Westchester and fairfield County Business Journals 081020

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AUGUST 10, 2020 VOL. 56, No. 32

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BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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hen it comes to comedy, so the saying goes, it’s all in the timing. But there’s nothing particularly funny about the timing of The SoNo Collection. Opening to much fanfare in October — only to shut down five

months later as part of Gov. Ned Lamont’s Covid-19 response — the 7 1 7, 0 0 0 - s q u a r e - f o o t Norwalk mall has weathered that crisis and emerged even stronger, according to its general manager, Matt Seebeck. “We’ve been doing really great” since reopening on May 20, Seebeck told the Business

Journal. “We’re pleased with the progress that’s going on here, and we’re very pleased with how the greater southwestern Connecticut region is doing.” Taking the “safety first” angle that is de rigueur for businesses in the Covid era, Seebeck praised the state gov» SONO

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BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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he founders of BRP Companies, who went to college in Boston, started investing in real estate there and now have grown a portfolio valued at $3 billion, are getting ready to grow their firm again with a development proposal in White Plains, the Business Journal has learned. BRP, through a limited liability corporation, recently bought a parcel across from the North White Plains Metro-North station. A proposal is being developed for a seven-story apartment building on the site. It would have 296 units and two levels of parking. Representatives of the company have had discussions with city staff to get their feedback and were planning to shortly submit a formal site plan application. BRP hopes to be able to begin construction in the second quarter of 2021. The site consists of several adjacent parcels covering approximately 1.67 acres. The street addresses include 20 Haarlem Ave., 18 Glenn St., and 2, 7, 11 and 20 Holland Ave. A deed filed with the Westchester County Clerk’s Office showed that the parcels were sold on July 1 by Peckham » WHITE PLAINS 6


Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Danbury seeks to rebrand as multifaceted marketplace BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN

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he Housatonic Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore — the nonprofit home improvement store and donation center — is on the cusp of an overhaul. But it’s not a matter of rearranging the furniture and slapping a coat of paint on the 11,000-square-foot facility at 51 Austin St. in Danbury. Instead, the organization — which sells its wares at steep discounts to fund affordable housing options in the area — has engaged a New Canaan design and concierge service, DesignDot, to completely redesign, style and curate ReStore’s layout. And even that isn’t all, according to the Danbury operation’s executive director Fran Normann. “Part of what we’re hoping to do is to invite other companies and nonprofits in to create their own space and energy here,” she said. “We’ve already been in talks with some of them about not only selling product here, but creating a whole marketplace. They could take space here once a month or once every six months.” All proceeds would still go towards Habitat’s mission of dedicating its revenue stream to building homes, Normann said. The philanthropic spirit also possessed Meghan Wunderlich, DesignDot’s owner, who said she initially reached out to Normann without having actually visited ReStore. “It was an even better fit than I’d imagined,” Wunderlich said. “We want to make more design available to more people, using a holistic mindset. We enjoy working collaboratively as designers, and we were looking at how we could continue down the path to sustainability. And Habitat for Humanity obviously is a really strong brand in that space.” Normann said that she began looking at redefining ReStore a couple of years ago. “As we continued to grow, I felt we really needed to take a look at what we were doing — not as a charity, but as a nonprofit thrift shop,” she said.

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Publisher Dee DelBello Managing Editor Bob Rozycki Associate Publisher Anne Jordan Group Associate Publisher Dan Viteri NEWS Senior Enterprise Editor • Phil Hall Copy and Video Editor • Peter Katz Bureau Chief • Kevin Zimmerman Senior Reporter • Bill Heltzel, Reporters Georgette Gouveia, Peter Katz Research Coordinator • Luis Flores ART & PRODUCTION Creative Director Dan Viteri Art Director Sebastián Flores ADVERTISING SALES Manager • Anne Jordan Metro Sales & Custom Publishing Director Barbara Hanlon Account Managers Marcia Pflug Events Sales & Development • Marcia Pflug Marketing & Events Director • Fatime Muriqi

Fran Normann and Meghan Wunderlich

Part of what we’re hoping to do is to invite other companies and nonprofits in to create their own space and energy here. — Fran Normann

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That included fully embracing the online marketplace, where various algorithms revealed that ReStore’s shoppers were no longer mostly older bargain-hunters going antiquing. “That’s not who we are now,” she said. “We’re still looking to reach those traditional shoppers, but we’re also taking another look at millennials. Everybody is becoming increasingly online shopping savvy, and younger people especially have no problem looking online and purchasing something. “It’s the wave of the future,” Normann said, “but that hadn’t necessarily been true here.” ReStore’s turn to online retail only began in earnest when the pandemic shutdown began, Normann added. “We saw that it wasn’t going to stop anytime soon, and we increasingly found out that putting up photographs of an item on Instagram and oth-

ers like that would result in people buying online and driving here to pick it up.” In addition to upping ReStore’s online ante, Wunderlich is experimenting with different layouts for its roughly 6,000 square feet of merchandise space. One concept involves “stacking” different supplies vertically. “There are huge ceilings, lots of floor space, and we want it to be flexible enough that it can be changed as needed,” she said. When the actual work will begin remains uncertain, Normann said. “We’ll need to figure out the right time frame, and the construction will be done by volunteers, so there’s the matter of finding the right people,” she said. In any event, Normann said, “we remain dedicated to helping people afford new homes.”

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Westchester County Business Journal (USPS# 7100) Fairfield County Business Journal (USPS# 5830) is published Weekly, 52 times a year by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave., White Plains, NY 10604. Periodicals Postage rates paid at White Plains, NY, USA 10610. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Westchester County Business Journal and Fairfield County Business Journal: by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave, White Plains, NY 10604. Annual subscription $60; $2.50 per issue More than 40 percent of the Business Journal is printed on recycled newsprint. © 2020 Westfair Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.

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Taking action on our commitment to Southern Connecticut We know we must do more to address the very real consequences of systemic racism that exist in society today. The impact on communities across the country is clear, including where our teammates live and serve our clients. To drive progress, Bank of America has committed to invest $1 billion over four years to advance racial equality and economic opportunity, building on work we’ve had underway for many years. We’re partnering with community and corporate leaders to create sustainable change. Our actions will help address critical issues and long-term gaps, including: •

connecting workers to new skills and enhanced job readiness

increasing medical response capacity and access to health care

powering minority-owned small businesses through access to capital

helping people find a place to call home they can both love and afford

We know there’s a lot of work to be done, but we promise to keep listening as we work together on this shared mission.

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An inside look at the new Wegmans BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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he employee area of the 732-car parking lot at the new Wegmans in Harrison was almost full while the area reserved for customers was empty when the Business Journal toured the long-anticipated food store in Harrison just two days before its grand opening on Aug. 5. Inside of the 121,000-squarefoot store at 106 Corporate Park Drive, some of the store’s 500 new employees were busy stocking shelves and making final preparations at specialty sections that range from an area with fresh seafood to a bakery, a section where meats are aged, a freshly prepared salad station, an area for hot foods, a cheese shop, beer section and row upon row of shelving and displays for the rest of the approximately 70,000 packaged, fresh, organic, and frozen items the store will have in stock. There’s a coffee bar, a place for pizza and a casual restaurant known as The Burger Bar. Wegmans has been inviting residents to open an account via its internet site so they can preorder groceries for curbside pickup or delivery. It also has an app that allows prepared foods and meals to be preordered. The store is on a 20-acre site that was bought for $26.5 million from Normandy Real Estate Partners. The Harrison store opening follows a July 29 store opening in Morrisville, North Carolina. Wegmans has 102 stores: 47 in New York, 18 in Pennsylvania, 9 in New Jersey, 12 in Virginia, 8 in Maryland, 6 in Massachusetts, and 2 in North Carolina. It has approximately 50,000 employees and in 2019 its sales were $9.7 billion. The company was founded in 1916 and is headquartered in Rochester. Harrison store Manager Matt Dailor told the Business Journal that getting ready to safely open in the midst of a global pandemic has posed some unexpected challenges.

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From top: Harrison store Manager Matt Dailor pushes a grocery cart. Wegmans has signs throughout the store reminding shoppers of social distancing rules. Workers prepare bowls at the Fresh Salad Station. A worker cuts lemons in the seafood section of the store. Photos by Bob Rozycki.

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“It’s redesigning how we do our business, but we still have to be focused on providing an absolutely exceptional experience,” Dailor said. He added that a lot of effort has gone into making sure that the newly hired employees love what they do. “If we do that then we can provide an exceptional experience when shoppers come in and they’re going to love shopping with us. Obviously with Covid right now in the world that we’re in, making sure we’re doing that in a way that’s extraordinarily safe both for our customers and the employees is certainly more challenging than business as usual six or eight months ago.” Dailor said they have placed numerous visual cues around the store to remind people about the need for social distancing and the wearing of masks. Store capacity will be monitored and the number of people allowed in at one time will be metered. “We’re going to have lines in the front of the store,” Dailor said. “We’re anticipating that we won’t be able to let everybody in at the same time specifically so that we can make sure we keep an environment inside the store where customers and employees can make sure they have adequate space to maintain some distance.” Dailor said that the store is featuring a contactless scanning program that allows customers to scan the barcodes on items they’re buying as they shop, bag the items as they go and then use self-checkout. “You don’t have to have anyone else touch the food that you’re buying,” Dailor said. “As an entire team here in this building we’re excited to show them a world-class experience that’s extremely safe. We’ve been flattered by the reception we’ve already gotten from Westchester and we can’t wait to see what that looks like when it comes to fruition (opening day).”


National News Actor Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson buys the bankrupt XFL BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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he XFL, the Vince McMahonowned professional league that declared bankruptcy in April, has been sold for $15 million to a group headed by one of McMahon’s former employees, professional wrestler-turned-actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Johnson teamed with Dany Garcia, his ex-wife and business partner, and the private investment firm RedBird Capital to acquire the XFL before it was put up for auction. The acquisition will require the approval of the bankruptcy court before it can be finalized. “The acquisition of the XFL with my talented partners, Dany Garcia and Gerry Cardinale, is an investment for me that’s rooted deeply in two things — my passion for the game and my desire to always take care of the fans,” said

Johnson, who played football in college at the University of Miami from 1990-94. “With pride and gratitude for all that I’ve built with my own two hands, I plan to apply these callouses to the XFL, TWB Crabtree Kittle House something and look forward to creating WCBJ for the players, fans and everyspecial 7.375” w x 7.125” h love of football,” he one involved for the 11-14-19 said in a statement. Jeffrey Pollack, XFL president and chief operating officer, said in a statement: “This is a Hollywood ending to

alternative to the National Football League. A first version came in 2001 as a joint venture between McMahon’s World Wrestling Federation (now Stamford-based WWE) and NBC, but the league never found the audience needed to sustain its operations. The new version of the XFL kicked off in February, but shut down one month later due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In April, McMahon laid off nearly all of the XFL staff.

our sale process and it is an exciting new chapter for the league. Dwayne, Dany and Gerry are a dream team ownership group and the XFL is in the best possible hands going forward.” The XFL filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April, listing up to $50 million in debts. Johnson did not offer a timeline on when the XFL would be resurrected. This year marked the second time that McMahon attempted to create an

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SoNo—

ernment’s response to the pandemic. For the past several weeks, Connecticut has seen its infection rate hovering around the 1.0 mark. “It’s a testament to the hard work of the public health and public safety offices that people feel comfortable enough to come back to stores,” Seebeck said. Adding that The SoNo Collection has seen “week over week growth” when it comes to foot traffic, he declined to give specific data. Owned by Brookfield Property Partners and managed by Brookfield Properties, the mall opened at a time when the so-called brick-and-mortar

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ing” strategy since its debut, today has about a 10% vacancy, but that Brookfield is “very excited that some really great stores are coming here soon.” He declined to identify which stores those are. All the stores that closed because of Covid have now reopened, he added, with the latest including The Body Shop, Sunglass Hut and Arhaus Furniture. Rigorous sanitation and social distancing efforts are in place, Seebeck said, including signs in common areas, reminders of each store’s reduced capacity, and security officers on patrol to offer face masks to customers who may have forgotten about that particular mandate.

White Plains—

Family Holdings Inc. of Brewster to NW Plains Venture LLC, a Delaware limited liability company with its address at BRP’s offices in Manhattan. The price was shown as having been $10.5 million. The property had been marketed by commercial real estate services firm CBRE as being “the definition of transit oriented development with ‘live, work and play’ benefits.” BRP was founded in 1998 and has 16 completed residential projects in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Philadelphia, West Baltimore and Newark. It has eight more projects either under construction or getting ready to be built, including two in New Rochelle. Groundbreaking is expected this fall for 500 Main St. in New Rochelle, a 26-story tower with 477 residential units and 2,600 square feet of retail space. Construction has started on BRP’s other New Rochelle project at 10 Commerce Drive, a 172-unit market-rate building with an expected completion in mid-2022. “Probably a third of our business is affordable housing, a third of our business is workforce housing and another third is luxury market-rate housing,” Geoff Flournoy, a co-founder of BRP Companies told the Business Journal. “Because we’re able to put together fully mixed-use, mixed income, large-scale projects that

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“retail apocalypse” had yet to feel the Covid brunt. According to research firm Reis, shopping center vacancies at the end of 2019 were their highest in 20 years, at 9.7%. And with the advent of the coronavirus, the retail picture has hardly improved, with dozens of long-lived retailers declaring bankruptcy and/or store closings. Those include SoNo residents Abercrombie & Fitch, H&M, Victoria’s Secret, Chico’s (in Canada only) and mall anchors Bloomingdale’s and Nordstrom, although the Norwalk stores remain open — at least for now. Seebeck said that the mall, which has taken a “rolling open-

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A rendering of 500 Main St. in New Rochelle.

satisfy the full constituency of certain cities we are a welcomed developer.” Flournoy said that the construction shutdown as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic did not impact the progress of their New Rochelle projects. “The larger project, 500 Main, is still in its predevelopment phase so certainly that didn’t have any impact on construction and our other site, 10 Commerce, we started the demolition of that site back in January and that really hasn’t had any Covid-related impact,” Flournoy said Rashid Walker, who is BRP’s managing director of acquisitions and is responsible for findFCBJ

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ing new development opportunities for the company, said, “In terms of the White Plains project, I think its proximity to the Metro-North train station was the primary factor in our interest as a company in doing that deal. The ability to get to Manhattan in 35 minutes on Metro-North was the primary driver in our decision to pursue this deal.” Walker said that the White Plains and New Rochelle sites have common elements. “New Rochelle is a very similar story, the dynamics of that market being close to Grand Central and midtown Manhattan and being walkable. Our location at 500 Main St. is walkable to the train station. TOD (transit-orient-

The mall’s housekeeping team is also out in force, he said, constantly cleaning common touch areas and working overnight shifts to provide more comprehensive deep-cleaning services. Partly as a result, “Our retailers are telling us there’s been quite a bit of pent-up demand” for in-person shopping, Seebeck said. “Obviously there’s been a lot of people working from home and doing some online shopping, but if you have an electronic device that fails for some reason, you probably weren’t able to get it fixed the same day. “We’ve certainly seen pentup demand for electronic services” at such outlets as Amazon

4-Star and Apple, he said. The mall also features a rotating selection of local artists’ paintings, as well as free giveaways throughout August via its “Summer of Surprises” program. Other events — meditation, yoga, even bingo — are designed to encourage consumers to return, Seebeck noted. “Obviously consumer confidence is really important to get folks back in,” he said. “And we’ve always been committed to safety as our number one goal.” And as the coronavirus situation evolves, The SoNo Collection will follow suit, he said. “We have the flexibility to change with the way people shop, and we will continue to do that.”

ed development) is important to us as it is to many developers. That was the primary reason for us wanting to be in New Rochelle,” Walker said. Walker said that BRP would not be requesting a zoning change from White Plains for the building across from the North White Plains station. “I’m a longtime resident of Westchester and pre-Covid I parked everyday at the North White Plains train station and commuted into New York City,” Flournoy said. “I fully appreciate the convenience that will also be afforded to our future residents with that location. “We love the Westchester market. It’s consistent with our business plan to have TOD opportunities and strong markets. Moving forward, we certainly will continue to look for new opportunities in the Westchester market and we definitely like White Plains. “With the North White Plains development and the developments we have in New Rochelle we will have developed almost 1.2 million square feet just in Westchester, and that’s a total of almost 1,000 units just in Westchester. So it’s definitely a marketplace and a submarket that’s of very strong interest and we’d like to expand on our opportunities. Southern Westchester is a target market for us.” Flournoy said that when he and his college friend and BRP co-founder Meredith Marshall started dabbling in real estate with their first investment in a

multifamily house in Boston, “I would have never envisioned where we are today with a $3 billion portfolio. We’re adding personnel even though it’s a somewhat difficult environment now given Covid,” Flournoy said. “We continue to attract capital. We’ve been working with Goldman Sachs for probably close to 15 years now. They have been a great investment partner of ours. They’ve probably committed 75% of our capital in what we’ve done over our history with BRP.” Flournoy said that he has heard chatter about some New York City businesses relocating or adding satellite offices in Westchester and that BRP may be securing a site in downtown White Plains for its construction division. “It’s hard to say if this is a temporary change of how we kind of live and work, but we think in the short-term certainly low-density cities such as White Plains that afford the same convenience and amenities and cultural opportunities are going to benefit from folks looking for a lower-density environment,” Flournoy said. Flournoy said that the BRP in the name of the company comes from their early efforts renovating brownstones in Brooklyn when they’d operate using Brownstone Realty Partners along with a number to signify a specific project. “As the brownstones turned into 100-unit buildings, we just truncated it down to BRP,” Flournoy said.


Fourth Westchester liquor license suspension for Covid-19 violations BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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he state has now suspended a total of four liquor licenses held by Westchester County businesses as a result of investigations that showed they were ignoring regulations designed to help combat the spread of Covid-19. On Aug. 4, the State Liquor Authority (SLA) suspended the license held by Sirenita Lounge at 12 Croton Ave. in Ossining after an investigation that followed the Ossining Police Department reporting that customers inside were not wearing masks and observing social distancing requirements and that people also were loitering and drinking outside. Previously, the liquor license held by Diaz Restaurant Inc. for the Atlantic Bar at 84 Croton Ave. in Ossining was suspended by the SLA. The SLA had been contacted by the Ossining Village Police Department regarding an incident on July 24. Police officers saw several patrons milling around outside and found that the front door to the business was locked. When the officers had the owner open the front door, they saw numerous patrons inside drinking and mingling with no facial coverings and no food being served. According to SLA documents, 94 liquor licenses were under suspension statewide as of Aug. 4 in the ongoing effort to enforce regulations that require: • liquor only be served when food also is being served; • patrons must be seated; • masks have to be worn except as necessary for consuming food and beverages; and • social distancing to be maintained. “The rising rate of infection among young people and the issue of crowded bars is not unique to New York. The World Health Organization has warned about it, states all across the country are dealing with it, and even the president has said young people should avoid bars, but we are taking decisive action in the Empire State to make sure it does not undermine our progress against the coronavirus,” Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said. There have been two other suspensions in Westchester related to the pandemic. On April 15, the liquor licenses of Joe Vin Enterprises LLC, doing business as Uncle Henry’s at 309-311 Halstead Ave. in Harrison, were suspended. It was found to be operating in violation of Cuomo’s executive order at the time requiring bars and restaurants to stop on-premises service of food and alcoholic beverages. According to the SLA, on April 10 officers with the Harrison Police Department found the lights dimmed in an attempt to conceal activity inside. Police found 15 people drinking at the bar or at tables. Several

people fled when the police arrived. Officers instructed the remaining customers to pay their bills and leave. A woman who identified herself as the manager initially claimed that she thought she was permitted to serve beer to patrons who were waiting inside for food, even though that is not permitted by the regulation and many of the patrons were observed leaving without any food. The SLA on May 29 suspended the liquor license of Alfonso Cabrera, doing business as Metapan Pizzeria Ristorante at 326 Webster Ave. in New Rochelle. It also

was found to be operating in violation of the governor’s closure order. The SLA reported that on May 9 New Rochelle Police conducted an inspection following complaints the business was violating social distancing guidelines with more than a dozen patrons drinking inside. The police found the front door locked but could see a group of six patrons leaving a different way. They heard music playing inside, knocked on the door and were finally allowed in, where they found at least 10 people drinking beer around a

pool table in an unlicensed back room of the premises. The owner’s son, acting as manager was warned that service inside the premises was a violation. The police referred the matter to the SLA. The SLA said that on May 22, its investigators and New Rochelle Police conducted a follow-up inspection. They found 12 people inside the restaurant, including four patrons drinking beer at and near the bar with four in the back room drinking and playing pool. There were four employees on the premises. The SLA said that the business was again warned to stop on-premises sales. Four days later, on May 26, New Rochelle Police officers made another visit to the premises, finding three patrons drinking at the bar.

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Eastchester construction executive gets 2 years in $5.1M kickback scheme BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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ichael Campana, an Eastchester resident who once made more than $400,000 a year as a construction executive, has been sentenced to two years in federal prison for taking an extra $429,000 for his part in a $5.1 million bribery-kickback scheme. Campana’s attorney depicted him as an otherwise decent man who “temporarily lost his way,” in a sentencing letter to the court, while prosecutors attributed his conduct to “pure avarice.” Campana pleaded guilty last November to tax evasion. U.S. District Judge Denise L. Cote also sentenced him July 27 in Manhattan federal court to three years of supervised release and ordered him to pay the IRS $155,000 for the taxes he evaded. His crime occurred when he worked as a construction manager from 2014 to 2017 for Bloomberg LLC, the financial services company owned by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. He colluded with more than a dozen officials at Bloomberg, Turner Construction and subcontracting firms working on various projects for his employer. Subcontractors submitted inflated bids for the work and won the contacts, according to court records, in exchange for kickbacks paid to the people who controlled the projects. Campana received cash — $239,800 was seized from his home — as well as payments for personal services. When he was married in 2017, for example, a subcontractor paid $40,000 to a catering hall in New Jersey, $13,000 to a photography studio and more than $23,000 to a travel agent for his honeymoon. Campana, 34, was born in Bronxville to an Italian immigrant who worked as a masonry contractor, and to a first generation Italian-American mother who found success as a real estate broker. He excelled in school and in athletics, according to the sentencing letter by Long Island attorney David S. Smith. He was captain of his high school baseball and football teams, and he went on to graduate with a business degree from Fordham University. He worked as a superintendent at Turner Construction from 2008 to 2011, then as a project manager in Bloomberg’s facilities group through 2016. He left that job to work as director of construction for Oxford Properties. Smith, citing numerous support letters attesting to Campana’s hard work, talent, professionalism, loyalty, compassion and generosity, argued that his client should

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be sentenced to no more than 18 months in prison. He was a role model, according to Smith. One man, for instance, credited Campana with saving his life after he tried to commit suicide. “He is the only person I felt I could reach out to,” the man explained in a letter to the court, “without the fear of being judged.” Campana’s direct boss at Bloomberg “pushed him to accept” the payoffs, according to Smith. “Michael unfortunately surrendered to temptation and agreed to … receive some of those illicit funds.” Campana’s true character “is that of an honorable, loyal and compassionate man,” Smith stated. He deserves leniency and is an “inappropriate candidate to make an example of for the sake of deterring others.” “The government does not question that Campana is a talented and accomplished person who has helped others,” assistant prosecutors David R. Lewis and Stanley J. Okula Jr. stated in a sentencing memorandum. Nonetheless, he “chose to steal and defraud and to hide that side” from family, friends and colleagues. They said Campana earned comfortable salaries” from Turner and Bloomberg, ranging from $100,000 to $270,000 a year. He was still receiving kickbacks on the Bloomberg scheme when he went to work for Oxford at more than $400,000 a year. “Campana has enjoyed significant financial stability and comfort as a well-educated, talented and successful construction official — an advantage most people can only dream about,” the prosecutors stated. But that wasn’t enough. “This was a crime of opportunity driven by avarice and greed, not necessity.” The prosecutors argued for a sentence of 24 to 30 months, to deter tax evasion by others. “To be sure, his life has included noteworthy and positive aspects and, unlike many defendants who appear before the court, he enjoys a strong network of family and friends,” they stated. “But we respectfully submit that those factors do not override the need for a meaningful sentence for a defendant who has not fully acknowledged the extent of his wrongdoing.” Campana also pleaded guilty to a money laundering charge brought by the Manhattan district attorney. Under a plea agreement he will be sentenced to one year to be served at the same time as the federal sentence. He is scheduled to surrender Sept. 4 to the federal Bureau of Prisons.


IBM says its within reach of achieving corporate clean tech goals BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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wenty years ago, IBM established the corporate goals of reducing its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 40% while expanding its use of electricity from renewable energy sources to 55% by the year 2025. However, the Armonkheadquartered company miscalculated its goals, albeit in a good way. According to the 30th annual “IBM and the Environment Report,” the company’s CO2 emissions have been reduced by 39.5% over the last 15 years while its reliance on electricity from renewable sources increased by 47%. According to Wayne Balta, vice president of environmental affairs and product safety, IBM used a triple-pronged strategy to reach its goals so rapidly. “Either we use less energy to get the same job done or we contract for renewable electricity, because that electricity hasn’t involved CO2 emissions or the electricity that we routinely get from a grid has a lesser CO2 intensity to it,” he said. “Those are the three levers that one can pull. And what has worked for IBM has really been some combination of all three.” Balta pointed out that IBM has been in the forefront of folding an environmental consideration into its corporate operations. In 1971, when the nation was placing a new priority on environmental protection, IBM Chairman and CEO Tom Watson Jr. oversaw the release of the company’s first published policy statement on environmental protection. “And Watson said something extraordinarily important,” Balta recalled. “He said that line management and IBM must be continuously on guard against adversely affecting the environment. And he got it right. Because at that time, Watson pointed out that this isn’t just some staff role for people who tidy up. This is the responsibility of line management.” During the early 1990s, IBM was among the co-founders in the creation of the Public Environmental Reporting Initiative Guidelines, an initiative that created the first cross-industry framework for voluntary corporate environmental reporting. With its in-house goals, the company made a concentrated effort to show that it was practicing what it preached. “For decades, IBM has focused on energy conservation, which means getting the same job done for less energy,” he said. “Now, that isn’t always regarded as the coolest or the neatest aspect of this. But it continues to be extremely important. And when you get the same job done for less energy, you’re simply having less emissions.”

IBM’s green focus is global, Balta said, adding the company has “a team of people who, year in and year out, continue to look for opportunities at all the places around the world where IBM is located.” And while the company is within striking distance of goals that it expected to reach by 2025, a new impetus was ratcheted up during the past year that resulted in the implementation of 1,660 energy conservation projects at nearly 230 of its locations around the world. Balta estimated that these projects delivered annual energy savings of 136,000 MWh, or 3.2% of IBM’s total energy use last year — surpass-

ing its corporate goal of 3%. “Having business and industry operate in a way that’s respectful of the place where we all live simply reflects IBM’s values,” Balta said. “We’re constantly trying to be respectful of the environment, because as individuals we all enjoy it and get value from it in different ways.” But what happens when the company finally reaches its goals? Balta said an encore is going to be challenging. “It gets tougher after you’ve picked the low hanging fruit,” he said, with a laugh. “I look to the day when we increase that goal even further. That has to do with the

issue of climate change in terms of pollution prevention and waste management. We continue to rigorously receive our old hardware for reuse, remanufacturing and recycling, rather than disposal. “But I think the big picture going forward,” he said, “is to see how the world’s most advanced information technologies — analytics, Internet of Things, machine learning, natural language processing, edge computing, blockchain — can be applied to data about the environment, to underpin new solutions to old problems. That to me, is certainly the next era. And it’s one that I’m quite personally passionate about.”

SLEEPY HOLLOW LOCAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION REQUEST FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST The Sleepy Hollow Local Development Corporation (SHLDC) has issued a Request for Expression of Interest (RFEI) on July 31, 2020. The SHLDC is seeking an experienced real estate development team to submit a letter of interest along with company qualifications and a development proposal for the redevelopment of an approximately 1.04 acre assemblage of properties located principally at 193 Beekman Avenue, Sleepy Hollow, New York (the “Development Site”). The Development Site commands views overlooking the Edge-onHudson development, the Hudson River and the new Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge. The Development Site has direct access to Beekman Avenue and future access to the north to the LDC’s Sleepy Hollow Common project. Submissions are due by Sept. 30, 2020.

A copy of the RFEI can be viewed or downloaded from https://www.sleepyhollowny.gov/local-developmentcorporation. Questions can be directed to Anthony Giaccio, Village of Sleepy Hollow, 28 Beekman Avenue, at (914) 366-5105 or agiaccio@villageofsleepyhollow.org.

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CONTRIBUTING WRITER | By Ross J. Pepe

Paving New York State’s Path to Economic Recovery “New York, like states all across the country, confronts the immediate effects of a paralyzing national recession, the longer-term challenge of improving our competitive position in the global economy, and the specter of a dangerous, ugly divisiveness among our people.”

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hose words, but with the single substitution of “pandemic” for “recession,” are as true today as they were in 1992 when spoken by Gov.

Mario M. Cuomo as he called for a national coming together with action to cure our collective woes. During the Covid-19 crisis, the people of New York state have benefited from the leadership of his son, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, our state legislators and local officials. New Yorkers, through a remarkable collective willingness to “crush the curve” and a heartfelt outpouring of support, are demonstrating what it means to stand and work together. We are grateful to our first

responders, health care workers and all the women and men behind the scenes — building and construction trades, public service, education, food and other services — working to maintain a sense of normalcy for all of us. This is not business as usual and it may never be again, following the protracted “New York on Pause” and historic levels of unemployment. Where do we go from here? Let’s take a page out of the history books and study the past six recessions and the

“Understanding and Leveraging Local Media to Promote Your Business” How to craft your story and make it newsworthy Best practices for working with local media Insights on how to leverage social media FEATURING EXPERT SPEAKERS:

Christina Rae President Buzz Creators, Inc.

Bob Rozycki Managing Editor Westfair Communications

Peter Katz Host Westfair Communications

Thursday, August 13th at 2 p.m.

Watch Live on LinkedIn, YouTube, or Facebook and bring your questions!

Learn more: Westchester.org/events PRESENTED BY

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Great Depression. The path to economic recovery was mainly paved by investment: “We need to rebuild the physical foundation upon which all economic activity depends,” said the senior Cuomo. That begins with investment in our infrastructure, which is an exceptionally efficient long-term job creator. For nearly a century of American life and economic growth, it has been proven that each $1 billion invested in infrastructure yields thousands of direct jobs and a multiplier of that in indirect jobs. We need only look to the new $4 billion Gov. Mario M. Cuomo Bridge, which generated more than 6,600 living-wage jobs and tens of thousands of indirect jobs in the region. As New York state reopens, we must invest in our state’s long-term health. Infrastructure is a bridge to the future, as it creates jobs so people can start and raise families, build stronger communities and boost local economies. A half-dozen major transportation projects are poised to move forward in New York. One of those involves widening Route 17 in the Hudson Valley and transforming the corridor into Interstate 86. Our Coalition — 17-Forward-86 — is seeking to add a third lane in each direction on Route 17 to improve mobility, enhance safety and ensure the economic well being of the Hudson Valley and Sullivan Catskills. We have more than 200 members of economic development and tourism groups, construction trades and energy companies representing thousands of individuals in the region. Widening Route 17 is critical — the corridor is already over-capacity and we must prepare for added traffic as more companies invest here. In addition, there are projects on Long Island (Oakdale merge) and upstate New York (I-81 viaduct project in Syracuse) that will have the same effect of advancing mobility efficiency and improving our daily lives. This is the time to move forward. Today’s highly competitive construction marketplace offers significant savings for public agencies and departments, which will benefit from low-interest bond rates. We all have felt the impacts of this pandemic — personally and professionally — and we believe that working together we will persevere. Let’s take those steps now to pave our path to recovery. Ross J. Pepe is founding member of the 17-Forward-86 Coalition and president of the Construction Industry Council of Westchester & Hudson Valley Inc. To learn more about the coalition, visit 17Forward86.org.


CELEBRATING NORWALK ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE

CITY OF NORWALK

125 East Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06850 203-854-3200 norwalkct.org Year established: Norwalk was founded in 1640 and incorporated in 1651 Executive(s) Title: Mayor Harry Rilling Type of company: City Municipality Description: Located in the heart of Fairfield County, CT, the City of Norwalk is a diverse community rich in culture and personality. Find out why Norwalk is the Sound of Connecticut.

BUILDING AND LAND TECHNOLOGY

1 Elmcroft Road, Stamford, CT 06902 203-846-1900 bltoffice.com Year established: 1982 Executive(s) Title: Carl R. Kuehner, III, Chairman Type of company: Real Estate Description: Building and Land Technology (BLT) is a premier vertically-integrated real estate firm. For more than three decades, the firm has developed, owned, operated, managed and invested in more than 25 million square feet of real estate where individuals live, work and play. Every aspect of BLT’s business, from creating innovative connections between residential and office spaces, to revitalizing underappreciated real estate assets, underscores its commitment to building communities that flourish and endure.

NORWALK NOW

125 East Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06850 203-561-9878 norwalknow.org Year established: 2017 Executive(s) Title: Linda Kavanagh Type of company: Marketing Description: Marketing support arm for Norwalk small businesses

SOUNDVIEW LANDING

20 Day Street, Norwalk, CT | 06854 203-714-8060 soundviewlanding.com Year established: 2018 Executive(s) Title: Patrick Lee & James Keefe, Principals of Trinity Financial and Trinity Management Type of company: Located in the heart of downtown South Norwalk (SONO), Soundview Landing is comprised of thoughtfully designed one- & two-bedroom apartment homes, which offer spacious open floor plans, abundant natural light and accommodate a wide range of furniture layouts. Our community is conveniently positioned with direct access to greenspace, local eateries, the harbor and other SONO attractions.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | WESTCHESTER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | AUGUST 10, 2020


BUILDING AND LAND TECHNOLOGY Live in Luxury, Work in Safety D

uring times like these, there is no place I would rather be than Connecticut. At BLT, we are community builders and have set our sights on the future of our state- where we see boundless opportunity for economic and societal growth that will benefit Connecticut businesses and families for years to come. For us, community comes first; which is why BLT has spent the last two decades planting roots in Stamford and Norwalk. Our team, comprised of hundreds of professionals, have worked to create lush ecosystems where our neighbors and friends can walk our paths, enjoy our parks, shop in our stores, eat in our restaurants, and work in our offices. Since the onset of the pandemic, we have worked tirelessly to maintain our community and residents’ preferred lifestyle, safely and at a distance. Working in tandem with our state and local officials, BLT pitched in quickly to help while updating our cleaning and hygiene protocols across all of our properties to create a safe environment for all those who enter our buildings. From enforcing face mask regulations and 6-foot distance markers to helping local businesses offer increased delivery services, expanded amenities, and transitioning restaurants to outdoors, safety has been and will re-

ABOUT US

Preferred landlord for many of America’s Fortune 500 corporations and retailers, Building & Land Technology (BLT) is a premiere Connecticut-based real estate firm devoted to building community. For over three decades, the firm has invested in, developed, owned, and managed more than 25 million square feet of commercial, hotel, residential, and mixed-use real estate where individuals live, work, and play. The largest franchisee of Sotheby’s real estate brokerage, with 28 offices and 1,000 real estate agents, BLT builds communities for the long-term by weaving together a holistic mindset of economic, environmental, and social sustainability.

OUR STATE, OUR COMMUNITY

Since 1982, BLT’s work has centered on cultivating and sustaining communities in Connecticut through signature developments, such as the proposed North Seven B2

THE CURB APARTMENTS, NORWALK, CT NORTH-SEVEN.COM

main our number one priority. Our great state of Connecticut will continue to meet the challenges of this crisis while helping to lead the way for the economy and for people to feel comfortable and confident returning to their desks. Our team of professionals at BLT have been working closely with business leaders in Norwalk and Stamford to create a safe haven for companies to once again welcome employees back to their

offices and storefronts. Across our commercial office spaces, we have collaborated with tenants to quickly update buildings and better accommodate our new normal, ensuring business can continue to boom in Connecticut. Our stores and restaurants and those who work in them, are a part of what makes our communities vibrant places to live, work, play and stay. We will continue to support local business owners and

welcome new entrepreneurs and visionaries to join our communities. I know that Connecticut will come out on the other side stronger, smarter, and better prepared to transform our future and at BLT we will continue to do our part to stand with our communities and meet the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. — Carl R. Kuehner, III, Chairman, Building and Land Technology

project in Norwalk. North Seven will add over 2,000 new apartment units and over 2.5 million square feet of office space that will serve as an economic engine for the city. The community will be located alongside Merritt 7 and serve as a microcosm that demonstrates the future of our communities across the state. The “new” CT economy will be supported by communities where our residents can work and live within our designed ecosystems that offer amenities and an ease of living. North Seven is on a similar trajectory to BLT’s $3.5 billion Harbor Point Redevelopment Project in Stamford, which encompasses more than 100 acres along the Long Island Sound. BLT has been recognized for its positive contributions to the community in terms of job growth, LEED-ND Gold certification, bringing a transit-oriented approach to development, as well as for its public parks and efforts to make waterfront

areas accessible to the public. Harbor Point has transformed a previously neglected area in the South End of Stamford into a dynamic and lively community featuring colorful restaurants, stores and boutiques, and lush public park space.

companies seeking alternative workspaces. We aim to help keep Connecticut productive and continue developing spaces for individuals to work safely and businesses to prosper, assisting with the long term economic viability of the state. No issue is more pressing to the future of our world than our environment. At BLT, we are invested in the long term growth of our communities by respecting the land we use and occupy. In 2008, BLT initiated one of Connecticut’s largest environmental cleanups by remediating more than 60 acres of contaminated brownfield sites. Today, that area has been transformed into a thriving community that has provided an economic stimulus to core public services such as schools, emergency services and critical infrastructure projects. BLT’s ongoing investments have attracted thousands of residents, quality retailers, restaurants and visitors to hundreds of free community events.

ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

With a portfolio of more than 8 million square feet in office space, BLT has created or redeveloped space for global organizations and is currently developing more than 900,000 square feet for the Charter Communications World Headquarters and more than 2.5 million square feet for North Seven. In recent months, BLT has transformed spaces to accommodate workfrom-home offices within residential buildings and communities, offering numerous solutions including co-working spaces, spec suites and pre-built units for immediate availability and use by residents or

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AUGUST 10, 2020


WELCOME TO CONNECTICUT, YOUR PREMIER DESTINATION TO LIVE, WORK & PLAY Building and Land Technology (BLT) offers world-class residential and commercial properties in Stamford and Norwalk. Within 45 minutes of New York City, our locations offer meticulous attention to detail, thriving communities and natural beauty you and your loved ones will enjoy year round.

Live in Luxury

Work With Peace of Mind

Play all year

To Learn More Visit:

BLTLiveWorkPlay.com/CT

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Home Starts Here

Brand New One & Two Bedroom Apartment Homes Now Available Starting at $1,850 and $2,475

Contact us today to apply or schedule a tour! (203) 714-8060 TRINITY

soundviewlanding.com

development & management

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Located in the heart of downtown South Norwalk (SONO), Soundview Landing is comprised of thoughtfully designed one- & two-bedroom apartment homes, which offer spacious open floor plans, abundant natural light and accommodate a wide range of furniture layouts. Our community is conveniently positioned with direct access to greenspace, local eateries, the harbor and other SONO attractions. South Norwalk has much to offer and Soundview Landing truly enhances the South Norwalk lifestyle with its combination of diverse city-character and quaint harbor-town-like vibes. A mixed-income neighborhood, this newly modernized development offers a refreshing approach on community, meeting the needs and demands of the environment and today’s contemporary living preferences. The Soundview Landing design and atmosphere was inspired by South Norwalk’s beginnings as a working maritime port, along with its evolution into an industrial center. SONO is now a thriving downtown that has the perfect balance of history and hip. Enjoy drinks on outdoor terraces, harborside walks along the river or a family visit to the aquarium--all within walking distance to Metro North train station and less than an hour away from New York City. In the Soundview community, our apartments include generous space to live, work, and socialize. From the state-of-the-art fitness center to the cozy lounges, to the rooftop sun deck and the new and beautifully designed Ryan Park (literally a hop across the street) there is much to experience beyond the private living spaces… and the list goes on. The first eighty Soundview residences were completed back in 2018, with our second wave of eighty five beautiful apartments just recently opened in 2020. Our community will be complete with a third phase of construction of 108 residences in two buildings, scheduled for completion in Spring 2021. Interested in getting more information on Soundview Landing? Email us today! SoundviewLanding@trinitymanagementcompany.com 20 Day Street | Norwalk, CT | 06854

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NORWALK: A CHARMING SLICE OF NEW ENGLAND

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his is Norwalk, Connecticut, a thriving city on the move and vibrant coastal community rich in history. Defined by its diverse districts that house charming residential neighborhoods, beach fronts and boatyards and flourishing businesses, Norwalk continues to shine as a popular Fairfield County destination to live, work and play. Affectionately referred to as “Oyster Town” due to its deeply rooted history as a fishing harbor and waterway, Norwalk embraces its coastal prominence, instilling a strong and sustainable coastal environment and preserving Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Norwalk Seaport Association and Maritime Aquarium, both integral components to the renaissance of South Norwalk, are a driving force behind Norwalk’s robust tourism industry. Popular Norwalk attractions include: Sheffield Island Lighthouse and ferry rides; Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum, a national registered historic landmark; Mill Hill Historic Park and Nor-

ON THE GOLD COAST OF CONNECTICUT

walk Historical Society; Stepping Stones Museum for Children, dedicated to early childhood education; historic Wall Street Theater; plus numerous nature hiking trails and year-round events that highlight Norwalk’s active art, entertainment, outdoor lifestyle, boating and dining scene. Through the progressive and active approach of Norwalk’s Economic and Community Development, Planning and Zoning, Building and Code Enforcement, Business Development and Tourism and Transportation, Mobility and Parking teams, the city remains steadfast with its on-going mission to enhance the quality of life for all residents, businesses and visitors through a balanced and managed approach to growth, improvements and support features. Norwalk Now, a support arm for Norwalk’s expanding small-business community, is the first business model of its kind in Fairfield County to offer free marketing, social media and public relations as-

www.norwalkct.org

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sistance to restaurants, retailers, arts and entertainment venues, attractions and lifestyle businesses with a cohesive and collaborative program designed to educate and support local business owners with their marketing endeavors. Urban renewal efforts throughout the city have never been healthier. New constructions and the restoration of historic buildings are on the rise. Numerous developments have taken flight in Norwalk in the form of Spinnaker Real Estate Partners’ Ironworks SONO mixed-used building, 19 Day and The Corset factory residential living, and cutting-edge workspace at The Locke Building. F.D. Rich Company’s SONO Pear and Harbourside SONO residential complexes, along with the completion of the highly anticipated opening of the Residence Inn by Marriott added to the renewed energy of this dynamic waterside township. Building and Land Technology recently enhanced Norwalk’s Route 7 Corridor with the development of North 7, a sprawling mixed-

use community with stunning modern amenities and sensibility. Renewal and urban redevelopment plans are also underway for the Wall Street and West Avenue neighborhoods that have seen tremendous growth and change over the last decade, including 1,000 new apartments and 78,000 square feet of commercial space. Its neighborhood anchor institutions, including Norwalk Hospital, King Industries, Norwalk Public Library, Factory Underground, and the Wall Street Theater, continue to foster an identity around art, science, technology, culture and health and wellness. New parking, zoning, construction and infrastructure are at the forefront of the city’s revitalization strategy for this historic neighborhood. Norwalk welcomes you to join our beautiful and evolving community, a charming slice of New England on the Gold Coast of Connecticut. Please visit norwalkct.org and norwalknow.org.

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Suite Talk Suite Talk: Tibi Guzmán, executive director and CEO of The Arc Westchester

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he Covid-19 pandemic has tested the patience of many businesses and organizations, but the challenges have been especially acute for The Arc Westchester, the largest organization in the county supporting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. In this edition of Suite Talk, Business Journal Senior Enterprise Editor Phil Hall speaks with Tibi Guzmán, executive director and CEO of The Arc Westchester, on how her organization faced the difficulties created by the pandemic and how it will be facing the latest obstacles in the road ahead. This must have been a very unusual past several months for your organization, to put it mildly. Looking back since the pandemic began, what has been the greatest challenge that you have faced? “It has been an unprecedented time for every kind of health care facility and it’s even more challenging because you are caring for people that have preexisting conditions to Covid. I think what was pretty shocking is that the systems — whether it’s the federal or the state-level systems — were not at all prepared for this type of pandemic, based on the fact that they could not give us enough PPE (personal protective equipment) at the right time. “We all know what happened to the health care industry and the hospitals lacking beds and the amount of people on ventilators and what to do with next-to-no masks. And we also had to deal with competing guidelines. “Priorities went to the health care system and we understand that hospitals are very important. But we did not get the same benefits and did not get the same relief that quickly. And we’re still recovering. Even though it’s not over until it’s totally over when there is a vaccine, we are still experiencing

kinds of techniques to ensure to help the individuals that can adapt to social distancing and wearing masks and washing hands. We have a lot of support systems in place.” How were visitations handled at your facilities? “Visitation was not allowed. We were sheltering in place and only necessary doctors’ appointments were allowed. There was no going out and no face-to-face contact with families. Fortunately, technology helps the families to connect with individuals through video conferencing, FaceTime and Zoom. “Today, we’re in phase four. We get our direction from the Department of Health and Office of People with Developmental Disabilities. They work together and provide protocols and guidelines for us to follow. And just only recently they allowed families to visit — but in a very structured and very limited manner. Visitors are wearing masks and are on a time-sensitive schedule, and there are multiple family gatherings.”

Tibi Guzmán

the aftermath of the peak of the New York pandemic, and we’re still struggling financially while ensuring that we have enough PPE stock for the second wave and ensuring that we have the right systems in place so we are able to survive.” How were you able to maintain the social distancing protocols and the mask-wearing mandates with the individuals that The Arc Westchester is working with? “That’s a great question because the people we support with developmental disabilities require a lot of assistance to do

any kind of daily function. And to ask them to constantly wear masks and practice social distancing is not easy. “First of all, there was no social distancing in the certified homes that we have. You can’t do that. You can’t manage that. It’s like being in a hospital — there is no social distancing in a hospital setting. The answer is PPE. In order to ensure the safety of the individual being served — and, of course, the staff — that’s the first thing. “As we go out in the community, we’re going to practice safety as much as possible. We have visuals, audios, modeling and all

If you don’t mind my asking, what kind of a financial challenge has this crisis brought to the Arc? And how would the proposed budget cuts from the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities impact your operations? “It has brought a tremendous challenge to the industry at large. We have spent more than $600,000 in PPE equipment, which is astronomical for us because it is something that is not budgeted for. We have increased salaries for the people who are working in quarantine environments, and rightfully so. “The proposed cuts are overall in the magnitude of millions of millions of dollars for the industry. These cuts will be in a range of up to a minimum of $2 million a year, which is large and astronomical for our organization. We’re very concerned FCBJ

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that these cuts, in addition to the increased expenses due to PPE, will be in the range of a million-dollar loss to the organization on an annual basis. “We don’t have the cushions and the large reserves to sustain us in these losses for a long term. So, it’s going to be tough in the next few months. We’re going through a planning process right now to ensure that we have long-term stability. We may have to make some very serious decisions in the future. What are your priorities for the remainder of 2020? “Number one is safety and ensuring that we’re continuing the health and welfare of the individuals that we support. That’s our utmost priority. And then, we want to maintain that our staff is healthy so that our individuals can be healthy. We spent a lot of time with education and staff development, ensuring that we’re communicating with our staff and our individuals on a regular basis to ensure that the safety protocols are in place.” As for yourself, have you been able to stay focused and stay strong during this very difficult time? “That’s a great question — actually, you are the first one to ask me that question of all the interviews that I have done. First of all, I give credit to my immensely dedicated team. We have an emergency management team that has been in place since March 2nd. This team of 15-odd people have been with me on a daily basis and addressing all these issues. Not only reacting, but planning, which is the key issue. “We knew this was coming because we had this procedure in place. That gives me a confidence level that we’re doing very well — our numbers are very good and we are feeling that we’ve handled it fairly appropriately. I’m immensely proud of our workforce and our staff.” AUGUST 10, 2020

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Beyond Biz

PLAYING ARMCHAIR TRAVELER IN THE TIME OF CORONA BY JEREMY WAYNE “MISERY ACQUAINTS A MAN with strange bedfellows,” observes Trinculo the jester in Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” To which I would add, not entirely consequentially, that COVID-19 has made armchair travelers of us all. But if we cannot go to the mountain, we must bring the mountain to us and modern technology, of course, allows us to do this, at least to some degree. I’ve always wanted to go to Bali, but to be honest with you, I never got the gig and the bank manager never thought it was a terribly good idea. Now, thanks to the coronavirus, I have finally been able to go virtually, obviously. Although closed to actual guests, the intriguinglynamed Desa Potato Head in Bali — a hotel so right-on and environmentallyfriendly that even the complimentary bedside slippers are biodegradable — has launched a #goodtimesathome program, accessible via Facebook or Instagram, with cultural expeditions, immersive reads and music playlists to download. A documentary about Brian Eno from 1973 and a fascinating video about turning plastic bags into speakers, were just two of the offerings I enjoyed. Just launching down Mexico way, the HiltonLosCabosAtHome series, which you can find at @hiltonloscabos on Instagram, will give you a taste of this newly renovated beach resort, while you continue to shelter in place. You will also be able to take Spanish lessons and plan a fun Mexican dinner at home, after joining the resort’s executive chef for a cooking session. And arts and crafts projects from the resort’s kids’ club should keep them busy with any luck, while you kick back and enjoy a restorative Mezcal cocktail. Mmm, tastes good. For a quick Caribbean fix, Le Barthélmy Hotel & Spa in St. Barts has made a recording of waves lapping its waterfront. Best listened to through to earphones, I made a flying visit down to the Caribbean the other afternoon and I was not disappointed. No astronomical airfare to pay either and home in time for dinner — a win-win situation. Out west, in Montana. The Resort at Paws Up is often credited as the world’s first glamping (luxury, glamorous camping) resort. It counts Leonardo DiCaprio and Gwyneth Paltrow among its legions of celebrity fans and has recently introduced a “Live from Big Sky Country”

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On the waterfront at Le Barthélmy Hotel & Spa. Photograph by Hugo Allard.

series. The programs offer a wide range of digital experiences, including visiting the resort’s resident baby horses, learning how to forage with the chef and making body scrubs, as taught by the resort’s spa and wellness director. The sessions are streamed on the @theresortatpawsup Instagram page and are also saved as Instagram Highlights. It was only a question of time before lockdown karaoke became a thing. On Monday nights, the adults only Hotel Gaythering, in South Beach, Miami, offers karaoke with a twist, presided over by regular drag queen host, Karla Croqueta. The Gaythering’s popular trivia nights (Wednesday) and bingo (Thursday) have also gone virtual. (@KarlaCroqueta is quite the party animal. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.) Closer to home, at the Emerson Resort & Spa in Mount Tremper in the Catskills, kids can take part in an online trivia quiz of their own, which between you and me is a bit of a breeze since all the answers to the questions are included on the Emerson website. Correct answers win a special Emerson Resort kaleidoscope, mailed out to your brainy little one. Also, in a clever twist on the usual online offerings during closure, the Emerson Resort gift shop is open to dispense Cabin Fever science and solar system kits to keep kids amused — delivered direct to your door. Still with the kids, an even more cerebral pursuit is being offered by WCBJ

Gurney’s Resorts in Montauk, New York, and Newport, Rhode Island. Focused on sustainability and education, #GoneHomeWithGurneys features everything from weekly digital lessons for kids to wellness tips, meditations and recipes. All programming will be streamed on the @gurneyresorts social channel, via

Misty Cook shack, The Resort at Paws Up.

Instagram Stories. If lockdown is making you anxious and travel restrictions are clipping your wanderers’ wings, Aman Resorts, those purveyors of luxury travel experiences, may have a solution. Inspired by nature, its skincare products use organic ingredients, many of which have been harvested in Aman destinations. The newly launched Ultimate Bath Set (with bath salts, body mist, serum and smoked body butter,) aims to dispel tension and promotes a deep sense of emotional and physical well-being. Along with a host of other, rather delicious Aman products, the bath set can be bought online at shop.aman.com. Of course, the boredom and frustrations of lockdown are undoubtedly relieved by online shopping, and not just for groceries or bare necessities. It’s an ill wind indeed that blows no good, and many online stores have reported near Black Friday sales volumes over recent weeks. But how do we justify shopping for luxury goods online during a pandemic, considering the risk we pose to manufacturers, packers, shippers and delivery people? The obvious answer is that by doing so we are helping shore up small pockets of the economy. And we can expiate any


Beyond Biz lingering guilt by giving our business to online shops, like the newly-launched Château Marmont boutique, where all profits are being distributed among hotel employees affected by the current crisis. The boutique’s night-blooming flowers scented candles make a wonderful gift, and the same goes for the château— branded cashmere sweaters, produced in collaboration with scenester London artist, Bella Freud. (shop.chateahmarmont.com). Slightly edgy and undeniably soft. Spoiled by swanky hotels over the years, but spending so much time at home right now, I realize how much my own house needs a makeover. And where better to turn to for inspiration than to Viceroy Hotels & Resorts? I love these hotels, from the understated but highly sophisticated L’Ermitage in Beverly Hills, to the laidback luxury of the villas at Viceroy Riviera Maya, in Mexico. Now, Kelly Wearstler, who designs for Viceroy, has released a 17-part video guide to the fundamentals of interior design, available through online education platform MasterClass (which makes a subscription charge,) I’m enjoying learning about color, light and the best use of space, as well as what to do with old furniture. Still, what with the morning workouts, culture-filled afternoons and nightly cocktail sessions, I’ve a feeling that by the end of lockdown, my house will look pretty much as it does now, only a little dustier. The less you have to do, the busier life gets, as many genuinely busy people have shrewdly observed.

TRAVEL TREATS FOR YOURSELF BY DEBBI K. KICKHAM

4. My “ThirdLove” affair — When you travel there or simply stay at home, you need support. ThirdLove’s mission is to get every woman into a great fitting, comfortable and beautiful bra that helps her feel confident. As the inventor of half-cup sizes, ThirdLove has led the charge on inclusivity, now carrying more than 80 sizes and counting. ThirdLove’s direct-to-consumer e-commerce site features its patented Fit Finder quiz, which asks women a series of questions about their current bras and even their unique breast shapes and uses data science to recommend their best sizes. BRA-va! Prices vary. thirdlove.com

YES, WE ARE ALL STAYING AT HOME. But we will all be getting out of the house someday, right? So prepare yourself now. Take time to renew your passport — one of the best ways is through itseasy.com — and splurge on these great luxury products I’ve discovered in my worldwide travels. Some, indeed, are ideal to take on your next trip (or just use at home):

5. Eye on the prize — Look stylish while protecting your eyes from the sun’s powerful rays without compromising comfort or fit. The breakthrough Yunizon Eyewear features signature Global Fit Technology, three different head widths in all styles and designs to accommodate high cheekbones, low bridge noses and other unique facial features. So it’s easy to find your perfect fit. Starting at $159 with free worldwide shipping. yunizoneyewear.com

1. Treat your tastebuds — You can’t visit New York City right now, but you can still take a bite out of the Big Apple. Li-Lac Chocolates makes small batches of the sweet stuff from its factory in Brooklyn, and you can find its stores all over New York (and in Grand Central Terminal). The bestsellers? The $18 Statue of Liberty, and the chocolate almond bark, $36. li-lacchocolates.com

6. Get a leg up — Now you can outshine everyone else with stunning Swiss hosiery crafted from silk and cashmere. Fogal hosiery is a first-class legwear line. Christie Brinkley favors the All-Nude in Capri but colors and styles abound for a variety of gorgeous gams. You can shop online, or simply visit the store in Zurich when the world returns to the new normal. Prices vary. Fogal.us

2. Stay healthy when you travel — Your well-being counts — whether you are at home or abroad. Vous Vitamin is a personalized vitamin subscription service for both men and women. Just take a short, online survey to match a customized multivitamin blend to your lifestyle and health history, and you can eliminate the pill pack. I say, “Bring on the Biotin.” $90 every three months. Vousvitamin.com.

7. Stay in step — Finally, there’s a high heel engineered to offer ease of wear and support. Ally Shoes, based in Manhattan, was designed by podiatrists and engineers, using some of the best practices from sneaker-making. With this shoe, you put more force on your arches (instead of on the balls of your feet), there are toe supports and deep heel cups. What does it spell? C-O-M-F-O-R-T. $285 in black; $295 in various colors. ally.nyc

3. You wear it well — Made for every road trip and redeye, the best-selling Jet Set Trousers are a four-season wonder. They are machine washable, wrinkle-resistant and sunburn-free with a UPF of 50. Made in Italy with a bartack at the hem so you can customize the length. $228. epoqueevolution.com

GIVE DAD THE GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING Robb Vices is a luxury subscription box of fine foods, beverages, tech gadgets, handmade dishware, handcrafted creations, artisanal cuisine and more. It partners with elite and exciting companies around the world and then curates a thoughtful combination of related products. Perhaps dad will enjoy a Champagne sabre kit or an Altec Lansing retro bluetooth turntable. Robb Vices ranges from $99.95 a month for a yearlong subscription to $159.95 month-to-month. Each box is valued around $250 to $300. Members. robbvices.com.

8. Put your best foot forward — Frette, the luxurious French brand that sells its sheets to top five-star hotels, also makes superb slippers. They are classic Frette - crafted in Italy with a plush velvet upper embroidered with Frette’s signature emblem and a genuine leather sole. Now that’s la dolce vita, $375. Frette.com. 9. Beautiful Belgian bedding — Give your mattress the king or queen treatment that it deserves. Made in Belgium by Guccio, this beyond-gorgeous European bedding features the best-selling Sweet Surrender duvet. Its exceptional Egyptian cotton pink bedding is finished in exquisite gold embroidery. Free shipping worldwide. $367 for the set of duvet cover, sheets and two pillowcases. Gucciohome.com 10. Sybaritic sleep — I never travel without a special silk pillowcase. Celestial Silk’s 25 momme pure mulberry silk pillowcases prevent wrinkles, banish blemishes and give you silky, smooth hair. They come in standard, queen and king sizes in lots of beautiful colors. $34.99. sleepingsilk. com or Amazon, where it’s a best seller. For more about Debbi, visit Debbikickham.com. Beyond Biz, the Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journals’ new section of lifestyle offerings

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FOCUS ON

HOSPITALITY WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNALS

A most hospitable family turns home-baked act of thanks into national volunteer initiative BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

B

ack in April, 16-year-old Scarsdale high school sophomore Brianna Subin wanted to show her appreciation to the tireless work that emergency responders were providing during the early weeks of the Covid-19 pandemic. Brianna baked cookies in her family’s kitchen and brought them as a gift to the Scarsdale Police Department. Rather than leave this token of thanks as a one-off gift, the Subin family began to coordinate more home-baked gratitude for local police, firefighters, emergency workers and pharmacies. This evolved into the collection of gift cards, toys and clothing for Westchester families who found them-

selves in desperate financial straits due to the pandemic. The Subins began to recruit others in their community to join their effort, and word of their activities spread quickly to other areas. Fast-forward to today and the Subins are the driving force behind Bake Back America, a national initiative that encourages the public to offer thanks to the workers on the Covid-19 frontlines and help families in need during this crisis period. For those who are not comfortable with their kitchen skills, Bake Back America has been set up to accept cash donations that can be allocated to nonprofits that are able to provide assistance. Bake Back America is also coordinating with restaurants around the country to deliver their excess food to local nonprofit organizations or

We have so many different initiatives and it’s such a broad sense of initiatives, from getting meals to people and pantries to granting wishes to Zooming art classes, and story-times to children in need. And they’re all important. — Melissa Subin

food-insecure individuals. The Subin family runs Bake Back America, with Brianna’s mother Melissa, a former tennis player, in charge of sponsorships and order fulfillments and father Herb, a personal injury attorney, handling finances and social media while assisting Brianna and her 13-year-old brother Benji with the baking. And while this might seem like an extraordinary journey from Point A to Point B, Melissa Subin believed the example set by Brianna needed to be expanded upon. “I felt if I was going to do something that I would not do it in a small level,” she said. “I’m very grateful that it has taken off to this level. We realized that a lot of people wanted to order meals to go different locations, but not every» FAMILY

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Focus On

Hospitality

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Brianna Subin with a large baking tin of muffins.

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Family—

one knew what restaurant to call and how to organize it. It’s a process and you have to be able to do that.” Melissa had a happy surprise over how quickly Bake Back America resonated. “We just had a delivery in Alaska yesterday,” she said. “And that’s just the meal portion of it. We work with those in need — we really want to inspire people to do acts of kindness. And it could be any level of acts of kindness — I have people emailing and calling me to say, ‘I have an act of kindness, can you help me get this going.’ We have so many different initiatives and it’s such a broad sense of initiatives, from getting meals to people and pantries to granting wishes to Zooming art classes, and story-times to children in need. And they’re all important.” Subin estimated that the initiative delivered approximately 30,000 meals

in the last few months, including a recent food pantry event in Westchester that drew 750 people in need of assistance. The family operates Bake Back America as a volunteer organization, but with more cash donations being offered they have begun looking into creating a 501(c)3 nonprofit that would include paid staff to help with the processing of requests and contributions. As for the original concept of showing appreciation via baking, the Subins’ kitchen is still very active. “We are going to be baking this weekend,” Subin said. “We just had a group of young 16-year-old boys who baked for the Coachman Family Shelter in White Plains. Baking is our fun grassroots way of dropping off and showing people that we’re thinking of them. It is a creative way give back that doesn’t require a whole process.”


LIONESS, INC.

S

Seeing wild animals display affection strikes a chord with us humans. We’ve been there. We’ve done that. Given the harsh environment and everyday struggle to survive in the wild, we are surprised to see glimpses of human behavior in their actions. This cub, in stride, reached up and leaned into his mother, looking for assurance. Solidarity is how they have always survived. Lions are the laziest of the big cats, often spending most of the day sleeping or resting. While lazing around, they can be very affectionate towards one another. While a group of people connected to one another is called a tribe, a group of fish is called a school and a group of owls is called a parliament, a group of lions is collectively called a pride because of their stately quality. Lions are the only cats that live in these social groups called prides. Family units may contain as many as 40 lions, including up to four males, who are responsible for protecting the pride, and a dozen females. All of a pride’s lionesses are related and will mate at approximately the same time. After a gestation period of about 110 days, the females gives birth to 1 to 4 cubs, weighing only 2 to 4 pounds. The cubs are then raised together, sometimes nursing communally. While the image of male lion superiority is ubiquitous in the world, the truth is that the females are the leaders of the pride and its primary hunters. Males rarely participate in hunting unless they are needed. Females fiercely defend their cubs, and while males tolerate them, they don’t always defend them. With high mortality

rates, about 80% of cubs will not survive until adulthood, but those that do may live to be 10 to 14 years of age. Helping humans learn how to live with lions is key to ensuring their survival. In northern Kenya, Samburu warriors, women and children with important local knowledge of wildlife issues are trained to collect data on wildlife sightings and respond to community issues like livestock depredation. In exchange, they receive educational lessons and a leadership role in their communities, creating a network of wildlife ambassadors. Some conservation organizations pay farmers to replace their livestock that have been taken by lions. There are so many fascinating things to discover about lions and all the other creatures that can be found on safari with John Rizzo’s Africa Photo Tours. It’s an unforgettable trip filled with lions, elephants, leopards, zebras and rhinos — all waiting to be discovered by you! Rizzo, an award-winning photographer, leads a team of experienced guides, specializing in safari and tribal tours within East Africa – Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia. His experienced team brings an intimate group of guests of all ages to see the “Big Five” (buffalos, elephants, lions leopards and rhinoceroses) as well as visit with the Maasai, Samburu and Turkana people. It’s a once in a lifetime experience. For more, visit africaphototours.com

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Good Things

Westchester and Fairfield Counties

THE OSBORN, GRADED ‘A’

The Osborn in Rye.

Fitch Ratings (Fitch) has affirmed its ‘A’ rating on revenue bonds issued on behalf of the Miriam Osborn Memorial Home Association (The Osborn). The rating indicates high-credit quality maintained by the facility, a nonprofit continuum of care retirement community based on a 56-acre campus in Rye. “We are very proud of this excellent rating, especially in light of the current challenging economic times,” said Matthew Anderson, president and CEO of The Osborn. “Throughout our 100-plus-year history, we have been committed to providing a safe, engaged and active lifestyle for our residents, as well as exemplary care for those who require it, while maintaining our financial stability.” Fitch is a leading provider of credit ratings, commentary and research. According to Fitch, The Osborn has maintained very strong occupancy for more than a decade. “…the stable outlook reflects Fitch’s expectation that The Osborn will successfully navigate the current operating environment.”

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COMMUNITY FOUNDATION MEETS $2M GOAL

The Westchester Community Foundation has raised $2 million for its Westchester Covid-19 Response Fund and distributed $861,500 to 38 human services nonprofits. For a complete list of the grants awarded, visit wcf-ny.org. The initial priority was to ensure that nonprofits could continue to do their work remotely by accessing requisite technology, that they could comply with public health measures through the purchase of protective equipment and cleaning of facilities, and that childcare was available for the children of first responders, essential workers and low-income families. “This pandemic has laid bare the disparities in Westchester County, one of the wealthiest counties in the nation,” said Laura Rossi, executive director of the Westchester Community Foundation. With more than $1 million remaining in the Westchester Covid-19 Response Fund, the foundation will shift its funding focus to a longer-term recovery phase

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to ensure that nonprofits will be positioned to provide programs and services in the months ahead. Westchester’s most vulnerable residents are facing health and safety concerns, unemployment, eviction and food insecurity. Childcare will become a greater concern as schools reopen. “Thanks to our generous donors, the foundation is uniquely prepared to meet emerging needs in the coming months,” said Rossi. The donors include: Elias Foundation, Intercontinental Exchange, JPMorgan Chase, New York State Health Foundation, People’s United Community Foundation, Robert Martin Co., Saw Mill Capital LLC and The Standard Charitable Foundation.

CBA HOSTED VIRTUAL ANNUAL AWARDS EVENT

The Connecticut Bar Association (CBA) recently honored legal professionals and community members at its annual awards event, Celebrate with the Stars, on July 22. Judith Altmann, a Fairfield-area resident, was honored for her work as a Holocaust survivor and educator. “The Connecticut Bar Association is pleased to honor Judith Altmann for sharing her story and selflessly giving her time for the promotion of justice,” said CBA President Amy Lin Meyerson. “Ms. Altmann is an inspiration to us all.”

Judith Altmann

From left: Liz Pollack, senior marketing manager, Cross County Shopping Center; Sara Brody, director Yonkers Downtown Waterfront BID; and Lou Albano, director of planning and development.

Altmann received the Citizen for the Law Award, for her significant contribution to the institution of justice and the law. As a Holocaust survivor and human rights advocate, she has dedicated her life to speaking about her harrowing experience and encourages others to “stand up” to injustice and acts of intolerance. Since 2005, she has reached more than 71,600 students throughout Connecticut. As a pioneer of the importance of Holocaust education, she spreads her message of tolerance and learning as a way to fight anti-Semitism and injustice across the state. “Celebrate with the Stars” recognizes Connecticut’s top judges, lawyers and professionals who make a difference through their work by demonstrating, dedication, conscientious service, commitment and mentorship. The Connecticut Bar Association, a nonprofit member service organization dedicated to advancing the legal profession and the principles of law and justice, was founded in 1875.

IT WAS CHRISTMAS IN JULY AT THE CROSS COUNTY

The Cross County Shopping Center celebrated Yonkers Back to Business marketing campaign with a Christmas in July event. Retail stores in the center, open to shoppers since June 9, have been seeing record number crowds, much like a holiday shopping season. “Yonkers is back to business and we are working hand in glove with businesses to boost our local economy, including Cross County Shopping Center, a staple in the community,” said Yonkers Mayor Mike Spano. “The new ‘Back to Business’ marketing campaign is meant to reinvigorate our growing business community and show that Yonkers is stronger than ever.” Opened in in 1954, Cross County Shopping Center is the nation’s first open-air shopping center.

CHAIR OF JUDICIAL APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE SELECTED

Mount Vernon Mayor Shawyn Patterson-Howard, has appointed William O. Wagstaff III of the Law Office of William O. Wagstaff III PC to chair


her judicial appointment committee. “…The starting point for the adjudication of criminal cases in Mount Vernon is the City Court. Understanding that, it was important to me for the chair of the committee to be a person who will facilitate a fair process that yields the best candidates for me to select from and ensure justice is served in the Jewel of Westchester,” said Patterson-Howard. The Judiciary Committee evaluates candidates for appointment to the vacant Mount Vernon City Court seat created by the elevation to the New York State Court of Claims of Judge Adrian Armstrong.

NAPPI CONSTRUCTION LABORMANAGEMENT SCHOLARSHIP FUND AWARDS

Seventeen Hudson Valley college students will begin the fall semester each with a $5,000 grant from the Louis G. Nappi Construction Labor-Management Scholarship Fund for undergraduate studies in mathematics, the sciences, engineering and technology. The scholarship, a major construction industry financial-aid program, was established in 2009 by Louis G. Nappi (1920-2014), a former chairman emeritus of the Construction Industry Council of Westchester & Hudson Valley Inc. Comprising representatives from both labor and management, the scholarship committee selects candidates who exemplify the high scholastic and personal standards needed to advance in the construction and building industries. “This scholarship is a living testimony to Louis Nappi,” said Ross J. Pepe, president of the Construction Industry Council, of which Nappi was chairman from 1986 to 1991. “Lou believed that giving students the financial means to pursue higher education and advanced degrees would help our nation’s construction and building industries regain global competitiveness and preeminence.”

Scholarship Committee Chairman William Mascetta, president of Transit Construction Corp. of Yonkers had this to say to the graduates, “In this high-tech age, with unlimited access to information, it’s tempting to rely on technology very heavily. However, remember that we build things and our world of infrastructure is three-dimensional. When you get caught up in digital distraction, it’s like going through life with blinders on. You, as future scientists and executives, must take off the blinders and open yourselves to the full periphery and reality of what we do.”

LAKE REVITALIZATION AT TIBBETTS BROOK PARK IN YONKERS

NYPA TO INVEST $10 MILLION AND DELIVER DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION

The New York Power Authority (NYPA) proclaimed it is the first energy company in the nation to join the American Association of Blacks in Energy (AABE) Energy Equity campaign to increase the representation of African Americans in employment, leadership, business contracting and workforce development in the energy industry. Announced at a recent NYPA Board meeting, the leadership also doubled its investment in diversity, equity and inclusion; environmental justice; and minority/women-owned business enterprises from $5 million to $10 million. “NYPA takes on the pressing issues of our day head on and I am pleased that the Authority is going to partner with a leading organization in AABE to address racial justice at NYPA,” said John R. Koelmel, chair, NYPA Board of Trustees. Paula R. Glover, president and CEO, the American Association of Blacks in Energy, said, “The American Association of Blacks in Energy is pleased to team with NYPA in its work on racial equity. Like NYPA, we believe that working together we can be a better industry when we embrace opportunities to improve the representation of African Americans in the energy industry….”

From left: Joe Stout, executive director, Westchester Parks Foundation; Westchester County Parks Commissioner Kathy O’Connor; Westchester County Executive George Latimer; and Emma Housman, program manager, Xylem.

The Westchester Parks Foundation (WPF) resumed its lake revitalization project at Tibbetts Brook Park in Yonkers, a multiyear project using a specially designed mechanical harvester to clear the 10-acre lake of invasive species. The project, started July 2018, is part of a planned effort to sustain the lake over the course of the next few years and ultimately restore it to its original state for recreational use. The work this summer is made possible by a grant from Xylem Inc., a global water technology provider located in Rye Brook, and is the part of a long-term partnership between the two organizations. Joe Stout, executive director of WPF stated: “Now more than ever, we need to focus our effort on improving our parks for recreational use. The process will take years to complete, but the end goal is important to help improve the quality of life for generations…”

Tibbetts Brook Park, one of the largest parks in the state, is critically important to the community in Yonkers.

ATTORNEY JOINS COHEN AND WOLF

Cohen and Wolf PC, a full-service law firm with three offices in Fairfield County has welcomed Andrew Philbin of Newtown to its trusts and estates group in the

Andrew Philbin

firm’s Danbury office. Prior to joining Cohen and Wolf, Philbin was an associate attorney at Giuliano Richardson & Sfara LLC, in Woodbury, where his practice focused on the drafting of wills and various types of trusts and general estate planning. He is also a former assistant district attorney for the state of Massachusetts where he prosecuted sexual assault cases, as well as larceny, DUI and other misdemeanors and felonies. Philbin received his Juris Doctorate from Suffolk University School of Law where he received a Jurisprudence Award and was named to the Dean’s List as a “Distinguished Oral Advocate.” Philbin also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in classical civilizations and Francophone studies from Union College in Schenectady, New York.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY CLOSING

After 17 years, RiverWinds Gallery at 172 Main St. in Beacon, New York, is closing Aug. 31. “It’s been a painful decision to close,” said Karl LaLonde, one of the co-owners. “We will miss our artists, our customers both local people and folks from out of town. And we will miss being part of Beacon’s vibrant artistic community.” A Going Out of Business Sale from now to Aug. 31 with discounts from 25% to 50% on most pieces of artwork is taking place. “The pandemic has done us in,” said Mary Ann Glass, one of the original co-owners. “We are the longest-running gallery in Beacon. We opened in July 2003, shortly after Dia:Beacon opened its doors. At that time, the west end of Main Street was a bit grim. But we just had a feeling that it was on the edge of change. And we were right. RiverWinds has been an integral part of Beacon’s renaissance. For 17 years we have promoted and sold work by some of the finest Hudson Valley artists.”

Cortlandt is ready for your business and investment. Contact George Oros, Economic Development Consultant at goros@townofcortlandt.com or (914) 522-6774. FCBJ

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Good Things

Westchester and Fairfield Counties

UWWP PARTNERSHIP REAPS 100,000 PAIRS OF SOCKS

From left: Meaghan Hurley, The Building Blocks Foundation board member; Jay Mota, founder and CEO of The Building Blocks Foundation; Tom Gabriel, president and CEO of United Way of Westchester and Putnam; and Avery Zuvic, director of community impact of United Way of Westchester and Putnam.

On Monday, July 20, the United Way of Westchester and Putnam (UWWP) in partnership with The Building Blocks Foundation, a nonprofit that helps homeless children in New York City, and Bombas, comfort-focused apparel brand with a mission to help those in need, distributed 100,000 pairs of socks to 100 not-for-profit agencies across the metro area. “This partnership was a match made in heaven,’’ said Tom Gabriel, president and CEO of the United Way of Westchester and Putnam. “Thanks to the generosity of Bombas and the resourcefulness of The Building Blocks Foundation and our team at United Way, thousands of people across the region will have the luxury of having something so basic, but so essential, to make their lives a little more comfortable.” “We usually work with the New York City schools to distribute socks to children in need, but with the Covid-19 pandemic we had to change the way we reached the students. By working with the United Way of Westchester and Putnam we were able to connect with organizations that help families in need in both New York City and Westchester County. It has been an incredible partnership,” said For The Building Blocks Foundation Founder and CEO Jay Mota. As part of its mission, Bombas donates a specially designed sock for every item sold. To date, they

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have donated more than 35 million socks to those in need with the help of more than 3,000 Giving Partners comprised of homeless shelters and community organizations.

PACE DRAMA SCHOOL PROGRAM CHAIR

Pace University, with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, recently announced that Professor Ion Cosmin Chivu has been appointed the new program chair of the Actors Studio Drama School Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program. “We are pleased to have Professor Chivu at the helm of the Actors Studio Drama School (ASDS). As a member of the Actors Studio and longtime faculty member of the Pace School of Performing Arts at Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, he brings vast experience to this leadership position that includes his successful career as a

Ion Cosmin Chivu

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director in the theater world. We are looking forward to his innovative ideas for teaching and learning that will inspire ASDS students and faculty alike,” said Richard B. Schlesinger, interim dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. A tenured associate professor since 2016, Chivu joined the Pace faculty in 2011 as a tenure-track assistant professor in what is now the Pace School of Performing Arts (PPA) with a mandate to create Bachelor of Arts programs in acting and directing that would be combined to create an international performance ensemble program. He has served as director of this successful program since its inception. A lifetime member of the Actors Studio and a member of the Lincoln Center Directors Lab, Chivu has completed artist residency programs with the Drama League, Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, and the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, and is the founder of InterArt Theatre Group. Chivu holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in theater arts from the G. Enescu Art Academy, in Lasi, Romania, and a Master of Fine Arts degree in dramatic arts/directing at the Actors Studio Drama School, then at the New School.

COMMUNICATIONS VETERAN TO MANAGE MEDIA RELATIONS FOR LAW SCHOOL

Rex Bossert, a veteran communications professional and former assistant dean at the University of California Irvine School of Law, has been named as assistant dean for external affairs at Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law. In addition to his work in media relations, Bossert has a law degree and extensive experience in the legal community. “We could not ask for a better candidate for this position,’’ said Dean Horace Anderson. “Not only does Rex possess excellent credentials in media relations, but he has worked in an academic setting and has a law degree. We are excited to welcome him to Elisabeth Haub School of Law.’’ Bossert brings many years of experience to the position, working in a wide range of positions both in media relations and the legal community. Most recently, he worked as an independent consultant for clients, including a ma-

Rex Bossert

jor law firm. Previously, he served as director of corporate communications for Dentons, the world’s largest law firm. Prior to that, he served as chief executive for communications at the State Bar of California.. Bossert holds a law degree from Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, a Ph.D. from Stanford University as well as a bachelor’s degree from Carleton College. He lives in New Rochelle.

PARACO GAS: GROWING, EXPANDING

Carl Kaplan has been hired by Rye Brook-based Paraco Gas as business development associate for the company’s mergers and acquisitions (M&A) team. “We are also excited to welcome Carl to the Paraco team as we expand our M&A department. He brings 20 years of experience in marketing and business development, which will help to identify and pursue potential acquisition opportunities as Paraco continues to grow,” said Christina Armentano, executive vice president, sales and business development. “…Over the last several years, our family-owned and operated company has focused on improving operational efficiencies, procedures, and processes with an em-

Carl Kaplan

phasis on customer experience. We have never been in a better position to embark on growth opportunities.” Previously Kaplan was at Ferrellgas serving as M&A business development executive. He holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing and management from Long Island University and a master’s degree in business administration from The University of New Haven. Paraco, founded in 1968 by Pat Armentano, is the largest privately held propane company in the Northeast and one of the largest propane companies in the United States servicing more than 120,000 residential and commercial customers.

WOW! IT’S READY TO POP

Kathryn Minckler, founder and CEO of Greenwich-based Wow to Pop, recently announced its first initiative, #2020TheGreatReset, a social media program in advance of the launch this fall of its first product, Actionnate™. Minckler said,“2020 has turned out to be a historical period characterized by a unique rapid succession of important events and trends. During this period, companies and people have taken an unprecedented pause and been forced to adapt to and plan for all kinds of changes…. The purpose of #2020TheGreatReset is to frame and inspire conversations as we imagine, educate ourselves and then take purposeful action around different positive changes….” Alberto Milani, president of the Italy America Chamber of Commerce and Wow to Pop Advisory Board member added, “This year’s events have re-enforced brands’ critical need to understand and align with customers’ values. Actionnate is a unique and timely tool for brands to conduct research and easily deliver complex messages about social responsibility in order to develop and maintain meaningful lasting customer relationships.” Wow to Pop was founded in 2018 to develop significant market insights, intelligence and innovative communications products.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.


WALL-TO-FORK FRESH PRODUCE

at Croton Point Park; Wednesday Sept. 9, 6:45 to 8 p.m. at Flowers City Park in New Rochelle; and Wednesday, Sept.16, 6:45 to 8 p.m. at Croton Point Park. Only 50 people will be allowed per event; sign up in advance at thewpforg/events.

and chairs will also be available. “…We anticipate that we will be required to toggle between in-class learning, distance learning and a hybrid model for students who may have to self-quarantine during the school year,” said Creeden

WHITBY READIES FOR BACK TO SCHOOL

Tracy Feiertag

Evergreen Kosher Market

Evergreen Kosher Market in Monsey, New York, is debuting a revolutionary 20-foot high geoponic (soilbased) wall farm that lets customers not only choose clean, fresh-picked produce but also see exactly where it comes from. The pesticide-free lettuce, kale, arugula, basil and cilantro from Evergreen’s on-site farm are sold at competitive prices in individual pots; products are Star-K Kosher Certified for purity. “We are gratified to be the first kosher supermarket in the country to introduce the vertical farm,” said Malki Levine of Evergreen. “Our customers are very much looking forward to buying fresh produce that is grown in our own backyard rather than being transported on long hauls from farms across the country. They will also appreciate the significantly reduced level of infestation, a major concern of kosher consumers.” Evergreen’s wall farm is the latest installation from Vertical Field, an Israeli ag-tech company that produces innovative vertical agricultural solutions. Geoponic vertical farming yields a new crop every few days, ensuring fresh greens and herbs will always be in season.

REWARD FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

Robert Mitchell, founding principal of the Stratford law firm of Mitchell & Sheahan, has been awarded the Connecticut Law Tribune’s Lifetime Achievement Award, which recognize attorneys who have had a lasting impact on the legal community

in the state. Sought after frequently by the media, Mitchell advises public sector employers, private company management and individual employees on their rights and obligations under federal and state labor and employment laws. A ceremony to honor Mitchell and others who have made a remarkable difference in the legal profession in Connecticut will be held Aug. 25. Mitchell has litigated and tried many cases in several states, federal districts, administrative tribunals and arbitration panels. He graduated with honors in 1978 from the Tulane University School of Law, where he was an editor of the Tulane Law Review abd earned his undergraduate degree from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1975. With offices in Stratford and Westport, Connecticut, and White Plains, New York, Mitchell & Sheahan believes clients are best-served when working with a full-time employment attorney, steeped in the complex knowledge and experience of state and federal employment law.

perfect choice to lead our hospital’s operations, and I look forward to her partnership and the exciting future of Phelps,” said Eileen Egan, RN, JD, executive director, Phelps. Feiertag joined Northwell in 2011 as senior director of emergency medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan and Lenox Health Greenwich Village. Under Feiertag’s leadership, Phelps has seen significant growth in neurosciences, surgical specialties and pediatrics.

SUNSET YOGA AT CROTON POINT PARK

Westchester Parks Foundation (WPF) kicked off the Sunset Yoga in the Park Series on July 29 at Croton Point Park in Peekskill, hosted by the WPF, Tovami Yoga of Mamaroneck, Westchester County Parks and sponsored by NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital and NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital. The free classes will be held throughout the summer. Additional dates include: Wednesday Aug. 26, 6:45 to 8 p.m.

The new school year, beginning Aug. 26 at Whitby School in Greenwich will start with three half-days, which allows students to reestablish relationships with classmates and teachers and become familiar with changes in routines. “Will things look different when the students come back to school? Absolutely,” said Dr. Jack Creeden, Whitby head of school. …The physical layout of the classrooms may change, but how we deliver our Montessori and international baccalaureate programs is not changing and are even enhanced by lessons learned from distance learning. “Masks will be worn by everyone starting with our kindergarten students and only students, faculty, and staff will be allowed in the buildings to minimize risk. “Physical space has been reimagined, which allows plenty of room to create smaller groups or cohorts of students and teachers to minimize contact with other cohorts. We are also implementing ‘zoning’ so that the Whitby Montessori Children’s House, Lower School and Middle School groups stay within specific areas of the school, said Creeden. Six-foot social distancing protocols, use of plexiglass dividers and a 20’x40’ tent complete with desks

NEW DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AT PHELPS HOSPITAL

Tracy Feiertag has been appointed deputy executive director at Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow. A leader at Northwell Health, of which Phelps is a member, she was most recently vice president of service lines at Phelps. “I feel confident that Tracy’s impressive reputation for execution and achieving results makes her the

From left: Meera Garcia, chief of general ob/gyn, NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital; Stacey Petrower, president, NewYork-Presbyterian/Hudson Valley Hospita;, and Christine LaPorta, deputy director, Westchester Parks Foundation. Photograph courtesy of Westchester Parks Foundation.

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Nadia Benson and Nunzio Raimo

NEW STAFF MEMBERS FILL TOP LEADERSHIP POSITIONS AT WITHERELL

John Mastronardi, executive director of The National Witherell, recently announced the appointment of two seasoned health care executives to fill critical roles at The Nathaniel Witherell, the skilled nursing and short-term rehabilitation facility, on 24 acres, owned and operated by the town of Greenwich. Nadia Benson, RN, has joined as director of nursing services and Nunzio Raimo as director of financial operations. Benson joins the Witherell from Five Star Premiere Residences of Yonkers, an independent, assisted living and memory care facility where she served as the director of resident care. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from Concordia College. Raimo has held several top positions at health care organizations, most recently serving as manager of finance at White Plains Hospital. He has also held financial management positions at North General Hospital and Mount Sinai Medical Center. He holds a Master in Business Administration degree from Fordham University and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Iona College.. AUGUST 10, 2020

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Facts & Figures

westchester county

BAKNRUPTCY Chaim and Margulia Neiman, Monsey, codebtors Juicy Deals Inc., Monsey and N.A.F. Sales Inc., Northvale, New Jersey, 2022893-RDD: Ch. 7, $698,410 assets, $1,793,602 liabilities. Attorney: Erica F. Aisner. Marianne O’Toole as U.S. Trustee vs. Armonk Garage Inc., Robert Herbst and Daniel Porpora, 20-6488-RDD: Robert Propora Inc., Chapter 7, adversary proceeding, fraudulent transfe. Attorney: William F. Macreery. Richard and Marisa Stadtmauer, New Jersey vs. Mark Nordlicht, New Rochelle, et al, 20-6489-RDD: Nordlicht Chapter 7, adversary proceeding, removal from Westchester Supreme Court. Attorney pro se. Marianne O’Toole as U.S. Trustee vs. Robert Porpora, Armonk, et al, 20-6490-RDD: Robert Porpora Chapter 7, adversary proceeding, fraudulent transfer. Attorney: William F. MaCreery.

COURTS Lisa Conger vs. WESCO Distribution, d.b.a. Electra Supply Co., Poughkeepsie, 7:20-cv-5897-NSR: Fair Labor Standards Act. Attorney: David R. Wise. AFL-AGC Building Trades Welfare Plan, Alabama vs. Par Pharmaceutical Inc., Chestnut Ridge, et al,7:20-cv-6003-NSR: Class action, anti-trust.Attorney: Michael M. Buchman. United Food & Commercial Workers, Local 2013, Brooklyn vs. Triple A Supplies Inc., d.b.a. Pinnacle Dietary, Newburgh,7:20-cv-6057: Employee retirement. Attorney: James M. Steinberg. Sarah Nachum, Brooklyn vs. Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla 7:20-cv-6059: Class action, Fair Debt Collection Act. Attorney; David M. Barshay.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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AUGUST 10, 2020

ON THE RECORD

Hudson Valley Bone & Joint Surgeons, Hawthorne vs. CNA Financial Corp., Chicago, et al, 7:20-cv-6073: Insurance contract. Attorney: Edward H. Gersowitz.

4 Central Place LLC, Tarrytown. Seller: Elkrief LLC, Hastings-on-Hudson. Property: 27 Main St., Greenburgh. Amount: $770,000. Filed July 31.

Rhonda Turner, Orange vs. Ulster Savings Bank, Kingston 7:20-cv-6084: Class action, Electronic Fund Transfer Act. Attorney: Andrew Shamis.

41 Walworth Avenue LLC, New Rochelle. Seller: Kevin D. Dierking, et al, Scarsdale. Property: 41 Walworth Ave., Scarsdale. Amount: $250,000. Filed July 29.

DEEDS

581 S Broadway Associates LLC, Forest Hills. Seller: 579 South Broadway Realty Corp., Yonkers. Property: 587 S. Broadway, Yonkers. Amount: $950,000. Filed July 28.

Above $1 million 2371 Exterior LLC, Mount Vernon. Seller: 635 Columbus LLC, Mount Vernon. Property: 635 S. Columbus Ave., Mount Vernon. Amount: $2 million. Filed July 28. 635 Columbus LLC, Mount Vernon. Seller: 550 Fulton Avenue LLC, Mount Vernon. Property: 550 S. Fulton Ave., Mount Vernon. Amount: $2 million. Filed July 28. Albert Properties V LLC, White Plains. Seller: R and A Realty Inc., Elmsford. Property: 50 Nepperhan Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed July 28. Brady 194 LLC, Elmsford. Seller: Hawthorne One LLC, Hawthorne. Property: 194 Brady Ave., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $1.9 million Filed July 30. Lionshare Properties LLC, Wellington, Florida. Seller: R. Bruce Cameron, et al, Katonah. Property: 472 Cross River Road, Bedford. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed July 31. White Plains Management Company Inc., Great Neck. Seller: 1 East Post Road LLC, White Plains. Property: 1-3 E. Post Road, White Plains. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed July 30.

Below $1 million 1718 Westchester Ave LLC, Croton-on-Hudson. Seller: Blackpine Development LLC, Bronx. Property: 1718 Westchester Ave., Peekskill. Amount: $75,000. Filed July 30. 22 CSY LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: W.A. S. Holding Corp., Yonkers. Property: 22 Culver St., Yonkers. Amount: $580,000. Filed July 31. 25 Prescott Corp., Scarsdale. Seller: Joseph J. Ferone, Eastchester. Property: 25 Prescott Place, Greenburgh. Amount: $364,500. Filed July 31.

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WCBJ

Panbar Realty LLC, Mahopac. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 3617 Buckhorn, Yorktown. Amount: $135,000. Filed July 28. Planet Property LLC, West Harrison. Seller: 35 Lake Street Realty Partners LLC, White Plains. Property: 10 Woodside, Harrison. Amount: $732,500. Filed July 28. Sanoli Realty LLC, Stony Brook. Seller: SLH Leasings LLC, Newburgh. Property: Route 9, Hudson River, D-20, Cortlandt. Amount: $85,000. Filed July 27.

581 S Broadway Associates LLC, Forest Hills. Seller: 579 South Broadway Laundry Corp., Yonkers. Property: 585 S. Broadway, Yonkers. Amount: $950,000. Filed July 28.

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C. Seller: Walter J. Gumersell III, et al, Lloyd Harbor. Property: 104 Maria Lane, Yonkers. Amount: $441,114. Filed July 30.

Acker and Li Mills Corp 401K Plan, New York City. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 185 Pelham Road, New Rochelle. Amount: $200,000. Filed July 31.

Town of Pound Ridge, Pound Ridge. Seller: David A. Kerr, et al, Pound Ridge. Property: 7 Old Pound Road, Pound Ridge. Amount: $525,000. Filed July 27.

APC New York LLC, Peoria, Arizona. Seller: Longde Yin, et al, Riverside, Connecticut. Property: 355 Old Tarrytown Road, 407, Greenburgh. Amount: $390,000. Filed July 31.

Town of Pound Ridge, Pound Ridge. Seller: David A. Kerr, Pound Ridge. Property: 7 Old Pound Road, Pound Ridge. Amount: $725,000. Filed July 27.

Cartus Financial Corp., Danbury, Connecticut. Seller: Mark R. Szycher, et al, Katonah. Property: 24 Sunderland Lane, Somers. Amount: $805,000. Filed July 29. Federal National Mortgage Association. Seller: Leslie Lorraine Crawford, Yonkers. Property: 13062 Glenwood Ave., 62, Yonkers. Amount: $249,307. Filed July 31. JDTA Outhouse LLC, Croton Falls, Seller: Catherine Outhouse, et al, Croton Falls. Property: 4 Sun Valley Drive, North Salem. Amount: $76,500. Filed July 30. Lowell Solutions Holdings LLC, New York City. Seller: Henry Guberman, Pleasantville. Property: 6 Usonia Road, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $850,000. Filed July 28. Madison Bay LLC, Great Neck. Seller: Robert P. Altmayer, et al, Yonkers. Property: 82 Vineyard Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $165,000. Filed July 28. MJD Contracting Corp., Yorktown Heights. Seller: Helene M. Greenberg, Elmsford. Property: 45 Hartsdale Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $303,000. Filed July 27. NLO Holding Corp., Roslyn Heights. Seller: Jose Diaz, et al, Yonkers. Property: 520 McLean Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $246,500. Filed July 28.

Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey. Seller: Zhengping Xu, et al, Chappaqua. Property: 30 Shady Lane, New Castle. Amount: $850,000. Filed July 30.

JUDGMENTS 447 Associates LLC, Croton-on-Hudson. $41,174 in favor of A and S Deli, et al, White Plains. Filed July 29. Carpentry and Millwork Inc., Mount Vernon. $3,830 in favor of Kamco Supply Corp., Brooklyn. Filed July 31. Mayerhauser Realty, Bronxville. $26,103 in favor of Miller Pondfield LLC. Filed July 27.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. Berke, Beverly, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $573,750 affecting property located at 215 Grove St., Mount Kisco 10549. Filed Feb. 26.

Brunetto, Marguerite A., et al. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $503,200 affecting property located at 9 Barnes Terrace, Chappaqua 10514. Filed Feb. 26. Burley, Sabrina, et al. Filed by JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $75,000 affecting property located at 11 Lorraine Terrace, Unit 121B, Mount Vernon 10553. Filed Feb. 20. Cofield, Doris, et al. Filed by Reverse Mortgage Solutions Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $544,185 affecting property located at 7 Dennison St., White Plains 10606. Filed Feb. 20. Cuzon, Michael, et al. Filed by Pennymac Loan Services LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $468,813 affecting property located at 445 Swanson Drive, Thornwood 10594. Filed Feb. 28. Dietz, Donna L., et al. Filed by Select Portfolio Servicing Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $642,697 affecting property located at 19 Black Birch Lane, Scarsdale 10583. Filed Feb. 24. Dodd, Ella K., individually and as surviving spouse of James A. Dodd, et al. Filed by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $795,000 affecting property located at 136 Forster Ave., Mount Vernon 10552. Filed Feb. 27. Doria, Cynthia, et al. Filed by JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $417,000 affecting property located at 35 Agnola St., Tuckahoe 10707. Filed Feb. 24. Esquivel, Oscar U., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 4 Old Mill Road, Yorktown Heights 10598. Filed Feb. 20. Feldstein, Hillary, et al. Filed by Citimortgage Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $484,350 affecting property located at 780 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains 10605. Filed Feb. 28. Figueroa, Stephen, et al. Filed by JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $392,000 affecting property located at 1735 Summit St., Yorktown Heights 10598. Filed Feb. 25. Giuliani, Michael, et al. Filed by Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 37 West Lane, South Salem 10590. Filed Feb. 21.

Heirs and distributees of the estate of Frances French, et al. Filed by American Advisors Group. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $938,250 affecting property located at 10 Kavey Lane, Armonk 10504. Filed Feb. 21. Hutter, Nance Martelli, et al. Filed by Bank of New York Mellon. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $1.7 million affecting property located at 175 Hickory Kingdom Road, Bedford 10506. Filed Feb. 25. Kuchenmeister, Rebecca, as heir to the estate of Irene Kuchenmeister, et al. Filed by Fareverse LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $637,500 affecting property located at 36 N. Evarts Ave., Elmsford 10523. Filed Feb. 24. Lipschultz, Brent S., et al. Filed by Bank of America N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $864,000 affecting property located at 24 Red Roof Drive, Rye Brook 10573. Filed Feb. 24. Maldarelli, William, et al. Filed by Bank of America N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $531,033 affecting property located at 27 Manhattan Ave., Yonkers 10707. Filed Feb. 25. Medina, Luis, et al. Filed by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $365,000 affecting property located at 63 Pleasantville Road, Ossining 10562. Filed Feb. 20. Meierfeld, Susan C., et al. Filed by Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $780,000 affecting property located at 2 Barry Lane, Katonah. Filed Feb. 21. Mendoza, Raul Garcia, et al. Filed by The Money Source Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $415,140 affecting property located at 440 S. Columbus Ave., Mount Vernon 10553. Filed Feb. 21. Modad, Wassim, et al. Filed by M&T Bank. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $471,200 affecting property located at 110 Durst Place, Yonkers 10704. Filed Feb. 20. Mosquera, Ricardo, et al. Filed by New Residential Mortgage LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $312,000 affecting property located at 184 Purchase St., Unit 2-8, Rye 10580. Filed Feb. 26.


Facts & Figures OSG Mamaroneck LLC, et al. Filed by AB Commerical Real Estate Debt — B.S.A.R.L. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $35.1 million affecting property located at 1311 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains. Filed Feb. 26. Ozdenak, Han, et al. Filed by Bedford Property Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $590,000 affecting property located at 922 Old Post Road, Bedford 10506. Filed Feb. 26. Pam 555 Warburton Realty LLC, et al. Filed by Bryan Park Commercial Real Estate Partners III LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $1.1 million affecting property located at 555 Warburton Ave., Hastings-on-Hudson. Filed Feb. 24. Ramon, Adrian, et al. Filed by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $405,000 affecting property located at 514 N. Terrace Ave., Mount Vernon 10552. Filed Feb. 27. Read, Jennifer, et al. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $406,342 affecting property located at 16 Ridge St., Eastchester 10709. Filed Feb. 25. Romero, Luz, et al. Filed by Sterling National Bank. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $275,000 affecting property located at 3534 Curry St., Yorktown Heights 10598. Filed Feb. 25. Rosenberg, Jeffrey, et al. Filed by Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $437,000 affecting property located at 9 Verne Place, Hartsdale 10530. Filed Feb. 26. Sheehy, John, et al. Filed by Carrington Mortgage Services LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $289,026 affecting property located at 1663 Paine St., Yorktown Heights 10598. Filed Feb. 26. Shinault, Yolanda N., et al. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $289,971 affecting property located at 440 N. Broadway, No. 14, Yonkers 10701. Filed Feb. 26. Spirito, Michael, et al. Filed by 16-3 Holding Company LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $265,000 affecting property located at 3736 Brook Lane, Shrub Oak 10588. Filed Feb. 27. Vanderhorst, Donna M., et al. Filed by Select Portfolio Servicing Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $765,557 affecting property located at 11 Deerhaunt Drive, Croton-on-Hudson 10520. Filed Feb. 21.

Vitolo, Constance A., et al. Filed by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $380,090 affecting property located at 181 Henry St., Buchanan 10511. Filed Feb. 26. Walker, Janeth, et al. Filed by HSBC Bank USA N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $606,900 affecting property located at 346 Highland Ave., Mount Vernon 10553. Filed Feb. 28. White, Mark, et al. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 507 S. Sixth Ave., Mount Vernon 10550. Filed Feb. 25. Wofford, Kellie Y., et al. Filed by The Bank of New York Mellon. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $275,500 affecting property located at 3219 Lincoln Drive, Mohegan Lake 10547. Filed Feb. 25.

Partnerships CD Cleaning, 14 Cambridge Ave., White Plains 10605, c/o Luis De La Rosa and Maria H. De La Rosa. Filed Feb. 25. Evolution Landscaping, 50 Chauncey Ave., New Rochelle 10801, c/o Salvador Mejia and Jose Morfin. Filed Feb. 26. Wanna Empanada, 44 Watson Ave., Ossining 10562, c/o Philip Gioio, Kenelyn Gioio, and Doreen Gioio. Filed Feb. 25.

Sole Proprietorships Away We Go, 333 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains 10605, c/o Sarita Schneck. Filed Feb. 25.

MECHANIC’S LIENS

Build A Brand, Be The Brand Fitness, -ODR-, 60 W. First St., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o O’Zelle D. Ricketts. Filed Feb. 26.

235-245 Delaware Realty, as owner. $11,435 as claimed by Allied Millwork Installers. Property: in White Plains. Filed July 30.

Capra Energy Group, 100 high Point Drive, Suite 301, Hartsdale 10530, c/o Tamir Druz. Filed Feb. 25.

37Dekalb Owner LLC, as owner. $207,130 as claimed by Papp Architects PC, White Plains. Property: in White Plains. Filed July 29.

CMS Custom, 22 Hillandale Road, Rye Brook 10573, c/o Christina Marie Settanni. Filed Feb. 25.

86 Convent Place LLC, as owner. $7,385 as claimed by Heat Inc., New Hyde Park. Property: in Yonkers. Filed July 30. Apessos, Pantelis, as owner. $700 as claimed by Werkheiser Painting and Roofing, Mamaroneck. Property: in Scarsdale. Filed July 30. BNS I LLC, as owner. $92,489 as claimed by Danbury Winair Co. Property: in Peekskill. Filed July 29. County of Westchester, as owner. $3.4 million as claimed by West-Fair Electric Contractors, Hawthorne. Property: in Mount Pleasant. Filed July 30. RXR 587 Main Owner LLC, as owner. $149,655 as claimed by T.F. Andrew Carpet One Floor, New Rochelle. Property: in New Rochelle. Filed July 29.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

Erwin’s Barber Academy, 255 Grove St., White Plains 10601, c/o Erwin Gilliam. Filed Feb. 26. Go Green Landscaping, 613 South St., Peekskill 10566, c/o Jermaine Gilleo. Filed Feb. 24. Handysmart, 12 Fairmount Ave., Apt. 2, Yonkers 10701, c/o Esteban R. Suazo Marizan. Filed Feb. 26. L and G Car Services, 257 Hoover Road, Yonkers 10710, c/o Lucio Efrain Guerrero Guerrero. Filed Feb. 24. Laurie’s Leashes, 300 Hayward Ave., Apt. 1J, Mount Vernon 10552, c/o Jessica Higgins. Filed Feb. 26. Maximus Res, P.O. Box 1165, White Plains 10602, c/o Daniel P. Morris. Filed Feb. 26. Nazari Custom, 15 Peter A Beet Drive, Cortlandt Manor 10567, c/o Isabella Cristina Nazario. Filed Feb. 25. Ricardo Taxi, 94 Ashford Ave., Dobbs Ferry 10522, c/o Ricardo Diaz. Filed Feb. 24.

Sarah Krawczyk Bethoney, 25 Wall Ave., Valhalla 10595, c/o Sarah Krawczyk Bethoney. Filed Feb. 26. Silk Lashes and Satin Skin, 55 Cole St., Yonkers 10710, c/o Alicia Harrison. Filed Feb. 24. Story and Brand, 31 Brookside Lane, Dobbs Ferry 10522, c/o Ryan Moynihan. Filed Feb. 25. Vividtone Painting, 144 Vista Place, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Richard Grant. Filed Feb. 24. Wooden You, 7 Overlook Road, Dobbs Ferry 10522, c/o Kent Bubbenmoyer. Filed Feb. 24.

PATENTS Aligned shingled writing for magnetic recording media and media having shingle-edge positioned tracks. Patent no. 10,734,023 issued to Robert Biskeborn, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Automatic transfer of audio-related task to a smart speaker. Patent no. 10,735,901 issued to James Bostick, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Bump-bonded cryogenic chip carrier. Patent no. 10,734,567 issued to David Abraham, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Configuration management for virtual machine environment. Patent no. 10,735,434 issued to Sanehiro Furuichi, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Coordinating the use of independent radio receivers associated with multiple different transmitters. Patent no. 10,735,938 issued to Brad Clawsie, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Discrete electronic device embedded in chip module. Patent no. 10,734,317 issued to Andreas Huber, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Dynamic distributor selection for network load balancing. Patent no. 10,735,250 issued to Qi Ming Liu, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Dynamically generated payment token ratings. Patent no. 10,733,609 issued to Arthur De Magalhaes, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Generating three-dimensional imagery. Patent no. 10,735,707 issued to Adam Bishop, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Head-mounted video and touch detection for health care facility hygiene. Patent no. 10,734,108 issued to Lorraine Herger, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Image labeling. Patent no. 10,733,742 issued to Eric Rozner, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Interactive closure device and beverage container. Patent no. 10,735,934 issued to Ryan Campbell, et al. Assigned to PepsiCo, Purchase. Performing vector comparison operations in fully homomorphic encryption. Patent no. 10,735,181 issued to Jerry Stevens, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Virtual container-extended network virtualization in server cluster. Patent no. 10,735,319 issued to Jerry Stevens, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY BUILDING LOANS Above $1 million Crannell Square LP, et al, as owner. Lender: CPC Funding SPE 1 LLC. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $12 million. Filed July 28.

Below $1 million Bonetti, Irma M., Beacon, as owner. Lender: Primelending. Property: in Mount Hope. Amount: $295,172. Filed July 31. Liptak Real Estate LLC, as owner. Lender: LendingHome Funding Corp., San Francisco, California. Property: 53 Crosby Ave., Brewster 10509. Amount: $216,200. Filed July 28. ML and YD Inc., Monroe, as owner. Lender: Northeast Community Bank, White Plains. Property: 10 Timber Trail and 587 Route 32, Highland Mills 10930. Amount: $979,406. Filed July 30. Pilot Light Productions Inc., Kerhonkson, as owner. Lender: Wallkill Valley Federal Savings and Loan Association, Wallkill. Property: 317 Main St., Kerhonkson 12446. Amount: $255,000. Filed July 28. Ricketts, Rashad A., as owner. Lender: Hudson Valley Credit Union. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $144,908. Filed July 30.

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Schepetin, Myles, Mount Tremper, as owner. Lender: Sawyer Savings Bank, Saugerties. Property: 62 The Middle Way, Mount Tremper 12457. Amount: $415,000. Filed July 28. Seyfarth, David C., et al, Saugerties, as owner. Lender: Rondout Savings Bank, Kingston. Property: 107 Houtman Road, Saugerties. Amount: $240,000. Filed July 30. Veronica Heights LLC, Newburgh, as owner. Lender: Rock East Funding LLC, New Milford, Connecticut. Property: 246 Grand St., Newburgh 12550. Amount: $290,000. Filed July 28.

DEEDS Above $1 million 2Stissing LLC, Pine Plains. Seller: James Root, et al, New York. City. Property: 118 Hoffman Road, Pine Plains 12567. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed July 30. Among The Trees LLC, New York City. Seller: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. Property: 19 Lawes Lane, Philipstown 10524. Amount: $2.1 million. Filed July 28. Woodstock Mill LLC, Woodstock. Seller: Bear Stauss, Missoula, Montana. Property: 74-76 Ohayo Mountain Road, Woodstock. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed July 29.

Below $1 million 16 Mahar Inc., Glen Head. Seller: Joanne Foley, Poughkeepsie. Property: 16 Mahar Drive,. Poughkeepsie. Amount: $350,000. Filed July 30. 17 State Street Propco LLC, Ardsley. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 17 State St., Middletown. Amount: $75,365. Filed July 31. 180 Developers LLC, Ellenville. Seller: Curtis Anderson, et al, Crozier, Virginia. Property: 249-251 Canal St., Wawarsing. Amount: $22,500. Filed July 27. 190-192 Route 22 Corp., Somers. Seller: Sonny Boy Realty Inc., Brewster. Property: 190-192 Route 22, Brewster 10509. Amount: $600,000. Filed July 28. 21st Century Living LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: City of Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $9,500. Filed July 30.

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Facts & Figures 24 Oswego LLC, Bellmore. Seller: TNE Holding Corp., et al, New York City, Property: 24 Oswego Road, LaGrange. Amount: $87,500. Filed July 30. 32 Joseph Drive LLC, Hawthorne. Seller: Cathleen Madden, Carmel. Property: 32 Joseph Drive, Carmel 10512. Amount: $690,000. Filed July 29. 69 West Chester LLC, Kingston. Seller: Gabriela A. Mayr, New Paltz. Property: 69 W. Chester Ave., Kingston. Amount: $175,000. Filed July 29. 9 Jude Drive LLC, Freeport. Seller: Robert K. Mackson, et al, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Property: Jude Drive., LaGrangeville 12540. Amount: $62,000. Filed July 30. All Mine of Orange Inc., Salisbury Mills. Seller: Michael Maher, et al, Newburgh. Property: in Cornwall-on-Hudson. Amount: $48,000. Filed July 29. Andrews Estate Services Inc., Patterson. Seller: Hedgerow Properties LLC, Weston, Connecticut. Property: 3 Preston Place, Patterson 12563. Amount: $77,500. Filed July 30. Antar Capital LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Estate of Eleanor M. Lomoriello, et al, Poughkeepsie. Property: 29 N. Clover St., Poughkeepsie 12601. Amount: $240,000. Filed July 29. Austin Black LLC, Monsey. Seller: Gerald Marlatt, et al, Pine Bush. Property: 3600 Route 52, Shawangunk. Amount: $55,000. Filed July 29. BWBI LLC, Millbrook. Seller: Hope Ingham, Washington. Property: in Washington. Amount: $154,000. Filed July 27. Chestnut Hill Holding Group LLC, Saugerties. Seller: Michael Persico, Saugerties. Property: in Saugerties. Amount: $65,000. Filed July 28. Chestnut Hill Holding Group LLC, Saugerties. Seller: Michael Persico, Saugerties. Property: 458 Route 212, Saugerties. Amount: $400,000. Filed July 28. City Vision National Revitalization LLC, Boca Raton, Florida. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Property: 18 Highland Ave., Warwick. Amount: $142,128. Filed July 31. Clove Valley Properties LLC, Hopewell Junction. Seller: Marie Sieloff, LaGrangeville. Property: in Beekman. Amount: $75,000. Filed July 27. Dry Brook Partners LLC, Bronx. Seller: Nicole B. Pagano, Palenville. Property: 465 Abeel St., Kingston. Amount: $260,000. Filed July 31. Federal National Mortgage Association. Seller: Maura A. Barrett, Poughkeepsie. Property: 74 Walsh Road, LaGrangeville 12540. Amount: $227,000. Filed July 29.

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Garvilla Construction Inc., Pine Bush. Seller: Frances Lofink-Wager, Seaside Heights, New Jersey. Property: in Shawangunk. Amount: $35,000. Filed July 28. J. Clement Inc., Stormville. Seller: U.S. Bank N.A. Property: 541 Lakeshore Drive, Brewster 10509. Amount: $234,675. Filed July 31.

Roe Park Realty LLC, Monroe. Seller: George Papageorge, Warwick. Property: 70 Village Pkwy., Highland Falls. Amount: $130,000. Filed July 31. Rymph Road Properties Ltd., Staatsburg. Seller: Joan H. McCarthy, Fishkill. Property: 6 Curry Lane, Hyde Park 12538. Amount: $161,000. Filed July 27.

JH Worldwide LLC, Monroe. Seller: Project 9 Realty Inc., Monroe. Property: N. Drury Lane, Newburgh. Amount: $120,000. Filed July 29.

Solomon Gardens 123 LLC, Kiryas Joel. Seller: IS Orange LLC, Albany. Property: 20 Hayes Court, Unit 203, Palm Tree-Kiryas Joel. Amount: $70,000. Filed July 30.

JNI Realty Corp., Newburgh. Seller: Bank of America N.A. Property: 650 Blooming Grove Turnpike, New Windsor. Amount: $175,500. Filed July 29.

Sylvan Rock LLC, New York City. Seller: David Borenstein, Red Hook. Property: in Milan. Amount: $500,000. Filed July 27.

JW and YG Meadows LLC, Monroe. Seller: Charles Tran Property LLC, Middletown. Property: 28 Houtman Drive, Montgomery. Amount: $150,000. Filed July 29. Kalapana Holdings LLC, Millbrook. Seller: Patrick P. Magnarella, et al, Millbrook. Property: in Millbrook. Amount: $260,000. Filed July 30. Malmark Construction Corp., Newburgh. Seller: Annette Biviano, Marlboro. Property: in Newburgh. Amount: $119,900. Filed July 28. Midnight Blue Glassworks LLC, Cheyenne, Wyoming. Seller: Suzanne Walton, Kingston. Property: 177 W. Pierpont St., Kingston. Amount: $275,000. Filed July 27. MTGLQ Investors LP, Irvine, California. Seller: Michael Curti, White Plains. Property: 6 Caryle Drive, Hyde Park 12538. Amount: $310,000. Filed July 27. Murray Lewis Properties LLC, Red Hook. Seller: Eight Big Trees LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: 8 Old Whalesback Road, Red Hook. Amount: $600,000. Filed July 30. Northern Enterprise New York LLC, Cornwall-on-Hudson. Seller: Ricki H. Berger, New City. Property: 65 Glenwood Road, Blooming Grove. Amount: $28,600. Filed July 31. Peacock Development LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Thanh V. Ho, San Rafael, California. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $165,500. Filed July 30. Peak Odell V LLC, Denver, Colorado. Seller: The Bank of New York Mellon. Property: 27 Stanton Trail, Blooming Grove. Amount: $7,272. Filed July 29. PHH Mortgage Corp., West Palm Beach, Florida. Seller: Susan J. Palmer, Chester. Property: 47 St. John St., Goshen. Amount: $120,640. Filed July 28. Property Analysis and Investment Deal Corp., Coral Springs, Florida. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 89 Keats Drive, New Windsor. Amount: $196,250. Filed July 30.

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Tiso Holdings LLC, Pawling. Seller: Alan V. Surman, Pawling. Property: W. Dover Road, Dover Plains 12522. Amount: $205,000. Filed July 30. Town of Lloyd, Highland. Seller: Richard M. Malenka, Brooklyn. Property: 141 Vineyard Ave., Lloyd. Amount: $700. Filed July 29. Town of Shandaken, Shandaken. Seller: Sandra Moores, et al, Woodstock. Property: in Shandaken. Amount: $45,000. Filed July 27. U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Seller: Nelson L. Martinez, McKinney, Texas. Property: 23-25 Waverly Place, Middletown. Amount: $224,257. Filed July 29. Viper Development LLC, Wallkill. Seller: Laura Gramazio, Goshen. Property: in Gardiner. Amount: $35,000. Filed July 30. VPM Realty LLC, Central Valley. Seller: Patsy Maietta, et al, Chester. Property: 110 Green Meadows Way, Unit 14C, Chester. Amount: $105,000. Filed July 28. Wallkill Central School District, Wallkill. Seller: 1500 NYS Route 208 LLC, Wallkill. Property: 1500 Route 208, Wallkill 12589. Amount: $575,000. Filed July 28. Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey. Seller: Thomas Murphy, Highland Mills. Property: 15 Ferndale Ave., Woodbury. Amount: $310,000. Filed July 31. White Feather Farm Inc., Saugerties. Seller: Teresa A. Smith, Woodstock. Property: 2565 Route 212, Woodstock. Amount: $600,000. Filed July 30. Wild Lands Holding Company LLC, High Falls. Seller: Trisha L. B. Luing, Morristown, New Jersey. Property: 64 Rock Hill Road, Rochester. Amount: $980,000. Filed July 27.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. Kelley, Mattie A., et al. Filed by Jose Del Gadillo. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $158,000 affecting property located in Port Jervis. Filed July 29. Maher, Jennifer A., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $500,000 affecting property located at 45 Upper Lake Road, Mahopac 10541. Filed July 29. Woodward St LLC, et al. Filed by Finance of America Commercial LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $251,398 affecting property located at 17 Horton Court, Cold Spring 10516. Filed July 30.

MECHANIC’S LIENS Doyle, Nancy, as owner. $6,661 as claimed by J.A.L. Enterprises, Kingston. Property: 4237 Route 28A, West Shokan. Filed July 30.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

Sole Proprietorships

Double O Cleaning and Catering, 365 Old Route 32, Saugerties 12477, c/o Donna R. O’Rourke. Filed July 30.

A Team Movement, 7 Neptune Lane, Middletown 10940, c/o Andy K. Hamilton. Filed July 21.

Estabrook Arbor Yard and Woods, 397 Main St., Rosendale 12472, c/o David W. Estabrook. Filed July 27.

Above Water, 8 Cordts St., Kingston 12401, c/o Brian S. Urban. Filed July 29. Affinity Advantage Medicare Solutions, 633 Route 211 East, Middletown 10941, c/o Thomas C. Ammons. Filed July 22. Albarr, 1161 Route 209, Cuddebackville 12729, c/o Rashad Rauf. Filed July 21. AMAJ Photography, 158 N. Brewster Road, Brewster 10509, c/o James Saintilfort. Filed July 30. Ancestor, 13 Patricia Road, Middletown 10941, c/o Gabrielle Bardeguez. Filed July 22. Anointed Creations by Tasha, 170 South St., No. 1, Newburgh 12550, c/o Natasha Desiree Patterson. Filed July 21. ATC Consulting, 46 Gleneida Ridge Road, Carmel 10512, c/o Matthew Sean Campbell. Filed July 28. BeautifullyYou!, 1 Buddy Lane, Wallkill 12589, c/o Jennie Miles. Filed July 21.

Doing Business As

Browzin Around, 78 Front St., Suite 56, Port Jervis 12771, c/o Marissa Pezzullo. Filed July 21.

Chestnut Mart of Highland Inc., d.b.a. Chestnut Market, 3502 Route 9W, Highland 12528. Filed July 30.

Burger im, 115 Temple Hill Road, Suite 300, New Windsor 12553, c/o Thien Vinh Nguyen. Filed July 21.

Chestnut Marts Inc., d.b.a. Chestnut Market, 3480 North Road, Poughkeepsie 12601. Filed July 30.

Christophermichael Forbes Unicone, 215 Quassaick Ave., Suite 102, New Windsor 12553, c/o Christophermichael Forbes. Filed July 22.

Hal N. Buch M.D., P.C., d.b.a. Buch Gastroenterology, 117 Mary’s Ave., Suite 201, Kingston 12401. Filed July 30. Kingston All Clean Laundromat Inc., d.b.a. Water Dragon Laundromat, 1126 Morton Blvd., Kingston 12401. Filed July 30.

Partnerships Orange County Mobile Mechanics, 33 Quaker Ave., Suite 619, Cornwall-on-Hudson 12518, c/o Edward Lee and Jonathan H. Lopez. Filed July 22. Unity 2.7, 1628 Ulster Heights Road, Ellenville 12428, c/o Matthew Valdez and Crystal M. Valdez. Filed July 30.

Cinda Street, 938 Route 12, New Hampton 10958, c/o Cinda L. Ford. Filed July 23. Clarity Nutrition and Wellness, 11 Diorio Prince Place, Marlboro 12542, c/o Marianne Petralia. Filed July 29. Covenant Bow, 135 Heather Circle, Newburgh 12550, c/o Danielle J. Small. Filed July 24. D and C Appliance Services, 35 Brigham Lane, Lot 4, Lake Katrine 12449, c/o David C. Goessinger. Filed July 28. Dead Relatives Redux, 590 Broadway, Kingston 12401, c/o Kari Ann Temming. Filed July 27.

Esther Friedman Collections, 15 Koznits, No. 203, Monroe, c/o Esther Malka Friedman. Filed July 24. Hancock Cleaning Fire and Maintenance, 1668 Route 213, Ulster Park 12487, c/o Marqita C. Clyde-Hancock. Filed July 28. House Music Community, 29 Grosso Court, Montgomery 12549, c/o Luis Sevills Jr. Filed July 24. Hudson Valley Gutters, 25 Central Ave., Wallkill 12589, c/o Edward F. Mitzner III. Filed July 28. J-Bubz, 218 Greenkill Ave., Kingston 12401, c/o Jon F. Kassler Jr. Filed July 30. Jesselli Architectural Collaborative, 411 Vista on the Lake, Carmel 10512, c/o Christian Francis Jesselli. Filed July 28. Landsculpting and Excavating by Scott Peters, 362 Band Camp Road, Saugerties 12477, c/o Scott K. Peters. Filed July 28. Larson Construction, 31 Ulsterville Road, Pine Bush 12566, c/o Steven Vincent Larson. Filed July 21. M.V.R. Contracting, 493 N. Lake Blvd., Mahopac 10541, c/o Matthew Vincent Reger. Filed July 28. Macarons By Jessica, 11 Winding Hills Road, Wallkill 12589, co Jessica Porter. Filed July 30. Mai Tai’s, 721 Broadway, Suite 100, Kingston 12401, c/o Tamanika B. Hammond. Filed July 27. McMillan Educational Consulting, 15 Rapelje Road, Walden 12586, c/o Robin Yvette McMillan. Filed July 24. Milk Mechanical, 1 Kerestier Court, No. 203, Monroe 10950, c/o Lievy Breuer. Filed July 23. Mr. Patterson’s Maintenance, 47 Mullins Lane, Newburgh 12550, c/o Devon T. Patterson. Filed July 21.

Primal Evolution Sporting Goods, 74 E. Green Road, Hamptonburgh, c/o Brian Lawrence Rudden. Filed July 21. Rebel Rom, 6 Underhill Road, No. 7, Middletown, c/o Romnee Hayes. Filed July 21.


LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Formation of EH & AH LLC. Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to 797 Yonkers Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10704. Articles of Organization of the LLC filed with the SSNY on June 10, 2020. Purpose: Any lawful act(s). #62601 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Refactor IT, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/17/2018. Location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent for service of process on LLC. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Refactor IT LLC, CEO 1 Primrose Avenue Yonkers, NY 10710. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62603 Notice of Formation of DERRICKíS LANDSCAPE LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 7/06/2020. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to: The LLC, 186 Rockland Ave, Mamaroneck, NY 10543. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62604 Notice of Formation of K & X RENTAL PROPERTIES LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY(SSNY) on 06/16/20. Office Location: Westchester Cty., Princ. Office of LLC: 62 William St. Yonkers, NY 10701. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr of its princ. office. Purpose: any lawful activity #62605

Notice of Formation of MejiasRent Apartments LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 07/10/2020. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 2 Old Albany Post Road Ossining, NY 10562. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62606 Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) All the Best Moments, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 29, 2020. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 2004 Beekman Court, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which LLCs may be formed under the New York LLC law. #62607 Notice of Formation of Tortorici Holdings, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 5/20/19. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, United States Corporation Agents, Inc. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62608 Notice of Formation of BADALY & BADALY ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING PLLC. Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the PLLC to 2 Wilson Place, 1st Floor, Mount Vernon, NY 10550. Articles of Organization of the PLLC filed with the SSNY on February 14, 2020. Purpose: Architecture & Engineering. #62609

Notice of Formation of Core Cleaning Solutions, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/08/2020. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 7 Odell Plz Ste 130 #562 Yonkers, NY 10701. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62610 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SHOPRO CONSULTING LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 7/10/20. Offc. loc: WESTCHESTER Cty. SSNY desig. agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC to 239 Sheridan Ave, Mt. Vernon, NY 10552. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62611 Notice of Formation of Scrubd, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 07/01/2020 . Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 7 Sherwood Ave Ossining NY 10562. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62612 Notice of Formation of Arielís Lip & Body Care, LLC. Art of Org. filed with NY Secy. of State on 7/6/20. Office location: Westchester County. Secy of State designated as agent upon which process may be served. Secy. of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him/her to LLC, c/o: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY. 11228. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62613

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Lion Factory Building LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 13, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Lion Factory Building LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62614

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Lion Factory Commerce LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 14, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Lion Factory Commerce LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62617

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Lion Factory Building Manager LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 13, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Lion Factory Building Manager LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62615

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Lion Factory Commerce Manager LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 14, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Lion Factory Commerce Manager LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62618

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Lion Factory Building Associates LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 13, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Lion Factory Building Associates LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62616

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: MIKADO HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/26/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 12 Aberdeen Road, Cortlandt Manor, New York 10567. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date. #62619

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: ANDOLINI MEDIA, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/27/2019. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 159 Ralph Avenue, White Plains, New York 10606, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62620 THE ANNUAL RETURN OF THE PATRICIA & BERNARD GOLDSTEIN FAMILY FOUNDATION for the year ended May 31, 2020 is available at its principal office located at 2 Manursing Way, Rye, NY 10580 for inspection during regular business hours by any citizen who requests it within 180 days hereof. Principal of the Fund is Patricia Goldstein. #62621 Notice of Formation of WAY2WIN MANAGEMENT LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 7/13/20. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the WAY2WIN MANAGEMENT LLC, 1011 King St, Chappaqua, New York 10514 Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62622

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: La Mora Managers LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 22, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to La Mora Managers LLC, 1511 Central Park Avenue, Yonkers, New York 10710. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62624 KJJ Strategies LLC Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State on July 29, 2020. Office located in WESTCHESTER COUNTY. Secy. Of State designated as agent upon which process may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him/her to: 300 Mamaroneck Ave. Suite 505 White Plains, NY 10605 (the LLCís primary business location). LLC may engage in any lawful act or activity for which a limited liability company may be formed. #62625

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: La Mora LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on July 22, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to La Mora LLC, 1511 Central Park Avenue, Yonkers, New York 10710. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62623

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Facts & Figures

fairfield county

BUILDING PERMITS Commercial 10 Lexington Avenue LLC, Greenwich, contractor for 10 Lexington Avenue LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 10 Lexington Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $31,000. Filed July 2020. Cohen, Claudine, Greenwich, contractor for Claudine Cohen. Build pool and spa with required safety barrier at 31 Glen Ridge Road. Greenwich. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed July 2020. Gateway Harbor Point Planned Community, Stamford, contractor for Gateway Harbor Point Planned Community. Install sign face-lit channel letters at 400-440 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $63,000. Filed June 29. The Home Depot USA Inc., Stamford, contractor for Andrew Scalesi. Install vinyl, replace windows at 254 Seaside Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $14,380. Filed June 26. The Home Depot USA Inc., Stamford, contractor for Duncan Lee. Replace windows and patio door at 455 Hope St., Unit 3J, Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,966. Filed July 1. Johnson, Barbara and Nordhol Johnson, Greenwich, contractor for Barbara Johnson. Remove and re-construct new first floor at 56 Gold St., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $60,000. Filed July 2020.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to:

Pavarini Northeast Construction Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for Stamford Exit 9 LLC. Build a security-operations office at 1 Blachley Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $100,000. Filed June 30.

5 Chapel Lane LLC, Old Greenwich, contractor for 5 Chapel Lane LLC. Build new single-family dwelling at 5 Chapel Lane, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $400,000. Filed July 2020.

Signature Construction Group of Connecticut Inc., Stamford, contractor for One Stamford Plaza Owner LLC. Expand Ninth floor at 263 Tresser Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $807,000. Filed June 25.

Acadia Investment Properties, Greenwich, contractor for Acadia Investment Properties. Remove existing garage and build a new car garage at 28 French Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $700,000. Filed July 2020.

Signature Pools Inc., Norwalk. contractor for Christopher Cabanillas. Build pool and spa with required safety barrier at 3 Knollwood Drive East, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $105,000. Filed July 2020.

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Adow Pool Services LLC, Stamford, contractor for Cara Moore. Add a spa to an existing swimming pool at 100 Doubling Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed July 2020.

Sprague, Jessica, Stamford, contractor for Jessica Sprague. Finish basement and add full bathroom in basement at 150 Hope St., Unit U-6, Stamford. Estimated cost: $16,910. Filed June 29.

Anderson, Carolyn H., Greenwich, contractor for Carolyn H. Anderson. Repair chimneys at 138 Clapboard Ridge Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $90,000. Filed July 2020.

Stamford Tent, Stamford, contractor for Greenwich Academy. Prepare for a private party at 200 N. Maple Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $16,000. Filed July 2020.

Aulenti, Diane, et al, Stamford, contractor for Diane Aulenti. Remove existing roof and re-roof 153 Wood Ridge Drive South, Stamford. Estimated cost: $29,795. Filed June 30.

Ten Ten Washington RSK LLC, Stamford, contractor for Ten Ten Washington RSK LLC. Alter office space at 1010 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $442,475. Filed June 26.

Baybrook Remodelers Inc., Stamford, contractor for Peter Sachs. Replace deck at 14 Farm Hill Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $19,000. Filed June 30.

Waterfront Office Building LTD, Stamford, contractor for Waterfront Building LTD. Add additional private offices, storage room, loading platform at 62 Southfield Ave., Unit T1, Stamford. Estimated cost: $3,905,008. Filed June 26. Wescorp, Greenwich, contractor for JSM Partners LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 81 Holly Hill Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed July 2020.

Residential 2 Sons Roofing and Windows LLC, Stamford, contractor for Shelia L. Plaisance. Remove existing roof and re-roof 60 Mill Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $4,000. Filed June 30.

Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Billington, Jeff and Kat Kiarsis, Greenwich, contractor for Jeff Billington. Finish basement at 7 Upland Street East, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $2,520. Filed July 2020. BMR Enterprises LLC, Stamford, contractor for Michael Bernstein. Re-roof 30 Crofts Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $18,870. Filed June 30. Bolick, Elizabeth, Cos Cob, contractor for Elizabeth Bolick. Add shower, toilet and vanity at 75 Cos Cob Ave., Unit 22, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $4,000. Filed July 2020. CES Danbury Solar LLC, Stamford, contractor for Chanda Nagendra. Reinstall solar panels at 83 Buckingham Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,788. Filed June 30.

CES Danbury Solar LLC, Danbury, contractor for Sally Wakeman. Install ground-mounted solar PV, SunPower, SolarEdge inverter, tesla power wall at 11 Mayfair Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $405,184. Filed July 2020. Dean, James M., Port Chester, New York, contractor for Daur Mark. Alter electrical, mechanical and plumbling systems at 14 Indian Pass, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed July 2020. DeSalvo, Thomas, et al, Stamford, contractor for Thomas DeSalvo. Build deck at 312 Thornridge Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed July 1. Domka, Magdalena, et al, Stamford, contractor for Magdalena Domka. Install vinyl panels and basement bathroom and renovate kitchen at 121 Midland Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $8,500. Filed June 29. Fonti, John, Stamford, contractor for Fonti Investment LLC. Add second floor and one-car garage at 33 Aquila Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $200,000. Filed June 29. Grunow Builders Inc., Darien, contractor for Frank P. Cammisa Jr. Remodel six bathrooms, kitchen and laundry room at 39 Lismore Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $310,000. Filed July 2020. The Home Depot USA, Atlanta, contractor for Jonathan Marchini. Remove and replace windows at 22 Linwood Ave., Riverside. Estimated cost: $1,714. Filed July 2020. Hong, Gregory L. and Diane GW Hong, Old Greenwich, contractor for Gregory L. Hong. Build deck at 16 St. Claire Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $66,570. Filed July 2020. Kemp, Philip Sperry, Greenwich, contractor for Philip Spery Kemp. Remodel kitchen, replace cabinets, floor and appliances at 73 Weaver St, Unit 11, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed July 2020.

Krepak, Boris Michael, et al, Stamford, contractor for Boris Michael Krepak. Install new HVAC system at 571 Roxbury Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $27,500. Filed June 26.

Przypek, Kevin V., Stamford, contractor for Thomas F. English. Install a generator at 20 Ocean View Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,314. Filed June 25.

Leibrock, Martin and Andrea N., Greenwich, contractor for Martin Leibrock. Finish kitchen and bathroom at 18 Dearfield Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed July 2020.

Rather, Jonathan M., et al, Stamford, contractor for Jonathan M. Rather. Construct a pergola at 241 Fairview Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed June 25.

Massucco, Chris, Norwalk, contractor for Edward Allen. Convert attic to living space at 8 Old Club House Road, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $122,000. Filed July 2020. Melton, Jonathan T., et al, Stamford, contractor for Jonathan T. Melton. Finish basement at 1020 Newfield Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $18,000. Filed June 30. Mike Lachance Construction LLC, Stamford, contractor for Cil Realty Inc. Convert single-family home to a six-member group home at 35 Very Merry Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $206,934. Filed June 29. Modular Home of Westchester, Bethel, contractor for Mike Kitselman and Elizabeth Kitselman. Finish basement and front porch at 175 Sheephill Road, Riverside. Estimated total cost of residence: $676,800. Filed July 2020. Morson, Eric B., et al, Stamford, contractor for Eric B. Morson. Install portable hot tub at 306 Dundee Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,300. Filed June 24. Nilsson, Peter and Part Maria W., Riverside, contractor for Peter Nilsson. Install an aboveground pool at 78 Florence Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $2,500. Filed July 2020. Pensiero, Grace Ann, Stamford, contractor for Grace Ann Pensiero. Finish basement at 422 Taconic Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $125,000. Filed June 30. Pro Custom Solar LLC, Stamford, contractor for Lisa Pesante. Remove existing roof and re-roof 68 Windward Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,688. Filed June 30.

Rio Pro Contracting Inc., Old Greenwich, contractor for Lilian Madrid de Andrade. Finish basement at 8 Watch Tower Lane, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed July 2020. Rodger Gibson LLC, Stamford, contractor for Rodger L. Gibson. Add a platform deck at 113 Westwood Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed June 30. Valiant Construction Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for CLT Association, Repair deck at 154 Cold Spring Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed June 25. VHD Carpentry & Construction, Trumbull, contractor for George E. Braun Jr. Remodel bathrooms, windows and add central air conditioning system at 343 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $27,180. Filed July 2020. Ward, Travers T., Riverside, contractor for Travers T. Ward. Remove existing roof and reroof 14 Cary Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed July 2020. Wellbuil Company Inc., Greenwich, contractor for James Omstrom. Repair and reinforce the existing structure at 107 Meadow Road, Riverside. Estimated cost: $45,000. Filed July 2020. White Birch Builders LLC, Greenwich, contractor for OG Hendrie Drive LLC. Repair damage from broken pipe at 1 Hendrie Drive, Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $48,000. Filed July 2020.


Facts & Figures Zweibel, Mark B., et al, Stamford, contractor for Mark B. Zweibel. Remove existing roof and re-roof 95 Interval Road, Unit 3, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed June 26.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Garcia, Donald R., et al, Fairfield. Filed by David Brady, Trumbull. Plaintiff’s attorney: Miller Rosnick D’Amico August & Butler PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6097673-S. Filed June 17. Golden Hill Foundation Inc., et al, Shelton. Filed by Michael Andrews, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Flood Law Firm LLC, Middletown. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully on the premises controlled and maintained by the defendants when he fell due to towels left on the bathroom floor, thereby causing him to suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief as the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6097344-S. Filed June 3. Grant, Shawn, Norwalk. Filed by Elizabeth Cruz, Plainville. Plaintiff’s attorney: Benjamin Kristian Potok, New Britain. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV20-6097712-S. Filed June 18.

Malinowski, Lauren, Easton. Filed by Cavalry SPV I, LLC, Valhalla, New York. Plaintiff’s attorney: Schreiber Law LLC, New Hampshire. Action: The plaintiff acquired the defendant’s credit debt. The defendant has failed to make payments. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages less than 15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6097742-S. Filed June 18. Moreno, Juan, et al, Beacon Falls. Filed by Brandon Cassidy, Beacon Falls. Plaintiff’s attorney: Berkowitz and Hanna LLC, Shelton. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6097927-S. Filed June 23.

Danbury Superior Court Dalipi, Vjollca, Ridgefield. Filed by Mutual Security Credit Union, Shelton. Plaintiff’s attorney: Becker & Zowine Law Offices LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff is a banking association, which issued a credit account issued to the defendant who agreed to make payments for goods and services. The defendant failed to make payments. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. DBD-CV-206036095-S. Filed May 7. Paige Enterprises Inc., Danbury. Filed by Martin Barteski, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Flood Law Firm LLC, Middletown. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully on the premises maintained by the defendant when he fell due to cigar boxes and display boxes, causing him to suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6036291-S. Filed June 11.

Shamrock Acquisition Corp., Stamford. Filed by Stephanie Gallo, Bethel. Plaintiff’s attorney: Alan Barry & Associates, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff was walking down the hallway when she slipped due to a water puddle that the defendant caused when it unplugged a refrigerator and it defrosted overnight. The plaintiff’s fall was caused by the negligence of the defendant and she suffered injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6036513-S. Filed July 7. Shi III Newtown Owner LLC, et al, Chicago, Illinois. Filed by Macri Associates Inc., Avon. Plaintiff’s attorney: Gordon & Rees LLP, Glastonbury. Action: The plaintiff entered into a subcontract with the defendant providing all the services and materials requested. An outstanding balance is due for the job. Despite the demands for payment, the defendant neglected to pay the plaintiff. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV20-6036233-S. Filed June 3.

Stamford Superior Court Basar, Teresa, et al, Greenwich. Filed by Ylena Klompus, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Benjamin Gold & Troyb PC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-20-6047184-S. Filed June 19.

City of Norwalk. Filed by DHL Express Usa Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Pullman & Comley LLC, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff was the leasee of a real property in Norwalk. The plaintiff claims a relief against a wrongful assessment of the property for taxation by the defendant. The plaintiff appealed to the defendant’s taxation claiming the valuation of the property was not the percentage of its true and actual value, but was grossly excessive, disproportionate and unlawful. The plaintiff seeks a new evaluation of the property and monetary damages exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV20-6047026-S. Filed June 9. Greenwich Council Boy Scouts Of America Inc., Greenwich. Filed by Nina Baldinucci p.p.a. Gina Baldinucci, Cos Cob. Plaintiff’s attorney: Diserio Martin O’Connor & Castiglioni, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff (a minor) attended the defendant’s camp. The plaintiff and a friend were playing basketball when an adult counselor ran into her and knocked her out and fractured her skull. The defendant failed to provide the plaintiff immediate medical care, treatment and advice from a qualified medical practitioner and a failed to call an ambulance. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV20-6047199-S. Filed June 22. Mosteghanemi, Maya, East Hartford, Filed by Brenda Danso, Bristol. Plaintiff’s attorney: Bruce Edward Newman, Bristol. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief as the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-20-6047108-S. Filed May 16.

DEEDS Commercial Baust, Edward Sorger and Rebecca Lynn Baust, Riverside. Seller: Hendrie Avenue LLC, New Canaan. Property: 100 Hendrie Ave., Riverside. Amount: $2,400,000. Filed June 22. Bella Blue 45 LLC, Point Pleasant, New Jersey. Seller: 45 Meadow Wood LLC, Greenwich. Property: 45 Meadow Wood Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed June 22. Brown, Jason and Bridgett Brown, New York, New York. Seller: Black Kats LLC, Stamford. Property: 2 Winthrop Drive, Riverside. Amount: $3,400,000. Filed June 26. Haendler, Michael and Kristin Haendler, Stamford. Seller: TH1 LLC, Stamford. Property: 34 Windover Lane, Stamford. Amount: $1,060,000. Filed July 1. Hendrie/Drinkwater Association, Riverside. Seller: Hendrie Ave. LLC, New Canaan. Property: 100 Hendrie Ave., Riverside. Amount: $1. Filed June 22. La Cerise LLC, New York, New York. Seller: Pequot Properties LLC, New York, New York. Property: 987 Pequot Ave., Southport. Amount: $2,900,000. Filed July 1. Meadowpoint LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Howard Steyn and Deborah R. Steyn, Greenwich. Property: 32 Grahampton Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2,200,000. Filed June 26. Muddy Puddle III LLC, Southport. Seller: Mauren C. O’Hara, Milford. Property: 361 Cross Highway, Fairfield. Amount: $32,000. Filed July 2. Remley, Elaine M. and Evan D. Remley, Fairfield. Seller: 150 Denise Terrace LLC, Newtown. Property: 150 Denise Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $1,010,000. Filed July 1.

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Santangelo, Robert A. and Melissa C. McCann, Greenwich. Seller: Chaise Middleton LLC, Greenwich. Property: 49 Baldwin Farms South, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed June 22. Shapiro, Jonathan, Stamford. Seller: Gator Management LLP, Stamford. Property: 24 Home Court, Unit 8, Stamford. Amount: $151,000. Filed July 1.

Residential Beach, William, Old Greenwich. Seller: Pavel Jansa, Southport. Property: 30 Mill Hill Road, Unit 30, Southport. Amount: $420,000. Filed July 1. Belton, John and Louise Belton, Greenwich. Seller: Robb Lemasters and Rachael Lemasters, Greenwich. Property: 9 Knoll St., Riverside. Amount: $2,730,000. Filed June 22. Castano, Hector and Judy Viera, Bronx, New York. Seller: Ernesto DePiano and Melissa DePiano, Stamford. Property: 115 Foxwood Road, Stamford. Amount: $668,250. Filed July 1. Castellanos, Lilian Amanda, Stamford. Seller: Peterson Y. Ochoa and Oscar Ruano, Stamford. Property: 45 Hillandale Ave., Stamford. Amount: $490,000. Filed July 1. Coquillon, Jean Mary and Karen Coquillon, Stamford. Seller: Whiling Maignan and Elvina Maignan, Stamford. Property: Lots 28-29, Map 1366, Stamford. Amount: $400,000. Filed July 1. De Santi, Yvonne, Greenwich. Seller: Julie Hedrick-LeStrange, Greenwich. Property: 406 River West, Greenwich. Amount: $687,500. Filed June 24. Delasho, Gail M. and Robert H. Hemley, Stamford. Seller: Haskell P. Jacobson and Elizabeth A. Jacobson, Stamford. Property: 35 Eliot Lane, Stamford. Amount: $740,000. Filed June 30.

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Facts & Figures Delise, Antonio and Lori Delise, Fairfield. Seller: Jacqueline D. Davis and Kerri Cagnassola, Fairfield. Property: 1091 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield. Amount: $2,889,000. Filed July 1.

Hopper, Forbes S. and Patricia Hopper, Greenwich. Seller: Christopher H. Belhumeur and Courtney H. Belhumeur Greenwich. Property: 293 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed June 24.

McKinney, Scott and Courtney McKinney, Old Greenwich. Seller: Jayne F. Pincus and Neil N. Pincus, Old Greenwich. Property: 1 Cross Ridge Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $876,562. Filed June 22.

Rubin, Leeanna and Joshua Gruber, New York, New York. Seller: Frances Geraci and Dominick Geraci, Southport. Property: 25 Taylor Place, Southport. Amount: $770,000. Filed July 1.

Demattle, Christopher and Corrie Colwell, New York, New York. Seller: Dorothy A. McOwen, Greenwich. Property: 62 Greenwich Hills Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $710,000. Filed June 22.

Jackman, Maurice and Shaunta McGann, Harrison, New York. Seller: Kevin Grewal and Yekaterina Grewal, Stamford. Property: 98 Idlewood Drive, Stamford. Amount: $595,000. Filed June 30.

Michaels, Jonathan and Amy Murphy, Fairfield. Seller: Jeanne C. Wingate, Fairfield. Property: 91 Glover St., Fairfield. Amount: $520,000. Filed July 1.

Shah, Jay and Kristine Walsh Shah, Stamford. Seller: Karen A. Jaber, Fairfield. Property: 15 Windermere St., Fairfield. Amount: $650,000. Filed July 1.

Feda, Laura and Thomas Feda, Greenwich. Seller: Wendy Friedman and Craig Friedman, Greenwich. Property: 116 Havemeyer Place, Greenwich. Amount: $1,350,000. Filed June 26.

Kapito, Robert S. and Kenneth R. Page, Greenwich. Seller: William J. Neuenfeldt and Janea O. Neuenfeldt, Greenwich. Property: 176 Shore Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed June 22.

Mitnick, Scott and Kim Helene Zeinick, Greenwich. Seller: Edward Chaplin and Karen L. Chaplin, Greenwich. Property: 613 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $0. Filed June 26.

Shender, Alexander, et al, Greenwich. Seller: Susan E. Roper, Greenwich. Property: 24 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1,055,000. Filed June 26.

Frank, George Andrew, Stamford. Seller: Jody Van Houten, Stamford. Property: 96 Cold Spring Road, Stamford. Amount: $285,000. Filed June 29.

Kegel, Michael Kristen and Maria Antonia Van Der Stok, Stamford. Seller: Terence M. Moore, Stamford. Property: 55 Rock Rimmon Drive, Stamford. Amount: $1. Filed June 29.

Gale, Kerry Ann, Weston. Seller: Sean Madgett and Kasey Madgett, Fairfield. Property: 51 Shoreham Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $490,000. Filed July 2.

King, William J. and Mary E. King, Riverside. Seller: Jose Ignacio Cerilla Cardona and Cecilia Ortiz Tirado, Riverside. Property: 90 Riverside Lane, Riverside. Amount: $775,000. Filed June 26.

Griffin, Ashley N., Stamford. Seller: Catherine Cadigan, Stamford. Property: 168 Belltown Road, Unit E4, Stamford. Amount: $318,000. Filed June 29. Gutkin, Mark and Marina Gutkin, Stamford. Seller: Gunnar Larsson and Nadejda Larsson, Stamford. Property: 283 Weed Ave., Stamford. Amount: $600,000. Filed June 30. Hernandez De La Cruz, Carolina Elizabet and Miguel Angel Hernandez Jimenez, Stamford. Seller: Gregory Musho, et al, Fairfield. Property: 178 Sunnyridge Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $504,000. Filed July 1. Hindman, Steven E. and Barbara Galton Hindman, Greenwich. Seller: Steven Hindman and Barbara Hindman, Greenwich. Property: 59 Hillcrest Park Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed June 22.

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Ligeiro, Daniel T. and Summer A. D’Astous, Stamford. Seller: Elijah L. Perry and Amelia I. Romaine-Perry, Stamford. Property: 47 Fairmont Ave., Stamford. Amount: $525,000. Filed July 1. Loetscher, Walker J. and Kylie M. Petti, Brooklyn, New York. Seller: Gianpaolo Blower and Monica Ortega, Stamford. Property: 43 Mill Road, Stamford. Amount: $625,000. Filed July 1. Malo, Tobie D. and Lauren Malo, Stamford. Seller: Alexis J. Schulten and Jennifer M. Schulten, Fairfield. Property: 193 Hulls Highway, Fairfield. Amount: $560,000. Filed July 2. McKemie-Lee and Jeremy Lee, Stamford. Seller: Keith Walsh and Michelle Ferrante, Greenwich. Property: 56 Emery Drive East, Stamford. Amount: $930,000. Filed June 30.

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Paul, Alex and Danielle Fecteau, Stamford. Seller: Robert G. Vincent, Stamford. Property: 252 Minivale Road, Stamford. Amount: $450,000. Filed June 30. Portnoy, Lawrence and Philippa Portnoy, Greenwich. Seller: Kevin Cassidy, Greenwich. Property: 18 Crown Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed June 22. Ramesh, Veena, Stamford. Seller: Simon Tuck, Stamford. Property: 52 Coachlamp Lane, Stamford. Amount: $635,000. Filed June 29. Rock, David M. and Elisabeth M. Rock, Fairfield. Seller: Denis R. Sullivan and Carol A. Sullivan, Fairfield. Property: 535 Hoydens Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,039,000. Filed July 1. Romans, Alexander Charles and Jennifer Chin Romans, Fairfield. Seller: Jennifer M. Rempe, Fairfield. Property: 226 Saxonwood Road, Fairfield. Amount: $715,000. Filed July 2. Rowland, Kristin Kallergis, Naples, Florida. Seller: William J. King and Mary E. King, Riverside. Property: 4 Highgate Road, Riverside. Amount: $3,050,000. Filed June 26. Rozelle, Alfred and Maria Rozelle, White Plains, New York. Seller: Felicia Gaglio, Stamford. Property: 180 Glenbrook Road, Unit 49, Stamford. Amount: $384,900. Filed July 1.

Shields, Livia, Westport. Seller: Amish S. Vyas and Malini Dave A. Vyas, Fairfield. Property: 15 Narrow St., Fairfield. Amount: $750,000. Filed July 2. Vineyard, Eric and Ellie Vineyard, White Plains, New York. Seller: Edward Moore and Kalley Moore, Greenwich. Property: 6 Caroline Farms Road, Unit 4, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed June 26.

LIENS Federal Tax Liens Filed Benenson, Michael J. 15 Valley Drive, Greenwich. $3,787, civil proceeding tax. Filed July 8. Benenson, Michael J. 15 Valley Drive, Greenwich. $167, civil proceeding tax. Filed July 8. Griffin, Sharon A. and Jamie L. Powers, 32 Concord St., Greenwich. $1,130, civil proceeding tax. Filed July 8. Lieberman, Jonathan and Cecilia Lieberman, 516 North St., Greenwich. $910, civil proceeding tax. Filed July 14. Werben, Judith, 100 Greenwich Hills Drive, Greenwich. $124, civil proceeding tax. Filed July 9.

Mechanic’s Liens Berman, Jacob and Kristin B. Berman, Greenwich. Filed by D&D Development, by Daniel M. McCabe. Property: 21 Marshall St., Old Greenwich. Amount: $24,010. Filed June 19. Eisenberg, Jaime and David Eisenberg, Old Greenwich. Filed by Aladdin Services LLC, by Eric Lonstein. Property: 177 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich. Amount: $16,602. Filed June 10. Elezaj, Alex, Riverside. Filed by Douglas Cutler Architects, by Christopher Malcolm Sun. Property: 294 Riverside Ave., Riverside. Amount: $10,211. Filed June 10.

LIS PENDENS 159 Grove Street LLC, et al, Stamford. Filed by Goldman Gruder & Woods LLC, Norwalk, for Northeast Builders Supply & Home Centers LLC. Property: 159 Grove St., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 29. 62 Mason Street LLC, et al, Greenwich. Filed by The Law Office of L. Bronwyn Rockefeller, Greenwich, for Jean-Pierre Gagne, Greenwich Capital Properties Group LLC. Property: 60 Mason St., Greenwich. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 29. Ippolito, Cheryl A., et al, Stamford. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for MEB Loan Trust IV. Property: 383 Erskine Road, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 30. Keshvarzian, Sarah, Old Greenwich. Filed by the Law Offices of Wayne D. Effron PC, Greenwich, for Al R. Keshvarzian. Property: 7 Middle Way, Old Greenwich. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed July 29.

Matute, Juan, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Goldman Gruder & Woods LLC, Norwalk, for Patkarholamy LLC. Property: 62 Glenwood Ave., Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 29. Orlando, Albert, et al, Greenwich. Filed by The Law Office of L. Bronwyn Rockefeller, Greenwich, for Jean-Pierre Gagne, Greenwich Capital Properties Group LLC. Property: 62 Mason St., Greenwich. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed July 24. Rhodes, Nia J., et al, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for the Stamford Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 30 Brown Ave., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 31. Rosero, Jorge L. and Maria C. Rosero, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for Stamford Water Pollution Control Authority. Property: 22 Brown Ave., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 31. Salerno, John, et al, Fairfield. Filed by Bressler, Amery & Ross PC, Florham Park, New Jersey, for Lisa DeMayo and GVN IV LLC. Property: 492 Penfield Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 27. Salerno, John, et al, Fairfield. Filed by Bressler, Amery & Ross PC, Florham Park, New Jersey, for Lisa DeMayo and GVN IV LLC. Property: 108 Southport Terrace, Southport. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 27. Salerno, John, et al, Fairfield. Filed by Bressler, Amery & Ross PC, Florham Park, New Jersey, for Lisa DeMayo and GVN IV LLC. Property: 378 Penfield Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 27. Salerno, John, et al, Fairfield. Filed by Bressler, Amery & Ross PC, Florham Park, New Jersey, for Lisa DeMayo and GVN IV LLC. Property: 394 Penfield Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 27.


Facts & Figures Schilling, Lynn, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Korde & Associates PC, New London, for Kondaur Capital Corp. Property: Unit 201, Clocktower Close Condominium, Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 9.

Conte, Steven and Cindy Rodriguez, Stamford, by Matthew L. Corrente. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 22 Sussex Place, Stamford. Amount: $412,000. Filed June 19.

SHD Glenbrook Gardens LLC, et al, Stamford. Filed by Stephen G. Walko, Greenwich, for Camsan Inc. Property: 504 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 24.

Cortes, Giselli M. and Javier Serrano, Stamford, by Loretta F. Glazier. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 38 Durant St., Stamford. Amount: $320,400. Filed June 19.

Skeeter, Danielle C., et al, Norwalk. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for Ben Franklin Gardens Homeowners Association. Property: Unit 3A, Ben Franklin Gardens Condominium, Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed July 13. Vega, Guadalupe J., Norwalk. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Citibank NA. Property: 21 Bayview Ave., Norwalk. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed July 23.

MORTGAGES Benoit, Daniel, Stamford, by Gillian Ingraham. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 129 Rock Spring Road, Stamford. Amount: $254,375. Filed June 19. Buono, Maria L., Norwalk, by Ellen Bayley Campbell. Lender: KeyBank National Association, 127 Public Square, Cleveland, Ohio. Property: 15 Melrose Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $340,500. Filed June 16. Cicchesi, Anthony and Angelica Cicchesi, Stamford, by John A. Cassone. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 300 Club Road, Stamford. Amount: $433,750. Filed June 19.

Cruz, Mario A., Norwalk, by Edna Colucci. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 10 Ingalls Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $156,000. Filed June 16. Dentel, Julie L. and Brian R. Dentel, Stamford, by Jeremiah N. Ollennu. Lender: The Federal Savings Bank, 300 N. Elizabeth St., Suite 3E, Chicago, Illinois. Property: 65 MacArthur Lane, Unit 2, Stamford. Amount: $489,000. Filed June 19. Drexler, Alex and Sasha Drexler, Norwalk, by Kim Rizza. Lender: US Bank National Association, 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 109 Kings Highway South, Westport. Amount: $524,800. Filed June 16. Dumbauld, Marea A., Norwalk, by Joseph J. Cessario. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 7 Splitrock Road, Norwalk. Amount: $510,000. Filed June 16. Dungan, Albert and Ellen Dungan, Norwalk, by Glenn Major. Lender: BlackRidgeBank, 825 26th Avenue East, West Fargo, North Dakota. Property: 34 Gregory Blvd., Norwalk. Amount: $387,000. Filed June 16.

Gibilisco, David, Stamford, by John J. Bove. Lender: First County Bank, 117 Prospect St., Stamford. Property: 112 Sylvan Knoll Road, Stamford. Amount: $161,000. Filed June 19. Gliga, Luciana and Cosmin N. Gliga, Stamford, by Gillian Ingraham. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 45 Pamlynn Road, Stamford. Amount: $454,000. Filed June 19. Gott, Stephen and Barbara Foster, Stamford, by John J. Bove. Lender: People’s United Bank National Association, 850 Main St., Bridgeport. Property: 305 Laurel Road, Stamford. Amount: $999,200. Filed June 19. Hernandez, Robert and Melissa Laracuenta-Hernandez, Stamford, by Michael Todd Taylor. Lender: Nationstar Mortgage LLC, 8950 Cypress Waters Blvd, Dallas, Texas. Property: 43 Emma Road, Stamford. Amount: $412,000. Filed June 19. Kolacki, Victor J. and Suzette Kolacki, Stamford, by Herbert Mendelsohn. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 177 Pond Road, Stamford. Amount: $235,000 Filed June 19. Macias, Yadira and Leonel Macias, Norwalk, by John R. Fiore. Lender: Loandepot. com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 9 Apple St., Norwalk. Amount: $328,000. Filed June 16. Meyer, Sara and Benjamin Meyer, Norwalk, by Jan A. Costello, Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 28 Algonquin Road, Norwalk. Amount: $442,225. Filed June 16.

O’Brien, Bradley W. and Joanne Morris, Stamford, by Gillian Ingraham. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 28 Hobson St., Stamford. Amount: $448,500. Filed June 19.

Uzicanin, Amela and Edin Uzicanin, Stamford, by Aaron Charney. Lender: PHH Mortgage Corp., 1 Mortgage Way, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Property: 56 Fifth St., Stamford. Amount: $167,500. Filed June 19.

Paladugula, Sneha Spandana and Vinay Kumar Nandamuri, Stamford, by Jason J. Morytko. Lender: Warshaw Capital LLC, 2777 Summer St., Suite 306, Stamford. Property: 167 Grove St., Unit E, Stamford. Amount: $350,550. Filed June 19.

NEW BUSINESSES

Perretta, Toni Buchetto and Thomas J. Perretta, Stamford, by Aaron Charney. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 117 Center St., Stamford. Amount: $379,364. Filed June 19. Reisch, Suzanne and Alan Reisch, Norwalk, by Lisa Kent. Lender: East Coast Capital Corp., 25 Melville Park Road, Melville, New York. Property: 253 Wolfpit Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $368,000. Filed June 16. Shah, Tushar and Hetal Shah, Norwalk, by Charles M. Batt. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 19 Byrd Road, Norwalk. Amount: $350,000. Filed June 16. Sofer, Robert Mitchell and Marilyn Galler Sofer, Stamford, by Aaron Charney. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 94 Cardinal Lane, Stamford. Amount: $395,000. Filed June 19. Tomasino, Katherine G., Norwalk, by Harvey Melzer. Lender: Savings Bank of Danbury, 220 Main St., Danbury. Property: 29 County St., Norwalk. Amount: $349,000. Filed June 16.

Amazed Rides, 31 Carolina Road, Stamford 06902, c/o David Courtright. Filed June 30. Guided Medicare Solutions BRP, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Medicare Insurance LLC. Filed June 26. Hala LLC, 269 Bedford St., Stamford 06901, c/o Marcelo Acosta. Filed June 29. Horse Coins, 235 W. Main St., Unit 202, Stamford 06902, c/o Terrance Shepard. Filed June 26. Nothing Bundt Cakes, 838 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06902, c/o Ann Folger. Filed June 26. Oh My Gosh LLC, 80 Red Bird Road, Stamford 06905, c/o Jorge Perez-Echartea. Filed June 26.

Method for weakening and removing coke and carbonaceous deposits. Patent no. 10,702,897 issued to William Scharmach. Assigned to Praxair Technology, Danbury. Reduction of regenerator clogging. Patent no. 10,712,092 issued to Hisashi Kobayashi, et al. Assigned to Praxair Technology, Danbury. System and method for multisite cellular manufacturing with transportation delays. Patent no. 10,732,913 issued to Rong Zhou, et al. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. System and method for multisite cellular manufacturing with transportation delays. Patent no. 10,732,913 issued to Rong Zhou. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Tunable adsorbents. Patent no. 10,717,035 issued to Steven Pontonio, et. al. Assigned to Praxair Technology, Danbury. Waterproof headphone structure. Patent no. 10,735,855 issued to Isword Zhang, et al. Assigned to Harman International Industries, Stamford.

Tamarindo, 80 Atlantic St., Stamford 06901, c/o Moises Jimenez. Filed June 30.

PATENTS Apparatus and method for generating virtual venues for a listening room. Patent no. 10,728,691 issued to Christopher Trestain, et al. Assigned to Harman International Industries, Stamford. Ion generation using modified wetted porous materials. Patent no. 10,732,159 issued to Robert Cooks, et al. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.

FCBJ

WCBJ

AUGUST 10, 2020

29


Fairfield and Westchester Counties

DOCTORS of DISTINCTION

Saluting those who go beyond the diagnosis

2020

DEADLINE: August 10 • NOMINATE AT: westfaironline.com/dod2020/ Historically, once-a-century a catastrophic health crisis hits the world like what we are experiencing right now. In Westchester and Fairfield counties the dramatic and courageous response of our health providers gives us the opportunity to give them a special tribute and recognition.

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