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WINTER 2015 THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM

Dangerous

Winter Looks

GET NKED Penn Alumnae on Founding Negative Underwear

A GUY’S GUIDE

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THE RACE DIALOGUE PROJECT // +

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RUNWAY-STYLE COCKTAILS


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MAX WANG

Editor-in-Chief

ASHLEY LEUNG, DANIELLA SAKHAI Creative Directors

DYANA SO

MONIKA HAEBICH

MADHAVI MURALIDHARAN

NATALIE PEELISH

Photography Director Operations Coordinator

Art Director

Marketing Director

LAURA PETRO

Editorial Director

VIVIAN VO

Director of Sponsorship

FASHION Style Director BREE JACKSON Men’s Style Director ALEXANDER MINTZ Beauty Director CAROLINA BELTRAN Stylists JOSEFINA BRAUNING, EXIA BURNS, JESSIE CHOI, HELEN DUGAN, PAOLA GAMARRA, NOLAN HILL, EMILY HSU, MASOMA IMASOGIE, REGGIE JAMES, ERIC KIM, ERIN KIM, MAX KURUCAR, LINDA LIN, LISA LIU, ALEXANDRA LOTZ, ALEX MORITZ, ADAM OELBERG, VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS, MARIANA PAVIA, ROBYN RAPAPORT, LINDY SMITH, JESSICA SUNG, SERENA TIBREWALA, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN, KATIE WU, BENJAMIN ZOU Beauty Stylists CHRISTINA ATTERBURY, ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUK-KIRILYUK, ELIE SOKOLOFF, MOLLY WANG On-Set Coordinator MARA VEITCH

FEATURES Fashion Editor AUGUSTA GREENBAUM Features Editor ANDIE DAVIDSON Copy Editors ANNA ROSE BEDROSIAN, ALISON FREUDMAN Research Editors CATHERINE DING, COURTNEY GU Contributing Writers EMILY CHENG, ANDIE DAVIDSON, ARLO GORDON, AUGUSTA GREENBAUM, TINA HSU, MASOMA IMASOGIE, ADAM OELBERG, MERIAH O’NEIL, JOSHUA O’SULLIVAN, LAURA PETRO, RIANE PUNO, ROBYN RAPAPORT, JULIA VITALE

PHOTOGRAPHY Photographers AMY CHEN, ISABELLA CUAN, ANNAIS JASMIN PAETSCH, SARA-PAIGE SILVESTRO Assistant Photographers ELIZABETH HWANG, MASOMA IMASOGIE, CONNOR McLAREN, KATIE ZHAO Videographer LUCY NEBEKER

ART AND DESIGN Assistant Art Directors KATIE WU, MARILYN YANG Layout Team ALEXANDRA BENYA, STEPHANIE BUSINELLI, AMY CHEN, TALIA DELIJANI, CAROLINA ENGLISH, ANUSHREE GUPTA, MARLENA HANNA, ERICA HARRITON, LISA HOONG, ZAHRA HUSAIN, CHAEWON LEE, MARIANA PAVIA, ISABELLA RAHM, GLORIA YUEN

MARKETING Social Media Representatives GENA BASHA, ALLISON RUBEN, ALICE SHEN, GLORIA YUEN, GABRIELLA ZACARIAS Events Coordinators ALLYSON AHLSTROM, LINDSEY GAON,, ZOE SHAN, MARIA ALONSO TORRAS, EMILY ULRICH, MARA VEITCH Market Research Coordinator ALEXANDRA BENYA Design Chair SUBI QIAN Alumni Relations Coordinator STEPHANIE WILF

MANAGEMENT Assistant Operations Coordinator CATHERINE DING Internal Affairs Coordinator STEVIE KLEIN Local Sponsorship Coordinators ELAINE CHEN, CHELSEA AWAN, WHITNEY PAN, COURNEY ZESSAR, SHREYA REDDY, TIANHAO GAO, AYOKUNLE FAGBEMI Professional Apparel Coordinators MADELEINE McCLINTIC, JULIA ZHU Bookings and Model Coordinator STEPHANIE WILF Penn Fashion Collective Executive Board Members ALEXIS RICHARDS, NICO GOMEZ, GRACE GUAN, NICOLE MALICK, MEGAN LUPPINO, MAHA SUBRAMANIAM

THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM Editor-in-Chief MAX WANG Editorial Director ERICH KESSEL Managing Editor MINJI KWAK Website Director NEERA THAVORNVANIT Operations Coordinator MADHAVI MURALIDHARAN Senior Fashion Editors LAURA PETRO, EMILY ULRICH Senior Health & Beauty Editors TINA HSU, ERICA POLLE Junior Fashion Editors HALEY BRAHMBHATT, SOPHIE FRITZ, AUGUSTA GREENBAUM, MARLENA HANNA, ANISHA KAMAT, KATHERINE LITTEL, CATHERINE MILANOSKI, EGE OZYEGIN, MAYA RIVERA, KARIS STEPHEN EMILY ULRICH, PHOEBE UM, JESSI YACKEY Junior Health & Beauty Editors STEPHANIE FAGBEMI, LAURA GARCIA-CID, ELLIS KIM, CAROLINE LEVY Junior Culture Editors NANETTE ELUFA, PAIGE PARSONS International Content Editor LAURA ZHANG Website Stylists SHAYLA COLE, MINJI KWAK Blog Director CODY MIN Assistant Blog Director TAYLOR BROWN Blog Photographers REBECCA GEVER, DARA HOFMANN, ERIN KIM, HANNAH NOYES, RYANN SHAFFER, PHOEBE UM

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA’S PREMIER FASHION MAGAZINE • VOLUME VIII • ISSUE II • JANUARY 2015 The WALK was founded in 2006 as a student initiative and continues to be a student fueled organization. TheWALKmagazine.com was launched in 2010 as a sister to the print edition. The WALK aims to satisfy our community’s widely-demanded fashion fix year-round. Stories edited by the editorial staff will carry bylines of the original author. Please report corrections to info@thewalkmagazine.com. We will post corrections on our website. This publication was typeset using GeosansLight and Bebas for headlines, Justus Italic for subtitles and captions and Adobe Garamond Pro for body text. Page layout was created using Adobe InDesign. Original images were taken with DSLR cameras and adjusted using Adobe Photoshop. The WALK was printed in Sappi Flo 70-pound gloss text paper (FSC and 10% recycled) using sheet-fed offset presses. The binding is saddle-stitched. Printed by Garrison Printing Company, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ. To get involved or to learn about advertising and partnership opportunities, please contact us at info@thewalkmagazine.com.


WINTER 2015 ARTS & STYLE

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We took to the Walk to see how Penn students deal with winter’s chill.

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FASHION AND FEMINISM - IT'S COMPLICATED

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FASHION

Penn speaks

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Are fashion and feminism really compatible? The verdict is in.

KICKING ASS AND CHASING GREATNESS Not your average college student: Three Penn students go to physical extremes in the name of passion.

THE RACE DIALOGUE PROJECT This group wants us to bring the colors of our skin to the tips of our tongues.

trend watch: fashion

This season, seek sartorial inspiration from ’60s mods and western styles revamped for the modern age.

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trend watch: beauty

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Find out which beauty trends are gracing the runway this season and how to actually wear them right now.

HAIR TODAY, TREND TOMORROW

We look at trends in runway hairstyles over the ages.

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LEVEL UP Inside Pottruck, high fashion reaches new heights when ballet meets belay.

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GLAMORLESS

The WALK goes behind the scenes to uncover the truth about the supposed glory and glamour of life as a fashion intern.

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NEGATIVE: LESS IS MORE

Find out how two Penn alumnae decided to ditch the frills and bring a chic sensibility to the women’s underwear game.

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ON EDGE

This season, shatter the mold with snake heads, skulls, tassels and gold.

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BAD BEAUTY HABITS

Clean up your act with these tips to get you looking and feeling great.

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A GUY'S GUIDE TO THE CITY OF BRO-THERLY LOVE

It wouldn’t be the “City of Brotherly Love” without some serious bromance. Follow our tips on how to treat your bro like the cool guy he is.

WALK ON

NIGHTCRAWLER Luxe furs, cool capes and sporty footwear prepare four night owls for a walk on the wild side.

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FRIDAY NIGHT (HIGH)LIGHtS

The WALK ventures into the heart of Philly’s art world.

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THE WALK IS IN YOUR PLACE

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We take a look around two stylish student dorms.

THE WINTRY MIX Whet your winter whistle with delicious cocktails that will make you feel the spirit of the season.

LAYOUT CREDITS Cover — Max Wang ‘15 • Behind the Scenes — Monika Haebich ‘15 • Masthead — Max Wang ‘15 • Cover Story — Monika Haebich ‘15 • Letter from the Editor — Max Wang ‘15 Penn Speaks — Carolina English ‘16 • Fashion and Feminism — It’s Complicated — Monika Haebich ‘15 • Kicking Ass and Chasing Greatness — Anushree Gupta ‘17 • The Race Dialogue Project — Max Wang ‘15 • Trend Watch: Fashion — Monika Haebich ‘15 • Trend Watch: Beauty / Hair Today, Trend Tomorrow — Isabella Rahm ’17 • Level Up — Katie Wu ‘17 Glamorless — Stephanie Businelli ‘16 • Negative: Less is More — Marlena Hanna ‘17 • Nightcrawler — Talia Delijani ’18 • On Edge — Monika Haebich ’15 Bad Beauty Habits — Amy Chen ‘18, Gloria Yuen ’18 • A Guy’s Guide to the City of Bro-therly Love — Erica Harriton ’17 • Friday Night (High)lights — Marilyn Yang ‘17 • The WALK is in Your Place — Alexandra Benya ‘16 • The Wintry Mix — Marilyn Yang ‘17, Max Wang ‘15 Edited by Monika Haebich ’15, Max Wang ‘15, Katie Wu ‘17, Marilyn Yang ‘17


COVER LOOK:

SHEER GRIT Inside Philadelphia’s City Hall, Isaac and Satya’s sharp coats and sweaters stand out against the stately walls and marble steps. Through the shadows, their modern looks bring a fresh perspective to this historic location.

DIRECTED BY DANIELLA SAKHAI ’15 AND MAX WANG ’15 PHOTOGRAPHED BY DYANA SO ’16 MODELED BY ISAAC NILSSON ’18 AND SATYA YERRABOLU ’17 STYLED BY REGGIE JAMES ’17 AND ERIC KIM ’15 BEAUTY BY CAROLINA BELTRAN ’15

On Satya Yerrabolu: Grey turtleneck; Blazer; Black pans; stylist’s own. On Isaac Nilsson: Black coat; White shirt; Camel sweater; Black pants; stylist’s own.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR We all know that reward doesn’t come without risk. No one ever made fashion history by playing it safe. This issue, we at The WALK have unlatched our oh-so-trendy safety belts to barrel fearlessly into the unknown in pursuit of a great fashion publication. As with every issue of The WALK, to execute our photo shoots we trusted college students with crazy amounts of borrowed merchandise. If that’s not enough to give you heart palpitations, this issue we upped the ante by suspending our student models from the Pottruck climbing wall, sending them sauntering through the Frogro parking lot at night and subjecting ourselves to countless years of bad luck smashing mirrors. You’re welcome. It seems, however, that fearlessness in the face of danger is a shared trait among Penn students. In “Kicking Ass and Chasing Greatness,” we raise a glass to some particularly awe-inspiring Quakers, who seem to laugh in the face of physical limitations while somehow maintaining good academic standing (Emma impressed us so much, we featured her twice!). In “Negative: Less is More,” we also celebrate Penn alumnae Lauren Schwab C’06 and Marissa Vosper C’06 who said “no thanks” to outerwear in favor of designing the ultimate underwear. Speaking of unmentionables, perhaps the most dangerous thing a Penn student can do is remain silent (or at least fail to ask questions) when confronted with important social issues. We spoke with The Race Dialogue Project, whose aim is to encourage and facilitate safe conversations about race on campus. Further,

in “Fashion and Feminism — It’s Complicated” we examine the tenuous relationship between fashion and its feminist ideals, while in “Glamorless” we revisit longstanding systematic issues with internships at the lower echelons of the fashion industry. Want to exercise your daredevil spirit in a more fashion-oriented way? We wouldn’t be The WALK without our “Trend Watch” feature (just go with us on the Western thing), beauty inspirations and health tips. Guys, it’s not even dangerous to be a fashion-conscious male anymore (see The WALK’s Summer 2013 Issue), so take the next step and show your hip bro how much he means to you with some tips from “A Guy’s Guide to the City of Bro-therly Love.” I for one can’t express enough how fortunate I feel to have been able to captain The WALK through uncharted seas this past year. It’s been a crazy ride replete with fearless fashionistas and talented taskmakers, one whose success I owe completely to the rest of the amazing WALK staff. I’m confident that moving forward, The WALK will meet and overcome any danger with the utmost style. I’ll leave it up to you to evaluate our success, intrepid reader. Did our risks pay off? I could sit here and talk the talk all day, but we want to know — did we WALK the WALK?

Max Wang, Editor-in-Chief

JOIN THE COLLECTIVE, PENN'S FIRST AND ONLY FASHION SOCIETY The Collective is composed of Dzine2Show and The WALK. Our mission is to provide resources and opportunities for University of Pennsylvania students who are interested in: fashion design, fashion show production & direction, fashion journalism & photography and the fashion & retail industries. JOIN OUR LISTSERV tinyurl.com/ThePennFashionCollective FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @ThePFCollective NEED MORE INFO? Reach out to us at info@thewalkmagazine.com


thewalk/ARTS&STYLE

PENN

SPEAKS

Once again, it’s that time of year when tank tops and shorts are tucked away to make room for peacoats and oversized sweaters. We teamed up with Seen on the Walk to see what winter fashion staples are making their way onto campus. It seems like despite the drop in temperature, nothing’s stopping these fashionable students from working Locust like a runway. With these tips from your peers on dressing for the season, the possibilities are endless — so ditch the sweats and follow in their footsteps! BY RIANE PUNO

HOW DO YOU PLAN TO STAY FASHIONABLE DURING THE WINTER? “I always try to have one item with color.” - Christina Qiu, C’17

All images photographed by Taylor Brown W’17

WHERE DO YOU DO YOUR WINTER SHOPPING? “All Saints. Bomber jackets, jean jackets — they’ve got it all.” - Augie Bernstein, C’15

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WINTER FASHION ITEM? “This coat.”

HOW DO YOU STAY WARM WHEN GOING OUT AT NIGHT? “I just run. Bringing your jacket out is never a good thing.” - Flora Morgan, C’17

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- Shohei Nanji, C&W’18


WHAT WOULD YOU WEAR TO A PARTY WHEN THE TEMPERATURE DROPS? “A dress, tights and a heavy leather jacket.” - Syra Ortiz-Blanes, C’17

WHAT IS ONE WINTER FASHION TREND YOU SEE AND HATE? “I really, really hate woolly hats.” - Toby Milligan, C’18

DURING THE WINTER: STYLE OR COMFORT? WHAT IS THE MOST CONTROVERSIAL ITEM IN YOUR CLOSET? “Anything fur. You always have to be careful of the PETA people.” - Samantha Cohen, C’18

“Comfort 100%.” - Rachel Kupelian, C’17

WHAT ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO WEAR THIS WINTER? “Boots – I have a pretty big collection.” - Elizabeth Peng, C’18

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FASHION AND FEMINISM— IT’S COMPLICATED

Chanel ends the S/S 2015 show in a feminist protest. Image courtesy of thenypost.com.

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ARTS&STYLE\thewalk In the public eye, fashion has been both an advocate for and a barrier against women’s empowerment. In the debate over whether fashion and feminism can coalesce, we must delve past the surface-level stigma and reveal the actual industry behind fashion. BY ADAM OELBERG n typical theatrical fashion, longtime Chanel creative director Karl Lagerfeld staged the finale for his Spring/Summer 2015 prêt-à-porter show as a feminist protest. Flanked by a faux-Parisian boulevard and overzealous photographers, fashion’s darling du moment Cara Delevingne led a mob of Chanel models down the esteemed runway chanting feminist mantras via megaphone. The models marched, wielding signs and shouting phrases such as: “Women’s Rights Are More Than Alright!” “Ladies First” and “History is Her Story.” The finale was as iconic as it was overtly kitschy. No surprise – Coco Chanel was an iconoclast in the movement for women’s liberalization, and the storied house that bears her name carries her legacy as a feminist bastion. Further, most can appreciate a fresh, culturally relevant feminist moment, especially the kind that isn’t mired in the sexless anger and politics that lead many women to distance themselves from the movement in the first place. “Old school” feminism: out, Beyoncé feminism: in. Yet, the all-for-show spirit of Lagerfeld’s parade left substance to be desired. It brought into question whether the provocative finale was truly a tasteful homage to the history of Chanel. Many among the fashion media viewed the finale as a troublesome reminder of the often superficial relationship between fashion and feminism. Already well accustomed to the designer’s extravagant antics, commentators were quick to spark controversy over the finale’s authenticity. Critics shot down the effort as a blatantly contrived “faux feminist protest,” as one Time Magazine article called it. The question is: how feminist is an army of six-foot-tall tweed-jacket-clad models traipsing down a Chanel ready-to-wear runway, megaphone or no megaphone? It is widely acknowledged that the fashion industry stands as one of the few arenas in today’s business climate where women dominate — or at least rival — their male counterparts. Female entrepreneurs, designers, editors, stylists and supermodels comprise the industry’s power players and have made their millions in fashion. Take designer and CFDA President Diane von Fürstenberg, or Neta-Porter founder and British Fashion Council Chairman Natalie Massenet, both of whom are emblematic of successful, self-made women. These women embrace feminism in the contemporary sense, actively reinventing the notion of the powerful woman through their achievements. By contrast, industries like finance or the management sector evoke the sort of man’s world–esque image depicted by Mad Men, where the glass ceiling is a very palpable reality. Success stories like von Fürstenberg’s and Massenet’s prove that fashion has become somewhat of a haven for driven female visionaries in a world that largely fails to leverage these voices. Their success and efforts in making room for other female leaders in the industry suggest that fashion doesn’t need a megaphone to have a say in the feminist discourse. Even so, many of fashion’s most notable names do in fact raise their voices to champion the goals and rights of other women. One of the industry’s most outspoken members, PR maven and People’s Revolution founder Kelly Cutrone, has been selling her brand of empowered femininity and zero-B.S. management style to an audience of “girls and gay boys” alike since her reality television debut on MTV’s The Hills. Since then, the businesswoman-turnedreality star has become a fixture on network TV — most notably as a judge on America’s Next Top Model — and has co-authored The

New York Times’ bestselling If You Have to Cry, Go Outside: And Other Things Your Mother Never Told You on empowering young women. Cutrone is far from the only fashion industry veteran who embodies these inspiring ideals in the media. Sophia Amoruso, the 30-year-old founder and owner of online retailer Nasty Gal, recently released her bestselling book #GIRLBOSS, which details the lessons that the CEO learned on her journey to success. These women and countless others have declared fashion as a milieu in which girls can achieve economic success and have used this platform to motivate other women to pursue their own professional aspirations in every sector. Despite the wealth of successful women in the fashion industry, some voices in fashion might not be so obviously motivated by feminist ideals and are nonetheless pervasive. On the day before the Chanel RTW show, Stella McCartney drew flak from the media when describing her inspirations for her latest collection, saying, “Strength on its own in a woman is quite abrasive and not terribly attractive all the time. This collection is really celebrating the gentle side.” McCartney’s collection was loose, ethereal, and indeed, gentle, but her distancing of femininity from ideas of strength caught many off guard. In the designer’s defense, Stella McCartney is both a mother of four and the head of her own multimillion-dollar international business — perhaps her words were misunderstood. It seems more likely that McCartney was merely caricaturizing the word “strength” in the traditional sense of brute power. In fact, the idea that strength encompasses autonomy and agency and exists well within the frame of conventional femininity is this multidimensional aspect of feminism that appeals to so many. Fashion’s most powerful women embrace and are living proof of this concept; they are strong and feminine leaders. These two ideas are not mutually exclusive. In the same vein, fashion’s treatment of women is not always so well-received by those outside the industry. The industry is often targeted for promoting unrealistic body image norms, drawing rampant criticism for the images of models it displays in editorial spreads, magazine advertisements and on billboards. At the same time, perhaps fashion bears a disproportionate level of blame for these issues because of its presence in visual media — when fashion is everywhere, it becomes easy to point fingers. The conversation on body image is quick to acknowledge that fashion creates these norms, but often ignores the fact that fashion also responds to changing norms as dictated by society. Further, concerns voiced against fashion regarding the exploitation of women or perpetuation of unrealistic body standards are hardly isolated problems within the fashion industry. While the industry is often mired in outdated traditions and expectations, recent moves to protect the rights of models and fashion’s constant challenging of what we consider to be beautiful suggests that progress is possible. Given the prominence of women leaders in fashion and the centrality of women to the entire industry, fashion may be the best industry to provoke this feminist progress. When one gets past the surface-level discourse of body politics and stigma, it becomes apparent that fashion has earned its place at the feminist table. One cannot dismiss fashion as anti-feminist at face value without acknowledging the industry behind it and the success it has produced. The women who occupy several of its highest positions hold and advocate meaningful and progressive ideas about feminism, and they deserve to be heard. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 11


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KICKING ASS AND CHASING GREATNESS Penn students don’t just work hard in the classroom — these three students push their bodies to the limit in service of their wildest endeavors. BY JULIA VITALE asked with balancing endless homework, exams, student groups and social lives, it’s hard to imagine how Penn students have time for anything outside the confines of the Penn bubble. While us mere mortals focus on our studies, a few bold and impressive Penn students manage to push their bodies to extremes in pursuit of their passions. Whether it’s for an undying love of a sport, a desire to help those in need or a combination of both, these students exceed physical limitations, achieving their largely unfathomable (and insanely impressive) goals.

EMMA BARCHI c'18

When 18-year-old College sophomore Emma Barchi was 13 years old, she decided she wanted to move from her home in Virginia to dance for a prestigious ballet program in New York City. With parents open to the idea, young Emma took the plunge and began an

(Above) Image photographed by Dyana So C’16. (Right) Images courtesy of Emma Barchi C’18. (Opposite) Images courtesy of Jesus Perez C’16.

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intense, all-day program with the American Ballet Theater, dancing from 9:30a.m. to 6p.m., all while juggling school on the side. Since her years at ABT, Emma has travelled across the country dancing with different companies, even spending a year with the San Francisco Ballet. Now, as a student at Penn, Emma trains with the Philadelphia Ballet, which allows her to balance school and her dedication to dance. Barchi has always surrounded herself with dance; when asked what kind of a toll it takes on her, she nonchalantly yet genuinely remarks that being a full-time dancer has been hard but that it gives her something exciting to work towards. Last year she performed in the Philadelphia Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker, a feat that took a considerable amount of training. Yet the hours spent dancing, the stiff limbs and the intense schedules have been entirely worth it in Emma’s eyes — she couldn’t be happier that she followed the voice of her decisive 13-year-old self.


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Jesus Perez, a College junior, knows a thing or two about having a decisive voice. As the Junior Class Board President, Jesus is just as much a leader in sports as he is at Penn. After seeing a friend become involved with the charity Impossible to Possible, Jesus was touched by the organization’s goals of educating, inspiring and empowering young people around the world and decided to apply to become a student ambassador for the organization. Impossible to Possible selects a group of four or five young athletes, taking them to extreme parts of the globe to run distance while educating their student followers. Jesus, a wrestler in high school, was never much of a runner but welcomed the challenge, both as a new way to push his body to its limits and as an opportunity to make a difference in young peoples’ lives. Jesus trained for the expedition here in Philadelphia, using it as a means to connect with his other team members and the many

students who would be following his expedition through social media and in-class videos. He then travelled to the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, the world’s driest place, and ran six marathons in six days, filming videos throughout his journey. As the Atacama is one of the best places to watch the sky at night, and its environment most resembles the surface of Mars, the topic of the expedition was “Exploring the Universe.” Jesus and his fellow participants connected through satellite straight from the desert and acted as the eyes and ears of the students following them: educating, inspiring and empowering. While running a marathon a day may sound impossible, Jesus was fairly undaunted by the task and enjoyed training for the runs and connecting with the students who would then follow him on his exhibition. He says the experience taught him to persevere for something he valued: he pushed his body for the sake of a cause that he cared deeply about, spreading valuable knowledge through his unforgettable running adventure.

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thewalk/ARTS&STYLE Images courtesy of Suzette Wanninkh C’16.

Suzette Wanninkhof C'16 Much like Jesus, Suzette Wanninkhof knows what it means to go the distance. Growing up commuter biking in Miami, she coincidentally came across an advertisement for Habitat for Humanity’s Bike and Build program. The idea of biking distance while building houses for people in need excited Wanninkhof. A year later she applied for the program, was accepted and decided to realize her life-long dream of biking across the country — plus, with the program she would be able to make a difference in other people’s lives. With a ceremonious purchase of her first-ever pair of spandex, Suzette cleared her schedule for the summer of 2014, raised $4,500 for Bike and Build expenses and travelled to Charleston, South Carolina to start her journey. With a group of 31 other young people, she biked over 4,200 miles across the U.S. and built houses for 17 days. It took the participants 82 days in all, and they averaged about 70 miles per day, finishing their route in Santa Cruz, California. They usually built for one day at each site, but in Colorado Springs Suzette and her group were able to essentially build a house from start to finish for the Davis family. The Davis’ deep gratitude, along with countless other such memorable moments, made biking the 4200 miles cross-country immensely rewarding and worth the distance. She has since raced the 100-mile New York Century Race with her father and brother and even participated in this past summer’s Philadelphia Naked Bike Ride.

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These remarkable feats are Suzette’s ways of combining her love for biking with her desire to give back, and we can’t wait to see where her bike will take her next. Whether it’s hours of training in a dance studio, running marathons in exotic places or biking across the country, Emma, Jesus and Suzette are living proof that your body can enable you to do amazing things, and if you’re lucky, will lead your mind to amazing places in the process.


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On Marjorie Ferrone: Tribal sweater, Hot and Delicious, $82, at Bonded; Silk houndstooth top, Parker, $242, at Knitwhit; Black joggers, model’s own. On Temi Ransome-Kuti: Pop art skirt, Rehab, $39.99, at Bonded; Mesh top, stylist’s own. On Roshumba Llewellyn: Blue plaid dress, Jill Sander, $580, at Knitwhit; Patterned coat, stylist’s own. On Ayinde Aleyne: Floral shirt; oversized sweater, stylist’s own.

DIRECTED BY BREE JACKSON ’15, DYANA SO ’16, MAX WANG ’15 AND DANIELLA SAKHAI ’15 MODELED BY AYINDE ALLEYNE ’15, MARJORIE FERRONE ’15, MARK HENDRAX ’15, NADIA LAHER ’15, ROSHUMBA LLEWELLYN ’17, BRITTANY MARSH ’16, TEMI RANSOME-KUTI ’17 AND CYNTHIA TONG ’17 PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY CHEN ’18 AND ANNAIS JASMIN PAETSCH’17 STYLED BY PAOLA GAMARRA ’17, NOLAN HILL ’18, ERIC KIM ’15 AND MARIANA PAVIA ’17 BEAUTY BY ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUK-KIRILYUK ’18

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On Mark Hendrax: Polka dot shirt and patterned jacket, stylist’s own. On Cynthia Tong: Red tie-dye sweater, Pam and Gela, $176, at Knitwhit; Tie-dye pants, stylist’s own. On Brittany Marsh: Cut-out dress, Jealous Tomato, price upon request, at Piper; Geometric top, stylist’s own. On Nadia Laher: Polka dot sweater, Each x Other, $472, at Knitwhit; Floral metallic skirt, Gracia, price upon request, at Piper.

RACE DIALOGUE PROJECT The


ARTS&STYLE\thewalk The Race Dialogue Project takes the taboo out of race-related conversations. BY ROBYN RAPAPORT

T

he topic of race can be a difficult one to tackle on college campuses. Though race is innately a part of every Penn student’s identity, often even the mention of the word can make people uncomfortable. The Race Dialogue Project (RDP) is dedicated to counteracting the notion of race as a taboo topic. In fact, RDP is specifically designed to get people talking. RDP encourages students to share their opinions, emotions and personal experiences and creates a safe space for members of the Penn community to engage in dialogue about difficult or otherwise uncomfortable race-related topics. Originally founded in 2004, The Race Dialogue Project went dormant for a few years before reorganizing in 2010. After two years of hosting only a few events, RDP returned to Penn’s campus in 2012 with a new sense of determination, revamped and ready to get the conversation started. At first, the group’s main focus was to get the word out about their mission. Now, with a passionate and personable board, monthly discussions on culturally relevant racial issues and annual events, RDP is looking to further its presence in the Penn community. Former Director and formative member of RDP Nadia Laher tells us about about the group’s journey to establishing the presence it has today, explaining, “We went from being this tiny group of six that no one had ever heard of to averaging 30 people at discussions. At first we were just trying to explain to people who we were. It’s always so exciting to me that people know what RDP is now because it took so much work to get to this point.” The group’s social media presence further attests to the expanding nature of the project. Laher expressed excitement that students are now “liking” their Facebook page and even sending unprovoked email inquiries, looking to get involved and participate in racial dialogue. Getting involved is exactly what RDP wants students to do. Each month, the group comes up with a relevant topic, be it casual racism and micro-aggressions, interracial dating or race in the media. RDP then finds the space for a dialogue and lets the conversation take on a life of its own. “We don’t force any opinion on the conversation — we come up with a topic and let people do with it what they will,” explained current Director Mark Hendrax. RDP stresses that there is not one point of view that is correct or even desired. “We want to create a space where

every voice can be heard,” Hendrax explained, “The atmosphere absolutely must be respectful, but we want people to feel safe sharing even controversial opinions so that real dialogue can take place.” As Laher remarked, “The way I always thought of it is that these conversations are already happening, but we’re creating a formal space for them to happen and for them to happen with total strangers.” With a board of only nine members, the beauty of the group is the freedom and flexibility that comes with having an intimate community. “We’re not so large that it becomes bureaucratic,” Laher continued. “It’s somewhat like a startup — we can try things out and see what works.” RDP can change the monthly topic in response to current events, relevant issues on Penn’s campus or simply the changing tide of a conversation in motion.


RDP’s small size and shared interests also create closeness in the group. Social Chair Ayinde Alleyne described group outings such as dinners and movies, race-related or otherwise. “We have discussions amongst ourselves to lay the foundations for the group discussion. We discuss different ideas that may come up or aspects of the question that we individually might not think of. We recognize that people can speak to different experiences, and it helps us keep an open mindset.” On a larger scale, RDP puts on annual events, such “One Mic,” an open mic night hosted with the United Minorities Council and Penn Monologues, as well as a curated art exhibit. Laher, Hendrax and Alleyne, as well as the entire board of RDP come from varying cultural backgrounds. Laher’s mother is from Yemen, and her father grew up under the South African apartheid regime. Her passion for social justice brought her to RDP. Also of mixed race, Hendrax experienced culture shock when he first arrived at Penn. Coming from a large New York community of families mostly from the Caribbean country of Guyana, the lack of Indo-Caribbean heritage on Penn’s campus left him feeling like he didn’t fit into any one cultural group. As he put it, “I found my place at RDP where I could talk about my identity.” Alleyne spoke about his parents raising him “as a part of one race: the human race.” But after encountering race for the first time in middle school and attending a primarily white private high school, Alleyne recalls “wanting to have discussions about race and race relations and how class played into that. When I got to Penn and discovered the Race Dialogue Project, it felt like home immediately.” Every person has something to add to the dialogue. Looking towards the future, RDP strives to add more racial and cultural diversity to their conversations. Above all, their ultimate goal is to break down racism and promote racial equality. Every person, every opinion and every voice is welcome. To get more information about how to get involved with RDP, contact them at: racedialogueproject@gmail.com or message them on Facebook! Applications to join RDP board are released in the spring on their Facebook page.


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TREND WATCH SAVE ‘Septa’ slim fit colorblock blazer, Ted Baker London, $525, visit nordstrom.com.

SPLURGE PRADA F/W 2014

Contrast sleeve herringbone weave blazer, Mauro Grifoni, $945, visit lanecrawford.com.

Slim vintage oxford shirt, J.Crew, $69.50, visit jcrew.com.

Ivory bubble stitch sweater, Sasquatchfabrix, $290, visit ssense.com.

Contrast-waistband chinos, Alexander McQueen, $665, visit mrporter.com.

‘Classic lux’ ribbed merino wool scarf, Polo Ralph Lauren, $60, visit nordstrom.com.

Navy blue satin chino trousers, Zara, $59.90, visit zara.com.

Dip dyed silk scarf, Laurence Bourthoumieux, $455, visit hermes.com. Dune black Chelsea boots, Topman, $134.75, visit topman.com.

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Dandy black patent leather loafer, Christian Louboutin, $895, visit christianlouboutin.com.


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swingin sixties

Dreamgirls and Mad Men—this one’s for you! Turn back your clocks and step out in a sixtiesinspired look that would impress even Twiggy. This season, embrace the colors, lines and shapes of the decade and accessorize with only the chicest mod accents.

BY MASOMA IMASOGIE

SPLURGE

SAVE FAUSTO PUGLISI F/W 2014 Meteora drop earrings, House of Harlow 1960, $46, visit houseofharlow1960.com.

Geometric cutout sheath dress, Cushnie et Ochs, $1,395, visit bergdorfgoodman.com.

Classic long tassel earrings, Oscar de la Renta, $395, visit oscardelarenta.com.

Cap-sleeve fitted knit dress, Diane von Furstenberg, $259, visit lastcall.com.

Anoushka glasses, Tom Ford, $425, visit barneys.com. Goodney glasses, Warby Parker, $95, visit warbyparker.com.

Leather shoes, H&M, $59.95, visit hm.com. Block heel pump, Miu Miu, $790, visit nordstrom.com.

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TREND WATCH SPLURGE

SAVE BERLUTI F/W 2014

Brown shearling collar foxe bomber, Canada Goose, $795, visit ssense.com

Coat with sheepskin collar, Zara, $259, visit zara.com.

Mixed fabric overshirt, Zara, $99, visit zara.com.

Slim fit chino flat front pants, UNIQLO, $39.90, visit uniqlo.com.

Derby chukka boot, Hawkings McGill, $79, visit urbanoutfitters.com.

Plaid western shirt, Saint Laurent, $890, visit barneys.com.

Black wool oversized trousers, Yang Li, $644, visit ssense.com.

Black leather ankle boots, Tiger of Sweden, $500, visit ssense.com.

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the wild west

The untamed country is calling you to embrace its flare and look good while doing it! While dark denim, a wide brim felt hat and some bomb boots are western go-tos, this season we challenge you to bring luxury, texture and sophistication to your urban outlaw outfit.

SPLURGE

SAVE BCBGMAXAZRIA F/W 2014

Layered fox fur cowl collar, Gorski, $995, visit neimanmarcus.com.

Sky blue fur collar scarf, Urban Outfitters, $44, visit urbanoutfitters.com.

Tunic Shirt, Levi’s for Opening Ceremony, $180, visitopeningceremony.us.

White Cotton Poplin Shirtdress, Cédric Charlier, $690, visit modaoperandi.com.

Leather envelope clutch with embossed detail, Givenchy, $1,495, visit net-aporter.com.

Sleek handcrafted black clutch, PeleCheCoco, $89, visit urbanoutfitters.com.

Black riding boot, Bussola, $159.95, visit nordstrom.com.

Black ‘Robespierre’ boot, Salvatore Ferragamo, $596.98, visit nordstrom.com.

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TREND WATCH: BEAUTY The weather outside is frightful, but the beauty trends are delightful! Heat things up with metallic eye shadow and clean-lined eyes. Don’t be afraid to lash out with doll-like lashes or try-out the latest luscious lip look. Find out which beauty trends are gracing the runway this season and how to actually wear them right now. BY TINA HSU Duo Eye shadow in Kuala Lumpur, NARS, Sephora, $35

MAD FOR METALLICS Although it may be dreary and gray outside, the runway is popping with bright, stunning metallic colors this season. Metallic eyes or lips add a glamorous bit of shine and provide the perfect oomph to any outfit. Whether you opt for a sleek gray metallic eye shadow or burnt orange lipstick, it’s hard to go wrong with classy jewel tones. This look tends to have a bit of an edge, but you can easily soften it for the daytime by using a light hand and rounding off the colors with a matte, nude eye shadow or some pale lip gloss. ‘The Loose Shimmer’ Eye shadow in Jade, Kevyn Aucoin, Nordstrom, $29

Anna Sui F/W 2014

Pigment in Copper, MAC, MAC Cosmetics, $21

Eye shadow Quad in Orchid Haze, Tom Ford, Neiman Marcus, $79

Clean-cut, fully lined eyes This season, we’re all about a dark, bold look that turns heads wherever you go. While smoky eyes are easy to throw-on, precise eyeliner requires a bit more work. Starting from the inner corner of the eye, draw dots of cream or liquid eyeliner along your lash line, connecting the dots once you’re done. To get even more definition, use a sharp, relatively hard pencil liner (avoiding any kohl pencils) to line your bottom lash line from the inner corner of your eye. Don’t worry if at first you have trouble drawing a perfectly straight line — practice makes perfect!

Accentuating Cream Eyeliner in Black, Shiseido, Sephora, $26

Eye Defining Pen, Tom Ford Beauty, Neiman Marcus, $55 Eye Studio Lasting Drama Gel Eyeliner in Blackest Black, Maybelline, Ulta, $9.99

Rag & Bone F/W 2014

They’re Real! Mascara in Black, Benefit, Sephora, $23 Strip Eyelashes in Lori, Make Up For Ever, Sephora, $16

WHIPLASH

Clumpy lashes are no fun, but who doesn’t love Twiggy-esque, defined doll lashes? The easiest way to embody this trend is to use false eyelashes — we prefer individual lashes because they look a lot more natural. Another option is to use a defining mascara with rubber bristles, which also works well for getting the spiky, doll-like look. Don’t forget your bottom lashes — volume is key, so try using just a few individual bunches of three or four false lashes. The overall look is sultry but not overbearing — perfect for a casual night out. Addict It-Lash Mascara in It-Black, Dior, Sephora, $26 Color Stay Just Bitten Kissable Balm Stain in Romantic, Revlon, Ulta, $9.49

Just-bitten lips

Dior F/W 2014

26 THE WALK / WINTER 2015

Gucci F/W 2014 Lip & Cheek Tint in Cat’s Meow, Tory Burch, Sephora, $38

This new lip trend is one of the coolest styles of the season. Using a baby pink gloss or lip stain on top of a nude concealer or lipstick, you can easily create this unique look. Your lips will appear sweet with a subtle hint of sexy. Use a soft pink balm to smooth everything out and smake this a more wearable look, or feather the color out with some lip liner to make your lips stand out at night à la Kylie Jenner’s Instagram–famous pout. Just be careful not to smudge your lipstick when you are sipping on your Starbucks drink to stay toasty this winter.

Baume de Rose Nutri-Couleur in Fig Fiction, By Terry, Beauty.com, $56


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HAIR TODAY, TREND TOMORROW Hair has become an essential element of the runway, supplying the fashion world with BY JULIA VITALE hairstyle trends ranging from classic to eccentric.

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he first American fashion show, held in a New York City shop called the Ehrlich Brothers, featured hair pulled back and out of the models’ faces — allowing the garments to be on full display. Originally conceived for practical purposes — to better sell garments — the fashion runway has since evolved into a forum loaded with ideas of selling images, starting trends and conveying concepts. From simply serving as a moving mannequin, the runway model transitioned to take on a persona, representing the trendsetting ideas and inspiration behind a designer’s products. With the runway’s transformation, hairstyle became a reflection and essential element of the designer’s vision. Just as style never pauses in its ever-changing trajectory, hair follows suit, constantly complementing runway pieces and continuing to evolve, both in-house and across designers. Lanvin, the oldest French fashion house still in operation, was founded in 1889. In its first shows, fueled by the idea of keeping the focus on the clothing, Lanvin crafted its models’ hair in the lightly, slickly done-up style popular with French women at the time. Then, during the 20’s, fashion became more artistic: Vogue subscriptions surged as more people became interested in fashion, and hair became an element through which designers could enhance the way their runways looked and were photographed. While Lanvin

seems always to incorporate slick hair into its runways, over the past 100 years it has moved with the times, modernizing the look and carrying it to thrillingly harsh extremes. Givenchy, another prominent fashion house, was founded in 1952, introducing its first designs amidst the stylized waves of the ’50s. Since then, Givenchy has accented the chic, feminine waves of its origin with fierce edginess. The idea of motion in hair, stemming from the movement evoked in the curl, has consistently swept its runways. By complementing punk and feminine looks alike, it gives cohesion to Givenchy style. Flash-forward to today, and no Spring 2015 runway is complete without carefully conceptualized hair. Some designers choose messy hair and crazy alternative dos, which add playfulness (see Michael Kors and Chanel) or severity and punk (à la Simone Rocha and Tom Ford) to the runway. Others champion revolutionized up-dos and ever-inventive braids which can read as modern takes on classics (cue Valentino and Erdem) or stunningly new and unexpected styles (hello Marni and Kenzo, and shout-out to Marques’ Almeida for rocking those voluptuous crimps). Now, statement hair extends past the runway, gracefully permeating street style, leaving its mark on fashion ads and crossing the boundaries of the expected in its quest for originality in fashion. (Top and above) From 1927 to 2014, Lanvin models consistently sport slick hair, lending unity to over 100 years’ worth of designs. Images courtesy of vogue. com and style.com. (Left, from left to right) Givenchy models rock wavy hair through the years. Images courtesy of style.com and vogue.com. (Bottom, from left to right) Tom Ford, Simone Rocha, Michael Kors, and Erdem all take a unique twist on hair to finish their runway looks. Images all courtesy of style.com.

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On Emma Barchi: Silk pants, $395, at Intermix; Green shirt, model’s own.


LEVEL UP

Drapey silks and bold jackets prepare you for anything—at any elevation, you’ll look good without breaking a sweat.

DIRECTED BY DANIELLA SAKHAI ’15, BREE JACKSON ’15, DYANA SO ’15 AND MAX WANG ’15 MODELED BY EMMA BARCHI ’17 AND EMILY LIPSON ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY CHEN ’18, AND DYANA SO ’16 STYLED BY JOSEFINA BRAUNING ’17, JESSIE CHOI ’16, MASOMA IMASOGIE ’17, LINDA LIN ’18, LISA LIU ’17, ADAM OELBERG ’17 AND VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS ’16 BEAUTY BY EXIA BURNS ’17 AND ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUKKIRILYUK ’18


On Emma: Jacket, dress, sweater, scarf and booties, stylist’s own. On thewalk Emily Lipson: Black top, long skirt and shoes, stylist’s own.

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On Emily: Grey jacket, ALC, $898, at Intermix; Top, pants and shoes, stylist’s own.

On Emma: Nude sweater, $395; Silk pants, $395, at Intermix; Shoes, stylist’s own.

32 THE WALK / WINTER 2015


FASHION\

Emily: Leather jacket, black top and striped silk pants stylist’sthewalk own.

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FASHION\thewalk

(Opposite) On Emily: Grey jacket, ALC, $898 at Intermix. Top, pants and shoes, stylist’s own. On Emma: Leather top, Bailey 44, $248, at Intermix; Dress and booties, stylist’s own.

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GLAMORLESS For fashion interns, is the price worth the payoff? BY EMILY CHENG

T

he fashion industry is a master of deception. Amidst the glossy magazines and haute couture, it’s difficult to see the grueling labor of stylists, writers and interns that keep fashion on its feet. Even reality show depictions of fashion internships, such as Lauren Conrad and Whitney Port’s Teen Vogue experience shown on The Hills, unrealistically glamorize internships as full of trips to Paris, photo shoot moments and cover girl opportunities. However, the refined façade that the fashion industry has so carefully cultivated has been destroyed in recent years. In 2006, The Devil Wears Prada brought the tedious, coffee-fetching realities of the style business to light. In even more recent years, class-action lawsuits against publishing corporations Condé Nast and Hearst have further brought the issue of fashion internships into public scrutiny. In her suit against Condé Nast, W Magazine intern Lauren Ballinger alleged that she was only paid $12 a day for 12-hour shifts at the magazine — well under minimum wage. As a result, Condé Nast terminated their internship program, leaving the issue unresolved. Undeniably, internships in the fashion industry are fraught with issues. It’s almost an unspoken rule that internships will pay very little or not at all, with most candidates accepting this as the cost of working in prestigious fashion institutions. Thus, most interns working in the industry are from privileged backgrounds, with other means to sustain costly lifestyles in New York City or other similarly unaffordable metropolitan fashion centers. For example, fashion internship veterans include Arianna Huffington’s daughter, as well as socialite and heiress Amanda Hearst, both individuals with wealthy upbringings. The lack of compensation effectively excludes candidates from lower socioeconomic classes, reducing the diversity of the fashion workforce. For many, unpaid internships highlight the disparity between the glamorous expectations and the demanding reality of fashion. For College sophomore Adam Oelberg, who worked at a boutique fashion PR agency in New York, his internship was a wake-up call to the tedious behind-the-scenes work of fashion. The tasks he was asked to do, such as keeping track of samples that were being lent to the press, organizing the showroom and delivering samples, simply did not align with his level of education and expertise. The biggest challenge he faced was feeling overqualified for the job. “The milieu of fashion is interesting, but the work I was doing was not,” said Oelberg. “Why am I studying advanced macroeconomics and business if all I’m doing is delivering garments? The work was very involved, but it was not something that you would have to go to university to learn.” Unfortunately, instead of gaining valuable experience, students like Oelberg end up working as glorified messengers and assistants. Veterans of fashion internships almost always have horror stories to tell, many of which reflect the dramatic and cutthroat sentiment of Miranda Priestly-type bosses, who dole out impossible tasks and expect interns to work until the early hours of the morning.

36 THE WALK / WINTER 2015


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Oelberg recalls a particularly grueling moment during his internship when he and a fellow intern were tasked with the most unwanted grunt work in the agency — hand delivering gifts to major press clients. “We literally had to carry 50 huge gift bags to the Condé Nast building in Times Square,” said Oelberg. “Running around New York with bundles of plastic bags — that’s the kind of job that you have to do as an intern.” Despite entering the fashion industry with low expectations, Oelberg was still somewhat surprised by the menial duties he was assigned. Interns are also often disillusioned by how different their jobs are from their initial perceptions of fashion. Wharton senior Sherry Ho, who interned at a luxury brand her freshman summer, felt a huge disconnect between the number-crunching tasks she did and the “glamorous” side of luxury fashion. Her four-week internship was comprised of analyzing data from customer surveys, manually inputting it into Microsoft Excel and converting it into visuals, which she found to be repetitive and isolated from the fashion industry. “I didn’t really see what my work was going towards,” said Ho. “I didn’t really see an outcome.” Ultimately, for many interns the educational value of a fashion internship is not in the tasks they do, but in being exposed to the inner workings of the industry. According to Oelberg, it’s “overhearing a phone call your boss made to a client or witnessing what your coworkers are doing at a launch event,” that gives you an insider edge. For Ho as well, her summer internship allowed her to understand how a large fashion corporation operated day-to-day. The hierarchical structure of “the internship” is so ingrained in

the fashion industry as a necessary rite of passage that it is unlikely to change. “Everybody has to pay their dues to the fashion industry,” said Oelberg. “Even if schlepping bags across Times Square isn’t going to help you become a fashion editor, it’s informally acknowledged that you have to do that.” The ready acceptance of the fashion internship’s tedious workload means that the supply of interns will not run out anytime soon. So long as there are candidates that would ‘die’ for a chance to work in fashion, the industry is able to maintain this broken system. Instead of merely terminating their internship programs, as Condé Nast has, fashion corporations should try to decrease working hours for interns and increase the quality of the learning experience, even if increasing pay is out of the question. Perhaps they could learn from smaller fashion startups and organizations, which offer more hands-on and educational internships. Ho, who also worked at the Hong Kong-based fashion NGO Redress, recounts her experience as being much more immersive than her luxury brand internship. In her work experience, she was charged with the significant task of organizing a fashion show, and was able to gain a holistic understanding of the fashion industry through working backstage and interacting with everyone from models to the CEO of the organization. Killing off internships is only a temporary solution to an ongoing problem, and it’s a solution that neither the industry nor interns want. “My biggest struggle is that I love this industry, but I want to be able to do something that’s challenging and be compensated for it,” said Oelberg. It’s up to fashion institutions to decide whether their future workforce is worth the investment.

{Opposite, top) Image courtesy of levo.com. (Opposite, center) Image courtesy of huffingtonpost.com. (Opposite, bottom) Image courtesy of hungertv.com. (Left) Image courtesy of huffingtonpost.co.uk. (Right) Image courtesy of nymag.com.

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NEGATIVE:

LESS IS MORE

Move over Victoria’s Secret, Penn alumnae Lauren Schwab and Marissa Vosper are taking over the lingerie world with their fresh and modern take on unmentionables. BY LAURA PETRO

W

hen it comes to underwear, Lauren Schwab C’06 and Marissa Vosper C’06 know that less is more. When these newlyminted grads left the ivy-covered walls of the University of Pennsylvania, they had no idea that just eight years later they’d be setting out to change the underwear game and become, as Vosper puts it, “legit competitors of Victoria’s Secret.” In a tale as old as Wharton itself, when Schwab and Vosper began working in finance and branding upon graduation, the young, driven women couldn’t help but feel the itch to do something more creative. In 2010, four years into their jobs, they started taking night classes at the Fashion Institute of Technology to satisfy those creative urges. Still working their high-demand day jobs, the two convened weekly for their four-hour classes at FIT while devoting hours to homework on the weekend — and that’s when an idea was born. “As two girls who always really cared about what we wore on the outside,” Vosper explains, “We didn’t feel like there was a similar corollary

38 THE WALK / WINTER 2015

for underwear — there was no go-to brand that we loved and felt passionate about.” As they began their classes and started to learn about the fashion industry, Schwab and Vosper felt like the ready-to-wear market was extremely saturated, whereas by contrast the underwear market was lacking. With Victoria’s Secret gobbling up 35 percent of the market share, the duo saw an opportunity. “It seemed like underwear fell into two camps,” Schwab notes. “Either really frilly, overdone underwear that’s all about making your body into something it’s not, or very functional, everyday underwear that’s not compelling or aesthetically interesting.” Unsatisfied with either prospect, Schwab and Vosper wanted to make underwear for the modern woman. No frills, no faking — just high-quality, beautiful undergarments that women would actually want to wear. “I remember getting home from work and immediately feeling like just taking off my bra,” Schwab explains. “We wanted to create a bra that you essentially forget you’re wearing.” “We looked a lot at consumer trends as well as fashion trends, which were moving towards minimalism — there arose the opportunity to simplify,” Vosper adds, referring to Negative’s polished, edited aesthetic. But the two didn’t just drop everything and launch their line. Starting with classes at FIT, they spent four years carefully planning, researching and cultivating their label before launching their first line just a few months ago. From developing their concept to making contacts in every corner of an industry previously unknown to them to actually constructing physical garments, the road to launch was long and carefully thought-out. “We always joked that we should have made a wrap dress,” Vosper says. The underwear business is not for the faint of heart — it is perhaps the most difficult garment to make. It took finding a patternmaker and learning about the construction of a bra — how to make it both look good and also function across sizes. Instead of scaling from one bra, they


FASHION\thewalk

made samples of every size and did what any smart women trying to launch a lingerie business would do: “We would invite our friends over, give them champagne and have them try on our bras,” Schwab laughs. The team didn’t even have staff members to whom they could dole out duties along the way. Instead, it was pretty much the two of them who designed the pieces, spoke with factories, created a carefully thought-out marketing campaign and actually launched the first line. “No one was going to work as hard, no one was going to use our money as wisely, no one was going to care as much about the details,” Schwab explains of their independence. It’s that attention to detail that causes Schwab and Vosper to face some challenges even today. Unlike many manufacturers, they source all of their components individually. “Our hook-and-eyes come from France, our elastics come from Japan, our fabrics come from Belgium,” Schwab explains, “So cross-cultural communication and respecting deadlines is a crucial part of production.” Also, attention to price was key: “We didn’t want to make another $200 bra,” Schwab explains, “But we weren’t willing to compromise on quality. So the only way we could make a bra and underwear that together would cost $100 work was through e-commerce.” But Vosper and Schwab welcome every challenge they face, whether it’s in production or pricing. “You have to

be willing to work ten times harder to pursue any good opportunity,” Vosper offers. “No good things come easily.” At this point, Vosper and Schwab are no strangers to challenges and hard work. Even when it comes to the still-uncertain thought of expansion, the ladies know that whatever they choose to do, it will be carefully thought out, tested and strategically developed. A greater variety of bra sizes and color options are both expansions that Vosper and Schwab certainly see in the future. Neil Blumenthal, co-founder of Warby Parker and fellow Penn alum, gave the ladies a valuable piece of advice: “Skew management is key. ” This has been a crucial wisdom they have held on to throughout the development of Negative. Starting a lingerie business for the anti-Victoria’s Secret customer might be a big undertaking, but these ladies are ready for every bump in the road that may come their way. With a clear, bold perspective and business savvy to boot, this chic and cool underwear-designing duo seem well positioned to serve a very underserved market and to truly rival longstanding companies that have a stronghold on the underwear industry, like Victoria’s Secret. Schwab and Vosper are modern, educated women who know what women want — a bra they can forget they’re wearing under their Rag & Bone t-shirt — not a ruffled, poking bra with bows and six pounds of pads. Those looking to break into the fashion industry might take a few notes from this dynamic duo. “Penn students shouldn’t be afraid to go against the grain,” Vosper explains. “And be nice to everyone you meet! You never know who works in the industry and who can help you along the way.” “And do your research! Know your audience and make sure that your idea is contributing something new,” Schwab adds. These women couldn’t be a better example of doing something new. Negative is a refreshing perspective and a welcome challenge to the existing static lingerie landscape. At its core, the brand sends a message of being comfortable in your own skin and treating that skin well. As Schwab notes, “Our underwear is about not transforming your body into something it’s not — at the end of the day, giving yourself good underwear is a form of self-love.” THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 39


On Ernesto Arrocha: Pants, Naked and Famous, $135, at P’s & Q’s; Collared shirt and shoes, model’s own; Jacket, stylist’s own. On Christina Atterbury: Cape, $469, at Club Monaco; Pants, J Brand, $850, at Intermix; Turtleneck, stylist’s own. On Hugo Lieber: Coat, Penfield USA, $130 at P’s & Q’s.; Shirt, Norse Project, $132 at P’s & Q’s; Pants, Publish, $92 at P’s & Q’s; Scarf, stylist’s own. On Alessia Lenders: Fur coat, Adrienne Landau, $1198, at Intermix; Overalls, $269, at Club Monaco; Hat, stylist’s own.


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NIGHTCRAWLER The night belongs to the reckless. Whatever mischief you pursue, decked in edgy cuts and neutral hues, when you get caught, you’ll look dangerously cool.

DIRECTED BY MAX WANG ’15, DANIELLA SAKHAI ’15, DYANA SO ’16 AND BREE JACKSON ’15 MODELED BY CHRISTINA ATTERBURY ’15, ERNESTO ARROCHA ’15, ALESSIA LENDERS ’17 AND HUGO LIEBER ’18 PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARA-PAIGE SILVESTRO ’16 AND ISABELLA CUAN ’18 STYLED BY HELEN DUGAN ’17, PAOLA GAMARRA ’17, MAX KURUCAR ’16, JESSICA SUNG ’17, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN ’17 AND BENJAMIN ZOU ’18 BEAUTY BY ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUK’18

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On Hugo: Sweatpants, Publish, $82, at P’s & Q’s; Jacket, stylist’s own; turtleneck and sneakers, model’s own. On Christina: Jacket, $369; Shirt, $159.50; at Club Monaco; Pants, J Brand, $1,095 at Intermix; Boots, $525, at Stuart Weitzman.


On Alessia: Jacket, $2360, at Intermix; Turtleneck, $139.50; Hat, $98.50; at Club Monaco; Pants and shoes, stylist’s own. On Ernesto: Jacket and turtleneck, model’s own.


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On Christina: Shearling vest, $895, at Intermix; Collared shirt, sweater and pants, stylist’s own. On Hugo: Collared Shirt, Gant, $135; Sweater, Gant, $195; Pants, Baldwin, $200; at P’s & Q’s; Boots, model’s own.

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On Vinita Saggurti: Thin pearl strand, VICXX, price upon request; Thick pearl strand, VICXX, price upon request; Graphite curb chain, VICXX, price upon request; Chunky mother of pearl rings, VICXX, price upon request; Clothing, model’s own. (Opposite page) On On Sanlie Auyeung: Rings, VICXX, price upon request; Ear cuffs, VICXX, price upon request; Skeleton necklace, VICXX, price upon request; Long necklace with pearls, VICXX, price upon request; Leather jacket and shoes, model’s own.

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On Edge Make a daring statement with long chains and stacked bracelets that will leave everyone else in the cold. DIRECTED BY MAX WANG ’15, DANIELLA SAKHAI ’15, DYANA SO ’16 AND BREE JACKSON ’15 MODELED BY SANLIE AUYEUNG ’15, MAX KURUCAR ’16 AND VINITA SAGGURTI ’15 PHOTOGRAPHED BY ISABELLA CUAN ’18 STYLED BY EMILY HSU ’16, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN ’17 AND KATIE WU ’17 BEAUTY BY ANASTASIYA KRAVCHUKKIRILYUK ’18

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/FASHION

Onthewalk Max Kurucar: Beaded wood bracelets, VICXX, price upon request; Clothing and watch, model’s own. On Sanlie: Drop snake necklace, VICXX, price upon request. (Opposite page) On Vinita: Silver leaf bangles, VICXX, price upon request; Long tassle necklace, VICXX, price upon request; Thin gold choker, Jez, $258 at Intermix; Chunky mother of pearl rings, VICXX, price upon request; Silver bangles, VICXX, price upon request. Clothing, model’s own.


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On Vinita: Graphite curb chain, VICXX, price upon request; Spiked necklace, FLN, $348; at Intermix; Raw stone cuff, VICXX, price upon request; Rings, VICXX, price upon request. (Opposite page) On Sanlie: Graphite and black jointed bracelets, Vita Fede, $275 at Intermix; Shark tooth leather necklace, VICXX, price upon request; Rhinestone ear cuffs, VICXX, price upon request; Rhinestone hand cuff, VICXX, price upon request.

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BAD BEAUTY HABITS Seven (not deadly, but harmful) health and beauty sins

B

BY AUGUSTA GREENBAUM

en Franklin said, “It is easier to prevent bad habits than to break them,” but let’s get real: there are some health and beauty sins you commit over and over again. You try to do the right thing, but many of these habits are hard to break. Yet, you don’t have to be stuck in a bad cycle forever. Experts say that it takes 21 days to break a habit, so what are you waiting for?

See you on the flip side Hasta la vista Havaianas! The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) warns that flip-flops should be avoided since they offer, “no arch support, heel cushioning or shock absorption”. While flip-flops can be worn for short periods of time (like as shower shoes), for activities that involve more walking, ditch those flops for healthier options. Channel Normcore with a comfy and supportive pair of Birkenstocks (or Birkenstock-inspired footwear). Once a choice for hippies and hipsters, Birkenstocks have recently made fashion headlines and have even earned the approval of Vogue. We recommend the classic Black Oiled Leather Arizona Birkenstocks ($125 available at www.birkenstockusa.com). For a more budget-friendly alternative, try Topshop’s Fang Double Buckle Flatforms ($80 at us.topshop.com).

BPA, no way 2.

It’s important to stay hydrated, but make sure that you are doing it the right way. Choose water over artificially sweetened soda and energy drinks, and stay environmentally friendly with a cute and functional BPA-free water bottle. BPA, or Bisphenol A, is an endocrine disruptor that can mess with our body’s hormones. Some great BPA-free water bottles include the classic Camelbak Eddy ($15 available at shop.camelbak. com), Lifefactory’s Glass Bottle with Flat Cap ($14.99 available at www.lifefactory.com) and the preppy monogrammed Tervis Tumbler ($32 available at www.themonogrammerchant.com). Want to stay motivated to drink more H2O? Apps likes Waterlogged will help you keep track of your water intake and make it seem like a game — the app provides you with reminders and reward coupons for reaching your goals.

The glamorous, the flossy flossy Nobody likes going to the dentist, but if you want to make your trips easier and less painful, the key is to get flossing! In addition to removing pesky bits of food lodged between your teeth, flossing can improve your breath and prevent cavities, gingivitis and periodontitis. Just like brushing your teeth, flossing regularly should become a part of your daily routine. Always on the go? It’s helpful to keep floss picks handy. Not a fan of mint? CVS even has mixed fruit-flavored flossers.


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Antiperspirant's dangerous secret It stinks that some harmful, pore-clogging chemicals such as aluminum chlorohydrate and aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex glycine can be lurking in many common antiperspirant brands. To be safe, try natural brands such as 100% Pure and Lafes. The Think Dirty app makes it easy to test for carcinogenic ingredients in beauty products. By scanning the barcode or by searching the product name, you can use the “dirty meter” to compare carcinogenicity, developmental & reproductive toxicity and allergies & immunotoxicities in your favorite beauty products. The app also offers helpful recommendations for better and safer options.

Nailing the "Toxic Trio" and 5-free Long-lasting and chip-free nail polish is not worth exposing yourself to harmful chemicals! Stay away from gel manicures that can cause itching and irritation and expose skin to UV light. Always avoid the “toxic trio” of chemicals: formaldehyde, toluene and dibutyl phthalate (DBP). They have negative side effects such as allergic reactions, dizziness and hormone disruptions, respectively. You can kick your nail polish game up a notch and look out for 5-free brands (meaning that they are free of dibutyl phthalate, toluene, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin and camphor). You don’t even have to sacrifice quality or color options for 5-free brands. Opt for brands such as Zoya, RBG and JINsoon. Benecos offers a vegan nail polish remover ($12.99 available at www.truenatural.com) that is acetone-free, hence gentler on your nails and skin.

Gloom and gum Most people don’t think twice about gum chewing, but unfortunately the aspartame and other artificial sweeteners added to give gum its flavor can be harmful. Studies have linked aspartame to risk of cancer in rats. Additionally, according to Dr. Joel Schlessinger, excessive gum chewing leads to mouth wrinkles. Do you use gum as a quick snack? This can actually make you hungrier since gum chewing stimulates gastric juices, preparing your stomach for food digestion. Instead, snack on some nuts or healthy granola. If you can’t give up your gum fix yet, choose natural, aspartame-free gum from brands like Glee Gum and PÜR Gum.

Poorly dressed When it comes to salad dressing, basic is better. The acidity in vinegar-based salad dressing is bad for tooth enamel. This can be remedied by whipping up some DIY salad dressing. Websites like Yummly have great recipe options. If you do decide to eat something acidic, wait one hour until you brush your teeth. While waiting to clean your teeth sounds counterintuitive, put down that brush! Your saliva will naturally help to heal tooth enamel, and brushing immediately could damage your teeth’s softened enamel. If you want a fluoride-free and abrasive chemical-free way to strengthen your teeth, try JĀSÖN Sea Fresh Strengthening Toothpaste ($6.39 available at www. jason-personalcare.com). All images illustrated by Gloria Yuen ‘18.

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A GUY’S GUIDE TO THE Need to spice up your bromance? Turn up the bro-therly love by showing your bro how to treat himself. BY ARLO GORDON

T

here are few relationships more sacred than that of two men bonded so tightly that their connection transcends the realm of mere friendship, entering a higher, more meaningful category. We refer, of course, to the most cherished partnership of all: the bromance.

A bromance, just like any other relationship, is rewarding and comes with fun, friendship and an inseparable bond — but that bond must be nurtured. Guys, your significant others and your parents are not the only ones who want to know you care — you’ve got to treat your bro like the king he is. We’ve got you covered on how to do just that.

GEAR P’S & Q’S (820 SOUTH ST.) Grab your crew and head down South Street to P’s & Q’s for a fullon, GQ-approved shopping spree. With brands like Cole Haan and Naked and Famous, as well as lesser-known labels such as Thorocraft, your bros will thank you for your style-savvy shopping skills (and for finding them a new wardrobe). SUGARCUBE (124 N. 3RD ST.) If your pal is more of the indie type, you might want to direct your shopping spree to Sugarcube, a cool Old City boutique that boasts an impressive array of independent designers as well as unique art. The exposed brick walls and decorative motorcycle will keep you and your bros shopping for hours. FIRESIDE CAMP SUPPLY (2207 SOUTH ST.) But maybe your bro doesn’t want hardwood floors — maybe he wants a burning wood campfire and a canteen to match. If your bro lives to be outdoors, take him down to Fireside Camp Supply, where he’ll be able to choose from the hippest selection of quality camping goods. If you really want to bro out, don’t just buy the supplies — plan an actual camping trip for some bro-on-bro bonding time with your guys.

(Top) Image courtesy of visitphilly.com. (Center) Image courtesy of psandqs.com. (Above) Image courtesy of sugarcube.us. (Right) Image courtesy of ubiqlife.com,

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CITY OF BRO-THERLY LOVE UBIQ (1509 WALNUT ST.) Is your bro less about hiking boots and more about trickedout kicks? Check out UBIQ, a.k.a. sneakerhead heaven. UBIQ offers a fresh, unique selection of sneakers right in Center City. If your bro is all about the footwear, shoe shopping here will be a dream come true.

GROOMING GROOM BARBERSHOP (1324 LOCUST ST.) Conveniently, the perfect grooming experience for you and your bro to share is just a short walk or train ride downtown. At Groom Barbershop, they cater to the guys. Offering haircuts at just $24 as well as various shave options, this place is the ultimate men’s salon to prep for a big date night or downtown event. Plus, with Motown or jazz playing in the background of this cool vintage-style shop, you and your bro will leave feeling like Don Draper himself. TRIUMPH & DISASTER Triumphanddisaster.com Long-distance bromance? Don’t worry, you can still help your bro pamper himself no matter where he lives. Former procricket player Dion Nash’s product line Triumph & Disaster boasts dude-friendly grooming products that are perfect to send to your bro for a little skin R&R. The apothecary-inspired “Stash Box” is one of our personal favorites, and can even be shipped worldwide.

gertips, look no further than 10 blocks west of campus to toss back a few beers and order a couple of the tastiest pies around. Dock Street Brewery is the perfect place for a chill night with your bro. As an added bonus, its late-night happy hour from 11 p.m.-1a.m. features $2 slices! PEP BOWL (1200 SOUTH BROAD ST.) Don’t bore your bro with another game of pickup at Pottruck — grab your bowling shoes and head on down to PEP Bowl for some real fun. Not only does PEP have a cool, intimate vibe that will let you and your bros feel like you own the place, but it’s also a BYOB. SUGARHOUSE CASINO (1001 N. DELAWARE AVE.) Maybe you’re looking for a more action-packed night to spend with your friends. What’s more exciting than sitting at the blackjack table or shooting craps with your bros cheering you on? A night at Sugarhouse Casino (no matter how much money — or pride — you win or lose) will be one to remember. Bromances are hard to come by and even harder to keep up. Luckily, our very own City of Brotherly Love has the best to offer. In fact, we’d even say that Philadelphia is the number one city to treat your bro.

GOING OUT DOCK STREET BREWERY (701 S. 50TH ST) Between date nights and late nights in the library, sometimes all a guy needs is a night out-- guys only. With Philly at your fin-

(Top) Image courtesy of phillyliving.com. (Center) Image courtesy of makingitinakl.blogspot. com. (Above) Image courtesy of delawareriverwaterfront. com. (Left) Image courtesy of pepbowl.com.

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ON

FRIDAY NIGHT

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(HIGH)LIGHTS One adventurous writer heads to Old City to explore the art, nightlife and Philly color of First Fridays. he air of Old City crackles with eclectic, slightly chaotic energy and crowds of people line every inch of 2nd Street. Along the sidewalks, vendors have set up tables and blankets with curious items, ranging from original paintings and funky jewelry to books, antiques and knickknacks of all sorts. Amid the clamor of voices and footsteps, street musicians fill the air with melodies of jazz, rock and country. It's First Fridays, and Old City knows that means it's time to party. On the first Friday of each month, Old City comes to life. From 5–9 p.m., galleries open their doors, open-house style, aspiring artists flock to display their artwork streetside and people crowd the sidewalks to explore and mingle. Most of the action takes place in the heart of Old City, from Market to Race Streets along 2nd and 3rd streets. At the center of all this commotion are, of course, the galleries. In contrast to the cluttered, slightly shabby Old City streets and alleys, the galleries are minimally decorated and pristine. The white walls and blonde wood floors leave the emphasis solely on the artwork featured in each gallery rather than on the galleries themselves. Along 2nd Street, open galleries house art ranging from classical to playful to irreverent. Whether from fascination or bemusement, I spend a great deal of time at 3rd Street Gallery, an artists’ cooperative located (inexplicably) on 2nd Street. Among the offerings, I see a shadow box of tiny “found” objects and a set of voodoo

dolls labeled with taboo words — derogatory monikers and potty mouth terms. The dolls are adorned with symbolic representations of their cheeky labels; a few of my favorites are "prick" with pins sticking out of it and "flighty" wearing a little propeller cap. I almost wish I could take home the cute figurines in the shadow box, but the voodoo — intriguing as it is — I'm content to leave behind. Moving on from the voodoo and tchotchkes of 3rd Street Gallery, I find a slightly more lighthearted display in the colorful, abstract swirls and blots of Donna Usher's acrylic painting collection “Contemplation” at the LG Tripp Gallery. Also exhibited is a series of bright pencil and watercolor cityscape sketches, entitled “Endless Day,” by Miriam Singer. But as I wind my way through the cobblestone streets, I realize the art isn't confined to the galleries — it’s also in the characters and creativity that stake their ground outside the official establishments. The crowd is a rush of people of all sorts — refined older couples, excited students, the hip artist set, grungy hippyish characters and scruffy skateboarders. There's funkiness. There's creativity and originality. There's magic (no really, there's a guy performing magic tricks). It's a smorgasbord of quirkiness. There’s no telling what — or who — you might stumble across. One alley houses a mini flea market of vendors selling jewelry, clothes and accessories that resemble the treasure trove of my grandmother's closet. Another acts as the

BY ANDIE DAVIDSON

stage for a country music trio in plaid shirts strumming guitars and playing fiddles. I pass by a two-man sidewalk band decked out in kilts to check out a display of jewelry crafted out of recycled bottle caps. Farther along the line, a vendor called Manic Muse sells jewelry made of watch machinery, compasses and magnifying glasses. A table of anime-style drawings recalls the good ol' days of Cartoon Network alongside a couple of guys selling masks that appear to be a cross between Carnevale and skull death masks. Behind one table, a vendor's head is covered by a shiny silver robot head (no idea how this relates to the wooden figurines she's selling). The rows of outlandish doodads and characters are endless. All my walking works up quite the appetite. Luckily, Old City is chock full of eateries. Many even have outdoor sidewalk tables for a prime people-watching vantage point, and some offer happy hour specials. I skip the higher-end offerings for a more student-friendly — but still delicious — meal of hearty lentil soup and seemingly endless warm bread for just $3 at Oasis Mediterranean. Despite my spendthrift efforts, I come home with round sunglasses, long silver earrings and a postcard illustration that reminds me vaguely of a Pokémon in meditation. More than that, I’ve gotten a slice of Philly’s quirky underbelly. First Fridays is an art event, and the art is amazing. But even more fascinating are the people, the voices, the energy. First Fridays is the life of the city, with all its creativity and diversity and eccentricity, congregating for a few hours

All images photographed by Katie Zhao C’18

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ON

THE WALK IS CHRISTINA FARLEY C’16 This Maryland PPE major takes advantage of unconventional and thrifty decorating techniques for her single in a Harnwell triple. The WALK: What inspired your decorating decisions? Christina Farley: Really my goal is just to cover all the white space in my room as cheaply as possible! I use things that I already own — like from childhood — and things that are free and colorful like paint chips from hardware stores and clippings from newspapers and magazines. 

CF: I have lots of random pieces of fabric in my room from some of my recent travels. These include a $4 shower curtain that was way too beautiful to put in a bathroom, a beach sarong from a high school trip in Hawaii, a tablecloth that I bought in Cairo and two pieces of fabric from my summer internship in Benin.

The WALK: Do you follow any sort of theme when decorating?

The WALK: Which part of your room are you most proud of?

CF: I don’t try to follow a theme, but much like a middle school girl, I go for bright pinks and blues, so my room kind of looks like an explosion of pre-teen. It just turns out that everything goes together. Or you could say that the fact that everything clashes means that everything goes together!

CF: I’m really proud of my mirror tiles. I’ve been using them since freshman year. Having a mirror on the wall makes the room feel less claustrophobic and more like a normal living space. Plus, they’re really cheap. I got the pack of six from Home Depot for like $10! 

The WALK: Which of your décor did you make yourself? CF: I made my collage last year (I have this weird obsession where I can’t flip through the Daily Pennsylvanian or any magazine without cutting stuff out). I also recently made this 3D wall art by painting packing material that came with a new TV my parents ordered, which I really like. The WALK: Does anything else in your room

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have a story attached to it?

The WALK: We agree, dorms can be cramped environments — how else do you work around that when decorating? CF: I got lucky because my room in Harnwell has about six extra feet of depth in addition to a full-size window. I’ve managed to break up the sterile rectangular layout of my room by dividing the room in two with curtains on tension rods. It separates my bed and desk area from the sitting area and makes the room feel larger. I don’t even mind the limited space anymore — I actually think it’s fun.


WALK ON\thewalk

College living is notorious for being overly cramped and poorly furnished, but that didn’t stop these two students from making their rooms look anything but. Now The WALK shows you around their decorative dorms to see where they got their inspiration. BY MERIAH O’NEIL

IN YOUR PLACE SHAKEIL GREELEY C’15 Having lived in many different places, it’s no surprise that this Visual Studies major has found interior decorating inspiration from around the globe. He manages to channel this unique design style through one-of-a-kind pieces that make his single in a Spruce Street house just as special. The WALK: How do you choose what to decorate your room with? Shakeil Greeley: I like to keep it simple, so any decoration is inspired by things I already own or by the space itself. The only real decoration I have is a few things for the walls, and I just have very positive memories attached to all the photos or posters.  The WALK: Are some of your photos or posters particularly meaningful?  SG: The photos on my walls I took on various adventures (roadtripping to Tennessee, traveling through South Korea), but the one thing that is out of theme is the collection of flyers all from shows that my dad has DJed at. He lives in Oakland, so I don’t get to see him very often, and it’s a nice reminder of him and a good conversation starter.  The WALK: How would you summarize your decorating philosophy?

SG: The curtains — I installed them myself.  The WALK: Do you own anything that’s second-hand? SG: The desk is handmade by the guy who was living here before, and to me it’s really the centerpiece of the room. The room is a weird shape, so having a massive desk that fits perfectly is a huge plus. And I guess you could say most of my book collection is thrifted.  The WALK: Which piece most embodies your personality? Why? SG: The clouds above my bed. I not only made them, but I also have my head in the clouds pretty consistently.  The WALK: Is there anything in your room you could do without? SG: The overhead lighting is something out of a 1960s horror movie — I never turn it on. 

SG: Do less.

The WALK: What advice would you give to someone looking to revamp his or her dorm?

The WALK: Which part of your room are you most proud of?

SG: Pay less attention to what band poster to put up , and more attention to lighting.

All images photographed by Connor McLaren C’16.

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ON

THE WINTRY MIX POMEGRANATE RASPBERRY SPARKLER Take a cue from late fashion supernova Oscar de la Renta’s F/W 2014 collection with this bubbly beverage. Perfect amounts tangy and sweet, this drink will have you dancing the winter blues away. Serves 4-6 1 bottle champagne or Prosecco 1 cup pomegranate juice 1 cup cranberry juice Juice of 2 large oranges ½ cup orange simple syrup Pomegranate seeds for garnish Combine champagne, juices and simple syrup in a pitcher. Stir and pour into glasses. Add a few pomegranate seeds to each glass upon serving. Oscar de la Renta F/W 2014

CRANBERRY & ROSEMARY WHITE SANGRIA Whether you’re entertaining or enjoying a quiet night in, try this effortless Burberry Prorsum-inspired drink. The seasonal sangria is sure to impress and will have you feeling festive in no time. Serves 4-6 1 bottle Pinot Grigio ½ cup white grape juice ¼ cup sugar 1 can club soda 2 sliced Granny Smith apples Sprig of fresh rosemary 1 cup fresh cranberries

Burberry Prorsum F/W 2014

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Mix white grape juice, sugar and club soda until sugar is mostly dissolved. Add apples, cranberries and rosemary and refrigerate for a few hours. Add Pinot Grigio, then stir and serve.


WALK ON\thewalk Like any good winter coat, great seasonal cocktails should be anything but basic. This winter we’ve conceived four runway-inspired cocktails that will surely warm you up. Whether prepared for a spirited soirée or a night by the fire, these drinks will add the perfect kick to a cozy night or a crisp morning—you’ll never resort to vodka cranberry again. BY LAURA PETRO

WINTER MORNING BURST Kickstart your crisp January morning with a bright and boozy beverage! This Carven F/W 2014 look is the perfect muse for an ampedup morning cocktail. Serves 2 3 oz. vodka 1 oz. triple sec ½ cup fresh clementine juice Lemon zest, to taste Sugar to garnish rim Pour all ingredients into a small shaker and mix. Pour into glasses and garnish with sugar. Serve cold. Carven F/W 2014

BOOZY HOT CHOCOLATE It wouldn’t be winter without spiked hot chocolate to cuddle with by the fire as you watch Elf on repeat. This decadent nutty blend will make you feel like you’re sporting this chic, warm Carolina Herrera F/W 2014 look. Serves 4 4 oz. Kahlúa coffee liqueur 4 cups milk 4 Tbsp sugar 3 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder ½ tsp cinnamon ¼ tsp nutmeg Salted caramel, to serve Mini marshmallows, to serve Whipped cream, to serve Carolina Herrera F/W 2014

Mix milk, sugar and cocoa powder in a saucepan on medium heat until sugar and cocoa powder are dissolved. Stir in cinnamon, nutmeg and Kahlúa. Pour into four mugs and garnish with whipped cream, salted caramel and mini marshmallows.

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