dominant side. Is an unbalanced body a major issue? Everyone has a dominant side. If they do not learn how to strengthen the other side of their body, or the weaker muscles in the body, they’ll really stress that side, those major muscle groups that they rely on. This imbalance will wear down the joints, particularly on the dominant side of the body. We want to help you avoid misusing one side of your body and avoid added wear and tear on the joints and muscles. Even for people who aren’t particularly active? We live in an aggressive world; it never shuts down. We have cell phones and laptops and gadgets to keep us working longer hours, but because of this I see so many people who spend too much time

sitting still. Whether it’s yoga, or Pilates, people need to get up, stretch and use their muscles, or we’re going to have a lot more knee and hip replacements in the future. How do you introduce people to Pilates? We offer both mat and machine exercises, and we offer personalized attention in both scenarios, so we can focus on teaching the specifics of the movements. It can be intimidating at first. We first teach new clients how to compensate for the issues we see in their body, then we focus on the smaller movements that they can build on from there. It’s a learning process, and we stress that they’ll continue to get better. What’s the hardest part? You have to think, and that’s a make-or-break situation for a lot of people. Some people just want to go to the gym, zone out and not think, but we have people who want to think about what they’re doing and focus on it. Sounds like a much more directed form of fitness. It’s something people should ideally start with an instructor. There are great videos and books, but we’ve found over and over that the people who’ve done that initial training by themselves don’t get the depth of the workouts until they come work with somebody. But then, once they get it, they get it.

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It seems these days that there's a salon on every block of the borough. With so many choices—from big operations with full hair and spa services, to small specialty shops—it's hard to know where to begin. That's where this list comes in! We've done the research for you and have highlighted every salon and spa's defining specialities to give you the low down on each. It's a lot of information, but we know you'll find it useful the next time you're looking for a cut, or wax, or facial...

Salons Aristocrat’s Salon Studio 25 S High St (610) 918-0300 Cuts, Color This salon studio is great because it is small and located right in the center of the borough. Because of its size, there is a family feel about it, where stylists personally know their clients and what will make them happy! Avanté on High Street 122 S. High Street (610) 696-4060 klipjointsalon.com Hair, Makeup, Men's Cuts The Klip Joint was Avanté Salon and Spa owner Frank Grubers' first foray into the realm of salon ownership, way back in 1978. It recently underwent a makeover of its own to re-open as Avanté on High Street. Cappella’s Studio 106 Furr Ave (610) 692-9976 cappellasstudio.com Full Service Hair, Nails, Premium Products Cappella's longevity in the area stems from their experience, friendliness, and accomodation of their guests. You will not find yourself waiting for your appointment, as the staff is extremely loyal to their clients. Inside and outside of their walls, Cappella's is family oriented and has a knack for keeping up with the latest trends. Cashmere Salon 237 E Gay St (610) 344-7289 cashmeresalons.com Color, Treatments, Extensions Cashmere Salon made a name for themselves in their Philadelphia locations before opening their stylish salon in West Chester. They've been featured multiple times in regional and national publications.

County Seat Style 105 N Church St (610) 692-5822 countyseatstyle.com Hair, Keratin & Highlights County Seat offers Keratin hair treatments for a great price. They also do "Crystal Hair Glazing," which uses an Olaplex Bond Multiplier to add proteins for healthier, stronger hair. Kalon Hair Studio 138 W Market St (610) 344-7747 Precision Cuts, Formal Styling, Chemical Treatments Kalon has excelled at making their studio atmosphere comfortable for the clients, which is most likely how they have stayed at that location for nine years! Hair Innovations 22 W Market St (610) 436-6128 hairinnovationsonline.com Texturizing, Sukesha, Moroccan Oil This salon has been in historic downtown West Chester since 1983, however they ensure that their stylists have ongoing industry training. The motto here is look good, feel good. Hair Cuttery 913 Paoli Pike (610) 696-9907 Walk-In Hair Almost everyone has needed a lastminute haircut, and that’s what is unique and easy about the Hair Cuttery. They are always open for walk-in appointments, but still provide quality service and usually not long of a wait! Hart’s Hair Designs 132 W Market St (610) 701-4335 hartshairdesign.com Full-Service Hair Salon Not only do they offer all of your regular hair salon services, but they solely use premium products from AVEDA for their coloring treaments.

Mia Bella Salon 7 N Church St (610) 696-HAIR miabellawc.com Glazing, Threading, Waxing, Extensions Mia Bella's specialists have a strong technical background and a great eye for creativity. Each employee is skilled at drawing inspiration from their clients and personalizing their styles. Platinum Hair Salon 129 Turner Ln (610) 692-2887 platinum4hair.com Bridal & Special Event Packages, Spray Tanning They offer high-quality salon services, nail treatments and take-home hair products. This salon also features upscale costume jewelry from New York in their boutique! The Refinery Hair Studio 121 W Market St (610) 430-7159 therefineryhair.com Men's Grooming, Women's Hair, Deva Curl The decor and the creative stylists differentiate this salon from others. The employees here really have their own personal specialties that they focus on for their clients, but the salon itself runs as a team - never double booking appointments! Sharp Image Hair Salon 327 E Gay St (610) 429-3737 sharpimagewc.com Cuts, Colors, Kids Sharp Image Salon does full-service hair and nails for adults and actually has quite a number of younger clients as well. They use products from ColorProof & Goldwell and offer a comfortable waiting area for clients... Keurig included!

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Salon & Spa Hair, Makeup, Massage, Facials Avanté Salon was created in 1991 for the purpose of offering more salon services to clients at a higher professional level. In 1998 the salon expanded, added new services and changed the name to Avanté Salon and Spa.

Calista Grand 1211 Wilmington Pike, (610) 399-6677, calistagrand.com Hair, Facials, Massage Calista is an international company whose staff is highly skilled in the latest beauty trends from massage techniques to facial treatments, to nail and hair care. They achieve the finished look using 'The Perfecter' and the Calista Wet & Dry styling line. Their motto is, “Feel Perfect Every Day.”

La Difference Salon & Spa 830 Paoli Pike (610) 429-1808 ladifferencesalon.com Hair, Skin, Nails, Health La Difference is the difference your beauty regimen really needs. Their owner not only runs the salon side of the spa, but is a L'Oreal partner that teaches the science of hair on a national level. Instead of deconstructing or bleaching out color, they use quality products to guarantee healthy hair, skin, and nails.

Balance Hair Spa Studio 150 E Gay St (610) 314-4300 balancehairspa.com Hair Styling, Spa Packages, Spray Tanning Balance Hair Spa is drenched in light and features elegant workspaces for clients to enjoy a chic environment. Each guest is given a custom, takehome prescription slip recommending an at-home regimen to use that includes which products work best for their style.

Emily Alice Salon 35 S High St (610) 696-3990 emilyalice.com Makeup, Hair, Skin, Photoshoots Many salons only focus on one or two areas independently whereas Emily Alice provides customers with comprehensive service. Their stylists succeed in making it all work together for you. At Emily Alice, they synthesize hair, cosmetics and style with the natural beauty, features, and skin tones of clients.

Peter's Salon & European Spa 1009 W Chester Pike (610) 436-6464 peterssalonandspa.com Hair Styling, Skin Care, Body Treatments Established in 1962, Peter's was one of the irst businesses in the Philadelphia area to offer complete and true European day spa and salon treatments. Relax and enjoy an extensive array of services in the classic elegance of this two-story salon and spa.

Avanté Salon & Spa

668 Downingtown Pike (610) 429-1800 avantesalon.com

Nails Zazen Nail Spa

200 E Gay St (610) 430-1200 zazennailspa.com

Nails, Waxing, Massage, Facials, Mens, Beverages Zazen is a Buddhist practice that means, "to calm the mind and spirit." This top-notch nail salon provides fun, seasonal choices, like the Pumpkin Spice Pedicure in the fall, and the Chocolate Mistletoe Manicure in the winter. Monday through Thursday clients enjoy a complimentary glass of wine to accompany their all-natural and non-toxic treatment experience.

Spas East Coast Float Spa 569 E Gay St (484) 881-3413 eastcoastfloat.com Float Rooms, Zero-Gravity Massage Chairs East Coast Float Spa is the largest and only floatation therapy center in the Philadelphia area. They offer a large, modern, inviting environment, almost like your own personal Dead Sea to relax in! East Coast Float is an all organic and natural spa that buys local and sustainable products whenever possible.

Massage Envy 1107 W Chester Pike (610) 701-4300 massageenvy.com Massage, Facials Massage Envy is likely the most convenient and affordable massage spa in the area. This spa believes massages and facials are not a luxury, but simply part of body maintenance. They provide lots of different types of services such as trigger point massage, sugar foot scrubs, and facials using Murad products. They even offer military discounts.

Remedi Day Spa 16 S Church St (610) 436-7546 remedidayspa.com Spa Services, Nutrition, MindBody Health This salon uses an integrative approach to health and beauty by focusing on both the body and the mind. Not only do they offer your regular spa services such as waxing and facials, but they host classes such as yoga, barre, and tai chi with an emphasis on nutrition and fitness.

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Home

Becca Boyd has a passion for good food

Beccanomics

For me, the age was 21. Late night pizza (not to mention the beers) and a fascination for the college cafeteria’s panini press led to an unwelcome weight gain. What followed was a journey; slowly but surely I settled into my groove of eating whole foods as much as possible. Burgers and pizza (and even paninis) have a place in my life, just not all the time. Besides a steady weight, this diet offers up beauty perks. These two recipes starring sweet potatoes rich in vitamins A and C, lead to shinier, thicker hair and smoother skin. Who knew beauty benefits could taste this good? bboyd@thewcpress.com Sweet Potato Pancakes with Cinnamon Honey Butter Makes 12 Honey Butter 1/2 c. butter, softened; 1 tbsp. honey; 1/4 tsp. cinnamon Pancakes 1 c. all purpose flour; 1/4 tsp. baking soda; 1/2 tsp. salt; 1/2 tsp. baking powder; 1 tbsp. sugar; 2 eggs; 1 1/4 c. buttermilk; 2 tbsp. vegetable oil 1.For butter, beat all three ingredients with electric mixer until smoothly combined. Scrape into a small bowl and set aside. 2. Whisk flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and sugar in a large mixing bowl. 3. Whisk eggs, buttermilk, oil, and sweet potato until smoothly combined. Add dry ingredients to wet ones and fold until just combined. 4. Heat a nonstick griddle over medium-low heat and add nonstick spray or butter. 5. Once hot, add batter in rounds; cook until the edges are set and the bottom is golden brown. Flip and cook on second side. Barley Pilaf with Sweet Potatoes and Black Beans Serves 8 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 in. pieces 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil, divided; 1/4 tsp. kosher salt; 3 cups chicken broth; 1 1/2 cup pearled barley; 3/4 cup sliced scallions; Juice of 1 lime; 1/4 tsp. garlic salt; 1/2 cup drained and rinsed black beans; 1/4 tsp. cumin; 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper, or to taste; 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1.Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and toss potatoes with 1 tbsp. olive oil and salt. Spread on pan and bake for 40 minutes, stirring once. 2. Meanwhile, bring chicken broth to boil in a large saucepan. Add barley and reduce heat to low – simmer with lid on for 30-40 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. 3. Transfer cooked barley to a large mixing bowl and add sweet potatoes, scallions, black beans, lime juice, garlic salt, cumin, pepper and cilantro. Stir gently to combine. Serve immediately or allow to cool and store in an airtight container for up to one week.

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T

he worst thing you can do is to call someone fat. Go ahead and throw that out for debate with the person next to you right now. I’ll meet you back here in five minutes. How’d it go? Any vivid memories from childhood spring to mind? Did fat shaming come up? How about skinny shaming? Hopefully, your conversation made it clear that body image is a complex topic. Marriage and Family Therapist Jennifer Chaiken of the WC Therapy Group says our ideas about our bodies start forming early, and what people tell us tends to stick around. “It so easily changes your perception of yourself when someone tells you something,” she says. “I’ve had clients say, ‘I remember this one time someone called me fat.’” Fellow therapist Emmalee Bierley chimes in, “Or we’ll remember that time someone said ‘Oh, you’re so beautiful. You’re going to be a model when you grow up.’” The third member of WC Therapy, Caitlyn Caracciolo, adds, “Our parents reinforce our self-concept, with girls and with boys. ‘You’re so beautiful,’ or ‘You’re so strong.’ That becomes your worth.” “And you take that first information as truth,” Emmalee says. “That is the initial truth. That’s your baseline.” In their sunny Walnut Street office, Jennifer, Emmalee, and Caitlyn settle in for a chat about body image. The coffee table in the middle of the room holds an array of books about eating disorders. These days, much of the terminology is part of everyone’s vocabulary: anorexia, bulimia, binge eating. Even pica (where someone eats non-

foods such as soap or wax) is familiar as a result of reality TV programs, while shows such as The Biggest Loser glorify zealous dieting and exercise practices as a gateway to some halcyon state of humankind. If we can agree that our appearance—that beauty—is pretty important, then the next question is where do we draw the line?

Seeing the Pros

Caitlyn likens eating disorders to other forms of addictive behavior. “You can think about it like you would alcohol or other addictions. It’s not how often you drink, but how often you THINK about drinking.” From a health insurance perspective, the line for eating disorder is crossed when an individual’s body weight falls below a certain point. But that can make it hard for those with borderline disorders to seek treatment. Emmalee notes, “They’ll think ‘It’s not bad enough. I’m not that bad.’” It’s not just young people crossing

that line, either. The Renfrew Center, an eating disorder treatment facility founded in Philadelphia in 1985, features a “midlife” section on their website. “Over the last few years, the Renfrew Center has seen an increasing number of women in their thirties, forties, fifties and sixties seeking treatment for their eating disorder,” the site maintains. “Over the past decade there has been a 42 percent increase in the number of women over the age of 35 who sought treatment at Renfrew.” Although it is, indeed, mostly younger women who show up at WC Therapy Group for help with their eating disorders, Emmalee notes that lots of older clients come in with a secondary issue first. “It turns out they’ve got an underlying eating disorder,” she says. Caitlyn adds, “It’s an offshoot of other types of anxiety. When you can’t control the things in your life, you can control that.” “It’s a preoccupation. You’re spending your day thinking about it. Maybe you’re feeling isolated and lonely, so you say, ‘I’m going to go the gym,’” Emmalee shares. “Then it becomes your best friend. You’ll ruin your relationships, your life, and to give that up means having to ask yourself ‘What’s next?’” And it’s not only women. “Society urges men to be more overtly competitive,” notes Caitlyn. “Because of that, they have nowhere to go, no vocabulary for their feelings.” Emmalee adds, “The only thing they’re allowed to feel is anger.” Restrictive eating and extreme exercise patterns can take the place of expressing those feelings. “It’s that ducks in a row philosophy,” Caitlyn says. “’I’ll be happy once I lose weight.’ But we have to stop waiting for that imaginary future time to be happy.” “Our flaws are what make us cool,” she concludes. “That’s what I love about being a therapist. You get to see everyone’s vulnerabilities, and you realize that we’re all the same.” Jennifer adds, “And being empathetic and vulnerable is the basis for human connection.”

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Co n n e cti n g the Dots

Libby Thorson didn’t originally plan to spend her days figuring out what it means to “be a man.” At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, she was focusing her studies on restricted emotionality and a personality feature called alexithymia. “People with alexithymia don’t see or know how to connect with their emotions, or appreciate when other people are sharing

e m o tion,” she explains. Her research led her to wonder if college men might experience a sort of socially constructed form of alexithymia, given that society largely encourages them not to connect with their emotions. For her master’s thesis, she interviewed individuals about how they navigate emotional conversations within the framework of their own masculinity. “I found out they learned from a man in

their life. ‘Anger’s okay, but don’t get too angry, and don’t be too excited about anything,’ they’d tell me. Well, what happens when they experience those emotions but have to negotiate them within their masculinity? They’ll say, ‘One day it hit me and I cried in the shower.’” The interview process revealed to Libby how trust and rapport afforded people the opportunity to challenge the traditional masculine stereotype. Her findings sparked a passion which led her here to West Chester, where she serves as Coordinator of the Violence Prevention and Healthy Masculinity programs at West Chester University’s Women’s Center, a position she’s held since July. “We advocate around the issues that women face, but everyone needs to be part of the conversation. And men tend to be missing from that conversation.” Enter Men in Action, a group that evolved three years ago from a discussion series about healthy masculinity. The series tackled subjects such as dating violence and what it means to be a “real man.” In a workshop on healthy male body image, participants related the concept of “bigorexia” (a body dysmorphic disorder stemming from the desire to be big or ripped) to how masculinity is portrayed by superheroes in comic books and other media. Eric Xavier is a peer educator for the Women’s Center, and currently one half of the Men in Action team. The senior Psychology undergrad got involved with the group when he was a freshman and now leads healthy masculinity workshops and classes all over campus. “Last semester a program called ‘Connect the Dots’ allowed people to explore how dating has turned into sitting behind a screen,” Eric says. “The theme was ‘Why actually talk to people when you can just swipe right.’ The goal

was to learn how to better talk with people and get to know them on a real level. And not just judge them based on their Tinder photos.” It’s often men in fraternities who take part in the workshops, which are always discussion-based. “We get the fraternity guys out because it’s easy to contact them,” says Eric. He recently facilitated a class of eight fraternity men, presenting the “contin-

T

he continuum is a great visual of how small oppressive actions lead to larger ones, and perpetuate a culture of violence uum of harm,” where Eric draws a line on the board, and together, participants figure out where to place cards containing a variety of statements along that line. He starts small, with seemingly innocuous sayings like “You throw like a girl.” “People will say, ‘Oh, that’s only 30 percent.” The statements on the cards build with phrases such as “Boys will be boys,” and participants fix them to the board, farther and farther to the right side, with the final card being rape. “The continuum is a great visual of how small oppressive actions lead to larger ones, and perpetuate a culture of violence,” says Eric. The activity had its intended effect. “Their minds were blown.” Libby adds, “It’s those light-bulb moments that spread the seeds of change.” With programs like healthy masculinity, Libby, Eric, and the rest of the Women’s Center team hope to give students the tools to shape healthy self-concepts, healthy relationships, and beyond. It’s a process that Eric thinks will always need to be around. “We showed a video from 1998 that talked about the same ideas we talk about today. There are a lot of people who will never get it, but we’ll keep working.” “Start the conversation. Get facts. Question the media. Seek out different

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


perspectives,” Libby urges. “Silence is complicity. People who need to be part of the conversation are silent. We need to realize that we are all empowered to do something.”

Spreading Peace :

look at other people, of those internal messages you get from society that you take back into your world.” BODYPeace emerged from the basement of Sykes Student Union in the spring of 2012, after Communication Studies senior Ciera Moutone chose a capstone project that explored women’s body image in the media. By the end of that semester, fellow student Ellisa Cruz was leading the effort to turn it into a club. In their first official year in 2013, BODYPeace co-hosted an event called Love Your Body Day in conjunction with its Greek counterpart, the Sister to Sister organization. It was a success, filling Main Hall’s 400-seat auditorium. Haleigh remembers, “We ripped media advertisements apart. We looked at video clips.”

A new club on West Chester University’s campus aims to foil negative body image from yet another angle. “We want people to be happy with who they are and what they have to offer,” explains Megan Monachino, social media chair for WCU BODYPeace. Although many members of the club have eating disorders or are still battling them, there are just as many students interested in BODYPeace’s mission for other reasons. For Megan, a senior English Writing major, “Personally, the whole idea that your worth is derived from your physical appearance has always kind of bothered me. Coming to campus and finding a group of women who are working to go against the grain and break that image really attracted me.” Junior Communication Studies major Haleigh Besecker is the club’s secretary. “I feel like everybody struggles with body image. When you’re 18 and in college, you’re so aware of your body. For me, it seemed like a good thing to keep me from going down that slippery slope of eating disorders. I’ve gotten so much more comfortable with my body.” Haleigh continues, “By talking about it, you also become hyper-aware of how you

The group hosts other events such as yoga night, the most recent of which drew about 100 students. Meetings center around discussions about current issues, with occasional special guest speakers, including Renfrew staff members. The ultimate goal of the organization is to put a dent in the percentage of college students who develop eating disorders. “We want to reduce the number of people who fall victim to eating disorders, and also create a culture on campus where people feel good about themselves,” says Megan. Of the 400 names on the organization’s email list, about 25-30 are active members. A few of those are men. “Generally, one or two guys show up for that first meeting. For the typical guy, though, it’s intimidating being the only one there,” Haleigh muses. “Plus, they aren’t as vocal about it. There’s a perception that men eat whatever they want. But then they’ll go work out at the gym for three hours.”

“We all associate beauty with body image. With BODYPeace, we want to make that definition more flexible,” she offers. “Beauty doesn’t just pertain to how people look, but they how work and think. The word ‘beautiful’ is redundant in that sense. We stress intelligence and creativity. Not just the physical part.”

I

’ve gotten so much more comfortable with my body. The power of change may lie in building community. “Typically eating disorders are hidden,” Megan says. “BODYPeace aims to break the stigma and allow people to express their feelings.” Adds Haleigh, “Knowing you’re a part of a bigger group helps, too. Sometimes, it’s the littlest things that make the biggest difference.” At an event last November, members handed out mirror stickers emblazoned with Christopher Robin’s words of solace for Winnie the Pooh: “You’re braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” “I left mine on my dorm room mirror when I moved out,” says Haleigh, “so it could inspire the next person who lived there.”

The club is navigating uncharted waters, one of the first of its kind on college campuses. “I don’t know of any other schools with an organization like this,” says Megan. “The University of Michigan has something similar, but that’s it.”

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And you can advertise for as little as $151 a month. Full Color

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The WC Press is the voice of this community, and we do our best to share our knowledge of interesting businesses, inspiring people and all the intricate stories that unfold within this town.


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Bartender of the

Month

PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Damien Paese talks about the pervasive family feel at Limoncello Ristorante & Caterers We’ll start with a hard one: is Limoncello the best bar in West Chester? Yes. I believe so. I think it’s a combination of everything: we have great food, a great atmosphere and great staff, and the owners really know how to run a business. I think it shows by how crowded we are every night and the satisfaction of everyone there. You don't think you're biased? Nope. How long you been there? I’ve been here for almost six years now. I’ve been serving for about five and in the past year I started bartending.

Now, the story of going from server to bartender is one I hear all the time. Why do you think most make the switch? I can’t speak for everyone, but I think for me personally it’s about dealing with people on a more individual basis. You have regulars who come in just to see you. You get a little of that experience serving, but this way you really have an opportunity to put a face on the restaurant, and it keeps people coming back. Is anything about the job more difficult or frustrating? I don’t know that anything is more difficult. It’s a different job, but I don’t find it more frustrating or anything like that. So the transition was easy? I’ve officially been a bartender for the past year, but before that I did off-site catering jobs where it’s a little easier of a job, and that gave me practice for an easy transition. If you weren’t bartending, what would you be doing… ideally. It’s a little far-fetched, because I’m terrible at sports, but I’d wanna be a professional athlete. Maybe like an international soccer player or something like that.

How about within the realm of reason? I won’t bartend forever, but I like the industry I’m in, and I did go to school for business management, so maybe in the future I’d run my own restaurant. You mentioned soccer; you guys often have soccer games on the TVs in Limoncello. I’m guessing that’s not a coincidence. Our staff is really into soccer, more so than most staffs. A lot of us are real big fans. Especially with Champions League going on right now, it’s a lot of fun. Do you find that soccer makes sense in an Italian place? The owner, the father of the family, Giuseppe, will sit down and watch with us, and he loves it. Gives a real European feel to the restaurant. Is the family environment really prevalent? Family is big—obviously the whole family of ownership, with Frank as GM, Paul being the chef, the whole family does their part. I think that extends to the people who work here. I’ve met friends here that I’ll have for the rest of my life. I think that trickles down from the whole family thing, and the overall feel that gives is picked up on by the customers.

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Great Food, Great Drinks

& Daily Specials 15 S HIGH ST  610.696.1400 BARNABYSWESTCHESTER.COM

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W

hen I was first offered this assignment—to visit eight West Chester salons and spas for a different service at each one— my initial reaction could be summed up in one word: HOORAY. Yes, please—I’d like a haircut and color, a mani/pedi, a massage, a professional makeup application—bring it. And then, almost immediately, came the second reaction: “Wait, what? I need a makeover over here? I look pretty good for my age, dammit.” I think that second reaction was prompted by two different things: 1 – most women are trained to look at “me time” as something furtive that they have to apologize for; 2 – a lot of us have our own comfort zone when it comes to our look, and sometimes we’re in denial about how “comfort zone” can equal “rut.” Of course, there’s also the idea of inner beauty—how what’s on the inside is what counts. And while I believe that to be an absolute truth, it’s also true that feeling good about how you look on the outside goes a long way towards boosting your confidence. And confidence, as we know, is beautiful—downright sexy, even.

Next up was the herbology exfoliating body wrap—more virgin territory for me. “So gallant.” Then, as I was sitting in the reception area, I saw him chatting on the phone, and then he marched right up to me and introduced himself as Dan Cosgrove, who, along with his wife, Christy, is the owner of La Difference. It’s a sprawling, tastefully decorated space, a full service salon and day spa, and it was hopping at 10am on a Thursday morning. Every single staff member I encountered was professional and pleasant After Dan fetched me a glass of water, I was ushered back to Anna for an eyebrow wax and an herbal body wrap. I’d never had a wax of any kind before, and was a bit apprehensive; I’m one of those “Oh, hey – my brows are looking a bit nuts

Viva La Difference La Difference Salon & Day Spa ladifferencesalon.com 830 Paoli Pike 610.429.1808 My first stop on the Beautify Kate tour was at La Difference, and the bar was set—high. When I pulled into the lot, I noticed a dapper gentlemen at the door, chatting with an older lady using a walker, and assisting her to her car. He held the door for me, and I thought

– let me pluck a couple” kind of girls. But with Anna’s deft and efficient work, it was over quickly and painlessly. And not only did I love the new shape, every other aesthetician I encountered on my next seven visits remarked on them. Next up was the herbology exfoliating body wrap—more virgin territory for me. Anna ushered me into a darkened room with a massage table, and I was rubbed down with a light oil and fragrant herbs, then loosely wrapped in something similar to large sheets of plastic wrap, covered in a blanket and left to unwind and – well, baste, I suppose—for nearly an hour. Not only was the experience itself incredibly pleasant and relaxing, but the difference in my skin continues to astound me. My

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Family Owned. Community Supported. Speakeasy Inspired. Boxcar Brewpub is the ideal spot for happy hour, a big night out or a relaxing weekend meal with the fam. Award-winning beers and a new homemade menu makes Boxcar the tastiest new place to be: • West Chester-crafted Boxcar brews • Seasonal beer cocktail menu • Local PA wines & ciders • Cuisine sourced local from scratch • 6-packs and growlers to-go Check out our ever-expanding event schedule online including an extensive line-up of live music. Consider us for your next private event in our upstairs lounge. 142 East Market Street, West Chester, PA 19382 www.boxcarbrewingcompany.com | 484.947.2503

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arms and legs tend to be a bit dry, particularly this time of year. That is no longer the case—even the somewhat scaly dry patches I tend to get on my upper arms have vanished.

i need a remedy Remedi Day Spa

remedidayspa.com 16 S CHurch St 610.436.7546 My next visit was with Victoria Piotrowski at Remedi Day Spa. This little space is both snug and airy, with a bright, light ambience and serene color palette. I was originally scheduled for a peel, but after a thorough and informative conversation with Victoria, who is the spa owner and lead aesthetician, we decided to go with a microdermabrasion facial. This is a tool—think of it almost like a tiny electric toothbrush—except with a soft sandpaper-like feel. It’s used to microplane away the dullness and when I tell you I left there glowing, I mean it. Victoria’s knowledge was nearly dizzying; I never felt for

a minute that she wasn’t fully-versed in the most up-to-date techniques. The best part of the experience was feeling that the service provided was utterly personalized to my specific skin type and issues. And while every place I visited had specific products for sale, I never felt like anything was being pushed on me. When I told Victoria that I am an over-the-counter skin care person, she offered specific suggestions for those products as well, which I—and my wallet—thoroughly appreciated.

think of it almost like a tiny electric toothbrush— except with a soft sandpaperlike feel.

of Media, PA? You are correct, sir. I wasn’t sure what the heck to expect here, but Ryan, the young man at the front desk, put me and the other waiting client at ease immediately. He showed us a brief informational video describing how it works and the health benefits involved, gave us a tour of the facility, and then we each chose our own “private Dead Sea.” There are three, each the same size with minor differences in décor. Each is equipped with a changing area, an open shower, and then a floating tank. You enter the room, strip, shower, insert earplugs, and into approximately a foot of warm salt water you go and float your cares away. It was smaller than I anticipated, but tall enough to stand up in comfortably. There is a neck/shoulder pillow provided if you choose (and I did, because that is where I happen to store my tension), but you will float either way. There is a tiny blue light in the tank which you can leave

And We'll All Float on East COast Float SPA eastcoastfloat.com 569 E Gay St 484.881.3413 While walking into East Coast Float Spa, I Instagrammed a sign in the window that reads “Like Floating in Your Own Private Dead Sea.” Within minutes, one of my followers commented “I go there twice a month—I love it—so relaxing.” And you know what, Steve Turner

strip, shower, insert earplugs, and into approximately a foot of warm salt water you go...

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on or turn off, for a fully isolated feeling. (I left it on for the first half-hour, turned it off for the second.) I’m a single mom with limited alone time, and I have to say that while curling up with a magazine on the couch for a bit is nice, floating naked in a saltwater tank with absolutely zero distractions is just amazing.

See Emily Play Emily Alice

emilyalice.com 35 S High St 610.696.3990 I think it’s safe to say that every woman who wears makeup has a go to: that one thing she won’t leave the house without, whether it’s lipstick, mascara, or blush. For me, it’s always been eyeliner—I feel naked without it. But I was actually excited to walk into Emily Alice’s salon and put my naked face into her capable hands, and I had a blast. The space itself is great—a converted brick row house on High Street, the kind of place I’ve lived in. Bright colors, enthusiastic staff, and lively music contributed to the high-energy vibe. Jackie gave me a quick tour, then had me take a seat in the bright front room to wait for Emily, the owner/ operator. The spa offers hair services, makeup, spray tanning, and an actual

she did some things to my face that would never have occurred to me...

“Brow Bar,” devoted to the upkeep of the eyebrow. Sometimes we (okay, I) forget just how important a role the eyebrows play in “framing” your face; I think I’ve let the recent trend of eyebrows that look if they’ve been severely drawn on one’s forehead with a Sharpie alarm me just a bit, but I ended up loving the look I left with. Do you remember when you were a teen and you and your friends would experiment on each other with makeup? That’s what it was like hanging out with Emily, except she was a highly competent friend, who would stop what she was doing to check the foils on a client’s hair color, or offer condolences to another customer who’d recently lost a family

member. And while she did some things to my face that would never have occurred to me (lining my eyes in a copper color to bring out the yellow—what??), it worked and I loved it. Also, false eyelashes are the bomb. She suggested I come back for a more outrageous, rock star look another time. I can’t wait.

most hairdressers, not only whips my hair into submission, but also serves as de facto therapist and friend. It’s like an affair, which, thankfully, his husband fully understands. So I approached the idea of getting a haircut elsewhere with trepidation—it almost felt like cheating. Thankfully, I went to the pros at Avante Salon and Spa. And wow—what an operation! The place is huge and was crazy busy when I arrived, with dozens of smiling, beautiful employees bustling about, beautifying dozens more clientele. They are a full-service salon (I went to the Bradford Plaza location—there are a total of three), offering everything from hair care to manicures to massages. There was even wine and cheese available in the waiting area— a godsend, as I just happened to be starved right then. (Okay, I’m starved a lot.) I was taken care of by Aubrey, who assessed the hot mess that is my hair with a cool, practiced eye— if she was frightened at all, she didn’t show it. My hair is naturally curly, tending towards frizzy at times, and I’ve been growing it out for about a year or so now. Aubrey not only deftly and efficiently cleaned up the dead split ends and shaped it perfectly, she then blew it out nearly straight at my request, giving it a fun, different-for-a-day look to go with my smokin’ makeup. I always feel great after a haircut; somehow it feels like a weight being lifted, but I exited Avante feeling like a brand-new woman. Aubrey she sent me off with a little gift bag containing a coupon for my next visit and some shampoo and conditioner samples, which are already tucked into my overnight bag.

Almost Cut My Hair Avante Salon & Spa avantesalon.com 668 Downingtown Pike 610.429.1800 Disclosure: I’ve been seeing the same hairdresser for 10 years, and he, like

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Excite all of your senses

at West Chester’s most alternative & unique boutique! A vast array of “one-of-a-kind” products, including...

Hip Clothing • Bags & Accessories • Jewelry Galore • Incense/Oils/Candles • Tapestries/Blankets • Eclectic home/Dorm décor • Hemp products • Grateful Dead, Bob Marley & ‘60s Memorabilia • Tie Dyes & Cool T-shirts • Hand-blown glass & local artwork • Tobacco accessories • Groovy Gifts Gift Certificates Available

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10% off purchase with student ID! SINCE 1992

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


And it Stoned Me Calista grand

Calistagrand.com 1211 Wilmington Pike 610.399.6677 I knew I wanted a massage at Calista Grand, and I selected a stone massage because it seemed like something really different. And it was. First of all, the space: it is at once REALLY large and yet inviting, like a tiny city devoted strictly to beautification. After checking in at the first floor front desk, I was escorted upstairs, to a dark, quiet waiting area with cozy lounge chairs, magazines, a tea service in the corner, and soft music playing. Karen took care of me, taking me into the massage room and explaining how the stone massage process works: hot stones—and, in a couple of cases, cold ones—are placed on and under the body in specific areas to target problems and pressure points. In conjunction with the actual massage, the effect is very—grounding, somehow. I was given a choice of scents to add to the massage oil; I chose a light citrus fragrance. Karen and I had a brief discussion of any areas that I wanted to address (shoulders/ neck), and what sort of pressure I preferred (I wanted to say hard but went with medium). Karen’s years of experience were evident, as she soundlessly places rocks and stones between my toes, up my belly, and under my shoulders. The warm rocks used to massage my arms were placed in my hands to hold afterwards. It added an entirely new dimension to the massage experience, one I would definitely repeat.

article in last month’s The WC Press, which she was reading downstairs while having her hair done—what are the odds?) Peter’s is a full service salon, with the. first floor devoted to hair care, and the second to massage, makeup, and manicures and pedicures. I went upstairs and was taken care of by the porcelain-skinned Karissa, who retouched my makeup, and then gave me a manicure and pedicure. I don’t typically paint my fingernails—I am typing almost constantly, so it seems pointless—but you will rarely catch me with unpainted toenails. The difference in doing it myself, is in the indulgences a professional pedi offers: the swirling whirlpool foot soak, the sloughing of the bottoms of the feet, and the care that is taken when someone as talented as Karissa is on the case. She helped me choose colors, something light for fingers, and a deep, nearly plum red for my toes. Another bonus— base coats and top coats—who has time for such luxuries?! Professionals do.

a question of balance Balance Hair Spa Studio balancehairspa.com 150 E Gay ST 610.314.4300 Somehow, prior to my visit to Balance Hair Spa (on Gay Street, they have a larger spa in Exton), I’d managed to live to my age (none of your business) without ever having my hair professionally colored. Yes, I’ve been doing the box hair color thing since my late thirties when greys started popping up, but had never pulled the trigger on having it done by a pro. And now, I fear, I am completely spoiled, as Whitney at Balance is my new best friend. Not only is she a joy to work with—fun and funky and clearly in love with what she does—she’s crazy talented. She talked with me for a few minutes just to get a feel for my personality before deciding what to do with me and whipping up her magic potions. Whitney doesn’t “dye” the hair, per se, she paints it. And then she loosely wrapped it in plastic, not foil, but explained that was just to keep the caramel highlights from bleeding into the chocolate base colors. She’s a chemistry geek and said she could have gone on and

Every Little Thing She Does is Magic Peter's Salon & European Spa peterssalonandspa.com 1009 West Chester Pike 610.436.6464 Another large, two story operation— clearly Peter’s is yet another reason why the West Chester region is awash in beautiful women. (This includes my friend Jen Laurence, who, completely unaware that I was upstairs, texted me a photo of my

Whitney doesn’t “dye” the hair, per se, she paints it.

on about the methods behind her madness, but I trusted her implicitly. Owners Biff and Thomas stopped by to chat, and they were delightful, professional, and uber-charming, even inviting me—with my kids—to their Christmas parade open house. They gave me a gift bag containing their own signature shampoo, conditioner, and misting oil spray, all of which I’ve been faithfully using. To say I was thrilled with how my hair turned out is a colossal understatement, and Whitney again blew it out straight for me, but asked that I send her a photo of it in its “natural state” afterward. Which I did, because that’s what you do for new best friends. If you’d told me prior to this story what a rock star I would feel like by the end, I wouldn’t have believed you. But I did. And while theoretically, I could have gotten all—or at least most—of these services at all—or at least most—of these places, it was fun doing it in pieces. Because just as each woman is beautiful in her own way, the different spas and salons in West Chester have things that set them apart, whether in services, vibe, or even décor. And each are there to enhance each woman’s beauty, from the inside out.

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WORK OUT and

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THE WC PRESS | VOICE OF THE BOROUGH

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I Live your best.


Look The

D

Grabill Family Dentistry helps you achieve the smile you've always wanted

ental Veneers (sometimes called dental porcelain laminates) are wafer-thin, custom-made shells of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front surface of teeth to improve your appearance. These shells are bonded to the front of the teeth, changing their color, shape, size, or length. Getting a dental veneer usually requires three trips to the dentist – one for a consultation and two to make and apply the veneers. . To prepare a tooth for a veneer, your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface. Next, your dentist will make a model or impression of your tooth, which is sent to a dental lab to be fabricated. Next, to prepare your tooth to receive the veneer, your tooth will be cleaned, polished, and etched -- which roughens the tooth to allow for a strong bonding process. A special cement is applied to the veneer and the veneer is then placed on your tooth. The final steps involve removing any excess cement, evaluating your bite and making any final adjustments in the veneer as necessary.

D

ental Bonding is a procedure in which a tooth-

colored resin material (a durable plastic material) is applied and hardened with a special light, which ultimately "bonds" the material to the tooth to restore or improve a person's smile. Dental bonding is an option to repair decayed, chipped or cracked teeth, improve the appearance of discolored teeth, close spaces between teeth, change the shape of teeth, and to protect a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed when gums recede. Little advance preparation is needed for dental bonding. Next, the surface of the tooth will be roughened and a conditioning liquid applied. These procedures help the bonding material adhere to the tooth. The tooth-colored, putty-like resin is then applied, molded, and smoothed to the desired shape. After the material is hardened, your dentist will further trim and shape it, and polish it to match the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface. Dental bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes per tooth to complete.

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Tell Me something

Good

Kate Chadwick takes a moment to spotlight local citizens for doing something swell.

Who she is: Rose Marinelli What she does: Rose volunteers with the annual charity ball committee at Friends Association, the oldest continuously operating child welfare agency in the state. This year’s Friends Association Charity Ball will be held on Saturday, December 5, at the West Chester Country Club. Why she’s on this page: Rose has been volunteering with the Friends Association Charity Ball committee for more than 20 years. Said Executive Director Catherine Friedman, “She’s been such a constant and longtime supporter of Friends Association. She’s one of the founding members of the Charity Ball, which is in its 27th year. Last year, Rose and her husband Fran received our Friend of the Community Award in recognition of their dedication to ending family homelessness in Chester County.” And why does Rose do it? “Year after year, I'm so totally impressed with the work and accomplishments of Friends,” she said. “The dedication of the staff is amazing, and their emphasis on preventing homelessness is what I'm most touched by. To know that they give not only hope to so many families, but also the tools and resources to turn their situations around is so important and effective.” What we like about her: She finds joy in her work. “This Charity Ball committee has been together for a long time—what a wonderful group of women,” Rose said. “And because they’re so wonderful, getting the Ball together has always been fun. We've had a lot of laughs over the years, and to me it's magical that the chemistry just works. The Ball is such a fun night, and although it's a formal event, I've never felt it to be stuffy.” What she likes about West Chester: “I’m afraid I can’t be objective about that—I’ve never lived anywhere else! It's part of me,” Rose told us. “When I was a kid, ‘uptown’ was where we went for fun, to the movies, for shopping, for everything. That faded when the malls came, and for a while we had a ghost town. It's been so wonderful to see our town come back to life with all the restaurants and shops. It's what it used to be like all over again.” Moral of the story: Use your background to form your future. “My mom was a pioneer of being a single mom. I witnessed her hard work and struggles to raise three children on her own. We were so fortunate to have a home to live in and a loving family close by,” Rose said. “Things could’ve been terribly different for us. I've been blessed with a strong family, and to have met and married a man who’s worked hard and provided our family with a comfortable life. So many of the families who come to Friends don't have that support. This is my way of giving back.” Friends Association is located at 113 W Chestnut Street. For more information, please call 610-431-3598, or visit friendsassoc.org. Do you know a WC resident who’s doing good things and deserves a little recognition in Tell Me Something Good? Let us know! Email details to kchadwick@thewcpress.com.

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T'S OFTEN STATED, YET STILL UNDER-APPRECIATED: YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT. Beautiful skin doesn't start with a Big Mac, and flowing locks aren't the result of late-night pepperoni pizza. And, that's not even taking into account what those kind of meals do to the overall shape of your body. So, we propose the following list of some of our favorite health-friendly food purveryors in West Chester. It's certainly not an exhaustive list, nor is it chock full of crazy out-of-the-way things you've never heard of (although there may be one or two). Instead, it's a solid list to turn to the next time a meal rolls around and you're thinking, "What do I want to eat that's healthy?" The answer is right here!

ROOTSCAFEWC.COM WESTCHESTERGROWERSMARKET.COM Located at the corner of North Church and West Chestnut Street. WEST CHESTER GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday from 9am-1pm. The market will be open every Saturday until December. Come January through April, the market will be open on the first and third Saturdays of the month from 10am to 12pm. Shop for fresh fruit, vegetables, herbs, eggs, plants and more from locally grown farms. Market vendors are all completely dedicated to providing the healthy and fresh products for market shoppers. Each week the market features new produce based on what is fresh and in season. A great way to spend your Saturday morning stocking up on quality produce from West Chester Grower's Market.

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NUTRITIONDOESIT.COM

Whether you are searching for a healthy breakfast to start the day or are in need of a satisfying lunch, ROOTS CAFÉ is your destination. They offer an array of organic-based items, prepared with farm-fresh ingredients. A comfortable atmosphere paired with a delicious menu marks this café as one of West Chester’s most unique spots. Roots Café has a seasonal menu, rotating based on the freshest ingredients available. With a focus on a greener food industry as a whole, their cups, containers and cutlery are all made from renewable resources, contributing to a healthier earth. The food, including all dressings and sauces, is made from scratch, ensuring quality freshness and ingredients to all visitors. Both veggies and meat lovers alike will find something to love at Roots.

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MYGREATPUMPKIN.COM

NUTRITION DOES IT provides health coaching to aid you in the discovery of personal health and nutrition. Results are achieved through the creation of individually designed plans. You'll learn how to transform your daily diet with personal consulting sessions that map out the ultimate health guides, including meal plans and fitness routines. Continual support and guidance is provided throughout your entire journey, making the process less difficult. Consultants at Nutrition Does It are focused on helping you find your best self through the power of food. Embark on a weight loss challenge or a lunch-and-learn session for more information. First-time consultations are free.

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THE GREAT PUMPKIN HEALTH FOODS is an independently owned supplement, produce and high-quality vitamin shop with a focus on the natural food industry. Inside the store, healthconscious customers will find aisles full of organic, vegan and gluten-free products. The shelves are stocked with healthy products to aid customers in the process of maintaining a healthy immune system and balanced diet. With unique findings, such as vegetarian supplements or glucose-support capsules, most products offered may not be available at popular grocery stores. This shop is the ideal spot for anyone concerned with keeping a vitamin-rich, well-balanced diet.

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WCFOOD.COOP THE WEST CHESTER FOOD CO-OP is focused on providing trustworthy and healthy food distribution to local residents. The organization is working towards bringing the first ever, member-owned, full-service cooperative grocery store to West Chester. The Co-op is fully dedicated to serving the community by offering high-quality, healthy, affordable and sustainably produced food. The grocery store will benefit local residents by sourcing from local farms and local produce. On November 6th, representatives from the West Chester Food Co-op will be at First Friday at Kiki Boutique and Jane Chalfant from 5 to 8pm. Learn more about the Co-op and the organization’s plans for the future.

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SHOOMAMASCAFE.COM SHOO MAMA’S FARM FRESH CAFÉ is a hidden health gem worth discovering. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, this cafe provides some of the best organic and fresh menu items you'll find in the area, and it's just minutes outside the borough. Their menu includes plenty of organic, vegetarian and gluten-free options, as well as allergy-free foods to accommodate any dietary restriction. The café’s meats, eggs and cheeses are locally sourced from Lancaster County, their milk, butter and cream are from our own backyard of West Chester, and their produce is also from West Chester’s very own Pete’s Produce and Thornbury Farms.

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BACOJUICEANDTACO.COM BACO JUICE & TACO—while clearly known for their tortilla-wrapped delicacies—have also made a name for themselves with a variety of organic juices and refreshing smoothies. Pair a healthy smoothie or fresh juice with an appetizing menu item created with fresh ingredients. Baco Taco’s farm-fresh menu will please any type of foodie, whether a vegetarian or meat lover. If you wanna keep the calorie count low (and stock up on good-for-you fatty acids) you've gotta try their light and crispy fish tacos. We recommend adding a bit of Hank Sauce to spice things up. The sauce, kept in stock, is made locally(ish) in New Jersey. All menu items are made to order and prepared upon request.

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THECOUCHTOMATO.COM THE COUCH TOMATO is a contemporary café serving delicious, nutritious and creative salads, sandwiches, paninis, wraps, homemade soups and artisanal pizzas. Menu items are created with fresh, local and organic ingredients whenever possible—even the fountain beverages and dessert options are organic. Customize your order to fit your preferences and watch it be prepared. The Couch Tomato focuses on a menu packed with vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options for all your dietary preferences or restrictions. Most salads, sandwiches or wraps come with healthy sides like fruit, pecans or whole-grain breads.

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Our Family, yOur TOwn, yOur FlOrisT, since 1957

29 S. Church St 610-696-5200 halladayflorist.com

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Home

Diane LeBold and the West Chester Food Co-Op examine local food production and bring eaters closer to the source of their food.

Grown

Eat local produce in winter? Yes you can!

A few generations ago, most people had access only to locally grown food. They were constrained to eating whatever was in season... or whatever they’d preserved for winter. But now, we’re used to buying asparagus in August and tomatoes in January, so the seasons have a minimal impact on our food choices. But for those interested in eating locally, take heart: fresh local produce is available in winter. It’s generally grown in “high tunnels,” which are greenhouse-like structures, solar-warmed, sometimes with a propane backup. At Two Gander Farm in Downingtown, for example, they grow selected varieties of organic produce well into February. This can include, for example, spinach, hakurei turnips, Asian radishes, arugula, Swiss chard, carrots, leeks and several varieties of kale—as well as other coldtolerant vegetables. The trick, according to Two Gander’s Deirdre Flemming, is to plant the seeds in early fall so the plants are full grown by Thanksgiving, and then harvest off the full-grown plants for the next few months. Deirdre also notes that the flavor of cruciferous vegetables can actually improve after several frosts! Food that’s been “put by” is another option. Preservation techniques include cold storage, canning, pickling, freezing, drying, and, for a special treat, preserving in alcohol! Suzanne Adams, of the West Chester Food Co-op, encourages everyone to try their hand at “putting by” local produce. “Preserving local food can be deeply satisfying,” she says. “When you open that jar of tomatoes in January, you can still smell the fresh basil that was growing in your herb garden in July.” Don’t be intimidated if you’ve never tried preserving food, Suzanne says. Start small and easy, maybe a couple of quarts of sour cherries (Highland Orchards in July) or some blueberries (West Chester Grower’s Market, July through August). These particular kinds of fruit are easy to preserve. You just wash them, pit them (for cherries), toss them in a bag and freeze them. Opening the bag in the depths of winter is like heaven. And, good news! It’s not too late to put some things by for this winter! We still have potatoes, carrots, cabbage, apples, and similar local fruits and vegetables available at local farm stands and growers’ markets. All of these do well in a root cellar and can be purchased in bulk for storage. Don’t have a root cellar? Suzanne bets that those who live in older homes in the Borough have a spot that could easily lend itself to that use. “Mine is in the crawl space under my kitchen,” she says. “I closed it off from the main basement and it retains a nice, damp, 55F—ideal for root cellaring.” Great information on preserving food is available from Penn State’s agricultural extension services. So visit the Penn State extension website: extension.psu.edu/food/preservation and eat well this winter! –dlebold@TheWCPress.com Find out more about the upcoming Food Co-op by checking out their website at www.wcfood.coop

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Local

Personality PHOTO Andrew Hutchins

INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Theresa Brewer of Ooh La La Salon speaks on the importance of standing out from the crowd You seem to know a good number of people in town. How long have you been here? My whole life; I was born here. What prompted you to go into business for yourself? Well, I had a couple things I wanted to do when I was at my old job—I worked at Avanté for 15 years—and I thought maybe I could try to do it myself. I had a very good book; I was basically 100% booked. An opportunity to come up on High Street presented itself, and it was a good opportunity I couldn’t pass up. Has it been rewarding? Yes. It is rewarding. It definitely has its perks. It’s nice that I can design my own place and get my own products—the ones that I believe in and want to carry. I can pick what I want

in my Salon, pick my hours and pick what I want to wear. You recently moved from that location on High Street, right? Well, we had to move out because Hotel Warner needed the space. They’d been telling me that for a while, and they gave me nine months notice. Still, I was like, “Oh boy.” I saw a couple places, but driving around, I saw this place here on the corner of Church and Chestnut, and I thought, “This is perfect.” We checked it out, and agreed to rent it. I imagine, seeing as many clients as you do, you’ve met a lot of people over the years. Yes. I do a lot of the QVC people, Like Mary Beth Roe, and I’ve met Joan Rivers and done the models for some of her shows. Really it’s just a lot of stuff like that. Any good stories? Out of the ordinary? I’ve had good drunk people. I had one lady, the mother of the bride, who dropped her whole lunch in the pedicure station; it was filled with lettuce and cheese fries. Having been in town your whole life, what are some of the best changes you’ve seen? Definitely the restaurants and seeing it build up a lot. Although some of the buildings are too high for me—it’s not quaint like it used to be before. Still, it’s

good that it’s growing and more people are staying in town, but I’d like to see them scale it down just a smidge. I’d like to see them keep the cuteness of the town. You’ll take the good with the bad? Sure. Everybody likes to come into West Chester now. Maybe they didn’t recognize it before, but now it’s the place everybody wants to be. People like to walk around - my clients want to be in West Chester, to live in West Chester. Except for the parking issues. I know my clients could do without those. Your salon has a very unique look. When we moved in here, I found that all the furniture we were looking at was was either black or white—I wanted something unique. All the furniture is from auctions and consignment shops that’s be reupholstered and refinished. Our stations are old desks and mirrors, we bought material for the curtains and sewed it ourselves. My whole family helped. I wanted to something that nobody else had. How important is it to stand out and be different? It’s big time. There’s 1000 other people who can do nails, so you have to think current and different and offer something that nobody else has. I want to be completely different.

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These two photos may appear to be same, but there are six differences between them. Identify the things that have been changed, then send an email to contests@thewcpress.com listing those changes. You’ll be entered to win a $20 gift card to a local business.

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November

Playlist

DJ Romeo curates a list featuring the top tracks you’ll hear played on the radio this month

The following is a list of songs that will take over the radio stations in the next few months—you’ll soon know them by heart and play them ‘til they’re tired. But, good news: you can download them first and look like the cool musical genius to all of your friends. djromeo@thewcpress.com

www.djromeo.fm | @DJRomeo24

Coleman Hell – “2 Heads” Panic! At The Disco – “Victorious” 5 Seconds of Summer – “Hey Everybody!” Ellie Goulding – “On My Mind” Selena Gomez – “Same Old Love” Demi Lovato – “Confident” Tove Lo – “Moments” Rudimental f./ Ed Sheeran – “Lay It All On Me” Sia – “Alive” Chris Brown – “Zero” Dierks Bentley – “Riser” DNCE – “Cake By The Ocean” Halsey – “New Americana” Zara Larsson – “Lush Life” Fetty Wap – “Again” Empire Cast f./ Pitbull – “No Doubt About It” Skrillex & Diplo f./ AlunaGeorge – “To U” The Vamps – “Wake Up” Darius Rucker – “Southern Style” Bit Funk f./ Shae Jacobs – “Off The Ground” Louis The Child f./ K.Flay – “It’s Strange” Tate Kobang – “Bank Rolls” (Remix) Years & Years – “Desire” Luke Bryan – “Strip It Down” OMI – “Hula Hoop” Rae Sremmurd – “Come Get Her” Sara Bareilles – “She Used To Be Mine” Money Drop f./ Queen Jo – “Everything on Fleek” Kendrick Lamar – “These Walls” Audien f./ Lady Antebellum – “Something Better”

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Quick Q&A PHOTO Andrew Hutchins INTERVIEW Robin Stuntebeck

Flu season is upon us, so we asked Dr. Geoff Winkley, MD of Doctor’s Best Immediate Medical Care to answer our winter illness-related health concerns. With cold and flu season underway, what is the best thing people can do to avoid getting sick? Prevention through vaccination. You should get a flu shot, no matter how old or healthy you are. On average, each year nearly 17,000 people die from the flu in the US. The very young and very old are most vulnerable to the influenza virus, but healthy people are also susceptible. If most people get the flu shot, the risk of spreading the virus among us reduces the chance that any one of us will get the virus as well. The term we use is community immunity. What about the common cold? The common cold is at its peak during the win-

ter months, when we tend to spend more time indoors in close proximity to each other. Different viruses can cause the common cold, but rhinoviruses are the most common. The best way to prevent “catching a cold” is to wash your hands frequently or use a hand sanitizer (65% ethyl alcohol or higher) before and after touching your mouth, nose or eyes. If you’re sick, the best way to reduce the spread of infection is to stay at home until your symptoms begin to resolve. Keep hand sanitizer and a box of tissues in your car and at your desk or work location, so that you have them available to yourself, and to offer to someone else who may need them! If you think you may have the flu or the common cold, what should you do? If you become sick, and believe that you have been in contact with the flu virus, there are prescription anti-viral medications available that can reduce the severity and duration of the illness and reduce complications as a result, if you start them within 48 hours of your symptoms. If you cannot get in to see your doctor, a walk-in urgent care center or retail clinic can assess your symptoms. For the common cold, since it’s a viral

infection, antibiotics will not help the illness. The best solution for getting well is adequate sleep. Sleep is essential in supporting the immune systems’ ability fight the infection. Drink fluids to stay hydrated and use over the counter (OTC) medications to manage the symptoms. We recommend using single symptom medicines rather than multi-symptom medicines to avoid taking ingredients that may not be effective for your symptoms. Some people develop sinusitis or bronchitis as a result of a cold or the flu. Would you recommend antibiotics in these instances? Most instances of sinusitis and bronchitis are caused by viruses and not bacterial infection, so again, they will not be cured by antibiotics which work exclusively on bacterial infection. Other than cold and flu prevention, what other advice do you have for this time of year? Stay healthy during the colder, darker winter months by staying active. Don’t let the cold keep you from enjoying the outdoors, and exercising for 30 minutes three to five times a week. Any is better than none! It’s not only great for your heart, but also gives you a mental boost to help beat the winter doldrums.

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Profile for The WC Press

The WC Press Health & Beauty Issue - November 2015  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Health & Beauty Issue - November 2015  

Voice of the Borough