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WINTER 2014 THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM

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ELONIA MCHENRY Editor-in-Chief

ERICA SACHSE Creative Director

EMILY KAZAM SHERBANY Editor-at-Large

MAX WANG

TIFFANY LU

MONTA OZOLINA

JESSIE LAWSON

Photography Director Operations Coordinator

Art Director

Marketing Director

ELIZABETH ELDER Editorial Director

ALIYA SAIGOL

Finance & Sponsorship Director

FASHION Style Director BONNIE ARBITTIER Men’s Style Director ARJAN SINGH Beauty Director LAURA SACHSE Stylists JESSIE CHOI, BERNICE KONG, ASHLEY LEUNG, ALISON MILLER, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN, VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS, MARIANA PAVIA, MAYA RIVERA, LINDY SMITH, KATIE WU, JULIA ZHU Men’s Stylists MICHAEL XUFU HUANG, MICHAEL KIGAWA, ALEXANDRA LOTZ Beauty Stylists JOYCE HU, ELIE SOKOLOFF, MOLLY WANG On-Set Coordinator ROLANDA EVELYN Concept Managers ROSA ESCANDON, ROOPA SHANKAR

FEATURES Fashion Editor AUGUSTA GREENBAUM Features Editor ANDIE DAVIDSON Copy Editors LAURI BONACORSI, KAYLA FUCHS, CORDELIA MESEROW Research Editors CATHERINE DING, ANDREA SHEN Contributing Writers TINA HSU, MICHAEL XUFU HUANG, ERICH KESSEL, ARIELA OSUNA, LAURA PETRO, MARY ALICE SOLMSSEN, OLIVIA STEARN, JULIA VITALE, ADAM WARNER

PHOTOGRAPHY Photographers TARA GONZALEZ, CODY MIN, SARA-PAIGE SILVESTRO, DYANA SO Videographer JENNIFER KIM Behind the Scenes Photographer ANGELA JANG

ART AND DESIGN Assistant Art Directors MONIKA HAEBICH, ANDREA SHEN Layout Team ALEXANDRA BENYA, STEPHANIE BUSINELLI, CAROLINA ENGLISH, LISA HOONG, ZAHRA HUSAIN, BECCA JAMES, MICAH KAATS, JULIA PALECKI, MARIANA PAVIA, ISABELLA RAHM, KATIE WU

MARKETING Social Media Representatives ANTONIA GREEN, ALLISON RUBEN, ALICE SHEN, GABRIELLA ZACARIAS Events Coordinators CAROLINE BATOFF, EMILIE BISHOP, NATALIE PEELISH, SAFIA SEXTON, MARIA ALONSO TORRAS Market Research Coordinator ALEXANDRA BENYA Design Chair SUBI QIAN Alumni Relations Chair BRIANNE POLITO Alumni Relations Coordinator MICHELLE LA COSSE

MANAGEMENT Assistant Operations Coordinator JACQUELINE LEM Internal Affairs Coordinator STEVIE KLEIN Local Sponsorship Coordinators ALLIE DRABINSKY, SALIMA GHADIMI, ERICA LIGENZA Professional Apparel Coordinators ANUSHA CHEMICALA, MAHA SUBRAMANIAM Bookings and Model Coordinator ROLANDA EVELYN Assistant Professional Apparel Coordinator ALEXIS RICHARDS Dzine2Show Executive Board Members LYNN NGUYEN, VINITA SAGGURTI, JOEY CHU, NICK GOMEZ, LEAH ALMINANA, GRACE GUAN, LISA MARSOVA

THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM Editor-in-Chief ELONIA MCHENRY Editorial Director CINDY YUAN Managing Editor ALICIA CHON Website Director CEASAR BAUTISTA Operations Coordinator MONTA OZOLINA Senior Fashion Editor ERICH KESSEL Senior Culture Editor ALLI KAYE Senior Shopping Editor LAURA PETRO Senior Health & Beauty Editor TINA HSU Senior Stylist Editor MAEGAN CADET Junior Fashion Editors SOPHIE FRITZ, AUGUSTA GREENBAUM, MARLENA HANNA, OLIVIA HORN, KASPER ABILDGAARD JORGENSEN, CATHERINE MILANOSKI, MAYA RIVERA, EMILY ULRICH, JESSI YACKEY Junior Men’s Fashion Editors TZVETOMIR GRADEVSKI, ALLISON RUBEN Junior Culture Editors SAIDZHAN ABDULLAEV, KELLY HA, MARILENA ZEPRUN, LAURA ZHANG Junior Shopping Editors ANISHA KAMAT, NANETTE NUNU Junior Health & Beauty Editors STEPHANIE FAGBEMI, LAURA GARCIA-CID, ELLIS KIM, CAROLINE LEVY, ERICA POLLE, LINDA YAO Website Stylists REBECCA AIELLO, SHAYLA COLE, ROLANDA EVELYN, MINJI KWAK, EMILY LIPSON Guest Blogger RAMA HAMARNEH International Content Manager LAURI BONACORSI Blog Director EMMA BAIADA Assistant Blog Director MADHAVI MURALIDHARAN Blog Photographers TAYLOR BROWN, SARAH KU, EMILY LIPSON, KATHERINE LITTEL, MICHELLE LIU, ALLISON MILLER, CODY MIN, HANNAH NOYES, VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS, ARIANA SCHANZER, SHEILA SHANKAR, JULIE SHANUS, ALEXANDRA TRITSCH, ANDREINA VAN MAANEN UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA’S PREMIER FASHION MAGAZINE • VOLUME VII • ISSUE II • JANUARY 2014 The WALK was founded in 2006 as a student initiative and continues to be a student fueled organization. TheWALKmagazine.com was launched in 2010 as a sister to the print edition. The WALK aims to satisfy our community’s widely-demanded fashion fix year-round. Stories edited by the editorial staff will carry bylines of the original author. Please report corrections to info@thewalkmagazine.com. We will post corrections on our website. This publication was typeset using GeosansLight and Bebas for headlines, Justus Italic for subtitles and captions and Adobe Garamond Pro for body text. Page layout was created using Adobe InDesign. Original images were taken with DSLR cameras and adjusted using Adobe Photoshop. The WALK was printed in Sappi Flo 70-pound gloss text paper (FSC and 10% recycled) using sheet-fed offset presses. The binding is saddle-stitched. Printed by Garrison Printing Company, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ. To get involved or learn about advertising and partnership opportunities, please contact us at info@thewalkmagazine.com.


winter 2014 ARTS & STYLE

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penn student bloggers: a class of their own

A fresh crop of student bloggers are taking the Penn fashion scene by storm.

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it's a bird, it's a plane, it's mert!

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FASHION

Penn speaks Here’s what Penn has to tell SEEN on the Walk to make this winter the most stylish yet.

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Penn’s Medical Emergency Response Team comes to the rescue.

the women of 13th street A labor of love: how Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran transformed 13th Street in Philadelphia.

trend watch: fashion From punky blacks to moody blues, we highlight this season’s most striking trends.

trend watch: beauty Take a cue from this season’s fashion shows, and try these runway-inspired beauty tips.

back to nature: RedEfining jewelry

Monique Péan C’03 incorporates antique diamonds, fossilized dinosaur bones and recycled platinum into her sustainable, award-winning jewelry line.

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same house, new resident Young designers are giving legendary brands a face-lift.

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Incorporate sporty yet structured looks into style that will keep you energized for miles.

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high tech , high fashion

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WALK ON

PrEt-A-Sporter

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3-D printed pants and lab-grown leather are the next big thing in fashion.

style, substance and success Caroline Issa W’99 proves that fashion cannot exist without business.

kings & queens Give your look the royal treatment with these DIY accessories.

dazed & confused Catch a glimpse of luxe furs and warm wools during a nighttime stroll in Fairmount Park.

get your charleston on

Philadelphia’s swankiest bars are getting into the spirit of the Prohibition era.

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art meets soul

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Penn students explain the backstories that inspired their tattoos as a form of expression.

midnight munchies

Six easy and tasty recipes for when nighttime hunger strikes.

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The WALK is in your place

Two Penn students’ dorm rooms are more than just functional.

LAYOUT CREDITS Cover — Max Wang ’15 • Masthead — Lisa Hoong ’17 • Cover Look — Erica Sachse ’14 • Letter from the Editor — Tiffany Lu ’15 • Penn Speaks / Website Ad — Zahra Husain ’17 Penn Student Bloggers: A Class of Their Own — Carolina English ’16 • It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s MERT! — Micah Kaats ’14 • The Women of 13th Street — Andrea Shen ’16 Trend Watch: Fashion — Lisa Hoong ’17 • Trend Watch: Beauty / Back to Nature: Redefining Jewelry — Isabella Rahm ’17 • Same House, New Resident — Mariana Pavia ’17 Prêt-à-Sporter — Stephanie Businelli ’16 • High Tech, High Fashion — Tiffany Lu ‘15 • Style, Substance and Success — Monika Haebich ’15 • Kings & Queens — ­­ Max Wang ’15 Dazed & Confused — Becca James ’14 • Art Meets Soul — Carolina English ’16 • Get Your Charleston On — Alexandra Benya ’16 Midnight Munchies — Julia Palecki ’17 • The WALK is in Your Place — Monika Haebich ’15 Edited by Monika Haebich ’15, Tiffany Lu ’15 and Andrea Shen ’16


simulacra

&simulation On Natalie Hernandez: Purple ruched gown, Armani Collezioni, $1,725, at Boyd’s. Earrings, BCBG, $60, at BCBG. Black jeweled bracelet throughout, Lanvin, stylist’s own.

Illuminated by light, Natalie’s elegant gowns emerge out of the darkness of our deconstructed set. This juxtaposition shows that beauty can be found in the most unexpected places.

Directed By Erica Sachse ’14, Bonnie Arbittier ’14 and Max Wang ’15 Modeled by Natalie Hernandez ’17 Photographed by Evan Robinson ’14 Styled by Bernice Kong ’15 Beauty by Laura Sachse ’16 and Molly Wang ’17 Coordinated by Rolanda Evelyn ’16 and Caroline Batoff ’17

On Natalie (cover): Cut-out navy gown, Cut 25, $595, at Boyd’s. Vintage earrings, stylist’s own. Hand bracelet, Eriness, $140 (contact lsachse@wharton.upenn.edu for sales inquiry). Black pumps, model’s own.

on the COVER


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Think back to your first night on Penn’s campus. There was a calm to the air that didn’t yet betray the liveliness of the student body we now know. If you’re an upperclassman, you might feel like you’ve already seen everything Penn has to offer. We beg to differ. For us at The WALK, fashion is about looking critically at things that at first appear obvious but upon closer inspection reveal complexity and meaning. In that vein, this issue seeks to shed light on subjects usually left in the dark. Simply put, there’s plenty left to discover, even in the supposedly familiar. This can reveal some unexpected and exciting results—which is exactly what we’re going for. In The WALK After Dark, we solve a few of Penn’s very own mysteries through a series of student spotlights and alumni features. Embracing the unconventional, we push the editorial and visual boundaries of our magazine. For example, for three years we have dreamed of the grungemeets-glamour shoot now featured on this issue’s cover—a creative feat involving one frat house basement and two very delicate gowns. In the absence of light and order, our cover model, Natalie, maintains poise—something we all aspire to in the midst of our unpredictable future. In “Dazed & Confused,” going against convention becomes the norm. The WALK staff brought our models to Fairmount Park in a chic adventure that lasted well past midnight. We pushed our creative team to capture raw moments: the shoot was photographed with light from a passing car cast on our stylish duo during a nighttime stroll. Back on Penn’s campus, we went behind the scenes with the student-run Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT), reinterpreting their mission of campus safety in avant-garde scenarios; our own real-life heroes come to the aid of fashion victims in “It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s MERT.” This adventurous spirit plays throughout the issue: in our view, risks pay off. What started as an analysis of Penn’s tattoo culture led to three poignant vignettes and an evocative piece titled “Art Meets Soul.” Additionally, “Style, Substance and Success” tells the story of alumna Caroline Issa W’99, who put her Wharton degree to work in an unconventional way—with much acclaim from the fashion industry. In “Same House, New Resident,” we examine several venerable old-world fashion houses who strayed from the

norm and appointed young designers as their creative directors. A few seasons into the change of leadership, we see brilliant outcomes: Slimane, Simons and Wang are now the visionaries of the Parisian maisons, continuing the legacies of legendary designers Saint Laurent, Dior and Balenciaga. New talent is also abundant in the City of Brotherly love, and we wouldn’t want to keep you in the dark. For the staunch supporters of Stephen Starr, we bring you an equally gifted team of restaurateurs: Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran. “The Women of 13th Street” credits the couple for taking a gamble on a once-seedy area and turning it into a place we now know and love for its food and one-of-a-kind finds. In “Redefining Nature,” discover newcomer Monique Péan C’03, who uses recycled and fossilized materials in her stunning fine jewelry line. Furthermore, see how technology plays an innovative role in fashion: “High Tech, High Fashion” highlights a new use for this knowledge in designs that both dazzle and confuse, while “Prêt-à-Sporter” examines style through geometry in the awardwinning Singh Center for Nanotechnology. And finally, we look at the fun and alluring side of darkness. A lineup of speakeasies delights in “Get Your Charleston On” in both a historical and contemporary context. Or, cap off the night with six delicious recipes sure to satisfy your sweet or savory cravings in “Midnight Munchies.” Each story illuminates a few of our favorite uncharted spaces.

Elonia McHenry, Editor-in-Chief

Join THE COLLECTIVE, Penn's first and only fashion society The Collective is composed of Dzine2Show and The WALK. Our mission is to provide resources and opportunities for University of Pennsylvania students who are interested in: fashion design, fashion show production & direction, fashion journalism & photography and the fashion & retail industries. JOIN OUR LISTSERV tinyurl.com/ThePennFashionCollective Follow us on Twitter @ThePFCollective NEED MORE INFO? Reach out to us at info@thewalkmagazine.com


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Penn

Speaks

With winter on our minds, we wanted to know what is on everyone’s fashion agenda. We paired up with SEEN on the Walk to hear from our most fashionable peers on campus. With temperatures this chilly, it can be tempting to pile on the comfy sweats. But these students still manage to look good in 30-degree weather. With the help of their tips and tricks, you can make 2014 your most stylish winter yet!

BY ELONIA MCHENRY

Tell us a winter tip. “Use gloves as a pocket square. They can be an accessory even without being worn.” – Thoba Grenville-Grey C’14

What are you looking forward to this winter? “I’m from L.A., so I’m not looking forward to winter at all.” – Ben Griffiths C&W’17

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This winter, what can’t you wait to wear? “Anything velvet or furry…really, anything we can pet.” – Emily Sherbany C&W’13, Monika Haebich C’15, Alexis Richards C’15 (from left to right)


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Do you like dressing for the cold? “I love winter! It’s my favorite season.” – Jordan Silverman C&W’14

What are you looking forward to wearing? “Hats—fedoras and beanies!” – Victoria Sutherland C&W’17

what will you be doing to stay stylish? “More layering” – Patrick del Valle W’15

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT winter? “Snow days” – Spencer Penn W’14

What ARE your essential winter accessorIES? How do you motivate yourself to dress well in the winter?

“Hats and sunglasses” – Zeynup Ugur C’16

“In the morning, I have a set of clothes next to my bed and get dressed underneath the covers.” – Whitney Mash C’14 All images photographed by Jillian Kaltman N’15.

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BEHIND THE SCENES PHOTOS

Student style profiles

weekly tips beauty

E H T F O E R MO ! E V O L U O Y S G N I H T find us online at:

ogue teen v ider: n i ns fashio editors he meet t

THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM

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PENN STUDENT BLOGGERS:

A CLASS OF THEIR OWN Penn’s fashion community is as strong as ever. The WALK takes a look at a fresh crop of student bloggers and unveils their backgrounds, passions, thoughts and future ambitions. Featuring Reggie James from The Preppy Scholar, Jessica Yackey from Shenanigans and Whatnot, Emily Ulrich from Hazy Laughter and Jameel Mohammed from jmohammedphoto and jmohammedfashion. BY ERICH KESSEL

Reggie James W’17, Undeclared East Stroudsburg, PA thepreppyscholar.com Prep is not dead. At least, not according to Reggie James, one of two creators behind a blog heralding the revival of the iconic American aesthetic. If The Preppy Scholar’s high-quality pictures of Penn and Brown students evince anything, it’s that crisp Oxford shirts and collegiate knitwear are here to stay. The WALK: You’re one half of a blogging couple. Your girlfriend and collaborator is a Brown student. How did the blog come about? Reggie James: My girlfriend and I always talked about what we see people wearing as well as other blogs. One day over Skype I casually mentioned starting a blog together. This past spring after school we made the Facebook page, and it has evolved every day since then. The WALK: As the name suggests, your blog is driven by a preppy aesthetic. What role does that look play today? RJ: A lot of what we do is very reminiscent of American culture, especially when you go back into the ’60s and ’50s and see very much a classic look, like the Ralph Lauren teddy bear sweater, for example, that just came out. Brooks Brothers just redid the whole Gatsby line. When you look back on recent American history, there is a very iconic American look. And you can tie that back to the Ivy League. That’s what we try to express through The Preppy Scholar.

The WALK: Do you see your blog expanding in the future? RJ: I definitely see it expanding in the future. My main inspiration for the blog was F.E. Castleberry [the founder of Unabashedly Prep, a broadlypublicized prep style blog]. He started out as a financier, and he just got tired of it. He then became a huge concept artist for Ralph Lauren. There’s not a moment where you don’t see evolution in his blog. The WALK: What type of evolution will The Preppy Scholar experience? RJ: My partner and I have talked a lot about possibly monetizing the site. But we don’t want to lose a natural sense of appreciation by trading in for money. We’re still trying to think of the best way to do that, and we’ve thought of something similar to what Kiel James Patrick did, where you make and sell simple bracelets. Or what F.E. Castleberry does is [include] small ads on the side that don’t take away from his photos. It’s a constant conversation, but our main focus is to keep The Preppy Scholar cool.

All images photographed by Cody Min C’17 and Sara-Paige Silvestro C’16.

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Jessica yackey C’15, Communications & English Chicago, IL shenanigansandwhatnot.com Jessica Yackey’s Shenanigans and Whatnot is a blog of the moment. True to Millennial fashion, Yackey’s diary-esque format is all-encompassing, including everything from personal style to creative recipes for the perfect chai latte to writings about everyday social dynamics.

The WALK: When did you start blogging? Jessica Yackey: I toyed around with the idea of blogging my senior year of high school, but I didn’t truly become comfortable with the platform until the summer after my freshman year of college. The WALK: How does blogging fit into your college life? JY: Blogging is a great form of release. After writing so intensively—and somewhat dryly—for so many of my classes, blogging reminds me of how much I can truly enjoy writing. The ability to write about absolutely anything is not only a great way to release stress with the occasional rant but also provides me with a relaxing creative outlet. Experimenting with all different sorts of style, cooking, and beyond on a public platform has helped me become more confident in my writing and quirky taste. The WALK: On the point of quirky taste, your blog also seems to transmit some idiosyncrasy—a very unique view. Could you speak about that? JY: My blog is a whimsical blend of fashion, food, art and a whole jumble of other things. My goal is to put a fun spin on things that are often taken way too

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seriously. Taste—whether it is in clothing, cooking or anything at all—should not be restricted to a single hoity-toity perspective. Shenanigans and Whatnot is an attempt to add a bit of silliness to fun subjects gone stuffy. The WALK: What have been some of your coolest moments as a blogger? JY: For me, the coolest blogging moments are when someone brings up a genuine point that I have made online. Obviously, not a lot of my posts are earth-shattering opinion pieces, but the occasional dose of a personal viewpoint does sneak its way in. For instance, I wrote about a passionate dislike for rudeness, and the positive feedback I received was really encouraging. The WALK: Finally, since your blog also functions as a lookbook of sorts, what is one item that every reader needs in his or her closet for fall? JY: A heavy-duty, cozy sweater. Not a dainty ‘I look like fall and enjoy pumpkin spice’ sweater, but rather a thick one that legitimately embodies sweater weather— no cop-outs. The bigger the better. And menswear inspiration is here to stay. I’ve gotten more compliments on my dad’s hand-me-down sweater than any of my other fall outfits combined.

emily ulrich W’17, Marketing Communications & Social Impact Somerset, MA hazylaughter.com Hazy Laughter, run by Emily Ulrich, rests at the intersection of chic self-presentation and interesting meditation on fashion and life. The name was inspired by an F. Scott Fitzgerald short story, “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” a comingof-age narrative that fittingly reflects the content of Ulrich’s blog.


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The WALK: When did you start blogging?

jameel mohammed

Emily Ulrich: Technically, I started my blog during the fall of 2011, but it wasn’t until the following summer that I took it seriously enough to consider what I was doing blogging.

C’17, Undeclared Chicago, IL jmohammedphoto.tumblr.com jmohammedfashion.tumblr.com

The WALK: What is blogging to you, in a general sense?

Freshman Jameel Mohammed aspires to be a fashion designer. Having already interned for Narciso Rodriguez and Nicole Miller, one might say he’s well on his way. His two blogs—jmohammedphoto and jmohammedfashion—move away from the diaristic format of most sites, opting to focus on presenting this Chicago-bred creative’s works.

EU: With some people, the way they dress and the way they present themselves are very important. And it’s hard to articulate that in an everyday sense. So I think blogging is just a great outlet for some people who have something to say. The WALK: Your posts are mainly writings and personal style images. How do you come up with different ideas for each entry? EU: I don’t really conceptualize the post ahead of time. I try and let it be completely uninhibited—what I’m doing that day, what I’m wearing, how I’m feeling. Because, again, it’s such a personal thing, I try not to distract it with a structure. Sometimes the posts are really short, but there’s an authenticity to it that I try to play throughout [my blog]. The WALK: Describe the future of blogging in two words. EU: Natural selection. The WALK: That sounds ominous. Could you elaborate? EU: Well, the blogosphere is so saturated right now. There are people who are posting every single day, multiple times a day. And a lot of times, they’re just copying content of others or it doesn’t reflect the author. When you have blogs that are special—in that you can discern them from other ones—the better blogs are going to rise up and be the very few, but well-done ones [left in existence].

The WALK: How do your photography and design blogs play into your ambition to be a fashion designer? Jameel Mohammed: My blog is both a portfolio and a document of my evolution. I have some of the very first sketches that I was really proud of along with some of the work that I think is really fresh and new. What I think is interesting, and what is made visible by the open format of the site itself, is that I’m still interested in some of the same things. My work has been cyclical: some of the same motifs come up again and again. The WALK: How long have you been designing clothes? JM: I started designing during my sophomore year of high school. The WALK: Your blogs also seem to reflect a specific view about the role of fashion in our lives. You even photographed a fellow blogger, Emily Ulrich, in your designs. Could you speak on that? JM: As I’ve gotten older and more mature as a designer, my work has become more and more applicable to the lives of real women. The page has work from both of my internships and shows

the incorporation of the aesthetics of both Nicole Miller and Narciso Rodriguez. I think what’s most noticeable in my work is a turn toward the commercial. While some regard this as a bad word in fashion, I’ve spent time considering fashion as a career and realized that clothes don’t need to be boring to sell. The WALK: So far, what has been your coolest moment in blogging? JM: I really enjoyed surpassing 100 followers. I used to also have this really weird little fashion blog, and I founded it with the express purpose of becoming an “It” blogger and getting to go to [NYC] Fashion Week. It didn’t quite happen that way, but I did get to go to Fashion Week, so it was cool to reflect on my progress.

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'S IT

RD! .. I B A

. IT'S A PLANE! ... IT'S

DIRECTED BY ERICA SACHSE ’14, BONNIE ARBITTIER ’14 AND MAX WANG ’15 MODELED BY MERT MEMBERS ROSE KLEIMAN ’14, GRACE KUNAS ’15, MAX PRESSER ’14 AND OMAR SOBH ’15 AND FASHION VICTIMS EVE BOWERS ’16 AND GABRIELLE FREDERICK ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY CODY MIN ’17 AND DYANA SO ’16 STYLED BY ANDREINA VAN MAANEN ’17 AND VASILIKI PAPANIKOLOPOULOS ’16 BEAUTY BY LAURA SACHSE ’16 AND MOLLY WANG ’17 COORDINATED BY ANUSHA CHEMICALA ’16, ROLANDA EVELYN ’16 AND MAHA SUBRAMANIAM ’16

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Being "on trend" is key. The stakes are as high as the heels. In times of extreme style mishaps, can Penn's Medical Emergency Response Team save these fashion victims? BY Augusta Greenbaum


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MERT IS EN ROUTE TO THE CALL!

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M

etropolis has Superman, Gotham City has Batman and University City has MERT. The students on the Medical Emergency Response Team, or MERT, are real-life superheroes, coming to the aid of Penn students in need. But MERT members don’t need capes or flight to save the day—they wear red polo shirts and zoom around faster than a speeding bullet on their bikes. While the lack of phone booths on campus would make it hard for Clark Kent to transform into Superman, all that the MERT members need is their squad room in the basement of Butcher in the Quad. As the Chief of MERT, Maxwell Presser C’14 knows that with great power comes great responsibility. Presser has been a part of MERT since his freshman year, and he feels honored to be involved in such a meaningful organization where “there is so much mutual respect.” What superpower would he choose? The rollercoasterobsessed Presser would love to be able to fly, since biking up the 38th Street bridge with 40 pounds of equipment can be tough. Likewise, staying alert during the 5p.m.–7a.m. MERT shift might seem daunting, but Presser approaches his duties with a smile. He likes putting on funny YouTube videos and doing the “little things that remind you to laugh even when times are serious.”


Working for MERT certainly isn’t a walk in the park—the job is anything but relaxing. The MERT team is on call 5p.m.7a.m, seven days a week during the academic year, including additional hours during special events such as Spring Fling. It’s entirely student-run and has 70 members, each of whom works at least 24 hours per month. Managing such a large and important organization is no easy task, but Presser is proud to “be the representative that can go out and show everyone how MERT can help.” Presser and his fellow heroes come together to form a MERT team that even “The Avengers” would envy. Omar Sobh C’15 is a Superman fan. The College junior is MERT’s Training Officer and has “loved every second of it.” His dream celebrity patient would be Celine Dion since “maybe she’ll sing to me when I’m done treating her.” While Sobh wants a celebrity serenade, Rose Kleiman C’14 would prefer someone who could make her laugh. The MERT Scheduling Officer’s dream patient would be anyone from the cast of “Saturday Night Live,” since “they would just

be cracking jokes the whole time and probably would have gotten injured in a hilarious way.” For Grace Kunas C&N’15, MERT was one of the most attractive aspects of Penn. She told The WALK, “I came to Penn with a Pennsylvania EMT certification, so I was able to apply immediately.” Prospective heroes, don’t worry— MERT does offer classes both in EMT and CPR, which are necessary to become MERT certified. Like her favorite superhero, Blossom from “The Powerpuff Girls,” MERT Lieutenant Kunas has red hair, which “clashes big time” with her red uniform shirt. MERT is the perfect on-campus opportunity to gain hands-on medical experience, which makes it ideal for future doctors and nurses. Presser, Sobh, Kleiman and Kunas are all planning to attend medical school. The crew may not be jumping into phone booths or donning capes anytime soon, but they’re well on their way to saving the world. Interested in joining MERT? Stay tuned for news about their summer EMT training session and visit pennmert.org for more information.

THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 17


On Gabrielle Frederick: Black leather jacket, Willow, $1,398; Tan fur scarf, Adrienne Landau, $198; Dangling gold necklace, Fallon, $350; at Intermix. Shimmery black dress, Ark & Co., $74; Geometric dangling earrings, $16; Spiked metallic purse, HD by M, $48; at Smak Parlour Truck. Gold hand bracelet, Eriness; Gold ring; stylist’s own. Black heels, model’s own. On Eve Bowers: Red ribbed dress, Ronny Kobo, $360; Gold chain-linked bracelet, BAM, $220; Black leather belt with gold plate, BRAVE, $198; White, black and green snakeskin clutch, Khirma Eliazov, $895; at Intermix. Cream fur vest; Black sheer maxi skirt, Karl Lagerfeld; Gold stud earrings; Gold leaf ear cuff, BCBG; Gold necklace; Black open-toed heels; stylist’s own.


TO BE CONTINUED...


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THE Women OF At Barbuzzo, guests are invited to sit at the bar and watch the chefs at work. Images courtesy of thedrinknation.com (above, below and far right) and courierpostonline.com (right).

The ever-trendy Verde sells flowers, artisan chocolates, accessories, jewelry and other gift items. Swing by for some homemade truffles! Image courtesy of phillylovenotes.com.

Marcie Turney (left) and Valerie Safran (right) have revitalized the area around 13th street in Philadelphia. This photo, taken October 12, 2012, memorializes the Made with Moxie “all girl chefs’ dinner” they hosted to launch the release of Charlotte Druckman’s new book Skirt Steak. The two later donated $3,000 from ticket sales to Women Against Abuse, a Philadelphia nonprofit supporting victims of domestic violence. Image courtesy of womenagainstabuse.org.

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ARTS&STYLE\thewalk

13

th

STREET

Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran turned 13th Street from seedy red-light district to trendy midtown village as part of the food movement that has swept Philadelphia.

By Mary Alice Solmssen

f you’re one of Penn’s many self-professed ‘foodies,’ then you’ve probably experienced the delight that is Barbuzzo. Nestled between Drury and Sansom streets, this dimly-lit Mediterranean kitchen and bar boasts one of the most creative menus in the city. Since its opening in 2010, Barbuzzo has received rave reviews from the Philadelphia foodie scene. It would be impressive for owners Valerie Safran and Executive Chef Marcie Turney if Barbuzzo were their only offering, but the restaurant is merely one star in the constellation that is their business empire. With the opening of Little Nonna’s, Turney and Safran now own and operate seven businesses, all of which are located on or near 13th Street in Midtown. When Turney and Safran opened their first storefront in 2002, 13th Street was a different place. Instead of Stephen Starr restaurants and gourmet grocery stores, the street was populated with adult entertainment shops and shady check-cashing joints. Vestiges of the old neighborhood still exist, like Danny’s Leather, Adult and Video, but that’s more novelty than norm. (I once stopped in there to get cash from the ATM—I don’t recommend it). In those days, 13th Street was more redlight district than yuppie paradise, but it was against this backdrop that the partners opened up their first business, a lifestyle boutique called Open House. The bank was unwilling to give the couple a loan to start their business, so they had to put everything on Safran’s credit card. The gamble paid off: Open House was a success. Still in business today, the shop carries a plethora of novelty household items. From there, Turney and Safran went on to open

Lolita, the popular BYO. As the city began to gentrify around them, Turney and Safran’s empire grew. They expanded their restaurant line to include Barbuzzo, which opened in 2010; Jamonera, a Spanish-style tapas bar; and their newest offering, Little Nonna’s, which is the couple’s take on home-cooked Italian fare. In addition to Open House, the two also operate another lifestyle store called Verde and an artisan chocolate shop called Marcie Blaine. Their work on 13th street and their contribution to the city has not gone unnoticed—Turney and Safran have been affectionately dubbed the “Queens of the Gayborhood” by various Philadelphia publications. “In a city where what has been usually dictates what will be, in a neighborhood that nobody else wanted or cared about, two women came in and breathed change all over everything…they had ideas,” wrote Philadelphia Magazine in 2012. The couple has since received accolades from The New York Times, Travel + Leisure and Oprah Magazine. Turney and Safran are proud of the part they have played in the revitalization of the Philadelphia food scene. “Ever since we moved into this neighborhood in 2002, we’ve dreamed of building 13th Street into a lively corridor of restaurants, shops and cafes,” says Turney. “I couldn’t be more proud to have had a hand in creating the vibrant culture that exists here today.” Turney and Safran’s efforts to revitalize Midtown Philadelphia is remarkable for many reasons. Philadelphia food empires have traditionally been headed by men—Stephen Starr and Jose Garces, for example. Turney and

Safran have become names in the Philadelphia food scene, on par with Starr and Garces, and they are arguably the first female chefs to reach this degree of success in Philadelphia. Although many believe that there is a glass ceiling in the food industry, Turney and Safran seem to have successfully broken through it. What also sets Turney and Safran apart is the success of their brand. The two have created an eclectic and well-articulated brand across all of their enterprises, drawing on global inspiration for dishes and décor. Each business is unique yet fits like a puzzle piece into their overall brand. Despite their success, Turney and Safran maintain a hands-on management style. Everything from décor to menu design is done together by the couple. Safran’s Twitter feed is littered with 140-character insights into the creativity and thought that permeates every aspect of their empire. She recently Instragrammed a picture of a lone chair standing on a few wooden planks, captioning that Chef Turney had “insisted” on wood floors for Little Nonna’s opening. This dedication to authenticity is evident in all of their endeavors. Need more proof? Go to Little Nonna’s on a Saturday night and you’ll see Turney in the kitchen taste-testing dishes while Safran handles the floor, ensuring that the choreography of the wait staff is seamless. Watching them work, it’s evident that after eleven years of empire-building their passion for food—and Philadelphia—has only grown stronger.

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TREND WATCH SPLURGE

CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION F/W 2013

SAVE

Leather panel tailored coat, Valentino, $2,865, visit matchesfashion.com.

Black leather look star punch t-shirt, Topman, $44, visit topman.com.

Navy 2 in 1 smart biker coat, River Island, $195, visit riverisland.com.

Diamond ceramic & PVD stainless steel watch, Movado, $1,795, visit saksfifthavenue.com.

Leather gloves, Dolce & Gabbana, $525, visit thecorner.com.

Detroit cut leather trousers, Rick Owens, $1,434, visit matchesfashion.com.

Leather boots, Salvatore Ferragamo, $1,042, visit farfetch.com.

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Black dobby skinny trousers, Topman, $70, visit topman.com.

Plaid-lined combo boots, Forever 21, $35, visit forever21.com.

Leather bowling bag with foldover flap, Zara, $189, visit zara.com.


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PUNKYblack

Embrace the winter darkness with a sleek silhouette and the dangerous scent of leather. Punk jackets let you look cool without feeling this season’s chill.

SPLURGE

BY MICHAEL XUFU HUANG

SAVE Black stand collar side zipper biker jacket, Feeluxury, $70, visit feeluxury.com.

Degrade pear embroidered peplum top, Alexander McQueen, $1,860, visit alexandermcqueen.com.

Mink-trimmed leather shoulder bag, Alexander McQueen, $3,520, visit theoutnet.com.

Black leather pyramid and spike wrist cuff, Hot Topic, $11, visit hottopic.com.

Punk bracelet, Luis Morais, $1,390, visit aloharag.com.

Bay harbor patch clutch wallet, Apt. 9, $24, visit kohls.com.

Parisian zip detail leather look mini skirt, Chiara, $31, visit chiarafashion.co.uk.

Signature motorcycle mini skirt in black leather, Saint Laurent, $2,850, visit ysl.com.

Spike pump, Anthony Vaccarello, $882, visit farfetch.com.

ANTHONY VACCARELLO F/W 2013

Eiffel tower heels, Skin, $72, visit theiconic.com.au.

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TREND WATCH SPLURGE Dark blue silk self-tie bowtie, Forzieri, $72, visit forzieri.com.

LOUIS VUITTON F/W 2013

SAVE

Optic white slim fit oxford shirt, Banana Republic, $48, visit bananarepublic.com.

Navy plain tie, Zara, $36, visit zara.com.

Navy corduroy floral blazer, Marc by Marc Jacobs, $460, visit ssense.com.

Floral print waterfall blazer, Mango, $100, visit mango.com.

Cupidon cufflinks, Hermès, $540, visit hermes.com.

Navy embroidered sequined skull smoking slipper, Alexander McQueen, $645, visit bergdorfgoodman.com.

Slim fit trousers, Original Penguin, $48, visit flannels. com. Wool alexia pants in blue, Jil Sander, $845, visit stylebop.com. Arlen loafer in navy suede, Vaneli for Jildor, $124, visit jildorshoes.com.

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MOODY blue SPLURGE Ornate crucifix necklace, Dolce & Gabbana, $1,545, visit farfetch.com.

Though winter is here, spring isn’t far behind. Put on those blue suede shoes, add some vibrant florals, and get ready to welcome a bright new day!

SAVE

ANNA SUI F/W 2013

Antique floral orb charm pendant necklace, Bill Skinner, $80, visit billskinnerstudio.co.uk.

Velvet floral dress, Christopher Kane, $2,422, visit farfetch.com.

Floral print jersey dress, Mango, $80, visit mango.com.

Rhinestone ring, Stella McCartney, $385, visit yoox.com. Teddy fur pea coat, Topshop, $158, visit topshop.com.

Candice rabbit fur coat, Diane von Furstenberg, $1,900, visit matchesfashion.com. Byzanthium perspex embellished clutch, Skinnydip, $64, visit skinnydiplondon.com. Navy blue high heel suede loafer, Jil Sander, $735, visit forzieri.com.

Navy suedette high court shoes, Faith, $80, visit debenhams.com.

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TREND WATCH: BEAUTY Need to update your makeup routine? The Fall/Winter 2013 runway collections are the perfect inspiration. This season’s BY TINA HSU makeup trends are nothing short of bold and shocking—super for a night out with the girls!

OPULENT ORANGE WINKS Burnt orange eye shadow is all the rage this season. Best of all, it works with all different eye colors, though blue and green eyes tend to pop the most against the orange. Tone it down by blending it with burgundy or prune eye shadow for a more sophisticated look. Liquid metal in enrapture, Illamasqua, $26, visit sephora.com.

Primasilk eye color in solstice, Sunday Riley, $26, visit sephora.com.

Powder eye shadow in vapour, Illamasqua, $20, visit sephora.com.

J. Mendel F/W 2013

Loose color concentrate in mimosa, Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics, $14, visit sephora.com.

Magnificent metals foil finish eye shadow in comex gold, Stila, $32, visit sephora.com.

SMOKY, SULTRY CAT EYES Winged eyeliner has been popular since the 1950s, but that doesn’t mean it’s outdated. This winter, use a combination of smooth, color-rich eyeliner and velvetytextured shadows to take this cat-eye classic to a new generation. Beauty magic marc’er precision pen in blacquer, Marc Jacobs, $30, visit sephora.com.

Eye paint in black valley, NARS, $25, visit NARScosmetics.com.

They’re real mascara, Benefit, $23, visit benefitcosmetics.com.

Pure pigments in black, Make Up For Ever, $20, visit sephora.com.

Anna Sui F/W 2013

Beauty highliner gel crayon in blacquer, Marc Jacobs, $25, visit sephora.com.

ALL THAT GLITTERS There is nothing wrong with loving glitter, unless you are talking about Mariah Carey’s 2001 film flop. But seriously indulge yourself by adding some bling to your lids. Pair this look with simply, natural colored lips and just a tiny bit of blush to keep your look from being over the top.

Heavy metal glitter liner in distortion, Urban Decay, $19, visit urbandecay.com.

Moondust eyeshadow in moonspoon, Urban Decay, $20, visit urbandecay.com. Glitters in multicolored silver, Make Up For Ever, $15, visit sephora.com.

Chanel F/W 2013

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Diamond powder in white turquoise, Make Up For Ever, $25, visit sephora.com.

Pigment in platinum, MAC, $21, visit MACcosmetics.com.


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BACK TO NATURE: REDEFINING JEWELRY

From sliced antique diamond, to fossilized dinosaur bone, to recycled platinum—Monique Péan C’03 champions social causes and sustainability through her fine jewelry line. BY JULIA VITALE

Diamond Stacking Band, $1,465, at Barneys New York.

Diamond & Emerald Slice Stud Earrings, $18,270, at Barneys New York.

Woolly Mammoth and Smoky Topaz Earrings, $4,985, at Barneys New York.

Geometric “Imix” Necklace, K’ATUN Collection, $30,330.

Diamond Slice & Recycled Rose Gold Eternity Band Ring, $16,610, at Barneys New York.

onique Péan is redefining fine jewelry. Dubbed “One to Watch” in Fortune’s “40 Under 40” list and named one of “Ten Women on the Rise,” by O, The Oprah Magazine, Péan’s namesake collection is both stylish and sustainable. After majoring in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Penn, she drastically changed gears, switching from a career as an analyst with Goldman Sachs’s fixed income group to a jewelry entrepreneur within three short years. While Péan was working at Goldman, tragedy struck her family. Her younger sister, who had been heavily involved in Philanthropic endeavors in Haiti, was killed in a car accident at the age of sixteen. The passing of her younger sister prompted Péan to reconsider her corporate career in finance and instead focus on a new role that would enable her to build on her sister’s charitable legacy. “I decided that I wanted to find a career that allowed me to combine my passions for design, art, travel and philanthropy,” Péan said, reflecting on her dramatic course change. Combining her interests, Péan created a line of jewelry that was sustainable and a company that was focused on giving back. The high quality of the products in conjunction with a socially responsible and philanthropic approach allowed Péan to honor her charitable sister as well as to create an entirely new niche within the accessories business. As part of her commitment to environmental responsibility, Péan’s jewelry incorporates recycled materials. For example, Péan notes that gold mining is incredibly destructive, saying, “mining enough gold for one wedding band can produce over 20 tons of waste, and there is already enough gold available to last the jewelry industry for the next 50 years.” Mining releases cyanide, lead and mercury into local water sources, and is frequently linked to poor working conditions and low safety standards. By using only recycled gold and platinum in her pieces, Péan’s company limits the demand for mined materials. Furthermore, she uses fair trade and conflict and devastation free stones, ensuring

Diamond Stacking Band, $1,465, at Barneys New York.

that every stone has been handled according to strict protocols. Péan’s diverse undergraduate and career background has produced notable innovations in jewelry. Monique loves using rare materials, such as fossilized dinosaur bones, which have never before been used in fine jewelry. Péan was inspired to use the bones due to their range of ages, 146-156 million years old, and, of course, their aesthetic appeal: “Due to impurities that were in the surrounding sediment,” Péan says, “the fossils range in color from lavender to black with red, yellow, brown and blue. The intricate patterns in the bone remind me of abstract art.” Péan’s sources of inspiration are diverse, but her consistent worldly voyages primarily fuel the wellcurated eclectic beauty of Péan’s collections. Each year, Péan travels to a new, exotic locale in search of new environmentally sustainable materials for her pieces, and subsequently, new local artisanal business partners. The geographic makeup and the indigenous art of places such as the Arctic Circle and Shishmaref, Alaska have served as “core inspirations” for her collections, such as her inaugural Bering collection. Péan’s most recent collection, Tu’til, came about as a result of her trip to Mayan archeological sites in Guatemala. Echoing the evolution of nature, Péan sought to, “explore the juxtaposition of negative space, three-dimensionality and geometric form” to create a sense of timeless beauty in pieces that possess strong connections to their natural origins. A positive attitude and a progressive business savvy have simultaneously allowed Péan’s company to reflect her own worldly nature and deeply passionate values. In light of her company’s rapid nascent on the fashion horizon, Péan encourages Penn students to not only learn from their mistakes, which can be integral to finding success, but also not to limit the scale of their dreams.

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SAME HOUSE, From Wang to Simons, young designers are leaving their mark on storied fashion houses. BY CORDELIA MESEROW

merican designer Ralph Rucci claimed, “Style is a continuum… a refinement of the same vocabulary.” Regarding the contemporary 2013 fashion skyline, Mr. Rucci could not have shown more insight. Be it Madison or Montaigne, a stroll down the fashion artery of any international metropolis will find the same names as a half a century prior. From Céline to Vuitton, many of today’s houses were as familiar to post-war Parisian fashionistas as they are to gossip girls of post-credit crisis Manhattan. Upon walking through the door of any luxury house, one would be in the midst of the “refined vocabulary” to which Mr. Rucci so brilliantly referred. Although the surname on the door remains associated with Christian and Cristóbal, European fashion houses have undergone major changes in creative leadership, subsequently altering the nature of the clothes. Creative directors are doing everything possible to keep their brands relevant in light of the longstanding histories of those brands. Luxury giants LVMH and Kering have brought in a host of new creative talent at a fashion triumvirate of brands: Dior, Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent (LVMH owns Dior, and Kering owns Balenciaga and YSL). Following John Galliano’s 2011 oust, Dior was ripe for a face-lift. Galliano’s extreme designs embodied over the top ’90s and early-millennium extravagance. The brand needed to scale back. Gossip circulated throughout LVMH’s yearlong search: Would Ricardo leave Givenchy? Could Albert be poached from Lanvin? Did Marc decline in order to succeed Karl at Chanel? While it may seem that Raf Simons was chosen as a last resort, Simons’ designs for Dior were lauded for being (Top) Simons bids goodbye at his final collection for Jil Sander in 2012. Image courtesy of glamour.com. (Left) Alexander Wang celebrates his successful debut Balenciaga collection during Paris Fashion Week F/W 2013. Image courtesy of thedailybeast.com.

Alexander Wang studied the Balenciaga archives for his F/W 2013 debut collection. Images courtesy of nymag.com.

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sleek, prescient and elegant. Cathy Horyn, The New York Times’s notoriously harsh fashion critic, praised Simons’ Fall 2013 couture show, noting, “Mr. Simons questions everything… the show was a challenge to people’s ideas: what’s new, what’s old, what’s original.” Simons presents his challenges to fashion norms quietly, rarely giving interviews or posing for photographs. His shows have been resounding successes, making Dior enviable on the runway as well as wearable for young shoppers. One cannot help but notice equally impressive changes at Kering’s Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent. At Balenciaga, Alexander Wang’s December 2012 appointment as creative director caused quite the industry scandal. What was a twenty-something Asian American who couldn’t speak French doing at a Paris-based fashion house? Nicolas Ghesquière had already propelled the brand into the 21st century. His infamous “City Bag” with its studs, zippers and various colors and sizes, became a staple. All seemed to be running smoothly except for the fact that none of Ghesquière’s edgy designs were consistent with Cristóbal Balenciaga’s understated vision of Spanish pre-war elegance. Kering CEO, FrançoisHenri Pinault, recognized the need to return to the heritage of the brand—just as Raf Simons had at Dior—and saw no one better than Wang, the king of minimalism, to run the house. And while outrage, or as one industry insider put it, “sacrilege,” marked the initial responses prior to Wang’s first show, he ultimately received resounding approval from editors and retailers. The fashion director of Neiman Marcus, Ken Downing, even claimed Wang’s first collection marked “the perfect balance between edge and elegance.”


FASHION\thewalk

NEW RESIDENT While minimalistic femininity reigned supreme on Avenue Montaigne at Dior and on Rue Cassette at Balenciaga, just around the corner, YSL’s Avenue Georges V headquarters experienced a maelstrom. At Yves Saint Laurent, a complete rebranding took place practically overnight. The February 2012 removal of Stefano Pilati, who created 21st century YSL icons including the caged-bootie, and the subsequent replacement by former creative director of Dior menswear Hedi Slimane, seemed bizarre and unnecessary. Slimane came to Yves Saint Laurent with a number of strings attached, including rebranding the ready-to-wear line as simply “Saint Laurent” with an accompanying logo change. He further demanded to move the design headquarters to his residency in Los Angeles. Kering caved to Slimane’s demands. At Slimane’s first showing, editors were outraged. Slimane’s designs were harsh while Laurent’s were tailored. His take on ’90s grunge did not resonate with the ’70s structure Yves created. Slimane, however, defended his nouveau grunge approach as consistent to what Yves would have wanted if he were still living. Although many disagreed, Slimane found a champion and supporter in YSL’s surviving life and business partner, Pierre Bergé. Bergé, who no longer has a financial stake in Yves Saint Laurent, believed in Slimane’s vision. Since this endorsement, Slimane’s collections have gained more approval. His looks landed international magazine covers including January 2013 Vogue, and many credit Slimane for the quiet “grunge” resurgence currently taking place in fashion.

With Simons’, Wang’s and Slimane’s appointments, it is clear that fashion houses are not necessarily associated with the emboldened names on their shopping bags. The role of creative director, despite his ability to wield influence in the fashion community, is constantly in flux. As recently as November 2013, Marc Jacobs announced his departure from Louis Vuitton, and the briefly unemployed Nicolas Ghesquière was named to take his place as Jacobs focuses on a potential initial public stock offering for his own brand. Jacobs’ innovative shows, creative vision and celebrity collaborations defined the Louis Vuitton womenswear of the past decade. LVMH executives are confident in Ghesquière’s creative abilities, however. Michael Burke, Louis Vuitton’s chairman and CEO, said: “Crafting is the metaphor. We are talking about Nicolas crafting his destiny today, and we, on our side, are crafting the success of Louis Vuitton.” The cyclical nature of trends and the simultaneous desire for brands to remain relevant are an art, not a science. Both editors wielding their Miranda Priestly-like universal power and, more importantly, how far customers are willing to open their wallets, regulate the retail climate. At the same time, the likes of Simons, Wang and Slimane have collectively created a fervor in the fashion industry. Whether it be a return to history at Dior, a renewed faith in youthful talent at Balenciaga or the continuation of a legacy at Yves Saint Laurent, new creative directors have the ability to not only refine the “vocabulary” of their predecessors, but also to start an entirely new conversation.

Hedi Slimane (top) shook the fashion world with his grungy makeover of French fashion giant Yves Saint Laurent. His debut F/W 2013 collection (above) and recent collaborations with recording artists (below) such as Marilyn Manson have redefined the YSL brand. Images courtesy of nypost.com, style.com and thewildmagazine.com.

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thewalk/FASHION On Caroline Min: Leather sleeved varsity jacket, Club Monaco, $398; Black and white cashmere gloves, Club Monaco, $50; at Club Monaco. Black and white flare skirt, A.L.C., $498, at Intermix. White sports bra, Athleta, $46; Gray pattered leggings, Athleta, $74; at Athleta. Black and white heeled Converse, stylist’s own. On Miller Radford: Black nylon leather sleeved jacket, stylist’s own. White sonic try tank, Sugoi, $70; Black running tights, Nike, $75; Running sunglasses, Tifosi, $80; at Philadelphia Runner. Black socks and black trainers, model’s own.

Prêt-à- Sporter In the Singh Center for Nanotechnology, sportswear meets exacting standards. Bold and empowered, we take points, lines and surfaces to higher dimensions.

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FASHION\thewalk

DIRECTED BY Erica Sachse ’14, BONNIE ARBITTIER ’14, Arjan Singh ’16 AND MAX WANG ’15 MODELED BY NATALIA JUNCADELLA ’14, CAROLINE MIN ’14, MILLER RADFORD ’14 AND WES SPIRO ’14 PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAX WANG ’15 STYLED BY MICHAEL KIGAWA ’17, ALI LOTZ ’16, ALISON MILLER ’16, LINDY SMITH ’16 AND MICHAEL XUFU HUANG ’17 Beauty BY JOYCE HU ’17 AND LAURA SACHSE ’16 COORDINATED BY ANUSHA CHEMICALA ’16, ROLANDA EVELYN ’16 AND MAHA SUBRAMANIAM ’16 THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 31


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On Caroline: Heather gray sweater, Club Monaco, $150, at Club Monaco. Dark gray headband, Athleta, $14, at Athleta. Metallic gold and silver pants; Athletic leather gloves; stylist’s own. Orange and blue trainers, Asics, model’s own. On Natalia Juncadella: Hooded leather jacket, Helmut by Helmut Lang, $995; Geometric knit tank, Intermix, $198, at Intermix. Black yoga shorts, Athleta, $34, at Athleta. Black thigh-high socks; Metallic rose gold sneakers; stylist’s own. (Opposite page) On Natalia: Black and white paneled sweater, Rag & Bone, $328; Black and white chevron dress, Gig, $750, at Intermix. Black and toffee leather gloves, Club Monaco, $99, at Club Monaco. Metallic rose gold sneakers, stylist’s own. On Wes Spiro: Neon yellow tank, Mizuno, $45; Neon orange green and gray trainers, Nike, $110, at Philadelphia Runner. Heather gray pants; Gray wool jacket; stylist’s own. White button down shirt, model’s own.

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On Wes: Gray button down shirt, CMMP, $125, at Commonwealth Proper. Black sweatpants, Adidas, $60; Neon orange, green and gray trainers, Nike, $110; Turquoise and navy zip up jacket, Nike, $115, at Philadelphia Runner. Gray wool jacket, stylist’s own. On Miller: Black running tights, Nike, $75; Fluorescent green trainers, Adidas, $110, at Philadelphia runner. Navy blue puffer jacket; Dark gray sweater; Orange and black print hat; stylist’s own. White t-shirt, model’s own.

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(Left) On Natalia: Emerald silk top, Intermix, $198; Black sheer paneled long sleeved top, Otis & Maclain, $125; at Intermix. Black and white leather knit leggings, Club Monaco, $150, at Club Monaco. Gold chainlinked bracelet, stylist’s own. Gray trainers with lime green laces, model’s own. (Right) On Wes: Red quart-zip jacket, Nike, $65; Neon orange green and gray trainers, Nike, $110; at Philadelphia Runner. Heather gray pants; Sunglasses; stylist’s own. Black bubble hooded jacket, model’s own. (Opposite page, left) On Miller: Black running tights, Nike, $75, at Philadelphia Runner. Black graphic t-shirt; Black matte backpack; stylist’s own. Black leather bomber jacket, model’s own. (Opposite page, right) On Caroline: Black and white plaid peplum shirt, Torn by Ronny Kobo, $278, at Intermix. White opaque vest, Oiselle, $70; Black and white trainers, Nike, $110; at Philadelphia Runner. Black yoga shorts, Athleta, $39; Black tote bag, Athleta, $79; at Athleta. Black net zip up jacket, stylist’s own.

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HIGH TECH, HIGH FASHION Technology and fashion team up to introduce a new era where the possibilities are endless. BY ADAM WARNER

(Top) Utilizing an eye-tracking system, fashion designer Ying Gao’s interactive, gaze-activated dresses writhe around and light up in response to an observer’s stare. (Center) Daniel Widrig’s exhibit, “The Art and Science of Flex,” celebrates the essence of the human body in motion. (Bottom) A piece from Iris van Herpen’s F/W 2011-12 “Capriole” Haute Couture collection.

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ottled sequins, reptilian prints and eerily anatomical heels wowed the fashion world during Alexander McQueen’s Spring/Summer 2010 presentation. Similarly, Balenciaga’s metal-plated leggings from Spring/Summer 2007 seemed plucked from the cover of an Isaac Asimov novel. Science has often inspired creative directors, but rarely have science and fashion fused in such a tangible way until recently. Now, a new type of sci-fi invasion has arrived—in the form of high fashion. Just a decade ago, printing nylon glasses in a garage and growing leather in a lab weren’t merely considered outlandish—they were unimaginable. Step forward to today and the fashion industry is in an era where Tron-esque luminescence, 3-D printing and biofabrication are reshaping traditional design approaches. Initial forays into fabrication nouveau are fantastical. Montrealbased designer Ying Gao rigged her glowing dresses with an eye-tracking system and motors—the fabric writhes mesmerizingly in response to the gaze of onlookers. Iris van Herpen, a Dutch designer, captured water splashing over the naked form with a high-speed camera and then digitally recreated the images by printing the images as pieces in her “Crystallization” collection. The unbridled freedom offered by 3-D printing has been stimulating the minds of scientists and designers since its conception in 1984. The tools have been used for modeling and prototypes in research, engineering and architecture since the 1980s. Its applicability to fashion, however, has only recently been realized as a group of young names experiment with the technology to expand the traditional definition of clothing. Recent utilization has often been with a designer-architect duo, the latter bringing expertise of the programming software, thus highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the emergent design process. Yet, the changes to manufacturing are perhaps the most exciting.


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(Opposite page) Iris van Herpen and Daniel Widrig’s S/S 2010 “Crystallization” collection of 3-D printed dresses. (Left) The “strvct” collection from Continuum Fashion is one of many 3D-printed shoe collections to come. (Right) Daniel Widrig’s collection of 3-D printed clutch bags was a part of Moondial’s “Fashion X Technology” exhibit at New York Fashion Week in September 2013.

3-D printing allows for single, customized production with minimal investment cost. Production runs no longer need assurances of mass sales to maintain profitability, creating an environment where creativity and customizability can flourish. Made-to-order garments, traditionally prohibitively expensive, may soon be available. Design houses that traditionally could not muster the capital now have flexibility. Already, small 3-D printers intended for small runs retail as low as $1,200. The effects have been immediate: mainline companies like New Balance have begun printing custom shoes while Ron Arad’s 3-D printed sunglasses and Continuum’s custom undergarments and bikinis have already hit the consumer market. With the new technology, inventive and customized creations may be feasible on a large scale at affordable price points. Compared to printing, growing clothing may seem downright alien. However, the knowledge for both advances is being adopted by the fashion industry. Though cell and tissue cultures are certainly nothing new, the ability to effectively recreate functional human and animal tissue is just now becoming a reality, which is of use to designers. For instance, Andras Forgacs co-founded Organovo, a company that prints human tissue, when he quickly realized the applicability beyond the medical field. He uses this technology from his current company, Modern Meadow, to mass-produce leather and other animal products, resolving many of the moral, sanitary and sustainability questions that plague the use of the natural counterparts. Grown leather in particular may be the first to be used on a wide scale. The single layer of cells can be grown to fit any desired dimension or thickness. For example, the iconic Louis Vuitton handbags may theoretically be prepared from a single sheet grown in the exact shape needed. Whether or not this reeks of some Frankenstein-esque creation, the tangible benefits are obvious. The possibilities for new materials and notions of clothing construction are still to be determined. Fashion is rarely predictable, and its tendency to uphold tradition and innovation in equal esteem makes forecasting future trends seemingly impossible. It remains to be seen whether or not 3-D printing will escape the realm of the avant-garde and how willing people will be to purchase items made of skin grown in a lab. When the novelty eventually wears off, these questions will remain, challenging our perceptions of what clothing really is. These developments might be a fad, but they are quite plausibly a foundation for a radically transformed industry.

Los Angeles designer Michael Schmidt collaborated with 3-D printing company Shapeways and Brooklyn architect Francis Bitonti on a 3-D printed dress decorated with thousands of Swarovski crystals, modeled here by Dita Von Teese.

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Style, Substance Armed with business breadths and Balenciaga, Caroline Issa W’99 struts her stylish smarts on the international boulevards.

By Elizabeth Elder eek into a corridor at Huntsman Hall, and you’ll likely see students scurrying around in their Brooks Brothers best. However, not all Whartonites fit the pinstripe mold. Meet Caroline Issa W’99, a unique combination of business savant and fashionista who has found success in the world of European street style. After concentrating in Strategic Management, Issa began working in management consulting in San Francisco. Today, she’s at London-based  Tank (tankmagazine. com), an eclectic magazine focusing on fashion, visual arts, culture and global issues. Now in its fifteenth year of publication, Issa has been an integral force in keeping the publication relevant as its Fashion Director and Publisher. She is also the Editor-in-Chief of Tank’s online fashion magazine  because (becauselondon.com). It’s no surprise that Issa is one of The Business of Fashion’s 500, an elite group of fashion industry professionals including style arbiters such as Anna Wintour, Gisele Bündchen and Grace Coddington. Back in her Penn years, one would find Issa clad in a markedly chic mix of thrift finds and streetwear. Today, she’s more often found in Chanel and Jason Wu. Although her budget has become more amenable to high profile designers, Issa has always been a fan and devotee of J. Crew. She’s even a face in their Fall 2012 ad campaign. Fresh from the Spring/Summer 2014 fashion shows in London, Paris and Milan, Issa took the time to chat with The WALK about Penn, professional life, prognostications and, of course, Prada.

The WALK: At Wharton, many classes focus on business fundamentals, not creativity. As a Wharton gradudate working in a creative profession, do you think there is a dichotomy between these two? Caroline Issa: I believe business fundamentals are important, even for creatives, though they are quite different to understanding how to manage creativity or encouraging outside-the-box thinking. Statistics are not creatives’ cup of tea, unless they are math geniuses. But I’m grateful for the business fundamentals I took, as they have served me well throughout my creative career. The WALK: Now that you are in the fashion industry, what are the benefits you reaped of going to a business school? CI: I think I have a rare profile and background having gone to an undergraduate business school. The fashion industry needs a balance of both people

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who appreciate the creative genius of designers and directors, and business people who structure for growth and development! The WALK: You made the jump from management consulting to working at  Tank.  What prompted the change? CI: I had spent almost three amazing years travelling around the world on different consulting projects, and when I landed in London, I met the partners of Tank who were looking for someone to help run their business. It was too good of an opportunity to pass up, so I left a stable job to become a fashion publishing entrepreneur! The WALK: Was this something you always wanted to do? CI: No, not that I knew of. I always loved fashion and publishing, but I did not think I’d get to do it while I was so young.


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and Success S/S 2014 looks from some of Issa’s favorite up-and-coming designers, Ohne Titel, Barbara Casasola, Emilia Wickstead and Gabriele Colangelo (from left to right, respectively). Images courtesy of style.com.

Caroline Issa is a regular fixture at fashion week as well as a constant street style photographer favorite. Images courtesy of lipstickandloudmouths. blogspot.com.

The WALK: Describe a typical workday at because and Tank. CI: There is no typical workday! Between commissioning photo shoots, consulting on brand projects, working across all of our social media platforms and thinking about opening our gallery in our office for Tank.tv and a new magazine shop—the tasks vary day to day! The WALK: Many critics have cited print publication as a dying business.  What do you think?  Are online magazines the way of the future? CI: We believe that mobile is the savior of print magazines. A year ago, we launched something called the Fashion Scan. It’s been incredible in the sense of revolutionizing fashion print magazines and delivering digital content triggered by every single print page, including the ads. This is how it works: http://becauselondon.com/

fashion/2013/10/editors-letter.aspx. The WALK: With the integration of technology and fashion, what’s in store for the industry? And for Tank?  CI: We’ve applied the Fashion Scan to Tank and believe the technology is the future for print. Every print magazine should be taking it up soon, or face extinction. The WALK: In your opinion, what kinds of innovations are necessary for fashion houses right now? CI: Embracing digital and all that technology has to offer will be paramount for fashion houses— empowering customers, exploring heritage, becoming transparent and being storytellers [all through the use of] technology will be exciting. The WALK: Which designers do you think are the savviest and why?

CI: Alessandra Facchinetti and Stefano Pilati have both done projects where the clothes they showed were available to buy the next day (Uniqueness and Agnona brands). I think challenging the current, slow fashion cycle is a smart thing to do. The WALK: What are you most excited about this season?  CI: The Prada collection! The WALK: What pieces should college students invest in to build their wardrobes this winter? CI: An oversize coat will last several years, if not a lifetime. The WALK: What are the three best tips you would give students for success? CI: Live your life with passion. Enjoy what you do. Feel the fear, but do it anyway. THEWALKMAGAZINE.COM 41


KINGS & OUEENS

Liquid metal drips on a backdrop of skin, transforming flesh into structured armor. The beauty in confidence and the strength in vulnerability shine alongside DIY accessories in a tactful play of power and balance.

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Directed By Erica Sachse ’14, Bonnie Arbittier ’14, Arjan Singh ’16 and Max Wang ’15 Modeled by Naomi Biden ’16, Humayra Kabir ’16, Jose Pablo Toscano ’14, Jacob Wallenberg ’16 and Chantal Walton ’14 Photographed by Tara Gonzalez ’14 and Sara-Paige Silvestro ’16 DIY Accessories and Styling by Jessie Choi ’16, Michael Xufu Huang ’17, Ashley Leung ’16, Alexandra Lotz ’16, Mariana Pavia ’17 and Katie Wu ’17 Beauty by Laura Sachse ’16, Joyce Hu ’17 and Elie Sokoloff ’17 Paint by Lindsay Rapp ’14 Coordinated by Rosa Escandon ’15 and Rolanda Evelyn ’16

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On Chantal Walton: Metal headpiece, AhA-Gallery, price negotiable. On Jacob Wallenberg: Antler necklace, Moon & Arrow, $42, at Moon & Arrow. On Humayra Kabir: Calder-vintage necklace, $68, at Moon & Arrow. On all models: Metallic latex body paint, Liquid Latex Fashions, $17.25, at liquidlatexonline.com.

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DAZED & CONFUSED

Passing cars illuminate luxe furs and warm wools. When you look this chic, your rendezvous should be anything but secret.

DIRECTED BY ERICA SACHSE ’14, BONNIE ARBITTIER ’14 AND ARJAN SINGH ’16 PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAX WANG ’15 MODELED BY ANTHONY GEORGIADES ’16 AND LAUREN RANTZ ’17 STYLED BY MICHAEL XUFU HUANG ’17, MICHAEL KIGAWA ’17, MAYA RIVERA ’17 AND JULIA ZHU ’17 BEAUTY BY LAURA SACHSE ’16 AND ELIE SOKOLOFF ’17 COORDINATED BY ANUSHA CHEMICALA ’16, ROLANDA EVELYN ’16 AND MAHA SUBRAMANIAM ’16

On Lauren Rantz: Gray and black wool jacket, Alexander Wang, $1395, at Knit Wit. Black clutch with two studs, Stitch Collective, $110 at Kembrel. White dress pants, Céline; Necklace, Chanel; stylist’s own. Shoes, Elie Tahari, model’s own. On Anthony Georgiades: Black jeans, SkarGorn, $118, at Kembrel. Black Blazer, Hugo Boss; White Dress Shirt, Savile Row; Black dress shoes, Steve Madden; model’s own. Black bowtie, Topman, stylist’s own.

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On Lauren: Fur hat, Hatattack, $125, at KnitWit. Red shirt, Nell, $98; Cheetah jacket, BB Dakota, $146; at South Moon Under. Necklace, Chanel; Purse, Rebecca Minkoff; stylist’s own. Shoes, Elie Tahari, model’s own. (Right) On Lauren: Black fur jacket, Itala Testino, $895; Black pants, Paul Smith, $425; Leather gloves, Carolina Amato, $50; at Knit Wit. White lace shirt, Lovemarks, $50, at Kembrel. Lavendar felt hat, BCBGeneration, $45, at South Moon Under. On Anthony: Black jeans, SkarGorn, $118, at Kembrel. Polyester silver blazer, Le Château; Graphic black t-shirt, Givenchy; stylist’s own. Suede Loafers, Tod’s, model’s own.


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On Lauren: Block dress, Mason, $341; Leather gloves, Carolina Amato, $50; at Knit Wit. Gray and white faux fur jacket, Kristen Blake; Necklace, Barneys Co-Op; Shoes, Miu Miu; stylist’s own. On Anthony: Khaki blazer, Life After Denim, $228; Checkered pocket square, Ivy Prepster, $40; Cotton beige v-neck sweater, Fred Perry, $125; Blue pants, Jachs Driftere, $71; at Kembrel. White dress shirt, Savile Row; Suede loafers, Tod’s; model’s own.

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On Anthony: Polka dot blue shirt, 611 Lifestyle, $108; Off-white pants, Jachs Drifter, $71; at Kembrel. Long wool navy coat, Burberry, stylist’s own. Suede loafers, Tod’s, model’s own.


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GET YOUR CHARLESTON ON Feeling the Jazz Age spirit? Philadelphia is traveling back to the Roaring Twenties with chic, new speakeasystyle bars.

BY ANDIE DAVIDSON

THEN: THE JAZZ AGE

(Top) Speaking of throwbacks, here’s a gem from The WALK’s Summer 2012 issue, featuring Penn Jazz. Photographed by Max Wang C’15. (Bottom) 1920s speakeasies flourished in part because they were extremely profitable. Photo courtesy of Life magazine.

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he sky darkens, the lights of the city begin to glow and beyond an unmarked door, the buzz of lively voices and jazzy notes fills the night. It’s the height of the Roaring Twenties and the speakeasies are ready for action. With the start of Prohibition in 1920, many Americans turned to back-alley entrances and black market liquor. Named for the need to whisper or “speak easy,” illegal bars were located in hidden spots and required passwords or admission cards to enter. Rife with corruption and bribery, they were often funded by organized crime rings. At any moment, warning bells might go off, alerting patrons of a police raid, and the speakeasy would empty in a chaotic flash, shelves of liquor flipping upside down to dispose of their contraband. Even in the heyday of the speakeasy, alcohol quality was low and sometimes even dangerous. Moonshine liquor could include such ingredients as wood scraps, plant bits or even kerosene or mercury. Cheers? The art of bartending was focused on trying to make drinks marginally swallowable. For those in the jet set—those with the money

to import from overseas—there may have been better options. The Gin Rickey (gin, lime juice, soda water) was supposedly F. Scott Fitzgerald’s favorite, while Al Capone was said to have preferred the Southside (gin, lime juice, simple syrup, mint, club soda). Speakeasies weren’t merely places to drink, however—they were the embodiment of an attitude and lifestyle. The birth of jazz and new (scandalous) dancing took root in speakeasies. For the first time, women were allowed in drinking establishments, sparking what is now a common pastime in bars—flirting. And of course, there was the fashion. Many of the elaborate speakeasies welcomed a glamorous and wealthy crowd. The ubiquitous flapper of the Roaring Twenties got all dolled up to hit the town with a raised hemline, sleek bob, kohl-lined eyes and scarlet lips. With their cigarettes and scandalous “fast-living,” the most stylish men and women were found in speakeasies. Clearly, Prohibition didn’t have quite the effect it was aiming for. In the process though, the era gave us an iconic style and attitude still very much alive today.


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NOW: THE ROARING TWENTIES REVIVAL The flapper is out in full force, or at least, the flapper spirit. With Boardwalk Empire, Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby and everyday fashion trends, the past few years have felt like a throwback to the ’20s. Now another iconic Jazz Age feature is entering the scene: the speakeasy. Though New York City was the Grand Central of the speakeasy scene (and is the birthplace of the recent revival), Philadelphia was home to many illegal distilling mavens such as Mickey Duffy and the “king of Philadelphia bootleggers,” Max “Boo Boo” Hoff. It’s only fitting, then, that the speakeasy renaissance arrived in Philly with the 2009 opening of The Franklin Mortgage and Investment Co., named for the business facade Hoff used for his bootlegging. Since then, speakeasy-style bars have popped up across the city, bringing with them the iconic air of mystery, glamour and seduction. Many adopt the illicit aura of the original speakeasies with out-of-theway doors, dimly lit interiors and little official marketing. In contrast to the iffy liquor of Prohibition, however, the real star of the show today is often the drink itself. “[Speakeasy style] is getting more popular because the classic style cocktails are really starting to get revamped,” said Village Whiskey manager Chris Mann. “A lot of bartenders across the country are really starting to focus on the classics.” This focus on classic cocktails is evident from the

lists of “classic” or “prohibition” drinks on many bar menus, but despite the throwback to Prohibition style, cocktail culture today differs in at least one notable aspect: quality. “Prohibition didn’t exactly help the American art that was the cocktail,” said Franklin Mortgage assistant manager Robert Morris. “Spirits in America became a lot rougher around the edges; as a result, people tended to add sugar/ citrus to cover the harshness up.” In contrast, the modern craft cocktail movement speaks to a fresh attention and care. “It’s all about quality,” said Morris. “Establishments are beginning to treat their cocktail menus with the same respect as their food menus.” This is a far cry from the tradition of Prohibitionera bartenders forced into inventive concoctions; modern mixologists are also getting creative with various liquors and unusual organic ingredients. “There’s a lot of shock at the number of ingredients in our drinks…[and] curiosity as to what those ingredients are,” said Morris. “That’s where we come in to help guide them through it all.” In fact, the unique and handmade character of craft cocktails fits in well with the burgeoning farm-to-table movement taking root in Philadelphia. One thing is for sure: whether you go for classic or creative, these modern Juice Joints are an experience all their own.

(From top to bottom) Head downtown to The Farmer’s Cabinet, Village Whiskey or The Ranstead Room to try one-of-a-kind cocktails. (Top and center) Photographed by Angela Jang W’14. (Bottom) Image courtesy of The Ranstead Room.

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WHERE TO GET YOUR GIGGLE WATER IN PHILLY Hop Sing Laundromat 1029 Race St. / hopsinglaundromat.com

Despite the fact that Hop Sing Laundromat bills itself as “just a simple bar,” the smoke and mirrors suggest otherwise (starting with the eccentric owner, “Lêe”). From the gated door, unmarked except for a sign proclaiming, “For prosperity repeal 18th Amdt.,” visitors proceed to a complimentary shoe shine and into the classy candlelit interior. Then it’s time to get serious: Hop Sing Laundromat enforces a strict dress code (all class, people!) and restricts photos and cell phone usage. Most of all, Hop Sing takes its drinks seriously—the bar stocks about 1000 bottles and offers a variety of unique cocktails. Daisy would approve. Drinks to try: Clover Club (fresh raspberries, gin, Velvet Falerum, lime juice, egg white), The Boston Healer (coffee, mint, bourbon, honey liquer, Licor 43, cream)

The Ranstead Room 2013 Ranstead St. / elreyrestaurant.com

If you’re looking to follow in the footsteps of glamorous flappers, head to The Ranstead Room. Appropriately, there’s no website and no glaring sign—in fact, there’s not really even a front door. Instead, in true speakeasy fashion, visitors either are led by a waitress through the El Rey kitchen or venture into the alley behind El Rey to enter a nondescript door marked with intertwined “R’s.” In the intimate interior, expert bartenders whip up fancy custom tinctures to enjoy amidst the chandeliers and leather furniture. Drinks to try: Violet Fizz (gin, violette, lemon, egg white), Eastside (gin, lime, cucumber, mint), Chin Chin (bourbon, apple, ginger)

Village Whiskey 118 S. 20th St. / villagewhiskey.com

What will it be today, “prohibition” or “repeal?” Divided between recipes envisioned during Prohibition and ones created after repeal, the cocktail list features a variety of classic and modern drinks as well as craft beers and more than 80 whiskeys. Village Whiskey also claims to have the “best damn burger in town” (something to judge as you sip your whiskey or Bee Charmer). Drinks to try: Old Fashioned (bourbon, bitters, sugar, lemon), Commodore (bourbon, orange bitters, lime, demerara sugar, mezcal rinse)

The Franklin Mortgage & Investment Co. 112 S.18th St. / thefranklinbar.com

Descend into decadence, if you will. In an underground haven, the mixologists of Franklin Mortgage craft both classic and innovative cocktails. In a nod to Philadelphia’s real-life Prohibition record, the bar is named for the largest Prohibition-era alcohol ring in the U.S., which was based in Philadelphia. Here, the drink reigns supreme. The bartender is an artist, and the cocktail is not just a drink but an experience. Drinks to try: Red Viper (bourbon, Cointreau, watermelon-habanero syrup, orange bitters), Moon’s Shadow (bourbon, rum, sherry, crème de cacao, cream, brown sugar and cinnamon syrups, aromatic bitters)

(From top to bottom) Be sure to check out Hop Sing Laundromat, Village Whiskey and The Franklin Mortgage & Investment Co. (Top) Image courtesy of Robert Neroni Photography. (Center and bottom) Photographed by Angela Jang W’14.

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The Farmers’ Cabinet 1113 Walnut St. / thefarmerscabinet.com

From the Mason jar lights strung from the ceiling to the wooden plank menu boards lining the walls, The Farmers’ Cabinet is all about organic simplicity. This extends to a list of carefully handcrafted cocktails, craft beers and locally-sourced food. Despite its rustic theme, however, the drink list is full of inventive twists on classics. Drinks to try: Dear Diary (cognac, amaro averna, Aztec chocolate bitters, angostura bitters, vanilla), Spelling Error (genever, lemon juice, amaro ramazotti, sherry, molasses)


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BY Olivia Stearn

ART MEETS SOUL Three tatted Penn students share their amazing stories and incredible ink. Tattoos are more than skin-deep. Just like statement rings or oversized handbags, tattoos can showcase our sense of style, self-image and personal ideology. Yet there is a fundamental difference: permanence. Throughout time, this unusual permanence has incited controversy, contributing to a persistent perception of tattoos as counter-cultural. Sam Stavis C’16 notes that many people are surprised

avery Krieger C’16, Cognitive Science Houston, Texas

zeynep uguR

she has a tattoo simply because she does not fit the “goth” or “hipster” stereotypes. Irene Katopodis C’15 looks forward to a time when tattoos are considered commonplace and no longer carry any social stigma. Here are three inspiring Penn students who have opted to adorn their bodies permanently, for reasons ranging from the purely decorative to the deeply sentimental.

Avery Krieger got his intricate back tattoo from a protégé tattoo artist in Houston, Texas after spending over a year drawing out his design. He admits, “Part of the tattoo was relatively painless, but other parts were extremely excruciating.” His family supported his decision to acquire the large piece. Krieger eloquently describes the meaning behind his tattoo: “The cogs to neurons to circuitry represent the chronological progression of science and societal understandings of technology. It embodies the idea of cross-subject and interdisciplinary ideals that I believe are necessary for human progress.” Krieger will continue adding a new chapter to his tattoo story every year.

C’16, Architecture Istanbul, Turkey

Zeynep Ugur, with her connection to her creative spirit, mesmerizes us. In Ugur’s words, “Having a tattoo is the residue of life experience. It is in your heart as well as on your body.” Her tattoo portrays her connection to nature and a celebration of time passing, with each small tree representing three years of her life. Ugur remembers the tattooing sensation as “a specific type of pain that [she] was familiar with and wanted to feel.” Her parents respect her as a “performance artist” for enduring pain for the sake of self-expression. She explains, “I got my tattoo because I was drawn to the moment-to-moment experience of getting a tattoo.” She remembers the experience as “a live drawing session [with] ink, a stranger, and the frontier of your inner self, the skin.”

Molly Stein C’16, Biological Basis of Behavior Wyncote, Pennsylvania

Molly Stein views her tattoos as a family affair. With college looming, she and her twin sister, Alex, worried about staying close. Stein relates, “We had never been apart before we left [home] for freshman year, so it was a huge change for us.” The sisters decided to commemorate their shared birthday in Roman numeral tattoos as a reminder that they are always together. Their father chose to adorn himself with a large DNA double helix strand with A and M base pairs, which stand for his daughters’ names. Stein is considering additional tattoos that will strengthen her family ties: a compass, inspired by a gift from her mother, and Hebrew script similar to that which her late grandfather wore around his neck. All images photographed by Dyana So C’16.

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MIDNIGHT MUNCHIES BY LAURA PETRO

TREAT YOURSELF Flutternutter Truffles Directions

Recipe 1 cup peanut butter 1 cup marshmallow fluff 3 cups powdered sugar 2 cups chocolate chips

1. In a bowl, combine peanut butter, fluff and powdered sugar. 2. Roll the mixture into balls about the size of golf balls. Place on baking sheet covered with parchment or wax paper and chill in fridge for about 20 minutes until firm. 3. Melt the chocolate chips in a microwave-safe bowl. 4. Take the balls out of the fridge. Dunk each in melted chocolate. Place again on baking sheet and refrigerate until chocolate hardens (about 30 minutes). 5. Remove from fridge and enjoy a decadent, next-level-sweet treat.

Peanut Butter Oreo Popcorn Pretzel Meltdown Recipe 1 bag popped popcorn 3 cups mini pretzels 10 Oreos, crushed 1 cup peanut butter ½ cup chocolate chips

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Directions

1. In a large bowl, combine popcorn, pretzels and crushed Oreos. 2. Combine peanut butter and chocolate chips in a separate microwave-safe bowl and heat on medium heat for 1-2 minutes until melted. 3. Drizzle the melted chocolatepeanut butter mixture over the popcorn. 4. Enjoy immediately for optimal melty, salty-sweet satisfaction.

Spicy Grillled Cheese Recipe 2 slices bread (sourdough pairs best, but whatever you have in your fridge works, too) 3 slices pepper jack cheese 1 tsp chili powder 1 ½ tsp Sriracha 2 tbsp butter

Directions

1. Heat a medium-sized skillet on medium heat. 2. Mix Sriracha and chili powder in a small bowl. Place cheese on one slice of bread, spreading the Sriracha mixture on top. Close sandwich. 3. Butter the outsides of the sandwich. 4. Heat in skillet for about 3 minutes on each side or until crispy. 5. Remove from the skillet, slice diagonally (it makes a difference, I swear). Nothing says comfort food like a grilled cheese that makes your mouth sizzle!


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We’ve all been there: it’s 3 a.m. and the hunger pangs have kicked in big time. Whether you’ve just stumbled home from an eventful evening (and managed to walk by McDonald’s without ordering two double quarter-pounders), or you’ve been stationed in front of your laptop for hours on end cramming for an exam, there’s no way you are hitting the sack without hitting the fridge first. From sweet to savory, try these easy snack recipes to satisfy any late-night culinary craving.

KEEP IT LIGHT Salted Chocolate Apple Nachos

Directions

Recipe 2 apples ½ cup dark chocolate chips 1 tbsp sea salt

1. Slice apples and arrange on a plate. 2. Melt the dark chocolate in the microwave for about two minutes or until melted. 3. Drizzle melted chocolate over apples and sprinkle sea salt on top. 4. Take delight in the delicious combo of salty and sweet!

Cinnamon Toasted Almonds Recipe 3 cups raw, unsalted almonds 3 tbsp cinnamon 2 tbsp granulated sugar (or natural sweetener like Truvia) 3 tbsp maple syrup (or natural agave nectar)

Directions

1. In a small bowl, mix together cinnamon and sugar. 2. Place almonds in a bowl, and mix in syrup. 3. Add the cinnamon sugar to the almond mixture, mixing until combined. 4. Spread mixture onto a baking sheet. 5. Bake at 300 degrees for 5-10 minutes. 6. Enjoy warm for a crunchy, sweet treat that will satisfy your sweet tooth without ruining a day of healthy eating!

Recipe 2 cups shelled, cooked edamame 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp chili powder 1 tbsp pepper salt, to taste

Hot and Crispy Edamame Salad Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. In a medium bowl, mix shelled, cooked edamame, olive oil, chili powder, pepper and salt until fully combined. 3. Pour the edamame mixture into a baking pan. Place in oven for 7 minutes. 4. Remove from the oven and enjoy while warm. (Once you get a taste, this crispy, spicy snack will become a definite late night go-to. Plus, the spices will get your metabolism moving!)

All images photographed by Dyana So C’16.

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E C A L P R U O Y N I S I K L A W THE BY LAURA

PETRO

Cody Min C'17

It’s no surprise that this New Jersey native is majoring in Visual Studies. He has a knack for interior design, having transformed his Fisher Hassenfeld triple into a comfortable and classic living space. You’ll never guess where he got some of his favorite pieces. The WALK: Tell us a bit about how you approached decorating your room.

door is Handel’s “Israel in Egypt” oratorio. I really enjoy listening to classical music.

Cody Min: I think my approach was really just to avoid the stereotypical Bed Bath & Beyond look. I like simplicity, so I tried to buy things that wouldn’t clutter my room. I also think lighting is really important, so I focused on getting good lamps. Sometimes I’ll just leave a lamp on at night for the way it feels.

The WALK: What’s the one piece that everyone notices when they walk into your room?

The WALK: How would you define your personal style? CM: I would say my style is pretty preppy—I try not to be super flamboyant. I think that really comes across in my room, which is mainly black and white. The WALK: How did your style and personality influence your room? CM: All the elements in my room are influenced by what I’m interested in culturally. The sheet music on the

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CM: The flag. Definitely the flag. It’s also probably my favorite item. It’s a 48 star flag that I bought on eBay, which I think is pretty cool. I really like buying used things, like the tennis racket, nook and camera on the mantle—those are all used, and I feel like it gives them character (and it’s cheaper). The WALK: Where do you get most of your stuff? CM: (With a laugh) I dumpster dive. The WALK: Wait, really? CM: Yeah! It’s fun. And free. This chair, I got it out of a dumpster and disinfected it with some Lysol. I’ve taken some of my friends dumpster diving with me. It’s a great way to get cool stuff.


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l living

a ’ exception

n students of two Pen r u to a n o ? takes you e to be dull The WALK rooms hav rm o d ys sa o spaces. Wh

Remy Haber C'16 This trendy NYU transfer student didn’t leave her style in the Big Apple. A fashionista from Old Westbury, NY, she seriously spiced up her Fisher Hassenfeld room. The WALK: What’s the one piece that everyone notices when they walk into your room? Remy Haber: The rose-colored lamp on my dresser. It’s something I’ve had since I was about four years old. When it’s lit, it casts a really lovely glow on the entire room. The hanging crystals around the lampshade make the light dance and give my dorm room a warm, cozy feel. The WALK: How would you define your personal style, and do you think that comes through in your room? RH: Above all, my personal style is eclectic. In my room, I mix bohemian and modern styles with classic and antique ones. I draw a great deal of inspiration from my parents, who always taught me to express myself through creativity. Having the blank canvas of a college dorm room has allowed

All images photographed by Tara Gonzalez C’14 (opposite page) and Cody Min C’17 (this page).

me to do just that. The WALK: What is your favorite part of your room? RH: The antique black and white photo of the Penn Class of 1873 in front of College Hall. When I found it on eBay, I could not have been more excited. It adds a dose of nostalgia to the room, connecting it to the traditional atmosphere of the Quad itself. As a transfer student, I thought it would help me feel more connected to my new home. The WALK: What’s the biggest challenge of having a dorm room? RH: The furniture definitely isn’t conducive to decorating, since it’s not that aesthetically pleasing. On the upside, it gives you the ability to come in with a blank slate.

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The WALK - Winter 2014