__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

AWARD WINNING EDITORIAL

JULY 19, 2021 VOL. 57, No. 29

I N CLU DI N G TH E H U DSO N VALLE Y WE E K LY S EC TIO N

westfaironline.com

A New Jersey developer proposes tearing down 701 Westchester Ave. and replacing it with apartments. Photo by Bob Rozycki.

NIMBY RETURNS

Not drowning, but waving: How CT is attracting more businesses

Neighbors oppose apartment plan for Westchester Ave. office building BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

F

Five White Plains neighborhood associations have come out against a proposal by Senlac Ridge Partners of Morristown, New Jersey, to tear down an office building at 701 Westchester Ave. and put up a 5-story, 360-unit apartment building. The North Street, Gedney Farms, Rosedale,

Haviland Manor and Old Oak Ridge associations that are opposing the proposal cover about 1,600 homes. Senlac owns the office park at 701-777 Westchester Ave. and is asking the city to apply the Planned Campus Development Overlay zone to its 54.8-acre property. It has submitted a master plan along with its zoning application but would need to file a site plan application and receive site plan approval should use of the overlay zone be approved. The proposed building would include 21 studio apartments, 177 one-bed-

BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN

room units and 162 two-bedroom units. Amenities would include a fitness center for residents, a business center, library and lounge spaces. Hearings on the » NIMBY RETURNS

14

kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

I

s 2021 really shaping up to be the year of the Connecticut comeback? Gov. Ned Lamont used that phrase to express his customary optimism during his annual State of the State

address in January. But while Connecticut appears to be steaming ahead in terms of its economy — depending upon whom you ask — the hoary stereotype of it not being sufficiently business friendly remains (mostly) in place. Chief Executive mag-

azine’s annual “Best and Worst States for Business” poll, published in April, found the Nutmeg State not exactly storming to the top, by moving from 2020’s 46th to 43rd. The rankings were based on responses from 383 CEOs in March, » CT BUSINESSES

6

WE HAVE THE TOOLS TO OPTIMIZE YOUR BUSINESS Dedicated Mobile App • Remote Deposit Capture • Automated Clearing House (ACH) • Wire Transfer Online Banking with Bill Pay • Merchant Credit Card Processing • Positive Pay • Escrow Account Management Call Dominick Petramale, SVP, RBO & Director of Cash Management Services

Serving the Lower Hudson Valley Since 1871 914-248-7272 PCSB.com


White Plains green lights DMV move to The Source BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

W

hite Plains has given the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) the green light to move its office from the White Plains Mall at 200 Hamilton Ave. to 1 Maple Ave. The unanimous vote of approval came moments after a state representative told the council that a lease for the space was still being negotiated. The DMV would to go into the 265,000-square-foot, four-story commercial building that had been home to Fortunoff and is known as The Source at White Plains. Existing businesses at The Source include Whole Foods, The Cheesecake Factory, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Raymour and Flanigan, the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors Inc. and the headquarters of Danone North America. The DMV would renovate and occupy 20,195 square feet of space on the building’s ground floor fronting on Maple Avenue

next to The Cheesecake Factory, which occupies 11,844 square feet with frontage on both Maple Avenue and Bloomingdale Road. Next to The Cheesecake Factory on Bloomingdale Road is the 36,734-square-foot Whole Foods store. On May 20, Jessica Gabriel, the acting associate commissioner of the Office of General Services, Division of Real Estate Services for New York State submitted an application to White Plains asking for a Government Use Permit. It was speedily referred out to various city boards and officials for review and failed to run into any detours that might have slowed or blocked approval. Gabriel subsequently appeared before the common council and said that the state would continue negotiations with the property owner in the hope of finalizing a lease if the use permit was approved by the city. In its resolution approving the permit, the common council said the DMV official is beneficial to the city’s residents and businesses. The DMV’s plan calls for two

These have been our choices for businesses and nonprofits that are Making an Impact in our communities.

M A K IN

I M PA C T G AN

• JANUARY 18: René Hue, Murmuration 2 02 1 • JANUARY 25: Nic King, Proud Puffs • FEBRUARY 1: Judith M. Watson, Mount Vernon Neighborhood Health Center Inc. • FEBRUARY 8: Gary Bilekzikian, Guidecraft • FEBRUARY 15: Jonathan Winn, Thrown Stone Theatre Co. • FEBRUARY 22: Carlo Vona Jr., Paramount Stone Co. • MARCH 1: Peter Kempner, Kempner Properties • MARCH 8: Joshua Applestone, Applestone Meat Co. • MARCH 15: Michael Sachse, Dandelion Energy • MARCH 22: Donvil Collins, VeeKast • MARCH 29: George S. Kaufman, Kaufman Astoria Studios • APRIL 5: Jon Winkel, The Stamford Partnership • APRIL 12: Amiee Turner, Team Woofgang & Co. • APRIL 19: Ken Londoner, BioSig • APRIL 26: Jonathan Gertman, The NRP Group • MAY 3: State Sen. Billie Miller, Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz, Fran Pastore, Women’s Business Development Council • MAY 10: Peter Hubbell, Apply:you & Leigh Shemitz, Soundwaters • MAY 17: Michelle Brier, Blue Path Service Dogs • MAY 24: The Grasso family, Urban Mining CT • MAY 31: Shirley Acevedo, Latino U College Access Inc. • JUNE 7: David Greenstein, TestZone • JUNE 14: Henry Welt, Abigail Lewis, Ossining Innovatives! • JUNE 21: Christos Athanasiou, Jonus Ademovic, miniMAX • JUNE 28: Martin Ginsburg ,Ginsburg Development Cos. • JULY 5: Jake Allyne, Breakthrough Fitness Co. If you would like to nominate a business or nonprofit that you feel is also making an impact, please send an email to Bob Rozycki at bobr@westfairinc.com

2

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

M A K IN G

I M PA C T AN

2 02

1

We don’t create gimmicks to enrich ourselves; we enrich our readers with news about where they live and work. MAIN OFFICE TELEPHONE 914-694-3600 OFFICE FAX 914-694-3699 EDITORIAL EMAIL bobr@westfairinc.com WRITE TO 701 Westchester Ave., Suite 100J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407

Publisher Dee DelBello Executive Co-Publisher Dan Viteri Managing Editor Bob Rozycki Associate Publisher Anne Jordan

1 Maple Ave, White Plains. entrances, one directly from Maple Avenue and one within the interior vestibule of the building, which has access to the building’s elevators and its 1,025-space, four-story parking garage. Councilman Justin Brasch told Gabriel that the state should work out an arrangement so that people going to the DMV do not have to pay for parking in the garage. A DMV study found that because it now requires visitors to make advance appointments and conducts much of its business via mail and internet, the number of people at the new facility at any one time would be limited and it estimated its operation would require use of only about 145 parking spaces. It said that during weekdays more than 700 spaces typically remain empty. The DMV said that no driver license road tests would take place at the Maple Avenue site. The building is in the city’s B-1 Zoning District and the planning department told the common council that it found that the DMV’s use of space at 1 Maple Ave. would be consistent with zoning. “The White Plains DMV is an office use providing specific services, similar to other uses in the immediate vicinity,” the department said. The DMV’s Environmental Assessment Form concluded that

no adverse impacts would result from the project. A traffic and parking analysis submitted by the DMV concluded that the relocation of the DMV would not cause any adverse traffic or parking impacts. As part of the approval, the city is requiring that the DMV install informational signs at the Maple Avenue garage entrance to encourage its customers to use that entrance. The city also told the DMV to install signs indicating that DMV visitors should use the garage’s second and third floors for parking. No planned date was announced for a possible move to The Source. There previously had been a plan for the DMV to move from the White Plains Mall to a nearby office building at 3 Barker Ave. After critics of that proposal expressed concerns about parking availability and cost and the extra activity that would be taking place at the building, the DMV withdrew its application for the move. Plans call for the White Plains Mall to be demolished to make way for the $585 million Hamilton Green project, which is to include four buildings with a total of 860 apartments, more than 85,000 square feet of retail and restaurants, 27,000 square feet devoted to coworking space, almost 1,000 parking spaces and a public park.

NEWS Fairfield Bureau Chief • Kevin Zimmerman Senior Enterprise Editor • Phil Hall Copy and Video Editor • Peter Katz Senior Reporter • Bill Heltzel, Reporters Georgette Gouveia, Peter Katz Assistant Editor • Bridget McCusker Research Coordinator • Luis Flores ART & PRODUCTION Creative Director Dan Viteri Graphic Designer Sarafina Pavlak ADVERTISING SALES Manager • Anne Jordan Metro Sales & Custom Publishing Director Barbara Hanlon Marketing & Events Director • Fatime Muriqi Marketing Partner • Marcia Pflug Events Sales & Development • Marcia Pflug AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Manager • Daniella Volpacchio Research Assistant • Sarah Kimmer ADMINISTRATION Contracted CFO Services Adornetto & Company L.L.C. Westchester County Business Journal (USPS# 7100) Fairfield County Business Journal (USPS# 5830) is published Weekly, 52 times a year by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave., White Plains, NY 10604. Periodicals Postage rates paid at White Plains, NY, USA 10610. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Westchester County Business Journal and Fairfield County Business Journal: by Westfair Communications, Inc., 701 Westchester Ave, White Plains, NY 10604. Annual subscription $60; $2.50 per issue More than 40 percent of the Business Journal is printed on recycled newsprint. © 2020 Westfair Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.

A MEMBER OF


Immigrant demands $2.5M from ex-partners in Yonkers construction companies BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

A

Salvadoran emigrant who developed expertise in concrete and rebar construction claims that his partners in two companies froze him out by threatening to get him deported. Vicente Martinez Cienfuegos is demanding $2.5 million from Glenco Contracting Group and Aro Construction Group, both of Yonkers, and from co-owners Sean Aronsen and David McGrath, in a June 27 lawsuit filed in Westchester Supreme Court. “Defendants engaged in a systematic pattern of racial harassment and shareholder oppression,” the complaint states, “before ultimately extorting him through threats of deportation, forcing him to sign an agreement ... in order to retake his valuable onethird interest without consideration.” The defendants’ attorney, Martin P. Skolnick, said the complaint contains “serious inaccuracies and falsehoods,” and his clients “categorically deny the false and defamatory assertions.” Cienfuegos emigrated to the United States in 2003, according to the complaint, and specialized in installing rebar, the steel bars that reinforce concrete. Rebar expertise, he said, is extremely valuable, commands high profit margins and is consistently in demand in the New York market. Cienfuegos claims he has the technical expertise and, because he is bilingual in English and Spanish, the ability to coordinate with general contractors, site foremen and the laborers who, like himself, are often native-Spanish speakers. He got to know Aronsen in 2011 when they were union employees working on rebar projects. In 2017, the complaint states, Aronsen approached Cienfuegos about starting their own rebar and concrete businesses. Glenco, a concrete company, and Aro, a rebar company, were formed in 2018. They agreed to be one-third partners, according to the complaint, and share profits equally. Each contributed $45,000 in capital. Cienfuegos’ role was to procure new work and supervise construction jobs. He says he worked without a written agreement for more than a year but was repeatedly promised that he would be compensated “as if he were an equal partner.” The businesses quickly became lucrative, according to the complaint, and generated millions of dollars in profits for the partners. In 2019, they formalized the partnerships with shareholder agreements, the complaint states. But according to Cienfuegos, his partners did not treat him equally. Cienfuegos alleges that Aronsen frequently referred to him in “hateful, racist and xenophobic” terms; threatened to deport

him if he didn’t do a good job; demeaned him at construction site meetings; and manufactured disputes with workers to undercut their trust in him. He claims that he was frozen out of decision-making and denied access to business records. In late 2019, the complaint states, Cienfuegos was summoned to a meeting with Aronsen, McGrath and their attorney to sign a new contract. They allegedly told him that he was ineligible to remain as a shareholder because of his immigration status. He was directed to sign new agreements that, he was allegedly told, would nominally remove him from the businesses but preserve his one-third interests until he attained citizenship.

The complaint does not explain Cienfuegos’ immigration status but states that he “always worked lawfully, pays his taxes, and is actively working with immigration counsel.” It also states that New York law does not bar noncitizens from holding an interest in state corporations. He claims that his partners coerced him into signing the new agreements by threatening to report him to immigration authorities. But they allegedly presented him only with the signature pages. They continued to pay him for supervising jobs for more than a year, at about the same annual compensation he had previously received, $500,000. He was fired in January. Then his attorney obtained the new agreements in their entire-

ty, and that is when Cienfuegos learned that they were actually recission agreements in which he had agreed to resign as an officer and director, relinquish his shares and not compete, leaving him “unable to work in the construction industry.” Cienfuegos said he was offered severance of $1.3 million, a sum that he claims substantially undervalues his one-third interest in the businesses. He accuses his former partners of fraud and breaches of contract and fiduciary duty, and Aronsen of discrimination based on his Hispanic heritage. He is asking the court to declare the most recent agreements unenforceable. Cienfuegos is represented by Manhattan attorneys Lee Bergstein and Evan Fried.

“First Republic shares my values — it’s all about relationships with people and community.” PAU L A G R I F F I T H S

CEO, Vesta Asset Management

(855) 886-4824 | firstrepublic.com | New York Stock Exchange symbol: FRC MEMBER FDIC AND EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

3


(from left) Yasuhiko Fukuoka, Gjilberta Lucaj Cohen, Joana Kaimi and Ergin Oda.

Fairfield County’s live music scene is growing thanks to breweries and vineyard BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

A

ttempting to go beyond the standard bar bands, area breweries and a vineyard in Newtown are trying to give a boost to local musicians and provide customers with something a little extra. “I love live music and we wanted that to be a part of the atmosphere and the whole experience,” said Neviana Zhgaba, who with her husband Ardian Llomi owns Aquila’s Nest Vineyards. The Newtown operation, which opened in November, offers music on Thursdays and weekends. “It’s mostly jazz,” Zhgaba said. “A lot of guitar or piano, some sax. Wine puts people in a good mood, and having music as well makes it even better.” Although the vineyard opened in the middle of both winter and a spike in Covid cases, she

4

JULY 19, 2021

said, “Some people felt they had nowhere else to travel and we had open space outside with fire pits so we stayed pretty busy. We were not expecting to be very busy at the start.” Bracing for a possible business drop-off during the hot months, as more people get vaccinated and arguably are willing to travel out of state after being stuck at home for so long, Zhgaba predicted that Aquila’s Nest will be busiest in the fall. The vineyard also has a full rotation of yoga, Pilates, karaoke and other events to draw crowds. Live music has been so successful at some breweries that they are in the midst of expanding their performance space. Reverie Brewing Co. in Newtown, which opened in 2019, is refashioning what had been a storage space across the parking lot from its main taproom as a special events room, while Nod Hill Brewery in FCBJ

WCBJ

Ridgefield, which opened in 2017, is building both a larger event space inside and a beer garden outside to capitalize on its steadily growing popularity. “I’m a musician myself — I’m in a band that’s played here — so we pretty much always have had live music here on weekends,” said Nod Hill co-owner David Kaye. “We want to feature original music, both talented local groups and touring bands as well.” “We didn’t want to be your typical music bar,” Reverie co-owner Ryan Broderick said. “But we definitely draw a live-music crowd on weekends.” Reverie has only offered live entertainment outdoors due to the pandemic, with weather always posing a threat. Having the opportunity to add an indoor space has been doubly advantageous, Broderick said, as returning to the practice of even a single guitarist in what had been a custom-

ary corner of the taproom would mean removing a couple of tables. Reverie has basically halved its indoor capacity and eliminated seating at the bar, which could hold up to 20 people, he said. Scott Vallely, owner and brewmaster at Danbury’s Charter Oak Brewing Co., which opened in 2018, said he too has added a beer garden, partly to make more room for bands on weekends. “We want to support local talent,” he said, “and some of them already have a good following — and the quality isn’t bad.” “The biggest shock for me was how many people around here are in bands,” Broderick said. “There’s 40,000 people in Newtown and 10,000 bands — how does that work?” Headbangers? No thanks The establishments all tend toward jazz, pop and rock; those hoping for heavy metal, thrash

and other more outré genres should look elsewhere. “We want something that fits the room acoustically and stylistically,” Kaye said. “We’ve found that people come out specifically for (music) but it’s not like they have to be quiet while someone’s playing.” “People may like live music, but it can’t be too loud,” Vallely laughed. “You don’t want people to have to scream over the music in order to have a conversation.” Acts are paid on a flat fee basis — no cuts of the receipts during their performances — and are required to submit either audio files, links to their social media containing performance videos, or on rare occasions play a live audition. “Word-of-mouth has traveled very fast,” Zhgaba said, “and we have relationships with some managers and bookers. That helps us to make sure we’re getting the


Long River Jam Band. right kind of act.” “There’s a link on our website for how to play here,” Broderick said. “It’s too difficult to deal with people walking up and asking me about it, or calling us — they have to do it on the website.” Meanwhile, Vallely — who said he’s already got performers booked into December — said that Charter Oak benefited from being known as a reliable, safe space that offered live entertainment throughout the pandemic. “The fact that the governor and the local government allowed us to set up outside, on sidewalks or whatever, was a big help,” Vallely said. “I’m really thankful for it. Unfortunately distribution is still hurting, with restaurants still trying to get back to where they were. A keg of beer equals seven cases, so that takes a toll on us.” “We all talk,” Kaye said of the state’s brewing scene, “and I know there was some frustration because we were required to sell food, which most of us don’t make on the premises. But we have good relations with several food trucks and they really came through for us in a pinch. For us it was kind of okay.” Reverie, which also features food trucks, took a dimmer view of the Lamont administration’s lumping breweries in with restaurants when it came to Covid restrictions — even going so far as producing a doppelbock beer called “Fries Aren’t Food” in a swipe at the edict that breweries had to provide something beyond snacks. “It’s not like there’s only a handful of us,” Broderick said, noting that there are now approximately 120 craft breweries in the state, according to the latest Connecticut Brewers Guild data. “There should be separate health regulations for breweries. “But the town did a great job,” he added. “The economic development department, the health department, they were all very helpful.”

Date: 7/19/2021 Focus: Banking & Investments Advertorial: Colleges & Universities Management On theCash Road Again Band.

Better Business Solutions

Convenient services to optimize funds and maximize profits

At First County Bank, we help you reach your business goals through a selection of services including Remote Deposit, Merchant Services, Positive Pay and more. For Cash Management tools that allow you to focus on business, you belong at First County Bank. Open your account by calling Cash Management Services at 203.462.4379

*Additional terms, conditions and fees apply. Visit FirstCountyBank.com for details.

Equal Housing Lender Member FDIC NMLS# 411487

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

5


1

CT businesses— whose top three priorities were tax policy, regulatory climate and talent availability. (“A strong, pragmatic Covid showing by rookie Gov. Ned Lamont impressed CEOs — and pulled tiny Connecticut out of the basement,” the magazine hopefully remarked.) But that ranking was preceded in March by U.S. News & World Report’s naming Connecticut the 7th most business-friendly state, due in part to its business creation rate (2.5%), tax burden (10.7%) and patent creation (829.1 per million people). The publication further noted that the state is home to more Fortune 1000 company headquarters per capita than any other. Both surveys took place before the seemingly sudden wave of major business announcements in Fairfield County over the past few weeks, including Philip Morris International, whose headquarters is moving from New York City to a yet-to-be-announced location in Fairfield County; Manhattan’s iCapital Network, which is opening a Greenwich office; ITT, moving its headquarters from White Plains to Stamford; and Tomo, which recently announced plans to formally establish its headquarters in Stamford. Coincidence? “Pretty much,” laughed Peter Denious, president and CEO of AdvanceCT, the state government’s economic development entity. “These deals always take a lot of time, and it just so happened that they all became official within a few weeks of each other.” Though AdvanceCT has been given a significant amount of credit for the moves, Denious was careful to give credit to what he called “Team Connecticut,” which includes Lamont (“He’s a former businessman himself, so he gets it”) and various members of his administration, especially David Lehman, commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development, which closely collaborates with AdvanceCT. Denious said that talks with Philip Morris began in 2019; temporarily sidelined by Covid, when they resumed, “We had a lot of questions about tobacco,” even though it is Altria, from which Morris divorced itself in 2008, that produces Marlboro and other traditional cigarettes. While Morris does sell cigarettes outside the U.S., it is committed to producing IQOS, an electronic, heat-not-burn “tobacco product.” “They were interested in the quality of our schools, health care — just the quality of life here,” Denious said. “Obviously we have a lower cost of living, certainly when compared with Manhattan, and there’s a chance to own a place that has an actual yard.” iCapital “already has a lot of employees in Connecticut, part of the post-pandemic phenomenon,” he continued. “I think they’re realizing that maybe you don’t need to ask your employees to commute every day.” Similar factors were at play with ITT, he said, while the announcement by Tomo, which had earlier established an office in Stamford, was almost a mere formality. “What’s great about them is that they’re a very young company, but they’ve grown

6

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

Peter Denious

2 Greenwich Plaza, future home of iCapital.

Greg Schwartz, Tomo co-founder and president.

itt innovation center.

Philip Morris International NYC. really, really rapidly over the last six months,” Denious said. With one of the largest seed rounds on record — $70 million — Tomo expects to employ up to 100 people in Stamford by the end of the year. As it expands, DECD will include “earn-as-you-grow” incentives that provide grants in arrears as job targets are reached. The recently passed bipartisan budget, and Lamont’s avoidance of new taxes, is helping draw first and second looks from companies, he said. “Connecticut is not cheap, depending upon where you live,” Denious said. “But what we’re doing, and how we got through Covid, says a lot. We had one of the most successful reopening plans out there, by any measure, and we’ve maintained being one of the top states in the country when it comes to vaccination rate.” As of July 11, Connecticut ranked fourth in the country with 67.9% of its population having received at least one inoculation. “That’s put Connecticut back on the map,” Denious averred. “The senior leadWCBJ

ership of some of our companies tell me that that helps instill confidence, and that it speaks volumes about how the state really is working well. “Connecticut is getting noticed again,” he continued, noting that “a couple” of additional major announcements could be made in the next few weeks. “The governor met ( July 6) in person with a CEO in Connecticut, convincing them to grow even more here.” One long-awaited project really is nearing completion, Denious added: A formal, longterm economic development strategy produced by AdvanceCT and DECD. “We could have that in a matter of weeks.” Based in part on the Governor’s Workforce Council, launched in late 2019 with the aim of breaking down barriers between the business community and state government agencies, the strategy will include upskilling and reskilling employees — $130 million has been earmarked to upskill those displaced by Covid — and to double down on workforce development.

‘Bring It On!’ It’s all part of what Denious said is the ongoing effort to reverse expectations. “We live in a great state with a great value proposition. I say, ‘Bring it on!’ Let’s go play offense for a change.” “Offense” in this case is not restricted to business recruitment, but also company retention, he said. AdvanceCT is increasingly relying not only on Connecticut’s 169 municipalities but also its various chambers of commerce and other economic development entities. “We want to be able to get in front of a situation,” Denious said. “If a business is looking to potentially be acquired, we want to be able to understand what’s going on and move as quickly as we possibly can.” He admitted that there is still plenty of room for improvement when it comes to small businesses; according to a January report by Motley Fool, Connecticut ranked 50th when it comes to the best states to start a small business, ahead only of the District of Columbia. Criteria included tax climate, consumer spending, rate of new entrepreneurs, business survival rate over five years, labor costs and climate change impact. “If we can help solve problems for (small businesses), put them in touch with the right people in the state to help ease their pain, then that’s what we need to do.” But the AdvanceCT chief is sticking to his belief that a rising tide can lift all boats, regardless of size. “There’s actual momentum in our state,” he said. “It’s been a long time since anyone was able to say that. But we are committed to making our case for companies to come here and stay here. “The real question,” he added, “is why aren’t they coming to Connecticut?”


150 years is a big

MIL EST ONE

Now more than ever the steadiness of PCSB provides reassurance for our customers, local businesses and retailers that better days lie ahead. While remaining true to our roots, our solid foundation has helped us expand across four New York Counties, becoming a respected commercial bank with a bigger footprint. 150 years of neighbor helping neighbor. That’s a milestone.

B

SERVING THE LOWER HUDSON VALLEY SINCE 1871 • 914-248-7272 • PCSB.com • MEMBER FDIC

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

7


Changes to Westchester’s Co-Op Disclosure Law could have implications for NYC, state BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

A

decades-in-the-making change to Westchester’s Co-Op Disclosure Law should have a significant impact on that real estate sector — and could ultimately result in major ramifications for New York City and the entire state, according to one attorney. “This addresses two opposing tensions that have been facing co-ops for years,” said Steven Ebert, a partner at Purchase’s Cassin & Cassin LLP. “On one side you’ve got the fact that a co-op is a private corporation under New York’s Business Corporation Law, and therefore they have certain obligations to their shareholders. They can keep all sorts of information about their decisions and actions private. “But residential housing has a public element to it,” Ebert continued. “That’s where you get into fair housing, discrimination. And that leads to those sides clashing with each other.” The Westchester County Board of Legislators voted 15-2 on June 28 to pass the amendment — Minority Leader Margaret Cunzio (Conservative3rd) and Terry Clements (D-11th) opposed it. County Executive George Latimer signed it into law later that day. Effective immediately, the amendment requires co-op boards to provide a notice of rejection to the Westchester County Human Rights Commission within 15 days of notifying prospective buyers of a denial. It also orders the boards to clearly state the minimum financial requirements to potential buyers before they apply to buy a unit, and to provide a reason for a denial. Groups, including the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors and the New York State Association of Realtors have been pushing for such an amendment in Westchester since it was first introduced in 1990. Opponents included the Cooperative and Condominium Advisory Council, part of The

8

JULY 19, 2021

Building & Realty Institute of Westchester & the Mid-Hudson Region, and the Council of New York Cooperatives & Condominiums (CNYC). “We feel co-ops have functioned very, very nicely for a very, very long time without this sort of government imposition,” CNYC Executive Director Mary Ann Rothman said prior to the legislation’s passage. After the amendment’s approval, Catherine Borgia (D-9th), the legislation’s chief sponsor, said, “This measure increases transparency and fairness in the co-op buying process. Buyers will know in advance what the financial requirements are — before they spend money on application fees — and they’ll know after the fact, if they’re rejected, exactly why. “Furthermore,” she added, “the Human Rights Commission will have the information it needs to protect Westchester residents if discrimination FCBJ

WCBJ

is taking place. That’s been a missing tool in the fair housing tool kit to date. With private home and condo sales, testers can pose as buyers and ferret out discrimination in lending or discriminatory steering in ways that cannot really be done with co-op sales.” “Co-ops are often the first and most affordable way for people to become homeowners in Westchester County,” said Majority Whip Christopher Johnson (D-16th), one of the measure’s co-sponsors. “Buying one shouldn’t be a mystery, with no clear idea of what the financial requirements are and no clear idea of the reason if a buyer is rejected. It also shouldn’t be a mystery to the Human Rights Commission whether or not a co-op is violating fair housing laws. This law will take away the mystery on both counts.” Damon Maher (D-10th), chair of the board’s Labor & Housing

Committee, noted that the measure is similar to one that has been in effect in Suffolk County since 2009. Despite fears voiced by opponents that the law would increase litigation or insurance costs, he said, “There’s really no evidence that this will have a negative impact on any co-ops that are behaving properly. In fact, having a reason for rejection in writing, and having co-op board members get fair housing training will probably protect co-op boards from possible litigation.” “My caveat” to that, Ebert said, “is that Westchester County has significantly more co-op properties” than does Suffolk. “It’s a little bit of a different market and New York City is even more different.” Ebert said he was encouraged that the new Westchester law includes a requirement for co-op board members to undergo fair housing training for two

hours every two years. “Co-op boards are comprised of people who own apartments, all of whom have different backgrounds and experiences,” he said. “Having them undertake fair housing continued education is a positive.” While there is no similar legislation under consideration in Connecticut, a like-minded bill has been introduced in the New York state Senate; sponsored by Housing Committee Chair Brian Kavanagh (D-26th), remains in committee. The New York City Council has discussed such legislation as well, though its future is uncertain for now. “There’s no bill on the governor’s or the mayor’s desk,” Ebert said. “But I suspect over the next year or two, once we see how the situation evolves in Westchester County — particularly in the lower part of the county — will drive New York City and New York state to examine the issue more carefully.”


White Plains Plaza office buildings for sale BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

W

hite Plains Plaza, a complex composed of two 15-story office buildings, is for sale. The property is being marketed by the real estate services firm Newmark. The buildings involved are at 1 N. Broadway and 445 Hamilton Ave. The real estate firm Ivy Realty bought the property in 2015. Shortly after the purchase, Ivy announced that it had initiated a $30-million revitalization of the complex. At that time, Ivy Realty CEO Anthony DiTommaso said “The activity we’re seeing at White Plains Plaza is incredibly exciting. The improvements to the buildings have really helped with the leasing.” Newmark did not list an asking price for the property. In an October 2016 article on White Plains Plaza, the Business Journal reported that Ivy Realty had bought the buildings for about $80 million. The article said that a Texas-based loan servicer took over the property after its previous owner, Westportbased Heyman Properties LLC, defaulted on a mortgage loan. The Business Journal reported that Heyman in 2005 had bought the office complex for $60 million from Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.

The buildings have a total of 715,365 square feet and date from 1968. At the time it opened, White Plains Plaza made a splash as an important element in the revitalization of White Plains that was just beginning. The 1 N. Broadway building became a popular entertainment destination for

Westchester residents because it housed a large United Artists movie theater. After the theater closed, the space was transformed into a fitness club complete with swimming pool. The garage entrance of 1 N. Broadway, which includes a ramp coming up to street

FCBJ

level, became a movie star, doubling as the exit from the printing plant of The Washington Post for Steven Spielberg’s 2017 movie “The Post,” which was largely shot in White Plains. In the movie, replicas of Washington Post newspaper delivery trucks were seen exiting the garage. The property is being marketed by a team consisting of Newmark’s Tri-State Capital Markets Executive Managing Director Kevin Welsh, Managing Director Brian Schulz, Divisional Head of International Capital Markets Alex Foshay along with Evan Layne and Brett Siegel who are co-heads of Newmark’s New York Capital Markets Investment Sales Division. Executive Managing Director Glenn Walsh will act as the team’s leasing market adviser. “WPP offers investors an exceptional value-add opportunity and scale with a combination of long-term durable cash flow and near-term upside through pushing rents on the leasing of the available space as well as marking rents to market on renewals,” Walsh said. “As companies evaluate a shift to less dense locations, but near Manhattan, White Plains Plaza will be a major beneficiary of this trend.” Newmark said that White Plains Plaza has 74 tenants and is 75% leased.

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

9


New Rochelle company accuses city of hazardous materials risk at Thruway overpass BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

T

he city of New Rochelle is engaged in an “abnormally dangerous activity,” a company claims, in moving around hazardous materials under a New England Thruway overpass near the downtown. Starr Tent and Event Group accused the city and Ashby Fuel Corp. of risking harm to others in a lawsuit filed July 8 in Westchester Supreme Court. The hazardous materials pose “a health and safety risk to Starr Tent employees, the residents of New Rochelle, and possibly all drivers on the Thruway that drive over this portion of the Thruway,” the complaint states. City spokeswoman Kathy Gilwit declined to offer a response to the allegations, citing a policy of not commenting on pending litigation. Starr leases party tents to wealthy individuals and for events such as the Tribeca Film Festival. It leases a warehouse at 75 Beechwood Ave., near the city’s waste transfer station at 85 Beechwood and Ashby’s base at 99 Beechwood.

10

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

Starr has an easement from the New York State Thruway Authority to use property under the highway for access to the warehouse. Ashby has a permit from the authority to use a portion of the land, according to the complaint, but not for storing hazardous materials. Ashby allegedly stores “oil trucks, rusted oil tanks, and other dangerous oil and construction debris” under the highway overpass and next to the driveway that leads to Starr’s warehouse. In February, the city began renovating the waste transfer station, the lawsuit states, and needed Ashby’s storage site under the highway. There is no indication, according to the complaint, that the city prepared an environmental impact statement or held public hearings on the project. The city should have directed Ashby to remove hazardous materials from the site, Starr claims, but instead forced Ashby to move its trucks and materials next to Starr’s building, where they emit oil, noxious fumes and dust that pose a risk to anyone nearby and pose a fire hazard to Starr’s building. The equipment and materials alleged-

WCBJ

The storage area under the New England Thruway that is at the center of the lawsuit. Photo via Google Maps. ly block Starr from loading and unloading trucks, threaten to shut down the tent rental business and put 24 employees out of work. Starr also accuses the city and Ashby of negligence, trespass and creating a

nuisance. It has asked the court to order them not to store hazardous materials next to it’s building and to remediate the alleged hazards. Starr is represented by Nassau County attorney Andrew Kazin.


Fairfield Chamber moves beyond pandemic for 75th anniversary BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

E

ight years ago, when Beverly Balaz became president of the Fairfield Chamber of Commerce, the organization carried a slogan that baffled her. “It was called ‘The Fun Chamber,’” she recalled. “And I thought, ‘What is that about?’ So, we changed our slogan to ‘Building Relationships, Building Business.’” As the chamber prepares to celebrate its 75th anniversary, Balaz believed the slogan is the perfect definition of the organization’s role within the town’s business community. “The key to our success is letting our membership know that we’re a trusted entity and that we are here to advocate on their behalf,” she continued. “And we help them not only sustain their business, but to grow their businesses as well.” Balaz has been encouraged with the recent flurry of new business openings across the town — her schedule has been busy with ribbon-cutting ceremonies. She credits much of the new activity to Fairfield’s multilevel appeal to business professionals. “When we get new owners and I ask them why did they select Fairfield, they say, ‘It’s just the perfect town to open a business,’” she said. “I think that Fairfield certainly is a town where people want to work, play and live.” Under Balaz’s leadership, the chamber has sought to involve the wider community in the support of local businesses. One of the chamber’s recent endeavors was the Fairfield Community e-Gift Card program launched last November with the participation of the town government in response to the economic challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic. The cards are redeemable in the 74 Fairfield-based businesses participating in the program, and Balaz noted it has helped boost businesses. “To date, our community has purchased over $70,000 worth of gift cards,” she said. “That money has to stay in Fairfield specific to the 74 businesses who are participating, so that’s a measurable number. We have the analytics on that. And we certainly hope to reach over $100,000 towards the end of the year.” For the chamber’s 75th anniversary festivities, Balaz is planning to launch a buy-a-brick program that will be centered on the town’s Post Road commercial district and feature special bricks with the names of donors to the program. “We want our business community

and our businesses to buy bricks,” she said. “That will be a really nice legacy to have in years to come, with our businesses’ names etched into a brick for everyone to see in the future.” Looking forward, Balaz is eager to see the chamber move completely beyond the pandemic. She lamented that its annual health and fitness expo has not been held for two years and will not be back until March 2022, but she was enthusiastic for a new golf tournament coming up at the Brooklawn Country Club scheduled for Sept. 27. Balaz laughed in pointing out that a special 75th anniversary dinner celebration originally slated for July is being moved to the fall because so many chamber members were taking advantage of

the lifting of pandemic restrictions to enjoy summer vacations that were not possible last year. And while she is glad for the chamber members being able to move their lives personal beyond the pandemic, she is also excited over restarting the organization’s slate of professional activities. “One of the most important things is to start to schedule events for networking and to get people together again, so people can shake a hand, say hello, hand out a business card and provide contact information so people can follow up with each other if they think there’s good synergy between each of the businesses,” she said. “I think we’ve missed that physical interaction throughout Covid.”

Beverly Balaz. Contributed photo.

Two Fabulous Events

Two Great Causes August 2, 2021

The Country Club of Darien, CT tournament • dinner event • prizes up to $1 Million

Live Entertainment by ETA Music

NEW: win $1 Million at our helicopter ball drop!!

net proceeds benefit:

Lots of high-value prizes PLUS 4 winners closest to pin get to compete for $1 Million

other prizes: win cash or a brand-new Range Rover! live & silent auctions: Vacations & much more!

Register Today for the Tournament or Dinner Event

HonorineGolfClassic.com in honor of Marcelle “Honorine” & Anthony Gance FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

11


BUSINESS INTEL NEWS

UPCOMING EVENTS Welcome Back Westchester! A Members-Only Networking Reception

July 27 | 5pm to 7pm Saltaire Oyster Bar & Kitchen | Port Chester, New York | Members: $60

For more than 70 years, the Westchester County Association has been the leading independent voice of Westchester’s business community – fostering smart growth and economic vitality in the region.

We are thrilled for Westchester’s reopening and more than ready to get back to in-person networking. Join the WCA for a cocktail reception with new and old friends looking to expand their network and reconnect. This is a members-only event. Register at westchester.org/events Sponsored by:

WCA Partner Event: Westchester GeoPossibilities Tool Co-Hosted by Sustainable Westchester & NYSERDA

July 22 | 12pm to 1pm This special event will provide an opportunity for property owners to learn more about Westchester GeoPossibilities, see it demonstrated, and consider whether their properties could benefit from the energy and financial savings generated by this newly available resource.

WCA IN ACTION Welcome Home Westchester Campaign WCA along with other business leaders attended a recent press conference to officially introduce the “Welcome Home Westchester” campaign, a multi-stakeholder effort to address the housing issue that has reached a crisis point over the past several years. The “Welcome Home Westchester” campaign combines several companies involved in the home building and development of housing with economic leaders like the Westchester County Association and Nonprofit Westchester, academics and think tanks that have extensively examined the housing question, organizations dedicated to fighting against homelessness and supporting families in need, faith leaders and community advocates to drive forward a new conversation around housing in the county. We are pleased this launch is getting the spotlight it deserves, and we look forward to continuing to be a part of the discussion in advocating for affordable housing throughout Westchester.

Register at westchester.org/events

WCA On-Demand Video Library: View all of WCA’s virtual events at youtube.com/TheWCAssociation Video highlights Include: • The future of telehealth in a post-pandemic world • Economic models for improved housing affordability •The mega shifts and trends in our region’s talent ecosystem

FCBJ

WCBJ

T p b in T p p e

F p e re b a H th b P m a p y

WC “The WCA has been and continues to be such a valuable organization to MGS, and the greater Westchester County business community, for so many important reasons. Whether it is the WCA’s strong advocacy in Albany and beyond, expert guidance during good times and bad, and interesting and informative programming, we are proud to be members of such a dynamic and prominent organization.” –Seth Mandelbaum, Managing Partner, McCullough, Goldberger & Staudt, LLP

HEALTHCARE | REAL ESTATE & HOUSING | WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT | DIGITAL CONNECTIVITY | ENERGY & SUSTAINABILITY

JULY 19, 2021

C

WCA MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

McCullough, Goldberger & Staudt, LLP represents a diverse group of clients. MGS has been an integral part of the Westchester community for more than 60 years. The firm offers a wide range of services in areas including land use, commercial and residential real estate, banking law, trusts and estates, municipal law, construction law and all types of litigation. Its clients include corporations, insurance companies, municipalities, coop, condo and homeowners’ associations, developers, golf and country clubs and not-for-profits as well as individual property owners. (www.mgslawyers.com)

12

T


PR ESIDE NT’S MESSAG E

CLEAN ENERGY PROGRAM PORTAL

—Michael N. Romita This month the Westchester County Association launched its

Clean Energy Program Portal – available at www.westchester.org. back

ol

rn sider vings

n

The Portal is a searchable and dynamic navigation tool developed in partnership with Pace University’s Energy and Climate Center to help businesses and buildings find government sponsored programs and initiatives that will help them transition to a low carbon future. There are many – from NYSERDA’s new construction and housing programs, to Con Edison’s clean heat and energy efficiency programs, to federal tax programs incentivizing renewable energy retrofits or electric vehicles, just to name a few. From reduced waste to decreased costs and increased productivity, it’s clear why making the shift to clean energy can offer major advantages. Businesses also receive the added benefit of improving their overall brand image by “going green,” all while promoting a healthier and safer workplace for their employees. However, it can be difficult to navigate through the process which can quickly discourage many businesses. With the launch of the WCA’s Clean Energy Program Portal, we have aggregated and curated this material in one single place complete with informative annotations, qualifying information, and direct links to the primary program sites. It is the first place to look to see what’s out there for your facility or business.

If we are to get serious about our energy and climate challenges, the next several years will be pivotal for Westchester. We will need to integrate environmental policy with economic development and job creation. To be sure, the targets for statewide greenhouse gas reductions set by New York’s 2019 Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act are very ambitious. Meeting these targets will require both mitigation strategies that directly reduce emissions and enabling initiatives focused on research and development of new technologies. The state’s Climate Action Council which was created under the 2019 Climate Act is developing a scoping plan of recommendations to do just that. Recent technological advancements in large scale renewables, energy storage and power transmission are cause for optimism. On the other hand, outmoded citing laws and land use regulations will act as obstacles to the rapid deployment of necessary infrastructure and the adoption of these new technologies. Such legal impediments need to be addressed. With respect to the private sector, businesses can push back against now codified statewide climate goals or they can engage, adapt and evolve. We should choose the latter and the WCA’s new Clean Energy Program Portal will help.

The portal is available at westchester.org/clean-energy-guide

WCA PLATINUM INVESTORS

Join the

WCA

Membership in the Westchester County Association is one of the best investments you’ll make for your business. When you join the WCA, you gain the full force of our formidable and proven advocacy infrastructure, working to advance your interests. You benefit from our relationships, our experience and our expertise across a full range of services designed to achieve our members’ business objectives.

Visit westchester.org/member-benefits for more information or contact Christina Barry, Manager Membership & Events, at 914.948.1860 or info@westchester.org.

Y

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

13


1

NIMBY Returns— proposal at which the public could speak were held at the White Plains Common Council’s June 7 and July 6 meetings. Seth Mandelbaum of the White Plains-based law firm McCullough, Goldberger & Staudt LLP, represented Senlac and said the property “can fully support this project. The project is proposed in essentially the same location as the existing underutilized, outdated 701 office building.” Mandelbaum said that the closest home would be about 450 feet away from the apartment building, which he described as being “about a football field and a half away.” Michael Romita, president and CEO of The Westchester County Association, spoke in favor of the proposal. “There is a continuing need to reposition outdated, increasingly obsolete commercial offices throughout the county,” Romita said. He pointed to data provided by real estate services firm CBRE that shows the availability of office space in the submarket that includes the Westchester Avenue location currently stands at 22%. “Last year, during the pandemic, leasing activity that comprises new and renewed leases, fell off the cliff and absorption plunged,” Romita said. “But that’s not just the pandemic alone. It’s the acceleration and continuation of a multiyear trend. There simply is a continuing decline and the demand for commercial office space continues to

erode.” Romita said that new development other than offices is needed along the Westchester Avenue and I-287 corridor to replace underutilized buildings and help preserve the tax base without overburdening surrounding neighborhoods or the existing infrastructure. Romita discounted the notion that property owners would deliberately empty out their office parks in order to build apartment complexes or retail centers. “That would be incredibly speculative and risky. Developers generally want the path of least resistance to profitability,” Romita said. “It would be much simpler and more profitable for a developer to simply lease-up the asset in its current form if that was possible, but that is simply not what’s happening in the current market and doesn’t reflect reality.” Alex Roithmayr, a White Plains resident, spoke on behalf of The Building &  Realty Institute of Westchester and the Mid-Hudson Region where he is a senior research associate. He stated that while Senlac is not a member of BRI, the organization supports the project and moving ahead with it would be compatible with the goals of BRI’s newly launched Welcome to Westchester effort that is designed to help address the county’s housing needs.

Congratulates April Joy Damian, PhD on her appointment as Vice President and Director of the

www.weitzmaninstitute.org 14

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

Roithmayr described the proposal as “exactly the type of low-hanging fruit that can help us make progress in meeting our housing needs particularly since the proposal will be fully compliant with the White Plains city affordable housing set-aside requirement.” Meadowbrook Road resident Don Buchwald urged the council to turn down the zoning request in order to allow residents’ views to be heard during a recently started process of updating the city’s Comprehensive Plan. The updating process is expected to take about two years. “No one knows now if there will be renewed interest in suburban office space,” Buchwald said. “Many companies and Westchester residents alike have grown to realize that the daily commute into Manhattan isn’t really necessary at all. A ‘no’ vote will maintain the status quo while our residents’ views about the future of White Plains are considered and the actualities of post-pandemic life are assessed.” Ethan Silverman, a Colonial Road resident, said, “I know that owners, not renters, are the citizens deeply committed to the long-term success of our White Plains community.” He expressed concerns that there may not be a strong enough market to absorb the apartments already being built in the city’s downtown and at other locations along Westchester Avenue. Mark Shapiro, another Colonial Road resident, suggested that apartment dwellers at the 701 Westchester Ave. site would have to use their cars to go downtown and the Senlac

development would result in a substantial increase in traffic. He also said that he found the developer’s prediction that the project would result in adding only 37 new students to the White Plains school system as “completely implausible.” Laura Kavanagh, a Meadowbrook Road resident, said, “If this goes through, our street, Meadowbrook, will definitely become a cutthrough street for new residents ... for delivery drivers and people just looking for a shortcut.” Bob Friscia, president of the North Street Association, said that when proposals such as Senlac’s are being reviewed by the city’s boards and commissions, developers are not asked such basic questions as “why — why the need; who — who will move into these projects, we don’t even know, they never discuss who is going to move into these projects, who they’re going to attract; how — how much is the cost for the average homeowner or renter to buy or rent these projects; and, what — how does White Plains benefit in return from these developments?” Friscia said that new development should be concentrated in the city’s downtown. “Our city needs to be developed in the interior downtown and bring life back to the city, not on the outskirts of 287,” Friscia said. “We need a visionary plan for White Plains that the residents can embrace for a brighter future.” The Common Council possibly could vote on whether to approve use of the overlay zone for Senlac’s property at its August meeting.


HUDSON VALLEY Legoland makes colorful and crowded debut

Legoland entrance (above) and the hotel (below). Photos by Kathy Roberts. BY KATHY ROBERTS

I

t may be “slow-motion Goshen” to residents, but Orange County’s town of 13,000 will see life kick up a notch or two now that Legoland New York officially opened its gates on July 9. It didn’t take long for the parking lot to fill up, either. After seeing its original opening date pushed because of the pandemic, Merlin Entertainment’s $500 million investment had a “soft” opening three months ago, admitting season passholders and offering a limited number of discounted tickets at the gate. With the virus restrictions lifted in June, state and local officials joined Merlin’s representatives on July 9 to cut the ribbon and formally open its doors, albeit a year later than originally planned. Seven themed “lands” make up the parks’ character, including Lego Castle, Ninjaworld, Miniland and Bricktopia. (Yes, every ride looks as if it’s made of Legos.) The new New York theme park also features the first Lego Factory Adventure Ride, transforming its riders into “minifigures” to give them a bird’s eye view of how Legos are made. For guests who use wheelchairs, it features a specialized vehicle capable of carrying them along for the ride. It is one of the many amenities Legoland strives to

include for children with disabilities. Construction of a 250-room Legoland Hotel with heated pool on site is nearing completion and is already booking reservations for Aug. 6. The hotel, geared toward the 3-12 age group, has rooms that include a separate children’s sleeping area and offers entertainment and scavenger hunts for the younger set on the premises. Legoland New York is Merlin’s third entertainment park in the United States and its 10th Lego-themed park worldwide. The company had first sought to build in Rockland County and had targeted the former Letchworth Village property in Thiells, but with no buy-in from the surrounding community, Merlin set its sights on Orange County. The company bought 500-plus acres on Harriman Drive, the site of the former Arden Hill Hospital, for what would eventually become its 150-acre amusement park. After Merlin obtained all the necessary approvals to proceed with construction in 2018, the company spent more than $40 million (with a $10 million assist from the Empire State Development) to relocate and reconstruct Route 17’s Exit 125 interchange, building an on/off ramp across the highway to access the property and a third westbound lane to improve traffic flow on

what will eventually become Interstate 86. Merlin negotiated a 20-year payment in lieu of taxes for the project, saving the company approximately $37 million. The PILOT calls for Merlin to pay $60 million to the Goshen Central School District, $5-plus million to the Goshen Fire District and another $10 million to Orange County annually. Merlin also agreed to pay its host community an annual fee based on park attendance, to discount residents’ admission and to provide well water. FCBJ

Legoland will also pay Orange County’s hotel tax, expected to generate a minimum of $500,000 annually. The park’s construction has helped to create hundreds of union jobs as a result of a project labor agreement with the local trade. It expects to employ 800 full- and part-time workers during its peak season. If you’re planning to visit the park, leave the cash at home: these days, it’s either plastic or Apple Pay; all of Merlin’s theme parks have gone “cashless.” WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

15


HUDSON VALLEY Startup Spotlight Rockland retailer celebrates entrepreneurs and consumers with disabilities BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

I

ndependence Café — A Unique Boutique, Rockland County’s newest retailer, opened on July 1 within the Bridges Welcome Center at the Palisades Center in West Nyack. The nonprofit Bridges is one of 41 Independent Living Centers (ILC) operating in New York under the auspices of the state’s Education Department. According to CEO and Executive Director Carlos Martinez, the ILCs aim to empower individuals with disabilities to make independent decisions while working to ensure they can achieve equal access to any opportunity they wish to pursue. “We’ve always had a hunger for entrepreneurial activities,” Martinez said. “We started a café in 2015 that’s located at the county courthouse in Rockland that’s a grab-andgo café to serve the patrons of the courthouse with breakfast and lunch items, coffee, doughnuts and pastries.” Martinez initially planned to open another café at the Palisades Center’s food court, but did not want to go into direct competition with long-established eateries. Instead, a new pursuit arose when he least expected it. “Someone came to me with the idea of putting their product in the front of our

Bridges CEO and Executive Director Carlos Martinez. Photo by Risa Hoag. office,” he continued. “That happened to be a person with a disability who designed a shirt and a hat. And I said, ‘I don’t know if we could do that right now. But let me give it some thought.’” After conferring with the Bridges team, Martinez realized a new business opportunity could be pursued. “We came up with the idea to open up this unique boutique that we would call the Independence Café, which would showcase and sell products designed by people with disabilities for people with disabilities.” Independence Café was initially con-

Garden dwellers at ROCA

R

ockland Center for the Arts and its Catherine Konner Sculpture Park are displaying botanical sculptures by artist Leigh Taylor Mickelson. By using natural forms — especially ones found in plant life — Mickelson uses her work to “magnify” the elements of this dichotomy, with natural forms playing out the spiritual, emotional and physical dramas that exist within our human selves. The exhibit is free to the public, weekends during the months of July and August. On Aug. 21, the park will be open seven days a week from dawn to dusk. Rockland Center for the Arts, on South Greenbush Road in Nyack, is the oldest and largest arts organization in Rockland County, presenting programs for over 70 years. For more information, visit rocklandartcenter.org.

— Kathy Roberts

16

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

ceived with products from six vendors, but word of the project quickly spread and it is now offering items from 20 vendors. Among the items for sale are soy wax candles from Beaver Creek Candle Co, which are prepared and shipped by people with developmental disabilities; jewelry designed and produced by Aspire Accessories, a program of the Houston nonprofit Social Motion Inc. that employs individuals with autism and other disabilities; and artisan jams from Sweet Heat Jam Co., a culinary arts program offering a three-month internship program for young adults with disabilities to learn culinary and

social skills. Martinez said that he is constantly on the lookout for new vendors. “Just yesterday, I was looking at the Westchester County Business Journal and I saw an article about a gentleman with a disability who is selling a product,” he said, referring to Newburgh-based Derrek Cooke, owner of the startup DerreksBags. “We connected with him — he’s another person that we’re in dialogue now to put in our retail space. “We look for opportunities to highlight people with disabilities who are inventing and creating. We have everything from books to artwork, to clothing, to jewelry, candles and soaps and food items like jelly and granola bars, and we’re getting chocolates, and all in line with the same mission. They’re designed by people with disabilities created by people with disabilities.” Martinez noted that the new store also carries products from able-bodied entrepreneurs designed to support people with disabilities. These items went through a testing phase to ensure people will be able to use the products to their fullest. In addition to the store, Bridges is looking to open additional grab-and-go cafés in Rockland, with the possibility of including several of the Unique Boutique items for sale in these new outlets, depending on the size and location.


FOCUS ON

BANKING WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNALS

Teller Andrew Chomyn, a student studying cybersecurity at Orange Community College; John Carola, vice president of retail delivery and marketing; Diana Leahy, customer service representative; and Derrik Wynkoop, president/CEO. Photo by Kathy Roberts.

Historic Walden Savings Bank embraces newest technology BY KATHY ROBERTS

C

an a 150-year-old institution remain relevant in these changing times? Walden Savings Bank is proving just that, according to President and CEO Derrik Wynkoop. “We’re bringing a more interactive approach to our flagship branch,” said Wynkoop, who began his career at Walden Savings Bank after graduating college. He returned in 2011 to become its president and chief executive officer. “We’re not bringing in technology for technology’s sake; we’re doing it because it’s going to make it easier and more comfortable for our current and future customers in every age group.” Walden Savings’ customer mix is split nearly 50-50 between those born before 1964 and those born after 1965. The move to an interactive platform — while continuing to offer traditional services its customers have come to expect — will bridge the generational gap. One consequence of the pandemic was that those who looked askance at “modern” banking methods have now embraced the ability to get things done when they can’t get out of the house or office. “My 86-year-old mom is using internet banking now,” said Wynkoop with a smile. “These upgrades are a benefit to all our

customers in every age group.” To meet the goal of melding traditional and contemporary seamlessly, the bank is creating a 3,100-square-foot interactive banking floor in its Montgomery flagship branch. The new floor plan eliminates the high counters that once separated teller from client and makes those customer queues disappear. Instead, customers will be greeted by a digital banking specialist who can help with basic cashless transactions, then guide clients to additional services on the main floor if needed. Four separate banking pods will replace the traditional tellers’ windows, and cash “recyclers” will handle the business of tallying bills and coins, freeing up the teller to assist the client with other services. The revamped space will also have a “digital discovery center” that offers the opportunity to learn how to access and use the bank’s technological services —including CardValet; Bank-Wise personal financial management dashboard; an online banking demonstration and enrollment; and Mobile Wallet. For customers unfamiliar or uncomfortable with new technology, the digital banking specialist will be available to explain how new banking options can fit into their lifestyle and work to their benefit.

John Carola, vice president of retail delivery and marketing, is especially excited about the introduction of augmented reality to the banks’ customers. “By scanning a QR code, they’ll be able to take an augmented reality tour of the branch and its services. It’s a very exciting innovation we’ll soon be able to offer our customers.” The revamped layout will also offer three confidential meeting areas and a separate conference room with video-conferencing capability for customer meetings. “When we get a new customer here in our Montgomery branch, I’m able to come in and personally welcome them,” Wynkoop said. “With the new video-conferencing capability, I will be able to personally welcome new customers in our eleven other branches and in our loan center as well.” Completing the new layout will be a self-service coffee bar for customers and a coin redemption center that does not charge a fee to its customers nor its neighbors who may need to utilize it. A new walk-up ATM can dispense 20s, 10s and 5s and is capable of handling bulk check and cash deposits for personal and business customers. The bank is also planning to introduce contactless cards, prestaging transactions, FCBJ

fingerprint biometrics and an ID scanner in the near future. Wynkoop said his board of directors was initially skeptical about introducing the integrated-technology concept into family friendly Walden Savings, but after discussing and brainstorming the long-term benefits the changes would bring to its current and future customers, they agreed to spend the nearly $1 million in physical and technological upgrades proposed. The new lobby is being built by Storm King Group, a Montgomery-based company, and is expected to be completed by this fall. Walden Savings Bank, a federally chartered mutual savings bank founded in 1872, has already begun preparations for its 150th anniversary next April 25. Part of the celebration, Wynkoop said, is the bank’s commitment to the community and confidence in its continued service with the addition of the newest technology. He said, “60 to 70 percent of our customers are omnichannel — but one channel doesn’t go away when another opens. Our goal is to make sure our customers get the same level of service on all channels. “Digital natives’ are the most comfortable with today’s technology. Traditional banking is not going away, but we’d be putting our heads in the sand if we did not embrace the technology and times. We’re committed to remaining contemporary.” WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

17


M&T becomes first bank to offer app for those with cognitive disabilities BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

M

&T Bank is the first U.S. bank to partner with MagnusCards, a free app designed to aid customers and employees with cognitive disabilities. M&T Administrative Vice President David Zolnowski, who is also president of the bank’s Disability Advocacy Network (DAN) Group, said that the Buffalo bank — which has nine locations in Fairfield County and 16 in Westchester — first came across the MagnusCards technology during a presentation by Magnusmode, a tech company also based in Buffalo. “A colleague of mine thought it would be a great tool to help the bank and the community,” he recalled. “We set up a formal meeting with Magnusmode and ultimately decided to go forward as it can help us reach a goal of helping those with certain conditions become more independent when it comes to their financial transactions.” The product, which can be accessed on a phone or any smart device, provides guidance through a number of tasks and activities that Zolnowski said users might otherwise find challenging or overwhelming.

MagnusCards provides what it calls Card Decks, which provide practical guidance through storytelling visualizations along with applied behavior analysis methods to offer prompt and positive reinforcement in support of experiential learning. “If I’m using an ATM to make a withdrawal,” Zolnowski said, “I put in the card, enter my PIN and hit ‘withdrawal.’ But with

the MagnusCard, it walks you through all the steps and gives the individual the ability to complete their transaction more confidently.” He noted that the app goes well beyond banking and money management, providing accessibility support for everything from public transportation and health care to shopping, school and other common places

and activities. The app’s users include people with autism, down syndrome, acquired brain injury, dementia, ADHD and other cognitive disabilities. “You also don’t have to be an M&T customer to use it,” he said. Being involved with the DAN group also has personal meaning or Zolnowski, who has a 27-year-old son with down syndrome and a friend who has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. “The resource groups are 100% employee-led,” he said. “If someone has an idea, they bring it to the board for approval. If they see the need for it, it pretty much gets rubber-stamped.” Other resource groups include Pride, Wellness, Women’s Interests and a host of support groups for employees of different ethnic backgrounds. “We take very seriously the fact that we are very much a community bank,” Zolnowski said. “Our employees understand the need to give back to the community.” Every employee is paid for a maximum of 40 hours per year, and members of the resource groups are compensated for up to 120 hours per year, of community service.

Your Source For All Your Business Insurance Needs CALL OR VISIT ONE OF OUR LOCATIONS TODAY

Tri-State Insurance Brokerage

277 Tarrytown Road, White Plains, NY 10607 Side Entrance of the Law Office of Laurence Shaw Building

914-607-7799 | www.tsinsbk.com Your TRUSTED CHOICE for your personal & business insurance needs

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., by appointment Licensed in NY, NJ, CT

Other Locations: Tri-State Insurance Brokerage

1 Stamford Plaza, 263 Tresser Blvd. 9th Floor, Stamford, CT 06901 Licensed in NY, NJ & CT

Tri-State Insurance Brokerage

609 E. 188th St., Bronx, NY 10458 Licensed in NY, NJ & CT

PROUD MEMBER OF IIABNY & PIA

18

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

Frank Kolovic Owner/Broker

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

WCBJ


COLLEGES UNIVERSITIES AND

AN ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | WESTCHESTER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | JULY 19, 2021


COLLEGES

& UNIVERSITIES

WESTCHESTER COUNTY AND REGION

Area code: 914 (unless otherwise noted) Berkeley College 12 East 41st Street, New York, NY 10017 800-446-5400 • berkeleycollege.edu info@berkeleycollege.edu President: Michael J. Smith Type of institution: four-year private college offering courses in more than 20 career fields Courses offered onsite and online. Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors and masters, along with certificates and continuing education programs Concordia College 171 White Plains Road, Bronxville 10708 337-9300 • concordia-ny.edu admission@concordia-ny.edu President: Rev. John Arthur Nunes Type of institution: private, four-year, coeducational college offering undergraduate and graduate programs Degrees conferred: bachelors, post baccalaureate, masters, advanced certificates Dutchess Community College 53 Pendell Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 845-431-8000 • sunydutchess.edu admissions@sunydutchess.edu President: Peter Grant Jordan (Aug. 2021) Acting President: Ellen Gambino (Sept. 2020 to Jul. 2021) Type of institution: community college offering more than 60 associate degrees, certificates and microcredentials Degrees conferred: associate’s Fordham University* 400 Westchester Ave., West Harrison 10604 367-3426 • fordham.edu/westchester President: Joseph M. McShane Type of institution: private, Jesuit university Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctorate, certificates, doctoral certificates Iona College 715 North Ave., New Rochelle 10801 800-231-4662 • iona.edu admissions@iona.edu President: Seamus Carey, Ph.D. Type of institution: private, Catholic, liberal arts college offering 63 degree programs Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, advanced certificates Landmark College 19 River Road South, Putney Vermont 05346 802-387-6718 • landmark.edu admissions@landmark.edu President: Dr. Peter Eden Type of institution: private liberal arts for students with learning differences (dyslexia, ADHD, autism) offering 2- and 4-year degree programs, a Bridge experience for visiting college students, summer programs for high school and college students, online dual enrollment for high school students, and professional development for educators. Degrees conferred: associate, bachelor's, postbaccalaureate certificates

LIU Hudson at Westchester 735 Anderson Hill Road, Purchase 10577 831-2700 • liu.edu/hudson Westchester@liu.edu, Hudson@liu.edu President: Kimberly R. Cline Type of institution: nonprofit, private, graduate university Degrees conferred: masters, advanced certificates

Rockland Community College 145 College Road, Suffern, NY 10901 845-574-4000 • sunyrockland.edu admissions@sunyrockland.edu President: Dr. Michael A. Baston Type of institution: community college Degrees conferred: associates, certificates

Manhattan College 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Riverdale 10471 718-862-7200 • manhattan.edu admit@manhattan.edu President: Brennan O’Donnell Type of institution: independent, coeducational university Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters

Sarah Lawrence College 1 Mead Way, Bronxville 10708 337-0700 • sarahlawrence.edu slcadmit@sarahlawrence.edu President: Cristle Collins Judd Type of institution: private, coeducational, liberal arts college Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters

Manhattanville College 2900 Purchase St., Purchase 10577 694-2200 • mville.edu admissions@mville.edu President: Michael Geisler Type of institution: private, coeducational, liberal arts college Degrees conferred: advanced certificates, post baccalaureate, bachelors, masters

St. Thomas Aquinas College 125 Route 340, Sparkill, NY 10976 845-398-4100 • stac.edu admissions@stac.edu President: Kenneth D. Daly Type of institution: Private, 4-Year Liberal Arts College Degrees conferred: Bachelors, Masters, Advanced Certificates

Mercy College 555 Broadway, Dobbs Ferry 10522 788-MERCY-GO • mercy.edu admissions@mercy.edu President: Timothy L. Hall Type of institution: accredited, private, nonsectarian, coeducational college Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters Monroe College 434 Main St., New Rochelle 10801 800-55-MONROE • monroecollege.edu ephillips@monroecollege.edu President: Marc M. Jerome Type of institution: private college Degrees conferred: certificates, bachelors, masters New York Medical College 40 Sunshine Cottage Road, Valhalla 10595 594-4000 • nymc.edu School of Medicine: mdadmit@nymc.edu School of Health Sciences and Practice: shsp_admissions@nymc.edu Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences: gsbms_apply@nymc.edu President: Alan Kadish Type of institution: medicine and health sciences university Degrees conferred: doctor of medicine, post-graduate medical education, dual degree, masters, doctor of philosophy, master of public health, doctoral, certificates Pace University 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville 10570 773-3200 • pace.edu undergraduateadmission@pace.edu President: Marvin Krislov Type of institution: private institution offering bachelors, masters and doctoral programs Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters

S2 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

SUNY Empire State College† 210 N. Central Ave., Suite 150, Hartsdale 10530 948-6206 ext. 3590 • esc.edu/locations/hartsdale escnews@esc.edu President: Jim Malatras Type of institution: public college Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, advanced certificates SUNY Purchase College 735 Anderson Hill Road, Purchase 10577 251-6300 • purchase.edu admissions@purchase.edu President: Dennis Craig, Interim president Type of institution: public liberal arts and sciences college Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters The College of Westchester 325 Central Ave., White Plains 10606 831-0200 • cw.edu admissions@cw.edu President: Mary Beth Del Balzo Type of institution: two-year and four-year private college Degrees conferred: bachelors, certificates Westchester Community College 75 Grasslands Road, Valhalla 10595 606-6600 • sunywcc.edu admissions@sunywcc.edu President: Belinda S. Miles Type of institution: community college offering more than 60 associate degrees and certificates Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors, certificates


ROCKLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE OVERVIEW

ACADEMIC SCHOOLS/DEGREES

Founded in 1959, Rockland Community College (RCC) serves as an education, cultural and workforce development resource for the region, with sites in Haverstraw, Orangeburg (Auto Tech Center) and Nyack (Hospitality & Culinary Arts Center), in addition to the main campus in Suffern. The College offers a safe, supportive learning environment for thousands of students from diverse backgrounds who appreciate small class sizes and personal attention from a distinguished, award-winning faculty that includes Fulbright scholars and SUNY Distinguished Professors. The student body is composed of first-time college students, high school students getting a head start on college coursework, international students and adult learners at all levels. Thanks to the school’s affordable tuition, students who begin their career journey at RCC and then transfer to a four-year college, can save up to $100,000 on their education. RCC is also proud to provide career training and professional development to adult learners looking to change careers or upskill.

The College offers Associate degrees in arts (AA), science (AS) and applied science (AAS), and Certificate Programs across five Academic Schools: Arts & Humanities; Business & Professional Studies; Education & Social Sciences; Nursing, Health and Wellness; and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. It is also home to the nationally acclaimed Sam Draper Honors Program, a rigorous academic program offering students the challenges and rewards of deeper discourse and a personalized mentoring relationship with professors.

INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES Rockland Community College is dedicated to educating students to be “Real World Ready!” RCC’s Job Placement Office, part of the Student Success Team at the College, is committed to tailoring its programs to meet the needs of every company and organization and welcomes conversations with regional employers about how to best partner together.

All students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the career services offerings and programming as part of their overall college experience. The Student Success Team offers an extensive workshop series on Career Essentials and Workplace Readiness. This series leads to digital badging and micro-credentialing, helping students both

obtain and maintain employment across various industries. The College is also developing a robust for-credit micro-credentialing program, including options for baking and food preparation, which will prepare students for the workforce, and can be counted as credit toward associate degrees. For more information, visit sunyrockland.edu.

START, CHANGE OR ENHANCE YOUR CAREER

AT ROCKLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE

RCC offers affordable and convenient courses, associate degrees, workshops, and seminars designed to provide technical skills, workforce certifications and career enhancements.

Learn more: sunyrockland.edu/academics JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S3


DUTCHESS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

O

ne of 30 community colleges in the State University of New York (SUNY) system, Dutchess Community College (DCC) is known for its exceptional faculty, inclusive and diverse community, and a learning environment that provides a wealth of opportunities for students to pursue their academic goals and personal growth. Offering more than 40 academic programs, numerous workforce training options, and professional development opportunities, the College provides access to an affordable education for those who want to earn a degree, learn a marketable skill, or advance their careers. DCC offers flexible, accelerated learning opportunities and realworld experiences to help students complete their education on time and graduate workforce-ready. One of DCC’s newest facilities – DCC@Fishkill - serves both traditional students and those starting or returning to college. With an enhanced focus on business, criminal justice, information technology and a newly launched hospitality and tourism program, the 47,000 sq. ft. facility features digitally equipped “smart” classrooms, a computational multi-purpose design lab, and a com-

puter classroom with an independent internal network. DCC@ Fishkill is also home to the college’s robust selection of microcredentials. These short, focused programs covering areas such as bookkeeping, small business management, public safety, Cloud computing and web administration, provide pathways to new capabilities and skills. Students earn a digital badge and at a later point, can take the next step by ‘stacking’ their qualifications into future certificates or degrees. For more information, visit www. sunydutchess.edu/dccfishkill Also new, is DCC@HVR Airport, which combines world-class flight, aviation management, and most recently, aviation maintenance technician instruction, with access to the Aviation Education Center, a stateof-the-art, collegiate aviation facility. With cutting-edge classrooms, labs and hangar, the 31,800-sq.-ft facility is the hub of operations for DCC’s aviation training programs. Located on the grounds of the busy Hudson Valley Regional Airport (KPOU), the center offers students the perfect aviation training environment. The center features advanced aircraft system simulators, including the Rainbird Full Motion Three Axis Simulator,

Whether you’re looking to get your degree or boost your career skills, DCC is

the perfect answer.

and access to a selection of Cessna, Beechcraft, Piper and Mooney aircraft, and a Robinson helicopter. DCC@HVR Airport is also home to Falcon One, an Air Force One Gulfstream G3 once used by President George H.W. Bush during his 1989-1993 administration. For more information about DCC’s aviation programs, visit www.sunydutchess. edu/aviation Serving nearly 8,600 students annually, DCC consistently partners with business and

industry, universities, school districts, lawmakers, and nonprofit organizations to meet the community’s evolving economic, service and educational needs. With a long history of producing successful graduates, DCC’s 45,000+ alumni follow their passions, build outstanding careers and become exceptional leaders and innovators in their fields. To find out why DCC is the perfect answer for meeting and exceeding professional and personal goals, visit www.sunydutchess.edu

Degree & Certificate Programs Whether you plan to transfer to a four-year college or start your career right away, DCC’s 40+ academic programs will help you achieve your academic and career goals!

Microcredentials & Career Skills Build career skills and boost your resume with our new microcredential programs. These short, focused programs can help you kickstart a new career, learn a marketable skill, or earn credits toward a traditional program or certificate.

Customized Training Looking to advance the skills of your company’s workforce to hone its competitive edge? Dutchess Community College provides skill development programs and technical training customized to match your specific needs.

Convenient & Flexible With convenient locations in Fishkill and Poughkeepsie – and on-campus, hybrid and remote learning options – you can achieve your goals on a busy schedule!

Now closer to you! Take classes at our new, state-of-the-art Fishkill location!

AT THE INTERSECTION OF RT. 9 & I-84

www.sunydutchess.edu/fishkill

S4 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

Fall classes begin August 23. Register today! www.sunydutchess.edu | (845) 431-8010


YOUR EDUCATION YOUR In-Person Online & WAY Hybrid JOIN US BACK ON CAMPUS THIS FALL More In-Person Learning

Enroll Today!

Your Local Shoreline-West CT State Community Colleges!

GATEWAY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

HOUSATONIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NORWALK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

20 Church St., New Haven, CT

900 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport, CT

188 Richards Ave., Norwalk, CT

GatewayCT.edu

Housatonic.edu

Norwalk.edu

Choose your local CT State Community Colleges for a flexible, affordable, top-notch education!

ENROLL IN A DAY EVENTS Saturday, August 14, 9am-2pm Saturday, August 21, 9am-2pm

APPOINTMENTS & MORE INFO:

GatewayCT.edu/EnrollmentDay

ENROLL IN A DAY EVENTS Saturday, August 7, 9am-1pm Saturday, August 21, 9am-1pm

APPOINTMENTS & MORE INFO:

Housatonic.edu/EnrollmentDay

ENROLL IN A DAY EVENTS Saturday, August 7, 10am-2pm Saturday, August 21, 10am-2pm

MORE INFO:

Norwalk.edu

JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S5


Berkeley College celebrates its 90th anniversary in 2021. The theme commemorating this milestone is “Empowering Lives for 90 Years!”

NJ, that second chance also meant they got to experience the day with each other. The siblings were among more than 1,800 graduates recognized at the Commencement ceremony. The Wilsons and the Drakefords were featured on the third hour of Good Morning America (GMA3) on Thursday, July 8, 2021, to share what the experience was like. Click here to read more.

THRIVE! Summit Prepares Latina Entrepreneurs for Economic Recovery in the Aftermath of COVID-19 Pandemic and Honors Latina Leaders

New York City Football Club (NYCFC) recently announced its first higher education partnership with Berkeley College. NYCFC and Berkeley College will collaborate on education, career development, and health and fitness initiatives that benefit NYCFC fans and employees, along with Berkeley College and its students. With a shared value of providing diverse and equitable pathways to educating the next generation of New Yorkers, the partners will use the power of soccer to enrich the lives of local youth and multicultural communities. NYCFC affiliates will also be eligible for Berkeley’s Corporate Learning Partnership tuition discount, which applies to undergraduate and graduate MBA programs. Click here to read more.

Berkeley College joined Latinas in Business Inc. in gathering Latina business owners, as well as leaders from all backgrounds, for the third annual THRIVE! Imperatives Shaping the Future of Women Entrepreneurs Summit. The afternoon virtual conference, attended by more than 125 guests from around the country, was packed with tools, insights and networking opportunities to help empower Latina entrepreneurs in the wake of COVID-19. General sessions and deep-dive breakout workshops focused on topics of personal power, financial wellness and business innovation. THRIVE! closed with an in-person awards ceremony that was also live-streamed to a virtual audience. Wendy Garcia, Chief Diversity Officer (CDO), NYC Office of the Comptroller, was honored as a “Small Business Champion.” Click here to read more.

Twin Graduates Share the Excitement of Walking Across the Graduation Stage Together on Good Morning NYCFC Names Berkeley America Segment College First-Ever Higher Education Partner of the Club From top, Berkeley College graduates, Myesha and Tyesha Wilson, fraternal twins from the Bronx, NY, who earned Bachelor’s degrees, and Ja’Von and Ja’Van Drakeford, identical twins from Haskell and Belleville, NJ, respectively, were featured on the third hour of ABC’s Good Morning America (GMA3) to share what it was like to walk across the graduation stage together after missing the opportunity for an in-person celebration in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Berkeley College graduates who missed out on the opportunity to walk across the graduation stage in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions, got a second chance when Berkeley announced it would allow 2020 graduates to participate in the May 27, 2021 ceremony held at MetLife Stadium. For two sets of twins, Tyesha and Myesha Wilson of the Bronx, NY, and Ja’Von and Ja’Van Drakeford of Haskell and Belleville,

“Small Business Champion” Latina Award Recipient Wendy Garcia, Chief Diversity Officer, NYC Office of the Comptroller, and Michael J. Smith, Berkeley College President.

Berkeley College, founded in 1931, is a career-focused institution accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education that serves students at campus locations in New York, New Jersey and Online. Graduate and undergraduate degree and certificate programs are offered in more than 20 career fields. The College also offers continuing education programs to enhance career credentials. For more information, visit BerkeleyCollege.edu. The mission of Berkeley College is to empower students to achieve lifelong success in dynamic careers. Berkeley College reserves the right to add, discontinue, or modify its programs and policies at any time. Modifications subsequent to the original publication of this document may not be reflected here. For up-to-date and detailed information, please visit BerkeleyCollege.edu and view our catalogs at BerkeleyCollege.edu/publications.

S6 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021


JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S7


INTEGRATING BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY ON THE GRADUATE LEVEL A CAREER-DRIVING, GAME-CHANGING PATH FOR WORKING PROFESSIONALS

A

s digital technologies disrupt business models and blur product lines, it is more valuable than ever for professionals to possess a vast skill-set in order to effectively solve complex problems. Sacred Heart University’s Jack Welch College of Business & Technology (WCBT) is a pioneer in the integration of business and technology, recognizing that every facet of business is quickly changing in how we communicate and learn, create and consume and work and do business. The modern business world is all about synergy––and that is no more evident than in the emerging alignment of vital technology and business. From the sophisticated software needs of accounting to cybersecurity concerns to the precise analytics that can make or break a business model, today’s successful leaders know how to blend technological innovation and business acumen for excellence in productivity, efficiency and innovation.

INTRODUCING INNOVATION MANAGEMENT AT SACRED HEART The Welch College’s forward-thinking curriculum and cutting-edge teaching labs incorporate a rich range of experiential, cross- and multidisciplinary learning opportunities that seek to make business students technology-literate and engineering and computer science majors businessliterate at graduation. Aligning with the College’s goals is the newest MBA concentration––innovation management––focusing on developing students into sophisticated end-users in both business and technology, able to create solutions from concept to development to market launch. “This concentration is focused on the application of technology in business rather than teaching technology as a separate function,” said Anthony Macari, clinical assistant professor of management and MBA director at the WCBT. “As our economy continues to go through digital transformation, every aspect of marketing, supply chain, finance and accounting is impacted by the ability to seamlessly transform the customer experience on a daily basis through technology.” The courses will be taught by seasoned professionals with decades of business experience at some of the largest corporations in the world. These instructors are business executives who developed and managed major technological solutions to business problems and will be able to share their insights with students.

Sacred Heart University’s Jack Welch College of Business & Technology Dean Martha J. Crawford, Ph.D. Photograph by Don Hamerman.

Students work in the IDEA Lab at West Campus. Photograph by Caryn B. Davis.

LEARN FROM LEADERS Ninety-five percent of WCBT full-time faculty––many of whom are successful industry leaders in their own right––have doctoral degrees. Collectively, they have worked a total 879 years in the corporate world. And the WCBT’s experienced professors not only share their knowledge but also mentor and prepare students to lead. They foster a mission-driven, inclusive community and a think-outside-the-box attitude to harness the benefits of technological convergence through new business models. The market for business school grads, especially those with MBAs or experience with data analytics, marketing, information technology and engineering management, is on the rise across the country. A solid academic program with an integrated core taught by professors with years of realworld business experience builds a multifaceted foundation.

INNOVATION BOLSTERED BY WORLD-CLASS FACILITIES When dynamic graduate courses take place in state-of-the-art experiential learning spaces, students have the opportunity to pursue their passions in real-time. The WCBT has undergone a top-to-bottom transformation since 2019, having moved to West Campus, the revamped former global headquarters of General Electric. The dynamic core curriculum infuses business courses with technology, and vice versa, and makes ample use of SHU’s world-class

S8 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

Aerial view of West Campus. Photograph by Sean Kaschak

facilities, including the iHub coworking space; prototyping, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity labs; a finance lab with Bloomberg terminals; a student incubator space. By housing both business and technology programs in one location, the WCBT has created an exciting innovation ecosystem that offers students myriad opportunities to work on their passions, collaborate with faculty on scholarly work and partner with business and tech leaders.

THE WCBT DIFFERENCE WCBT students acquire a “future-ready” entrepreneurial mindset grounded in ethical reasoning skills and informed by both modern global perspectives and centuriesold tradition. While not every WCBT student will become an entrepreneur, each will think like one–fully able to compre-

hend complex challenges, work in diverse teams and find socially sound solutions. WCBT offers a range of graduate and certificate programs, including a nationally ranked MBA and master’s degrees in accounting, business analytics, digital marketing, finance, human resource management and cybersecurity. The business world has been transformed by digital convergence in the past few years, and many schools are talking about adjusting their curricula and augmenting their facilities to meet the new challenges and opportunities. The WCBT difference? We are doing it. For further information on the Jack Welch College of Business & Technology, please contact Paul Rychlik, director of graduate admissions, gradstudies@sacredheart.edu, (203)365-7619.


INNOVATION MANAGEMENT. A NEW MBA CONCENTRATION WHERE BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY CONVERGE. THE JACK WELCH COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY IS A “PIONEER” IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO INTEGRATED LEARNING. Our forward-thinking curriculum and cutting-edge teaching labs incorporate experiential learning opportunities that develop students into sophisticated end-users in both business and technology, able to create solutions from concept to market launch. WITH COURSES IN: l Applied Innovation Management l Technology-Based Business Solutions and Innovation l Commercializing Technical Innovations

www.sacredheart.edu/businesscareer

JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S9


COLLEGES

& UNIVERSITIES

FAIRFIELD COUNTY AND REGION

Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted)

Albertus Magnus College 700 Prospect St., New Haven 06511 800-578-9160 • nd.albertus.edu admissions@albertus.edu President: Marc M. Camille Type of institution: independent, coeducational, liberal arts college. Catholic college in Dominican tradition Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, certificates Fairfield University 1073 N. Benson Road, Fairfield 06824 254-4000 • fairfield.edu admis@fairfield.edu President: Mark R. Nemec Type of institution: private, nonprofit, Jesuit university with 45 undergraduate minors Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters Gateway Community College 20 Church Street, New Haven, CT 06510 285-2000 • GatewayCT.edu admissions@GatewayCT.edu CEO: William ‘Terry’ Brown, Ph.D. Regional President: Thomas G. Coley, Ph.D. Type of institution: A Connecticut State Community College Degrees conferred: Associate, certificates Housatonic Community College 900 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport 06604 332-5100 • housatonic.edu HC-Admissions@housatonic.edu CEO: Dwayne Smith, Ph.D. Regional President: Thomas G. Coley, Ph.D. Type of institution: A Connecticut State Community College Degrees conferred: associate, certificates Norwalk Community College 188 Richards Ave., Norwalk 06854 857-7060 • norwalk.edu admissions@norwalk.edu CEO: Cheryl C. De Vonish, J.D. Regional President: Thomas G. Coley, Ph.D. Type of institution: A Connecticut State Community College Degrees conferred: associate, certificates

Post University 800 Country Club Road, Waterbury 06723 800-345-2562 • post.edu postadmissions@post.edu President: John L. Hopkins Type of institution: private, proprietary institution offered online in all 50 states Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors, certificates, masters, advanced certificates Quinnipiac University 275 Mount Carmel Ave., Hamden 06518 582-8200 • qu.edu admissions@qu.edu President: Judy D.Olian Type of institution: private, coeducational university offering 110 degree programs Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctoral, advanced diplomas, certificates Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 275 Windsor St., Hartford 06120 860-548-2400 • ewp.rpi.edu admissions@rpi.edu President: Shirley Ann Jackson it Type of institution: technological research university offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctoral Sacred Heart University 5151 Park Ave., Fairfield 06825 371-7999 • sacredheart.edu enroll@sacredheart.edu President: John J. Petrillo Type of institution: private nonprofit, Catholic university Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctoral Southern Connecticut State University 501 Crescent St., New Haven 06515 392-7278 • southernct.edu admissions@southernct.edu President: Joe Bertolino Type of institution: public university offering 117 undergraduate and graduate programs in five schools, as well as sixth-year certificates Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, certificates

S10 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

University of Bridgeport 126 Park Ave., Bridgeport 06604 576-4000 • bridgeport.edu admit@bridgeport.edu President: Danielle Wilken Ed.D. Type of institution: private, nonprofit, independent, nonsectarian university Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors, masters University of Connecticut Stamford 1 University Place, Stamford 06901 251-8400 • stamford.uconn.edu beahuskystamford@uconn.edu President: Dr. Andrew Agwunobi Type of institution: public university Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctoral University of Hartford 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford 06117 860-768-4100 • hartford.edu admission@hartford.edu President: Gregory S. Woodward Type of institution: independent, nonsectarian, coeducational school offering 96 undergraduate majors and 62 graduate-level degree programs Degrees conferred: bachelors, masters, doctoral, certificates University of New Haven 300 Boston Post Road, West Haven 06516 800-342-5864 • newhaven.edu admissions@newhaven.edu President: Steven H. Kaplan Type of institution: private university Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors, masters Western Connecticut State University 181 White St., Danbury 06810 837-9000 • wcsu.edu admissions@wcsu.edu President: John B. Clark Type of institution: public university with 41 undergraduate programs Degrees conferred: associates, bachelors, masters, doctoral, certificates                    


LEARN OUTSIDE THE LINES NOW OFFERING PROGRAMS IN NURSING Discover the renewed Iona College at Iona.edu today.

715 North Avenue | New Rochelle, NY 10801 | 1-800-231-IONA

JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S11


SCSU BREAKS GROUND FOR NEW SCHOOL OF BUSINESS BUILDING, ANNOUNCES WITH PROGRAM ENHANCEMENTS

Graduates can complete their MBA in as little as 18 months.

Southern’s new School of Business building is the first net-zero emissions building constructed by the State of Connecticut.

A NEW DESTINATION FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF BUSINESS LEADERS The world of business is changing quickly. Tomorrow’s business leaders will need to respond quickly to demographic and technological changes. Construction has begun on the next home for the School of Business, an environmentally sustainable structure that will provide a launching pad for expanding the school’s offerings and developing new partnerships with the business community. Southern’s new 60,000 square foot School of Business building reflects their needs — and our vision of what the future can be. Scheduled for completion in Spring 2023, this new building will be the first netzero emissions building constructed by the State of Connecticut. Net-zero emissions (NZE) buildings generate at least as much energy as they use. We’ll achieve that goal by using innovative technology. Plans include a new photovoltaic farm over an ex-

isting parking lot and geothermal heating and cooling wells on site. Key features include Consumer Behavior/Organizational Behavior Laboratory space, Sustainability/ Net Zero space, a FinTech and Data Analytics Lab, and business and community engagement conference and meeting space.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS TO LAUNCH IMPROVED MBA/AMBA AND NEW MBA CERTIFICATES PROGRAMS The Southern MBA program has announced two exciting changes that will take place in the School of Business beginning fall 2021. Both changes reflect the cornerstones of the Southern MBA program: Relevance, Value, and Flexibility. The first change is the transition of the both the Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Accelerated Master of Business Administration (AMBA) to 42-credit programs, with instructional modalities options in on-ground, hybrid, and online formats. The

S12 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

Southern’s MBA program, with traditional and accelerated formats, offers flexibility for working professionals.

previous credit requirement was 51. The changes reflect current developments in the MBA academic environment, integrating classroom and experiential learning within the coursework, according to Southern MBA Director, Dr. Adam Abugri. In addition, the MBA waiver policy could further reduce the required number of credits to as few as 30, depending upon specific required courses that the candidate may have completed as an undergraduate. Business has launched three brand-new MBA Certificate Programs. So far, certificates are offered in three subject areas in great demand among today’s — and tomorrow’s — employers: Business Analytics, Healthcare Administration, and Human Resource Management. The new certificate program provides a way to “ease in” to Southern’s MBA program for those who are not ready to commit to a graduate program leading to a master’s degree. “The new Certificate program provides

an excellent first step onto the MBA path,” according to Dr. Abugri. “Individuals who are not quite sure of their next move, either academically or career-wise, can maintain their momentum as they earn credits toward an eventual MBA, and, at the same time, acquire a formal certificate that demonstrates their expanded skill set to current or future employers,” he continued. Each program requires 12 credit hours to complete. Students who do not currently meet the admission requirements of the full MBA program can enroll in the certificate program now and later transfer their certificate credits to the full MBA program upon acceptance. A student could begin with the Business Analytics Certificate and roll those 12 credits into any of our MBA concentrations to finish with a very valuable and marketable C.V. All certificate programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission. For more information on Southern’s MBA or the certificate programs, visit southernct.edu/MBA.


Business • Master of Business Administration, MBA Accelerated, Accounting, Finance, Healthcare Administration, International Business, Management, Marketing • Data Science, Graduate Certificate • Finance for Healthcare Professionals, Certificate, CE* Blue Economy and Scientific Innovation • Applied Physics, MS • Applied Statistics, Certificate • Biology, MS • Chemistry, MS, Professional Science Masters • Computer Science, MS. Cybersecurity, Software Development • Data Science, Graduate Certificate • Environmental Studies, MS • Physics, Nanotechnology, Post-Masters Certificate

Advance Your Career With a Graduate Degree From Southern

Education • Applied Behavioral Analysis, MS, Post-Master’s Certificate • Bilingual Multicultural Education/TESOL, MS • Classroom Teacher Specialist Post-Master’s Certificate • Counselor Education and Supervision, EdD • Educational Leadership, EdD, 6th Year General, Intermediate Administrator • Library and Information Science, MLIS • Master of Arts in Teaching, MAT Bilingual/Elementary Education, Early Childhood, Elementary Education Grades 7-12 Concentrations: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Mathematics, Physics, Special Education • Reading, MS, 6th Year • Reading and Language Arts Consultant, Post-Masters Certificate • Remedial Reading and Language Arts Specialist, Graduate Certificate • School Counseling, MS, 6th Year, Post-Masters Certificate • School Health Education, MS • School Library Media, Certificate Cross Endorsement, Initial Teacher Certification • School Psychology, MS, 6th Year • Special Education, MS, 6th Year Assistive Technology, Autism Spectrum Disorders and other Developmental Disabilities, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities Movement Sciences • Athletic Training, MAT (Summer 2021) • Exercise Science, MS. Clinical Exercise Physiology, Human Performance, Sport Psychology • Physical Activity and Chronic Disease, MS Health and Wellness • Addiction Counseling, Post-Master’s Certificate • Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MS, Post-Masters Certificate • Communication Disorders, MS • Marriage and Family Therapy, MFT • Nursing, MSN, Post-Masters Certificate Clinical Nurse Leader, Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Educator • Nursing Education, EdD • Psychology, MA • Public Health, MPH Health Promotion, Executive MPH Management and Leadership (online) • Social Work, MSW. Clinical Practice, Community Practice: Community Organization, Policy, and Leadership • Social Work, DSW • Social Work & Women & Gender Studies, MSW/MA Liberal Arts • Creative Writing, MFA • English, MA, MS • History, MA, Graduate Certificate • Political Science, MS • Romance Languages, MA French, Italian, Spanish • Sociology, MS • Women’s & Gender Studies, MA, Graduate Certificate

Wonder if there’s room for graduate school in your busy life? Southern’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies provides you with market-driven programs delivered in flexible formats that will fit your schedule and help to advance your career.

Visit SouthernCT.edu/grad

Recreation and Sport Management • Recreation and Leisure Studies, MS Recreation Administration, Recreation Therapy • Sport and Entertainment Management, MS *Continuing Professional Education program

JULY 19, 2021 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | S13


{KEY { If Knowledge is

POWER Speed is the

NOW AVAILABLE DIGITALLY

Court Ca , s t i m r e P , g n i d l i Bankruptcies, Bu

losure c e r o F , s se s, D e e d

s, J

, Lea s t n e udgm

s

Pe n s i L , es

d

Mo , s n e

FCBJ RECORDS... HOURS OF RESEARCH DOWNLOAD YOURS NOW Visit westfaironline.com or contact

Audience Development Department | (914) 694-3600 S14 | COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES ADVERTORIAL RESOURCE GUIDE | JULY 19, 2021

rtg

,N s e g a

ew

in B us

es

nts e t a s, P


ABA cites value for businesses in accepting credit cards BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

T

he American Bankers Association (ABA) has completed a new study of credit cards based on data from nearly 16 million customers who have at least one active credit card. Personal information was removed from the data before it was made available to researchers. Banks, of course, are major issuers of credit cards. The ABA reported that approximately 76% of American consumers have at least one credit card. It found that the average number of cards per customer increases with income and those consumers with high-subprime to low-prime risk scores hold more credit cards than do people in different risk categories. Subprime credit scores are classified as those below 680, prime scores are those between 680 and 779, and super-prime scores are those 780 and above. The study found credit card users spend significantly more than those who pay in cash. The ABA said that when merchants accept credit cards, they typically see increases in the size of transactions. The study also cited data from 2019 showing that the average credit card transaction was three times higher than the average cash transaction and 1.5 times higher than the average debit card transaction. The ABA study also cited retail industry data indicating that accepting cards, espe-

cially those that offer rewards to consumers, saves merchants the costs of handling cash transactions that can average 9.1% of the transaction’s value. It described those cash costs as, including counting, storing, protecting, other handling costs and theft risk. It said the cash costs for bars and restaurants can hit 15% of transaction value. Merchants pay a fee to the entities involved in processing credit and debit card transactions, the merchant’s own bank, the credit card network and the bank that

issued the card. In addition to the fees of 2.19% to 2.26%, there is an interchange fee of 1.6% of the purchase value, according to the ABA study. “Some have argued that the costs of card acceptance (including interchange) cause merchants to raise prices on consumer goods and services, effectively ‘passing through’ the cost of fees to consumers,” the ABA study said. “Even after accounting for the cost of acceptance, credit cards provide a net benefit of 5% to 6.4% of the purchase value to merchants.” The ABA found that credit cards that offer rewards are especially popular with consumers and cited a Federal Reserve estimate that 84% of cardholders have at least one rewards card. It said that other data indicated 77% of lower-income cardholders had at least one rewards card and that 75% had redeemed a reward during a 12-month period. The ABA pointed out that most rewards cards are structured to give consumers points, cash back or other incentives as a percentage of their total credit card spending. That, of course, means higher spending generally leads to higher rewards and higher consumer spending leads to higher income for merchants. The ABA study also looked at data concerning people who pay off their card balances each billing period and those who don’t. It found that lower-income customers with high credit scores have the low-

est average revolving balance at $823. The highest-income customers with high subprime to low prime (620-730) risk scores had the highest average revolving balance of $13,500. “This finding is not unexpected,” the ABA said. “Consumers with more money tend to spend more and thus revolve higher balances, but it provides further evidence against the notion that lower-income individuals face high interest charges while higher-income consumers do not.” The study found that about 40% of all cardholders had an unpaid balance at the end of the monthly billing period. While cardholders with annual household incomes below $50,000 made up 15% of the study sample, they paid just 13% of the total monthly interest. Cardholders who earned more than $75,000 a year made up 67% of the sample but paid 70% of the interest. “While ABA encourages cardholders to pay balances in full each month, the flexibility to make a purchase on credit and pay it off over time is valuable to many consumers,” the study said. It pointed out that by allowing cardholders to pay off only part of the balance at the end of each billing period, independent and bank-affiliated card issuers “took the burden of nonpayment risk away from merchants: if a customer pays a retailer via a credit card, the retailer receives the payment promptly — regardless of whether the customer ever pays the card issuer the balance owed.”

We have your back No one supports your business like Bankwell. With unparalleled service, world-class products and local know-how, we’ve got your back.

(203) 652-2920 mybankwell.com © 2019 Bankwell.

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

19


Good Things WORK OUT ON WHITE PLAINS PLAZA

ARCHITECT SELECTED FOR YONKERS DEVELOPMENT The Municipal Housing Authority for the City of Yonkers (MHACY) and The Community Builders (TCB) have announced the selection of Monica Lopez Uran, AIA, LEED AP, principal of Monica Lopez Architect LLC, as the architect for Phase VI of the Ridgeway Redevelopment of Cottage Place Gardens. Uran has been a professional architect in New York City for nearly 30 years in New York City and has an extensive portfolio that includes publicly funded housing, schools, residential and commercial renovations and private apartment developments. Her firm is certified as a Minority/Women-Owned Business by New York City and New York state. Prior to establishing her own firm in 2012, she worked as an architectural project manager in her native Colombia, and for 12 years as a project manager and associate with award-winning architect

Warren Gran. She is a LEED-certified accredited professional, a registered architect in New York state and a member of the American Institute of Architects and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. “MHACY is excited to be working with Monica Lopez whose experience, design aesthetic and commitment to environmental sustainability fit perfectly with our vision for Phase VI,” said Wilson Kimball, president and CEO of MHACY. Phase VI is a $55 million project to create 92 residential units – the final phase of the master plan for a redevelopment. The Municipal Housing Authority for the City of Yonkers is the largest provider of affordable housing in the city and the second-largest public housing authority in New York state.

White Plains BID (Business Improvement District) has organized After WorkOUT, a series of outdoor fitness classes sponsored by Ivy Realty Services every Wednesday from now through Aug. 4 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Each week the class will be conduct-

ed by a trainer from a different White Plains fitness facility at White Plains Plaza, 1 N. Broadway, Each workout will start with a 15-minute group stretch by a reflexologist from StretchLab. Tickets per week are $10 and spaces are limited. The first 15 reservations for each class will receive a free yoga mat. For class schedule and tickets, visit wpbid. com/afterworkout.

BCW GAINS NEW BOARD MEMBER David DeMilia, president of Tompkins Mahopac Bank, has joined The Business Council of Westchester Board of Directors. CEO Marsha Gordon said, “With more than 20 years of banking experience, Dave will share valuable insights on our region’s economy and business climate. His perspective and contributions will be essential as the Board of Directors navigates the post-pandemic recovery.”

REALTOR® FOUNDATION PRESENTS DONATION TO CATHOLIC CHARITIES

DeMilia joined Tompkins Mahopac Bank as a regional vice president in 2008, became the Westchester commercial lending division manager and later the senior commercial lending division manager for all commercial lending in the Hudson Valley. He earned his Juris Doctorate and MBA from Pace University after having received his bachelor’s degree from SUNY Cortland.

T O R A I S E F U N D S F O R I N N O VA T I V E B R E A S T C A N C E R R E S E A RC H

TUESDAY • SEPTEMBER 14th THE GOLF CLUB OF PURCHASE FORMAT: ONE BEST BALL

11:00AM

REGISTRATION + LUNCH BUFFET OPENS ON TERRACE

1:00 PM

Caption.

SHOTGUN START

5:30PM

COCKTAILS w DINNER BUFFET w PRIZES

FOR SPONSORSHIPS + REGISTRATION breastcanceralliance.org/events

For more information. contact Yonni Wattenmaker, Executive Diretor, 203-861-0014

20

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

From left: Roberta Bangs, HG Realtor Foundation Committee; Maryann Tercasio, HG Realtor Foundation president; Marie Dely, case manager, and Daniel Eudene, executive director with Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland

The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation, the charitable arm of the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors®, recently presented a check for $1,500 to the Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland (CCCSR) in Haverstraw, which provides human services to any resident of Rockland County who needs help regardless of religious affiliation. CCCSR works to assure that the needy and vulnerable in Rockland have the basic necessities of life

and emergency assistance in times of crisis.  On average, CCCSR serves more than 4,000 families and 1,200 individuals each year.  “The support of the Hudson Gateway Realtor Foundation will make a real difference for many of our families struggling to provide basic necessities, such as diapers and baby food, as well as paying their rent,” said Dan Eudene, executive director.


NEIGHBOR TO NEIGHBOR HONORS VOLUNTEERS

Christa Picciano-Daniello

Dr. Indu Warrier

OSBORN EXEC APPOINTED

CONNECTICARE CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER NAMED One of Connecticut’s leading health plans, founded in 1981, Farmington-based ConnectiCare, has appointed Dr. Indu Warrier as its chief medical officer.  Warrier will work closely with provider partners to ensure the highest-quality care for ConnectiCare members. She will also oversee the plan’s health care management programs focusing on increasing members’ access to care, improving health outcomes and reducing medical costs.   “Dr. Warrier is an accomplished physician leader with a demonstrated track record of collaboration…,” said Eric Galvin, ConnectiCare’s president.  Prior to ConnectiCare, Warrier held leadership positions at Health Care Services Corp. in Texas, most recently serving as executive medical director and she was a practicing physician and faculty member at  The Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, Texas.  Warrier received her medical degree from Medical College, Trivandrum, University of Kerala, India. She completed a pediatric residency at Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Detroit and is board certified in pediatrics and allergy and immunology.  

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

Joseph and Barbara Havranek.

In an extraordinary act of selflessness, Barbara and Joseph Havranek showed up every Monday at Neighbor to Neighbor in Greenwich throughout Covid-19 to volunteer and pack grocery bags to get people food they needed to survive. Duncan Lawson, food resource and operations manager at Neighbor to

Neighbor, said “How do we repay our gratitude to such a dedicated couple? They are a brilliant example of service for others to follow. They worked tirelessly throughout the pandemic and continue to volunteer every Monday to help us pack bags and prepare for the busy week. We are incredibly grateful for their

support.”   Devoted to Neighbor to Neighbor, the Havraneks say they volunteered throughout the pandemic without missing a beat because, “We’ve been fortunate. We want to give back and they needed our help. Simple as that,” Joe Havranek said.

PEEKSKILL IDA GROUNDBREAKING The city of Peekskill Industrial Development Agency (PIDA) held a groundbreaking ceremony at 216 S. Division St. on Thursday, July 8. The groundbreaking was for a mixed-use residential and commercial site; one of the many new projects in Peekskill as part of its transformation and downtown revitalization. Mayor of Peekskill Andre Rainey, said “The addition of this project will provide quality housing our residents deserve, much-needed retail space for our ever-growing entrepreneurial community and this will expand our commercial tax base….” A site of a once-dilapidated building, the proposed 27,000-square-foot three-story building will have 22 market-rate apartments, 2,000 square feet of retail/commercial space on the ground level and a parking garage underneath the building. For more information, contact Matthew Rudikoff, PIDA executive director, at 914-734-4215 or email mrudikoff@cityofpeekskill.com.

The Osborn, a private, nonprofit continuum of care community in Rye, recently announced that its Vice President of Sales Christa Picciano-Daniello has been appointed president of LeadingAge New York’s Retirement Housing Cabinet and service line representative to the organization’s Board of Directors.  A dedicated professional with nearly 30 years of experience in the senior living sector, Picciano-Daniello joined The Osborn in 1998 and has held positions of increasing responsibility during the past 23 years. The Osborn has a 100-plus-year history of providing the full scope of senior living options on its 56-acre campus, which also features a renowned arboretum. Picciano-Daniello has been a speaker for  LeadingAge  national conferences and previously served as vice president of the Retirement Housing Cabinet, which plans programming and public policy agendas for members. Founded in 1961, LeadingAge New York represents not-for-profit, mission-driven and public continuing care providers. Its more than 600 members employ 150,000 professionals serving more than 500,000 New Yorkers annually. 

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

westfaironline.com wagmag.com

Photos courtesy of the city of Peekskill and Unicorn Contracting Corp.

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

21


Good Things GAME’S ON

Dr. David Gordon

NEUROSURGERY CHIEF, ‘TOP DOCTOR’ Dr. David Gordon, chief of neurosurgery at Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow and Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, part of Northwell Health, has been recognized by his peers as a 2021 Castle Connolly Top Doctor® in the New York metro region. Gordon’s clinical expertise focuses on the treatment of vascular diseases of the brain. “While I am very grateful for the recognition, this award fundamentally reflects the hard work and commitment of an entire team of exceptional people – a team I feel lucky to be a part of,” said Gordon. Castle Connolly Top Doctors are selected by the firm’s physician-led research team based on criteria, including medical education, training, hospital appointments and disciplinary histories.  “Only a small percentage of physicians are selected to be Castle Connolly  Top Doctors,” said  John Connolly,  co-founder and chairman of Castle Connolly. “Our goal is to make it easier for an average person to find the right doctor for themselves in what can be an overwhelming process at a difficult time in a person’s life….” A member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. Gordon previously was director of cranial, vascular and skull base neurosurgery and director of neurotrauma at NYU Langone Hospital – Brooklyn and an assistant professor of neurosurgery at the New York University School of Medicine.   He earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Brown University and a medical degree from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee.

22

JULY 19, 2021

River House Adult Day Center, a nonprofit organization serving families from Greenwich and Stamford with aging adults who wish to remain in the community but require daytime assistance, is hosting a party Thursday, July 22, from 6 to 9 p.m. at River House, 125 River Road Extension in Cos Cob. “Game On” will be a casual, adult evening of summer fun and games, silent auction and wine pull.  Dress is informal for the games inside and outside the historic building overlooking the Mianus River with musical entertainment by  Cover Story and dinner by Marcia Selden.   All proceeds will benefit the River House “Fund-A-Client” Scholarship fund.  Tickets start at $100.  Visit  theriverhouse.org  to purchase tickets or donate. 

Lisa Harvey

STAFFING FIRM ADDS TO HEALTH CARE DIVISION

HELPING STUDENTS GAIN FINANCIAL LITERACY

Mackey Staffing & Company LLC in Norwalk has welcomed Lisa Harvey to its team as director of recruiting responsible for supporting the continued growth of the health care division. A well-established recruiter since 1993 in the health care and pharmaceutical industries, Harvey is a graduate of Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts. A woman-owned business founded in 2002, Mackey Staffing is a direct-hire and temporary recruiting company, which uses a consultative approach to build long-standing relationships with a diverse group of clients in a variety of industries ranging in size from two employees to more than 5,000 throughout the Northeast.  For more information, contact Mackey at 203-655-1166, ext. 102, or maureen@mackeystaffing.com.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

From left: Tompkins Mahopac Bank Vice President Amy Greiner, Poughkeepsie High School Principal Kellyann Royce-Giron and Poughkeepsie Superintendent of Schools Dr. Eric Jay Rosser.  

A $7,500 grant from Tompkins Mahopac Bank  is providing an influx of financial resources over three years to help stock shelves for the reopening of the Poughkeepsie High School (PHS) Store, set to relaunch this September. FCBJ

WCBJ

According to PHS Principal Kellyann Royce-Giron, the store will be a pathway to graduation, where students can clock in hours, learn financial literacy skills and use the hours toward graduation.

“We’re working closely with the school to teach students how to budget, how to set up a business, manage inventory and discuss profit margins,” said Amy Greiner, vice president, Tompkins Mahopac Bank.

westfaironline.com wagmag.com


LAW FIRM HIRES TWO ASSOCIATES Kadeen Wong and Gina Nicotera have joined Bleakley Platt & Schmidt, an 85-yearold firm, in White Plains as associates. Wong is part of the firm’s elder law and special needs practice group as well as its trusts and estates practice group, while Nicotera is part of the labor and employment practice group. Prior to joining the firm, Wong worked in law firms located in White Plains and New York City. She earned her law degree

from Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and is admitted to practice law in both New York and New Jersey. Nicotera also worked in law firms located in New York City and White Plains. She earned her law degree from Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and is admitted to practice in New York, New Jersey, U.S. District Courts for the Southern, Eastern and Western Districts of New York and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. 

THERAPEUTIC DEMENTIA GARDEN St. Cabrini Nursing Home in Dobbs Ferry recently held a blessing ceremony to mark the completed renovation of its therapeutic dementia garden made possible by a $20,000 grant from the Field Hall Foundation. The purpose of the garden is to improve the quality of life for residents with Alzheimer’s/dementia who live at the nursing home or who utilize the dementia unit for respite. Due to safety reasons, most of the residents in this particular unit rarely get to go outside freely and unencumbered. Studies have shown that gardens designed for residents with dementia are an effective, nonpharmalogical intervention that reduces

dementia symptoms. During the ceremony, Cabrini Vice President of Operations and Administrator Bonita Burke said, “Cabrini is honored to have been the recipient of the $20,000 grant from the Field Hall Foundation. The funds are so appreciated and have enhanced the lives of the residents living with Alzheimer’s or dementia….” The Field Hall Foundation was incorporated in 1986 to assist Field Home – Holy Comforter with providing grants that will improve the lives of older adults and their caregivers in Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess counties.

FREE DRONE PILOT TRAINING FOR FIRST RESPONDERS, NATIONWIDE From raging wildfires out West to devastating building collapses on the East, police and firefighters constantly rise to the challenge of keeping Americans safe. Now,  Aquiline Drones  (AD), a commercial drone manufacturing and cloud technology company in Connecticut, is returning the favor.  Specifically, AD is offering free drone pilot training in the company’s  Flight to the Future  (F2F) program to all police officers and firefighters nationwide from now until the end of the year.  “We originally created Flight to the Future as a way to provide new hightech skills in a burgeoning industry to unemployed workers during the pan-

UNITED WAY’S INNOVATION GRANTS United Way of Coastal Fairfield County in Bridgeport has announced investments in 11 community partners to increase equity and opportunity in three impact areas:  health, education and financial stability. Awards were made to organizations in the majority of towns in the United Way service area and ranged from $10,000 to $25,000 each. “We are proud to leverage the power of partnerships to help improve people’s lives in innovative ways,” said Jeff Kimball, United Way CEO.  Investments were made though United Way’s Impact Philanthropy Fund and recipients were selected by a diverse group of 12 community volunteers, staff and United Way Board members. Michele Litt, director of Impact Philanthropy and leader of the granting process, said “We are pleased that this round of grant funding reaches broadly into the communities we serve and represents a wide range of initiatives….” Selection criteria included innovation, partner collaboration and shared data collection on outcomes.   Recipients were selected from a pool of 60 applicants. Addressing the new grant recipients,

demic to fulfill everyday services…,” said Barry Alexander, founder and CEO of Aquiline Drones. “But using drones to help better society and save human lives was the impetus in creating our company and we’re excited to do our part in arming those in the line of duty with crucial training to keep them safe and secure. The interactive online course teaches police and fire professionals how to safely and effectively utilize drone technology in their daily missions. Interested parties may apply for enrollment by sending an email with full contact information to: info@AquilineDrones.com.  For a detailed summary of the curriculum, visit  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMpMdKKRPkY.

Staff and volunteers at United Way.

Kimball said, “We are honored to be in the trenches with you. Together, we can create communities where all our neighbors can reach their potential.” United Way of Coastal Fairfield County serves the towns of Bridgeport, Darien,

Easton, Fairfield, Monroe, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stratford, Trumbull, Weston, Westport and Wilton. For more information on grant recipients, visit https://unitedwaycfc.org/impact-philanthropy-innovation-grants-2021.

FOUNDATION WELCOMES BOARD MEMBER

ENTA SIGNS EXTENSION WITH AETNA Tarrytown-based ENT and Allergy Associates LLP recently announced that it has signed a three-year contract extension with Aetna, assuring continued in-network access for its members in the tri-state area. Under this new agreement, Aetna members will be able to continue receiving covered services at in-network rates at ENTA’s 44 offices throughout New York and New Jersey. All Aetna plans are covered under the new contract. Robert Glazer, CEO of ENTA, said “ENTA has always been dedicated to ensuring that the needs of our patients are met by the finest care possible. It is so

paramount to everything that it is a part of ENTA’s mission, vision and values as a corporation. We are very pleased to have signed a group contract extension with Aetna that secures continuity of care for its members, at a fair, balanced and cost-effective delivery model for the next three years.” ENTA boasts the largest pool of board-certified and fellowship-trained physicians in the country serving more than 90,000 patient visits each month and offering same-day appointments. Visit  entandallergy.com. and find an ENT or allergy doctor.

Gregory (Greg) Stamos

The Valley Community Foundation (VCF) Board of Directors in Derby has welcomed Woodbridge resident and attorney Gregory (Greg) Stamos as a returning board member. Sharon Closius, VCF president and CEO, said, “On behalf of the VCF Board of Directors, we are thrilled to welcome Greg back to the Board. Greg comes

from a long-standing family tradition of civic-minded individuals who have worked alongside Valley community members and nonprofits alike. As a former VCF board chair, he is extremely knowledgeable of the Valley’s needs and opportunities….” An attorney for four decades with a law practice in his hometown of Ansonia, Stamos’ inFCBJ

WCBJ

volvement in Valley organizations has been wide-ranging and diverse. He is a graduate of Ansonia High School, the University of Connecticut and Villanova Law School. Established in 2004, the VCF distributes more than $1.9 million in grants each year to support the local nonprofit sector and the people it serves. JULY 19, 2021

23


Good Things COMMUNITY FOUNDATION AWARDS The Stamford Public Education Foundation (SPEF) announced that it has been awarded a $25,000 invitation-only grant from Fairfield County’s Community Foundation (FCCF) to support its general operating costs. General operating support grants from FCCF are reserved for highly effective organizations that are considered to be aligned with their strategic plan to close the opportunity gap in Fairfield

County. FCCF promotes philanthropy as a means to create change in Fairfield County, focusing on innovative and collaborative solutions to critical issues impacting the community. The Community Foundation is in compliance with the Council on Foundations’ national standards and has awarded more than $250 million in grants to nonprofits in Fairfield County and beyond.

HGAR FOUNDATION DONATES TO GREEN CHIMNEYS

The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation, the charitable arm of the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors®, recently presented a check for $2,000 to Green Chimneys in Putnam County.   Founded in 1947 and headquartered on a farm and wildlife center in Brewster, with a second campus in Carmel,  Green Chimneys is recognized as a worldwide leader in animal-assisted therapy and educational activities for children with special needs. Its services include an accredited special edu-

cation school, residential treatment center, nature-based therapeutic programs, community-based support for youth and families and public education and recreation opportunities for people of all ages. “Green Chimneys is so grateful to The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation for their support and commitment to helping us provide vital therapeutic education and services to the children and families across the Hudson Valley region,” said Green Chimneys Executive Director Dr. Ed Placke.

SCARSDALE RESIDENT, ON OPEN DOOR FOUNDATION BOARD

Federally qualified health care center, Open Door Family Medical Center, has named Leslie Chang of Scarsdale to its foundation board. After leaving the corporate world, Chang became a volunteer for Family Services of Westchester and joined the organization’s board in 2014, founding and chairing its junior board.   “Family Services of Westchester has been a close partner of Open Door, so I have certainly been familiar with their work over the years,” she said.  “I’ve been involved in the social services side and now with Open Door I look forward to getting involved on the health side….” A graduate of Skidmore College, Chang worked for an enterprise software company and was responsible for

its product strategy and marketing. “Leslie brings a corporate background and a keen understanding of technology with her, in addition to her experience in development,” said Lindsay Farrell, president and CEO of Open Door….” Open Door Family Medical Center’s mission has remained consistent since 1972. Today, the center cares for more than 60,000 adults and children every year in Westchester, Putnam and Ulster counties – with more than 300,000 patient visits and over 400 babies delivered annually – regardless of ability to pay. Open Door facilities are in Ossining, Port Chester, Sleepy Hollow, Mount Kisco, Brewster, Mamaroneck and a dental practice in Saugerties. For more information, visit opendoormedical.org.

CHEERING FOR BRIDGEPORT FINALIST

Jonathan C. Marcus, whose Bridgeport-based business, Rose Sisters Chips, a fourth-generation producer of gourmet, family-recipe baked tortilla chips is still in the running in the UPS Store Small Biz Challenge. He’s been selected as a top-five finalist in the nationwide contest to find the ultimate small-business owner.  The UPS Challenge aims to find small-business owners who think they have what it takes to compete

24

JULY 19, 2021

in a live challenge  competition where their business skills will be put to the test. At stake: a  chance to win up to $25,000 and an editorial feature in Inc. magazine.  The final component of the competition will unfold  July 29  with a virtual studio event where the five finalists will be challenged by answering complex questions. The event will be hosted  by celebrity chef,  author  and television host Carla Hall.  FCBJ

WCBJ

ORANGE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL PRESENTS O.C. LIVE MUSIC SERIES E’LISSA JONES Orange County Arts Council in Goshen presents its hybrid weekly music series, “O.C. Live,” for both in-person and virtual audiences. On Friday, July 23, E’Lissa Jones will perform at CoLab, 45 St. John St. in Goshen at 2 p.m. with simultaneous streaming on Facebook Live. Jones is a singer, prolific songwriter, violinist, pianist and guitarist. Her music encompasses a wide range of songs and her styling ranges from folk to rock. O.C. Live offers musicians the opportunity to connect with audiences with local performances. Now offered as a hybrid event, audiences can join live in-person (registration required) or tune in to Orange County Arts Council’s Facebook page to listen in. Visit ocartscouncil.org for the latest information on upcoming performances, venue spaces and times and registration. Tickets are $10; suggested donation of $5 for Facebook livestream viewers.

PIPE ORGAN INSTALLATION The installation of Christ Church Greenwich’s (CCG) new 4,639 pipe, two-chamber organ has begun and a celebration upon completion is anticipated for this October with a gala opening recital in October 2022 and a year of musical celebrations. The new organ, built in Durham, England, by Harrison & Harrison, one of the largest firms of organ builders in the world, will be an extraordinary instrument to serve the entire community of Christ Church, the town of Greenwich and musicians that come from all over the world. It is designed to fill the church with bass sound and encourage congregational singing. Christ Church Music is a renowned world-class RSCM (Royal School of Church Music)-certified  church music program. A  model of the Anglican

choral tradition with a rich history and global reach, the church offers six

active choirs, concerts, tours and a vibrant teen scholar program.

FORMER US ATTORNEY JOINS LAW FIRM David X. Sullivan has joined the business litigation group as a partner in the Hartford and Stamford offices of McCarter & English LLP. A former assistant US attorney for the District of Connecticut with more than 30 years of experience in investigating and prosecuting financial crimes, Sullivan’s experience provides clients with a solid understanding of litigation strategy in federal, civil and criminal jury and bench trials. Thomas J. Finn, chair of the firm’s

business litigation group, said, “David is highly regarded in Connecticut and throughout the country and we’re thrilled to welcome him to our team….” Sullivan was appointed as the national representative for all 94 US Attorney offices as the Department of Justice’s liaison for a federal inter-agency task force developed to improve communications on money laundering and asset forfeiture policies after the attacks of Sept. 11.  

During his time with the US Attorney’s Office, Sullivan headed the Asset Forfeiture Unit where he coordinated with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. He is an adjunct professor at Yale Law School and Western Connecticut State University. He graduated from the Columbus School of Law at the Catholic University of America and earned his Master of Laws degree in taxation from the Quinnipiac University School of Law.


PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO EMPLOYEES DURING COVID-19 RECOVERY You need to make sure that they’re healthy and you need to make sure that there’s a sense that you as an employer have their best interests at heart. However, you will find there are circumstances with the potential for employer liability. There are quite a few State, Federal and NYC employment laws you need to be very sensitive to in terms of whether you can compel somebody to come to work…” (Excerpted from the Westchester County Business Journal, Aug. 3.)

WE CAN HELP JEFFREY D. BUSS jbuss@sbjlaw.com 914-476-0600

YONKERS, NY

733 Yonkers Avenue, Suite 200 Yonkers, NY 10704 914.476.0600

NEW YORK CITY

60 East 42nd Street, Suite 4600 New York, NY 10165 212.688.2400

LONG ISLAND, NY

1305 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300 Garden City, NY 11530 516.207.7533

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

25


Facts & Figures U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT White Plains & Poughkeepsie Local business cases, July 7 - 13 Fifteen Twenty Six Fifty Second LLC, Suffern, Isaac Lefkowitz, CEO, 21-22397-RDD: Chapter 11, $4.7 million assets, $1,138,821 liabilities. Attorneys: James B. Glucksman, Robert L. Rattet. 10 Stag LLC, Suffern, owner Oscar Dais, 21-22399-RDD: Chapter 7, assets $350,000, liabilities $525,000. Attorney pro se.

U.S. DISTRICT COURT White Plains Local business cases, July 7 – 13 G&G Closed Circuit Events, Henderson, Nevada vs. El Compadre Mexican Restaurant, Spring Valley, et al, 21-cv-5829CS: Theft of satellite communications. Attorney: Joseph P. Loughlin. Jose Aponte II and Lisa Rosenberg, Fairfield County, Connecticut vs. Northeast Radiology P.C., Brewster, et al, 21-cv-5883-VB: Contract, class action. Attorneys; Amanda G. Fiorilla, Ian W. Sloss and Christian Levis. Jose Alberto Rodiguez Chucuan Inc., Boca Raton, Florida vs. Combate Americas, Larchmont, et al, 21-cv-5907-CS: Contract. Attorney: Anthony M. Verna III.

DEEDS Above $1 million  Barrymore Millpond LLC, New York City. Seller: Pierre Maugue and Hui-Hsien Wang, London, United Kingdom. Property: $3.2 million. Filed July 7.   Bloom, Elizabeth and Sahil Bloom, Hayward, California. Seller: S&L Dream Homes LLC, Pelham. Property: 1002 Edgewood Ave., Pelham. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed July 9.   Celebrity Westchester Realty LLC, Whippany, New Jersey. Seller: Charisma Holding Corp., White Plains. Property: 311 Route 22, Lewisboro. Amount: $6.8 million. Filed July 9.   Gaffey, Brita and Adam Wolk, New York City. Seller: Palamos LLC, New York City. Property: 18 Schoolhouse Road, Pound Ridge. Amount: $3.4 million. Filed July 7.   Gutman, Robert and Janine Gutman, Scarsdale. Seller: 27 Black Birch LLC, Scarsdale. Property: 27 Black Birch Lane, Scarsdale. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed July 6. KB Lake George III LLC, Chicago, Illinois. Seller: Locust Lot I LLC, Rye. Property: 34 Locust Ave., Rye. Amount: $2.6 million. Filed July 7.   Lindsea Wizer LLC, New York City. Seller: Saad Armed Khatri and Elizabeth Fisher Khatri, Larchmont. Property: 45 Stuyvesant Ave., Mamaroneck. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed July 6.   Materin, Julianna and Ariel Materin, Scarsdale. Seller: Elk Homes Partners LP, Rye. Property: 23 Wynmor Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $2 million. Filed July 6.  

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

26

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

ON THE RECORD

McGinty, Michael and Kristen McGinty, Briarcliff Manor. Seller: 10 Frog Rock Road LLC, Chappaqua. Property: 10 Frog Rock Road, New Castle. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed July 7. Mou, Jenni, Lexington, Massachusetts. Seller: 124 Brown Road LLC, Scarsdale. Property: 124 Brown Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed July 9.   Mulhearn, Patrick F. and Kerri-Lynn Osini, New Rochelle. Seller: Chardith East LTD, Ossining. Property: 169 Locust Ave., Rye. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed July 6.   Peri, Simita A. and Harish S. Peri, Mamaroneck. Seller: Elite Realty Team LLC, Mount Kisco. Property: 43 Marbourne Drive, Mamaroneck. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed July 9.   Sunshine, Jeremy and Dorothy Sunshine, Scarsdale. Seller: 1025 Post Road LLC, Scarsdale. Property: 1025 Post Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $2.6 million. Filed July 7.   White Plains Urban Renewal Agency, White Plains. Seller: 1 Water Street LLC, Jersey City, New Jersey. Property: 1 Water St., White Plains. Amount: $1.7 million. Filed July 8.     

Below $1 million

34 Alpine LLC, New York City. Seller: Harvey Beram, Yonkers. Property: 34 Alpine Road, Yonkers. Amount: $485,000. Filed July 7.   374 Warburton Avenue LLC, Dobbs Ferry. Seller: 374 Warburton Corp., Irvington. Property: 374 Warburton Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $865,000. Filed July 7.  

Azhar, Manzoor F., Hawthorne. Seller: Claremont Contracting Inc., Briarcliff Manor. Property: 323 Manhattan Ave., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $495,000. Filed July 7. Baldasaro, Carol L., Scarsdale. Seller: Toll Land VI Limited Partnership, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania. Property: 17 Bonham Lane, Cortlandt. Amount: $990,840. Filed July 7.   Blue Lake Side LLC, Dumont, New Jersey. Seller: David Chen and Paulen Wang Chen, Somers. Property: 212 Lakeside Drive, Unit 212, Lewisboro. Amount: $319,000. Filed July 7.   Bronx West Rock Fund LLC, Bronxville. Seller: DJH 559 Buxton LLC, Bronxville and 690 Mamaroneck LLC, Bronxville. Property: 491-493 New Rochelle Road, Eastchester. Amount: $800,000. Filed July 8.   Cartis Financial Corp., Danbury, Connecticut. Seller: Oleg Bogdanov and Kamilla Bogdanov, Scarsdale. Property: 124 Woodruff Ave., Eastchester. Amount: $825,000. Filed July 8.   Deal House Capital Fund I LLC. Seller: Tammie Y. Byrd and Marvin Byrd, New Rochelle. Property: 1 Slocum St., New Rochelle. Amount: $530,000. Filed July 6.   DeJesus, Glendis and Gleidis Angeles, Bronx. Seller: 10 Perry New York LLC, Bronx. Property: 10 Perry Place, Yonkers. Amount: $610,000. Filed July 6.   E2F Properties LLC, Scarsdale. Seller: Kia Pinto, Detroit, Michigan. Property: 75 Ethelton Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $350,000. Filed July 9.  

Goldberg, Randal Ian and Jennifer Kalina Freedman, Long Island City. Seller: Cartus Financial Corp., Danbury, Connecticut. Property: 124 Woodruff Ave., Eastchester. Amount: $825,000. Filed July 8. Hurley, Amy, Larchmont. Seller: Northeast Property Owner LLC, New York City. Property: 10 Byron Place, Unit 701, Mamaroneck. Amount: $982,916. Filed July 6.   Keating, Andre and Mizuki Arai, Croton-on-Hudson. Seller: Five D’s Realty Enterprises L.P., Katonah. Property: 38 Grove St., Mount Kisco. Amount: $515,000. Filed July 9.   Kolaj, Ernest and Vera Kolaj, Scarsdale. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust National Association, Dallas, Texas. Property: 1203 Post Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $860,000. Filed July 8.   Mistis Properties Corp., White Plains. Seller: Bettino Associates LLC, White Plains. Property: 115 S. Fulton St., Greenburgh. Amount: $307,000. Filed July 6.   Portchester 12 Oak Street LLC, Port Chester. Seller: Town of Rye. Property: 12 Oak St., Rye. Amount: $222,438. Filed July 8.   Scholar, Calvin H. and Danielle Williams, Mount Vernon. Seller: Delta Building LLC, Bedford. Property: 15 Kingswood Lane, Lewisboro. Amount: $580,000. Filed July 8.   SGB Realty Group LLC, Monroe. Seller: Manuel Daroqui, Port Chester. Property: 281 Madison Ave., Rye. Amount: $260,000. Filed July 8.   Sun, Xiao, Pleasantville. Seller: Greenwood Heights Pleasantville LLC, Thornwood. Property: 590 Bedford Road, 590-12, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $337,000. Filed July 8.  

westchester county

Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey. Seller: Kathleen M. York and Michael J. York, Cortlandt Manor. Property: 11 Shipley Drive, Cortlandt. Amount: $570,000. Filed July 7.

JUDGMENTS

   Anazco, Albarino, West Harrison. $2,819.10 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 7.   Auerbach, Todd, Dobbs Ferry. $18,703.90 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Bailey, Nicole A., Mount Vernon. $2,280.67 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed July 7.   Bardowell, Lenworth, Mount Vernon. $2,496.94 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8.   Bartley, Kardon D., Mount Vernon. $10,487.49 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Bautista, Maria I., Yonkers. $2,054.28 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, San Diego, California.   Bell, Jerrilyn B., Yonkers. $5,063.81 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 7.   Castro, Francisco, New Rochelle. $1,785.59 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 7.   Correia, King, Yonkers. $4,796.71 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8.   Cortes, Erik, Yonkers. $2,043.67 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 7.  


Facts & Figures Crumpler, Marla F., Harrison. $3,954.75 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, Bloomington, Minnesota. Filed July 9. Delacruz, Narcisco, Yonkers. $14,497.21 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Delarosa, Isis, Yonkers. $4,764.49 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Delavera, Milton, Port Chester. $1,680.30 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Field July 9.   Edwards, Levern, Ossining. $2,809.89 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Field July 9.   Felix, Phyllis, Mount Vernon. $4,122.39 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Field July 6.   Fernandez, Emilo, Tuckahoe. $9,649.96 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Field July 6.   Ferrandino, Michael, Port Chester. $2,721.82 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Gibla, Arnold, Yonkers. $2,496.53 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8.   Greenaway, Foustina, Yonkers. $7,371.33 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8.   Grey, Leisl B., Port Chester. $2,707.91 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.  

Haynes, Walter, Elmsford. $2,548.18 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 8. Khanns, Jheanell L., Mount Vernon. $10,408.21 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Leak, Fetson, New Rochelle. $1,487 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 9.   Levy, Douglas E., Mount Vernon. $5,648.70 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 7.   Mautino, Aydee, White Plains. $4,952.95 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, Bloomington, Massachusetts. Filed July 8.   Meara, Patrick J., Yonkers. $9,339.85 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, Bloomington, Massachusetts. Filed July 9.   Meneses, Alfredo, Pelham. $3,721.996 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 7.   Mora, Teresa and Jorge Mora, White Plains. $6,579 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Nepal, Lynette, Yonkers. $1,456.11 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8.   Paul, Anthony, New Rochelle. $14,133.54 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.   Perez, Miriam M., Yonkers. $8,070.71 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 9.  

Powell, Bruce, Peekskill. $2,054.50 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 7. Quinn, Conor J., Yonkers. $1,970.88 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 7.   Reis, Djalma B., Port Chester. $15,727.26 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, San Diego, California. Filed July 8.   Richards, Sylvia, Mount Vernon. $5,090.72 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 8.   Smith, Kenneth L., Ossining. $2,507.06 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 9.   Stevens, Dondra, Mount Vernon. $2,830.66 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 9.   Suarez, Teodora, Yonkers. $2,603.92 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 6.   Taveras, Yesenia, Yonkers. $1,422.41 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vega, Nevada. Filed July 8.   Tejada, Roberto A., Yonkers. $5,710.71 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vega, Nevada. Filed July 8.   Torres, Paul, Pelham. $1,250 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vega, Nevada. Filed July 6.  

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicate a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed.    Caroli, Claude. Filed by The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $80,767.98 affecting property located at 25 Rockledge Ave., Unit 202, White Plains 10601. Filed July 8.       

Decastro, Luis A. and Leonardo Medrano. Filed by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $382,936 affecting property located at 25 Noble Ave., Yonkers 10708. Filed July 8.      Dowd, Steven. Filed by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $360,000 affecting property located at 1802 Amazon Road, Mohegan Lake 10547. Filed July 8.      Passiatore, Michael J., Karen M. Passiatore and Angela Passiatore. Filed by Islancap LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $124,740 affecting property located at 15 Lee Ave., Ossining 10562. Filed July 8.        Shapiro, Jeffrey. Filed by KeyBank National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $2,033,189.15 affecting property located at 190 Wilmot Road, New Rochelle 10804. Filed July 8.      Sollazzo, Frank P. and Claire Anne Marie Dankel. Filed by Reverse Mortgage Funding LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $8862,500 affecting property located at 14 Meadow St., Harrison 10528. Filed July 8.      Tejada, Alejandro, and Maxine Lansky-Tejada. Field by The Bank of New York Mellon. Action:  Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $143,100 affecting property located at 94 Jervis Road, Yonkers 10705. Filed July 8.       

MECHANIC’S LIENS

Rudensky, Erin and Aryeh Rudensky, Scarsdale. $26,802.63 in favor of John J. Barile Landscaping Inc., Purchase. Property: 8 Archer Lane, Scarsdale. Filed July 6.  

NEW BUSINESSES

  This newspaper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.   

PARTNERSHIPS

New 317 Clermont Ave Funding Association, 133 Parkway Road, Bronxville 10708, c/o Michael Lynch, Barbara Lynch and Lynch & Associates PSP. Filed July 8.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS

723 Manhattan Avenue Funding Association,133 Parkway Road, Bronxville 10708. Filed July 7.   Absolut490 Creations, 155 Ferris Ave., No. 4e, White Plains 10603. Filed July 9.   As We Grow Day Care, 52 S. Bleeker St., Mount Vernon 10550. Filed July 9.   Bluestitch, 156 Centre Ave., 2B, New Rochelle 10805. Filed July 8.   Burning Treehouse Film Co., 759 North St., White Plains 10605. Filed July 6.   Delance Beauty Supply, 95 Riverdale Ave., Yonkers 10701. Filed July 6.   Dreams Carpentry, 293 Summit Ave., Mount Vernon 10552. Filed July 7.   Elaine Exquisite Fashion Services, 660 Locust St., Fleetwood 10552. Filed July 6.   Food & The Seasons, P.O. Box 279, Tuckahoe 10707. Filed July 7.   Food & The Seasons Academy, P.O. Box 279, Tuckahoe 10707. Filed July 7.   Forged Systems, 45 Pondfield Road, Bronxville 10708. Filed July 7.   Heyday Flower Farm, 153 Todd Road, Katonah 0536. Filed July 9.   Lucca General Construction, 9 Rochelle Terrace, Apartment 1, Mount Vernon 10550. Filed July 7.  

FCBJ

WCBJ

Mbk Law Practice, 2 N. Broadway, No. 6D, White Plains 10601. Filed July 8. Michael Stoffo, P.O. Box 501, Hastings-on-Hudson 10706, c/o Michael Stoffo. Filed July 8.   Ministerio Creciendo En La Verdad, 24 Manhattan Ave., White Plains 10607, c/o Carlos Augusto Aquino. Filed July 7.   MJ Tile & Stone, 29 Cottage Place, Tarrytown 10591, c/o Michael Joseph Verdeschi. Filed July 7.   Morning Glory Markets, 56 Sheldon Place, Hastings-on-Hudson July 9.   Norda’s Transportation Services, 47 Davis Ave., Apt. 3C, White Plains 10605, c/o Norda Thompson. Filed July 7.   Olive Branch Equestrian, 787 S. Bedford Road, Bedford 10506, c/o Olivia Nygard. Filed July 9.   Peppamint Bakes Home-Made Goodies, 234 Martine Ave., Apt. 55, White Plains 10601, c/o Patricia Thompson. Filed July 7.   Shea Butter Bluez, 354 Nepperhan Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Ben Martin Tobias. Filed July 7.   Super Power Cleaning Services, 14 Claremont Place, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Denilza De Souza. Filed July 7.   Threads By Tata, 22 Ferndale St., Apt. 2, Yonkers 10701, c/o Maria Sosa. Filed July 6.   Vavi, 354 Nepperhan Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Ben Martin Tobias. Filed July 7.   Wellness Medical Care Spa, 100 Stevens Ave., Third floor, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Beverly Floyd. Filed July 7.   Windows Creations & Reupholstery, 355 Mamaroneck Ave., Mamaroneck 10543, c/o Andrea D. Bustamante. Filed July 9.

JULY 19, 2021

27


Facts & Figures Automated document filtration and priority scoring for document searching and access. Patent no. 11,061,913 issued to Cheryl Eifert, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Confined phase change memory with double air gap. Patent no. 11,063,216 issued to Injo Ok, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Contacts having a geometry to reduce resistance. Patent no. 11,062,993 issued to Lawrence Clevenger, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Interactive learning experience. Patent no. 11,062,616 issued to Srirupa Chakraborty, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Monolithically integrated high-voltage photovoltaics with textured surface formed during the growth of wide bandgap materials. Patent no. 11,063,161 issued to Stephen Bedell, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Photographic directional light reference for articulating devices. Patent no. 11,064,173 issued to Jeffrey Bisti. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Prediction of olfactory and taste perception through semantic encoding. Patent no. 11,062,216 issued to Guillermo Cecchi, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Slidable assembly with spring clip retainer. Patent no. 11,064,623 issued to Ryan Elsasser, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Resistive memory device with meshed electrodes. Patent no. 11,063,089 issued to Takashi Ando, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Stabilized formulations containing anti-interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) antibodies. Patent no. 11,059,896 issued to Daniel Dix, et al. Assigned to Regeneron, Tarrytown.

Update management for RPU array. Patent no. 11,062,208 issued to Tayfun Gokmen, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Voltage-controlled highly linear resistive elements. Patent no. 11,062,204 issued to Stephen Bedell, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY

BUILDING LOANS

Above $1 million

JULY 19, 2021

Berries and Roses LLC, Monroe. Seller: Thomas L. DeAngelo, Mount Vernon. Property: 26 Amy Todt Drive, Monroe. Amount: $300,000. Filed July 7.

Landau, Moses, Brooklyn. Seller: The Land House LLC, Monroe. Property: 64 Wawayanda Ave., Middletown. Amount: $230,000. Filed July 8.

New Gen Construction Inc., Campbell Hall. Seller: James M. O’Hara, Greenwood Lake. Property: 4 Annabelle Lane, Warwick. Amount: $9,500. Filed July 9.

Monsey Center LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Wallace Enterprises Company LLC, Mosey. Property: 109 and 85 Route 59, Ramapo. Amount: $5 million. Filed July 7.

Cox, Steve and Jennifer Rivera, Bronx. Seller: E2F Properties LLC, Mahopac. Property: 130 Union Valley Road, Mahopac. Amount: $535,000. Filed July 8.

Langsa, Perel, Monsey. Seller: Blue House 8 LLC, Monsey. Property:34 Herrick Ave., Unit 113, Ramapo. Amount: $390,000. Filed July 8.

Nouhou, Zakou, Bronx. Seller: N&V Real Property Acquisitions LLC, Wingdale. Property: 30 Longview Drive, Patterson. Amount: $625,000. Filed July 6.

PCSB Bank, Yorktown Heights. Seller: Inter Park Management Corp., Mountain View Mobile Home Park Associates LLC and Valley View Mobile Home Park Associates LLC, Stony Point. Properties: 75 Washburn Lane, Stony Point, Route 211 East, Wallkill and 1525 Route 211 East, Wallkill. Amount: $8.5 million. Filed July 6.

Eureka3 Homebuyers LLC, White Plains. Seller: Marianne Rowe, Middle Island. Property: 2340 Mountain Road, Mount Hope. Amount: $250,000. Filed July 8.

Lefkowitz, Yehuda and Chaya Lefkowitz, Union City, New Jersey. Property: 11 Homer Lee Ave., Unit 11-103, Spring Valley. Amount: $510,000. Filed July 7.

NRZ Reo XVIII LLC, New York City. Seller: Naomi R. Duker, White Plains. Property: 98 Canopus Hollow Road, Putnam Valley. Amount: $500,995.81. Filed July 7.

Fang Chang LLC, Middletown. Seller: Ted & Penny Enterprises LLC, Black River. Property: 38 Smith Road, Wallkill. Amount: $120,000. Filed July 8.

Lifestar Family Holdings LLC, Monsey. Seller: Jack Operman and Cipora Operman, Pomona. Property: 42 Westminister Way, New Hempstead. Amount: $725,000. Filed July 8.

Opperman, Peter and Russ Ann Opperman, Olathe, Kansas. Seller: RRWC LLC, Central Valley. Property: 22 Debra Lane, New Windsor. Amount: $561,236. Filed July 8.

Below $1 million

Goshen Turnpike Holdings LLC, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Property: 2278 Goshen Turnpike, Wallkill. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed July 9.

40 Haller Crescent LLC, Spring Valley. Seller: Ponice Thomas and Glenn Ebron, Spring Valley. Property: 40 Haller Crescent, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $645,000. Filed July 6.

HSC Poughquag LLC, as owner. Lender: Trustmark National Bank. Property: Beekman. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed July 9.

73 Hillside LLC, West Nyack. Seller: Robert W. Graves, Airmont. Property: 73 Hillside Ave., Ramapo. Amount: $590,000. Filed July 9.

Below $1 million

108 Prospect Avenue LLC, Monsey. Seller: Senkev Holdings Inc., Middletown. Property: 108 Prospect Ave., Middletown. Amount: $145,000. Filed July 8.

2 Hilltop Drive LLC, as owner. Lender: Masonic Home Inc. Property: in New Windsor. Amount: $32,280. Filed July 9. Apollonia Properties LLC, as owner. Lender: Lima One Capital LLC. Property: 51 E. Green Road, Rock Tavern. Amount: $102,300. Filed July 8. Monopoly Holdings LLC, as owner. Lender: EH Capital LLC. Property: 29 Upper Brook Road, Sparrowbush. Amount: $175,000. Filed July 8.

DEEDS

Above $1 million

28

Community Outreach Center Inc., Monsey. Seller: 15 Rems Corp., Brooklyn. Property: 31 Remsen Ave., Ramapo. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed July 6.

FCBJ

WCBJ

285-289 Hudson Street LLC, Forest Hills. Seller: AJ Bennett Enterprises LLC, Newburgh. Property: 285 and 289 Hudson St., Cornwall-on-Hudson. Amount: $145,000. Filed July 7. Amjal LLC, Warwick. Seller: Valley Bible Church, Warwick. Property: in Warwick. Amount: $150,000. Filed July 7. Argento, Lettica, Woodhaven. Seller: HBR Homes LLC, Walden. Property: 23 Woodrose Court, Middletown. Amount: $264,900. Filed July 7. Banda, Mayer and Baila Banda, Monsey. Seller: Blue House 8 LLC, Monsey. Property: 24 Herrick Ave., Unit 111, Ramapo. Amount: $550,000. Filed July 8.

Forbes, Jermaine, New York City. Seller: ADC Middletown LLC, Middletown. Property: 82 Magnolia Park Road, Middletown. Amount: $345,765. Filed July 7. GADF LLC, Brewster. Seller: Patricia Greco and Gerald Greco, Carmel. Property: 12 Schuylkill Court, Carmel. Amount: $505,000. Filed July 8. Golden Property Group LLC, Carmel. Seller: Bernice Goldstein, Carmel. Property: 183 W. Lakeshore Drive, Carmel. Amount: $170,000. Filed July 8. Gross, Moishe and Rachel Gross, Spring Valley. Seller: Viola Ventures LLC, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $560,000. Filed July 7. Gross, Toby and Tovya Gross, Brooklyn. Seller: Viola Ventures LLC, Chestnut Ridge. Property: 3209 Corner St., Spring Valley. Amount: $569,000. Filed July 7. Gross, Yochanon and Rivka Gross, Monsey. Seller: Wedgewood New York, Monsey. Property: 24 Hearthstone Lane, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $442,000. Filed July 7. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Inc., Woodstock. Seller: Lula Shkreli, Patterson. Property: 43 Nosh Kola Lane, Patterson. Amount: $999,000. Filed July 9.

Luva24 LLC, Cold Spring. Seller: Alexander Saunders, Garrison. Property: 3 Brook St., Nelsonville. Amount: $50,000. Filed July 8. Martino, Michael and Stephen A. Jankowski, Pompton Lake, New Jersey. Seller: Northern Enterprises New York LLC, Cornwall-on-Hudson. Property: 10 Spartan Place, Tuxedo. Amount: $365,000. Filed July 7. Mdaaz Realty Inc., Chester. Seller: Roy P. Barber and Dianne Barber, Chester. Property: 733 Craigville Road, Chester. Amount: $410,000. Filed July 9. Monopoly Holdings LLC, Port Jervis. Seller: First Frontier Investments Inc., Chino Hills, California. Property: in Deerpark. Amount: $15,000. Filed July 8. Motzen, Solomon, Brooklyn. Seller: 17 Valley View LLC, Monsey. Property: 3 Stretner St., Unit 201, Spring Valley. Amount: $985,000. Filed July 8. Napoli Enterprises Inc., Newburgh. Seller: Alex T. Bauer and Sarah Lynn Bauer, Newburgh. Property: 7 Ridgeview Drive, Newburgh. Amount: $130,000. Filed July 9.

Ortiz, Jessie, Bronx. Seller: EMD Enterprises LTD, Montgomery. Property: 1590 State Route 17K, Montgomery. Amount: $400,000. Filed July 7. Pichardo, Jose M., Whitestone. Seller: Strategic Realty Fund LLC, San Jose, California. Property: 73 Lake Trail, Warwick. Amount: $125,000. Filed July 8. Ricciardi, Rocco, Nutley, New Jersey. Seller: 10Q-Dale LLC, New York City. Property: 12 Lexington Hill, Unit 1, Monroe. Amount: $150,000. Filed July 7. Shuart, Patrick J., Newburgh. Seller: SGB Realty Group LLC, Monroe. Property: 329 Meadow Ave., Newburgh. Amount: $247,000. Filed July 7. Sprague Empire LLC, Spring Valley. Seller: Markur IV Ventures LLC, Bloomingburg. Property: 31 First St., Port Jervis. Amount: $116,000. Filed July 7. Steinhauer, Daniel and Mary Ann Rees, Hastings-on-Hudson. Seller: RRWC LLC, Central Valley. Property: 77 Debra Lane, New Windsor. Amount: $569,000. Filed July 8. Taub, Nathan and Henny Taub, Monsey. Seller: Viola Ventures LLC, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $584,000. Filed July 8.


Facts & Figures Toras Chesed Inc., Lakewood, New Jersey. Seller: Roselyn Murphy, Edward G. Henry and Christina B. Knight, Garnerville. Property: 67 Lillian St., Haverstraw. Amount: $430,000. Filed July 6. Varghese, John and Sally Varghese, Congers. Seller: 150 W. Towline Road LLC, Congers. Property: 150 W. Towline Road, Orangetown. Amount: $565,000. Filed July 8. Weiss, Aaron, Spring Valley. Seller: 34 Midway LLC, Monsey. Property: 34 Midway Road, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $471,700. Filed July 6.

JUDGMENTS

Amaya, Jose and Munoz Amaya, Monroe. $7,910.92 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7. Arquitte, Doris, Walden. $5,625.03 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7. Babik, Justin, Middletown. $9,050.50 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed July 7. Battisti, Tonianne, Stormville. $3,428.73 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7. Caouette, Shannon L., Poughkeepsie. $1,596.24 in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem. Filed July 7. Ciofalo, Jennifer, Wappingers Falls. $2,265 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 8. Crudele, Alredo D., New Windsor. $16,541.15 in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, New Windsor. Filed July 7. Dancziger, Chana, Airmont. $4,489.20 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 6.

Delahoz, Kristin, Stony Point. $4,517.94 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.

Marku, Suela, Goshen. $1,322.75 in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC, Norfolk, Virginia. Filed July 7.

Estabaya, Venus E., Mahopac. $1,722.36 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, Bloomington, Minnesota. Filed July 7.

McDonald, Arabyia R., Newburgh. $5,122.02 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed July 6.

Exantus, Sharon Marie, Chester. $1,287.04 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7. Fana, Dany, Carmel. $1,125 in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah. Filed July 6. Feldhaus, Andrew, Monroe. $28,042.18 in favor of Hudson Valley Credit Union, Poughkeepsie. Filed July 7. Foster, Rattanasiri H., Stormville. $6,280.84 in favor of Capital One Bank National Association, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed July 8. Katz, Feigy, Monroe. $11,150.05 in favor of Capital One Bank, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed July 7. Kirk, Mark A., Chester. $4,622.85 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed July 7.

McLoughlin, Shari, Carmel. $5,070.37 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7.

Siano, Michelle, New Windsor. $852.13 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed July 7.

Moore, Anjaline, Hopewell Junction. $2,622.29 in favor of Petro Inc., Woodbury. Filed July 9.

Smaia, Elimelech, Monroe. $2,968.72 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7.

Navas, Milton and Jose A. Caguana, Spring Valley. $10,184.74 in favor of Toyota Motor Credit Corp., Plano, Texas. Filed July 6.

Thorne, Robert P., Carmel. $5,772.66 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 6.

Nelson, Laurie J., Maybrook. $1,737.20 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 7. Owens, Michael, Newburgh. $4,979.58 in favor of Capital One Bank, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed July 7. Pelton, Charles, Hyde Park. $16,324.99 in favor of Accelerated Inventory Management LLC, Austin, Texas. Filed July 9.

Lea, Terrance, Salt Point. $73,057.88 in favor of Hudson Valley Care Partners LLC, Highland. Filed July 9.

Pollak, Mirian, Monsey. $4,031.24 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed July 6.

Lefkovits, Gittel F., Monroe. $14,558.91 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7.

Jackson, Quinn, Poughkeepsie. $1,542.29 in favor of Mobile Life Support Services Inc., New Windsor. Filed July 8.

Letourneau, Keri, Florida. $3,503 in favor of Capital One Bank, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed July 7.

Reyes, Julissa, Middletown. $15,886.67 in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association, Wilmington, Delaware. Filed July 7.

Lowe, Aldrick J., Bloomsburg. $8,066.88 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7. Mannering, Ashley, Highland Falls. $3,054.27 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed July 7.

Sepulveda, Roberto, Thompson Ridge. $ 2,477.83 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed July 7. Silverman, David, Monroe. $6,105.98 in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah. Filed July 7.

Richards, Charles, Millbrook. $36,158.35 in favor of Hudson Valley Care Partners LLC, Highland. Filed July 9. Rodprasert, Wigrom, Warwick. $5,574.76 in favor of LVNV Funding LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada. Filed July 7. Russo, Rosa, Marlboro. $11,241.71 in favor of McCabe and Mack LLP, Poughkeepsie. Filed July 9.

Walker, Tyreece, Newburgh. $1,733 in favor of Mid Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Kingston. Filed July 7. Watson, Dawn, New Windsor. $38,202.51 in favor of Hudson Valley Credit Union, Poughkeepsie. Filed July 7. Watson, Suzanne M., Sparrow Bush. $15,513.50 in favor of West Morris Surgery Center, Succasunna, New Jersey. Filed July 7.

New Image Cleaning Service, 2 Beacon Road, Carmel 10512, c/o Guillermo Ismael Barcenas and Irma Julieta Barcenas. Filed July 8.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS A&G Roofing, 37 East Ave., No. 2, Middletown 10940, c/o Ana Karen Hernandez. Filed July 8. A&O Cleaning and Construction Inc., 33 Buttermilk Drive, Poughkeepsie 12601, c/o Jose Castellanos. Filed July 6. Anat Kuperman Cpa., 49 Oxford Drive, Suffern 10901, c/o Anat T. Kuperman. Filed July 9. AR Auto Repair, 63 Montgomery St., Middletown 10940, c/o Atta Ur Rehman. Filed July 8. Ava Wallpaper Hanger, 3514 Route 9, Apt. 2, Cold Spring 10516, c/o Jose L. Vera. Filed July 6. Best Luxury Car & Taxi, 36 California Ave., Middletown 10940, c/o Mazhar A. Sheikh. Filed July 9. Body By a Goddess, 2 Windsor Mews, Middletown 10940, c/o Angelica Ramos. Filed July 8.

Wright, David and Artisan Stone, Warwick. $8,521.83 in favor of Manpowergroup U.S. Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Filed July 7.

Filmatic Studios, 69 Rockland Lane, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Edwin Steven Morales-Roca. Filed July 7.

MECHANIC’S LIENS

Fresh Valley, 128 Dolson Ave., Middletown 10940, c/o Javier Alexander Romero Sanchez. Filed July 9.

Presutti, Jay R. and Laurie E. Presutti, as owners. $7,222.62 in favor of George Stoll Construction Inc. Property: 73 Goldin Blvd., Walden. Filed July 9.

NEW BUSINESSES

This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.  

PARTNERSHIPS Magoo’s House of Misfits, 20 Deer Run Court, Carmel 10512, c/o Michele N. Spadola and Aaron. Spadola. Filed July 9.

DGS Designs, 141 Piermont Ave., Piermont 10968, c/o Dana G. Stilley. Filed July 7. Jaramillo Taxi, 83 W. Church St., First floor, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Victor Jaramillo. Filed July 6. Junk Busters, 10 Summit Road, Mahopac 10541, c/o Nicholas Martino. Filed July 6.

Kula Exteriors Inc., 12 Charles St., Suite 3, Pleasant Valley 12569, c/o Alexander Cukar. Filed July 9. Lucila F De Tavella, 520 Chester Road, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Lucila D. Ferrerode Tavella. Filed July 6. Lucky Little Owls, 881 Burlinghamn Road, Pine Bush 12566, c/o Subrina Valdreem Campbell Stacy. Filed July 7. Main Dream Burner & Convenience Corporation, 530 Main St., Poughkeepsie 12601, c/o Imad Almawri. Filed July 9. Meme’s Helping Hands, 1111 Snake Hill Road, New Windsor 12553, c/o Kameka T. Oates. Filed July 8. Miz Clean Inc., 76 Pleasant Ride Road, Poughquag 12570, c/o Franco Bianchi. Filed July 6. Newburgh Business Center, 46 William St., Newburgh 12550, c/o Star Marion. Filed July 7. Oriental Kitchen Inc., 2003 Route 53, Suite 4, Hopewell Junction, c/o Feng Zheng. Filed July 9. Pine Barrens Partners Real Estate Inc., 135 Creamery Road, Hopewell Junction, c/o Keyan Sanai. Filed July 6. Rubber Biscuit Coasters, 116 Sixth Ave., No. 3, Nyack 10960, c/o William Capek. Filed July 8. Serve Rockland Civic Association, 361 Route 210, Stony Point 10980, c/o Michael Diederich. Filed July 9. Silverleaf Inn, 23 Johnsontown Road, Sloatsburg 10974, c/o Jade Nicole Donohue. Filed July 7. Voumont Investment Group, 9 Phillips Lane, West Nyack 10994, Robert Shuo Li. Filed July 7.

Ketonet Passim Bookstore, 72 N. Broadway, Nyack 10960, c/o Ahuva B. Cohen. Filed July 6.

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

29


Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial Noble Construction Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for J.M. Church Properties LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 295 Westport Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $22,000. Filed May 12. Westchester Industries Inc., Norwalk, contractor for I Park Norwalk II LLC. Relocate Dr. Weiss ENT Medical Office to space 5B, within the building at 761 Main Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $270,000. Filed May 13.

Residential Allied Home Exteriors LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Miguel and Ana Rivera. Remove existing roof and re-roof 4 Soundview Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $8,745. Filed May 12. Araujo Decking Construction LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Lori Cooper. Construct new deck at 2 Bonnybrook Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $23,232. Filed May 13. Bema Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Das 28 Bouton LLC. Construct retaining wall at 25 Bouton St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed May 11. Bradley Yeary, Norwalk, contractor for Bradley Yeary. Perform replacement alterations at 18 Yew St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed May 12. Brown Roofing Company Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Sonia M. Santiago. Remove existing roof and re-roof 8 Autumn St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $16,754. Filed May 13. Brown Roofing Company Inc., Norwalk, contractor for LaValle Chad. Remove existing roof and re-roof 217 W. Rocks Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $12,148. Filed May 13. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken.

Constantine Brothers Construction LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Basilios Poulopoulos. Remove existing roof and re-roof 2 Pine Hill Avenue Extension, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $32,000. Filed May 11. Mellad, Ordette D., Norwalk, contractor for Ordette D. Mellad. Finish basement and rebuild deck at 25 Deerfield St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed May 12. Mesa, Gonzalo, Norwalk, contractor for Gonzalo Mesa. Construct side deck at 73 Truman St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $4,000. Filed May 7. Power Home Remodeling Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Adam & Frazier. Remove existing roof and re-roof 23 Sachem St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $28,038. Filed May 12. Power Home Remodeling Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Joseph W. and Paule A. Dautruche. Remove existing siding and replace with green guard underlayment at 22 Raymond Terrace, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $43,414. Filed May 12. Scully, Stephen J. and Alison A. Wundeler, Norwalk, contractor for Stephen J. Scully and Alison A. Wundeler. Add new deck and bedroom at 149 Patrick Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $51,000. Filed May 11. Shafer, Paul C., Norwalk, contractor for Kimberly S. and Ryan T. Wilson. Construct superstructure for addition with 4 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms at 121 Witch Lane, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $504,000. Filed May 12. Sound Renovation LLC, Norwalk, contractor for James R. and Susan Martone. Remove existing roof and re-roof 30 Geneva Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $14,500. Filed May 12. Sound Shore Construction Group LLC, Stamford, contractor for Boroujeni Tannaz Iranpour. Expand doorway and add beam at 333 Rock Rimmon Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $6,000. Filed May 10.

Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

30

JULY 19, 2021

FCBJ

WCBJ

ON THE RECORD

Sunrun Installation Services Inc., San Francisco, California, contractor for Karen Vaca. Install roof-top solar panels at 65 Mathews St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $22,813. Filed May 13.

Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Anna Karidas. Install 37 roof-mounted solar panels at 15 Lighthouse Way, Stamford. Estimated cost: $49,000. Filed May 6.

Super K Electric LLC, Stamford, contractor for Maria Levin and Greg Busch. Install a Generac air-cooled generator and connect to existing propane tank at 206 W. Haviland Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,100. Filed May 19.

Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Gerard Nelligan. Install 24 roof-mounted solar panels at 30 Haig Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $28,000. Filed May 27.

Super K Electric LLC, Stamford, contractor for William and Sally M. Lovallo. Install a Generac air-cooled generator and connect to propane tanks at 111 McIntosh Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,500. Filed May 19. Szekely, Sean, Norwalk, contractor for Michael James Bredice. Construct superstructure for new single-family residence at 33 France St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $425,000. Filed May 11. Tesla Energy Operations Inc., Fremont, California, contractor for Stuart and Catherine Smith. Install roof-mounted solar panels and energy storage systems at 18 Bracchi Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,506. Filed May 18. Trimboli, Anthony Joseph and Ann Kelley, Norwalk, contractor for Anthony Trimboli. Finish basement and one-half bath at 8 Eugene Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $27,000. Filed May 13. Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Janet Triplett. Install 13 roof-mounted solar panels at 1011 Stillwater Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $19,000. Filed May 5. Trinity Solar Inc, Cheshire, contractor for Galo Quezada. Install 20 roof-mounted solar panels at 19 Bungalow Park, Stamford. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed May 5. Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Samantha Scalamogna. Install 49 roof-mounted solar panels at 25 Windermere Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $58,000. Filed May 5.

Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Kingston McKay. Install 25 roof-mounted solar panels at 63 Ledge Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $33,000. Filed May 20. Twp Home LLC, Stamford, contractor for Mark A. Ellis and George Kralovansky Jr. Install two windows at 709 Hunting Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,240. Filed May 6. Ushs LLC, Stamford, contractor for David R. and Jessica R. Brand. Add residence garage, master bedroom and bath to single-family residence and renovate basement area at 43 Old North Stamford Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed May 11. Velez, Wilson, Stamford, contractor for Elissa H. Stein. Install a Generac generator at 53 Heather Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,500. Filed May 25. Venture Home Solar LLC, Brooklyn, New York, contractor for Rahman Syed. Install 41 roof-mounted solar modules and inverters at 2020 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $24,000. Filed May 14. Vinylume Inc., Stamford, contractor for Peter J. and Izumi N. Favia. Remove existing singles and install new asphalt shingles with all applicable accessories at 90 Wellington Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $18,880. Filed May 6. Vinylume Inc., Stamford, contractor for Peter J. and Izumi N. Favia. Install new vinyl siding to entire house with all applicable accessories at 90 Wellington Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $39,840.  Filed May 6.

fairfield county

Vinylume Inc., Stamford, contractor for Robert M. and Susan Santapaola. Remove existing wood and asphalt shingles and replace with new asphalt shingles at 39 Leonard St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $18,580. Filed May 19.

Vlahakis, Dennis, Stamford, contractor for Vlahakis Andreas and Briana DeFalco. Construct a one-story master bedroom addition at 72 Rockledge Private Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $60,000. Filed May 13.

Vision Contracting LLC, New Milford, contractor for Ricardo Squitieri. Construct a single-family home with finished basement and garage at 499 Westover Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $N/A. Filed May 27.

Warjam Group Ltd., West Harrison, New York, contractor for William Riehl. Construct a new bathroom and partially finish basement at 39 Wedgemere Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $32,000. Filed May 20.

Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Katherine A. and Eric M. Kaplan. Install solar-mounted roof panels at 53 Gaymoor Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $13,872. Filed May 12. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Carlo Roche. Install solar-mounted roof panels at 102 Givens Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,016. Filed May 5. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Zeman Zdenka. Install solar-mounted roof panels at 31 Ely Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,180. Filed May 6. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Yvonne Vasquez. Install solar-mounted roof panels at 55 Big Oak Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $35,700. Filed May 12. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Sandra Puerta. Solar-mounted roof panels at 17 Fowler St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $24,480. Filed May 6. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Raffaella Giamba Revocable Trust. Install solar-mounted roof panels at 127 Mulberry St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $20,400. Filed May 26. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Norma Lopez. Install roof-mounted solar system at 259 Culloden Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $23,460. Filed May 21.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Consolidated Electrical Distributors Inc., et al, Irving, Texas. Filed by Reema Odeh, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Casper & De Toledo LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-21-6106839-S. Filed May 28. Gherlone, Alexa Rose, Orange. Filed by Gregory Derisme, Stratford. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Blomberg Law Firm LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6106850-S. Filed May 28. Knapp, Corinne, et al, Bridgeport. Filed by Linda Capozzo, Trumbull. Plaintiff’s attorney: Christopher J Donlin, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6107051-S. Filed June 7.


Facts & Figures Posigen Connecticut LLC, Jefferson, Los Angeles. Filed by Andrew Rossini, Weatogue. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cicchiello & Cicchiello LLP, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff started his employment with the defendant and worked as a sales representative. He was subjected to discrimination because of his ethnicity, derogatory remarks during a zoom call, demand by the defendant to work an intense schedule, and ultimately termination of his employment. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-216106893-S. Filed June 1. Schipritt, Wesley, et al, Wolcott. Filed by Phoumareth Phouangphiarith, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Moore O’Brien & Foti, Middlebury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedlybcaused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-21-6106951-S. Filed June 2.

Danbury Superior Court Durso, Angela Rose, Brewster, New York. Filed by Janet Rodriguez, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cramer & Anderson LLP, New Milford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6039512-S. Filed May 25. Janco, Jody John, et al, Torrington. Filed by Western Connecticut Health Network, Bethel. Plaintiff’s attorney: Michael V. Simko Jr. Law Office, Seymour. Action: The plaintiff provided hospital services and supplies to defendants. However, the defendant has failed to pay for the services. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6039429-S. Filed May 19.

Murphy, Thomas Edward, et al, Brookfield. Filed by Griselda Magana, New Rochelle, New York. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-216039497-S. Filed May 25. Pasaca-Arpi, Jennifer, et al, Danbury. Filed by Ryan Kvale, New Milford. Plaintiff’s attorney: D’Elia Gillooly DePalma LLC, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6039513-S. Filed May 25. Steven Willand Inc., et al, August, New Jersey. Filed by Dennis Witzke, Sherman. Plaintiff’s attorney: Allingham Readyoff & Henry LLC, New Milford. Action: The plaintiff was operating a product distributed or sold by the defendant and while mowing grass, the product was caused to overturn causing the plaintiff to suffer the injuries. Claiming the instrument was defective, the plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6039468-S. Filed May 21.

Stamford Superior Court Aj-Jerez, Jaime, Stamford. Filed by Jacques LaFortune, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cohen & Wolf PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-21-6051795-S. Filed May 18.

Kispert, Kimberly A., Stamford. Filed by Daniela Gallegos Aguagallo, Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: Papcsy Janosov Roche, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-216051903-S. Filed May 25. Rondano, Edward, Stamford. Filed by Susan Ryan, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Discala & Discala LLC, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-21-6051762-S. Filed May 17. Taborda, Hugo L., et al, Greenwich. Filed by Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB, d.b.a. Christ, Irvine, California. Plaintiff’s Attorney: Bendett & McHugh PC, Farmington. Action: The plaintiff was assigned the mortgage on the defendant’s property. The defendant defaulted on the terms of the agreement and has failed to pay the plaintiff the amount due. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the mortgage, possession of the property premises, monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-21-6051521-S. Filed April 29. Vilbrun-Avridor, Helange, Executrix of the Estate, et al, Hartford. Filed by Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. as trustee, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Plaintiff’s Attorney: Bendett & McHugh PC, Farmington. Action: The plaintiff is owner and holder of the defendant’s promissory note for which defendant agreed to pay monthly payments. The defendant passed away and plaintiff is entitled to claim the balance of principal and interest due and is seeking monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-216051575-S. Filed May 4.

Commercial

Sound Vision Homes LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Richard R. Carlson, Fairfield. Property: 216 Harvester Road, Fairfield. Amount: $260,000. Filed June 8.

Angle, Shawna and Joseph Borrow, Shelton. Seller: Burr Cottages LLC, Fairfield. Property: 1368 Burr St., Fairfield. Amount: $1,875,000. Filed June 9.

Walisever, Helene, Scarsdale, New York. Seller: 273 OMP LLC, Cos Cob. Property: 273 Valley Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $1,295,000. Filed June 9.

C and P Professional Services LLC, Stamford. Seller: Marguerite Benefico and Vincent Benefico, Stamford. Property: 5 Case Road, Stamford. Amount: $680,000. Filed June 7.

Wonsos TA LLC, Norwalk. Seller: Peter Sosnow and Elizabeth Sosnow, Darien. Property: 30 Taylor Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $N/A. Filed June 8.

Fisher, Carolyn L., Greenwich. Seller: Imma Properties LLC, Greenwich. Property: 40 Etll Lane, Unit 5, Greenwich. Amount: $N/A. Filed June 7.

Residential

DEEDS

Fraczkiewicz, Adam and Wioletta Fraczkiewicz, Stamford. Seller: 35 Lenox Avenue LLC, Newtown. Property: 35 Lenox Ave., Stamford. Amount: $600,000. Filed June 11. Lionetti, Kelli Ann, Palm Beach Garden, Florida. Seller: Techno Development LLC, Stamford. Property: 7 Ravenglass Drive, Unit 9, Stamford. Amount: $1,289,000. Filed June 8. Moirez, Eric and Darlene Moirez, Norwalk. Seller: Big Bad Development Company LLC, Weston. Property: 3 1/2 Colony Place, Norwalk. Amount: $615,000. Filed June 10. Molisse, Anna, Stamford. Seller: R.M.S. Holdings LLC, Stamford. Property: 39 Maple Tree Ave., Unit 21, Stamford. Amount: $550,000. Filed June 8. SCF RC Funding IV LLC, Princeton, New Jersey. Seller: Russell Road Wellington LLC, Unionville, Pennsylvania. Property: 600 Wellington Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $10. Filed June 10. Shaheen, Adnan, Fairfield. Seller: 95-97 CSF Company LLC, Fairfield. Property: 97 Churchill St., Fairfield. Amount: $495,000. Filed June 8.

Barreto, Adriana and Ana Rosa Lopez, Stamford. Seller: Rick Gianetti, Stamford. Property: 277 Bridge St., Unit 4, Stamford. Amount: $257,000. Filed June 9. Cafagno, Michael and Lyndsay Cafagno, Greenwich. Seller: Mark Coscia and Martine Coscia, Greenwich. Property: 27 Elskip Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1,605,000. Filed June 7. Calabrese, Anthony and Alston Calabrese, Greenwich. Seller: Steven T. Loeffler and Madeleine O. Parker, Greenwich. Property: 52 Winthrop Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $2,700,000. Filed June 11. Chuba, Kristin M., Norwalk. Seller: Dacia Coppola Norwalk. Property: 72 Grumman Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $450,000. Filed June 10. Ciez, Patrick and Samantha Femia, Middle Village, New York. Seller: Thomas S. Broderick and Joanne I. Broderick, Fairfield. Property: 162 Papermill Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $835,000. Filed June 11. Curry, Caitlin Maura, Harrison, New York. Seller: Carla M. Zilka, Cos Cob. Property: 102 Valley Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $549,000. Filed June 8. DeJesus, Irisel, Fairfield. Seller: Brian J. Fama and Melissa A. Lonergan, Milford. Property: 185 Knapps Highway, Unit A-3, Fairfield. Amount: $340,000. Filed June 10.

FCBJ

WCBJ

DeLaurentis, Marc and Meghan DeLaurentis, Bridgeport. Seller: Carol A. Quinlan and Robert F. Quinlan, Fairfield. Property: 70 Hersh Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,100,000. Filed June 9. Dougherty, Katharine Lee, Norwalk. Seller: Laura R. Nash, Fairfield. Property: 32 Fleming Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $800,000. Filed June 10. Dzaferovic, Safet and Seniha Dzaferovic, Stamford. Seller: Mark Malone, Monroe, Pennsylvania. Property: 151 Seaton Road, Unit 7-B-4, Stamford. Amount: $105,000. Filed June 11. Fanelli, Kara L. and Christopher Fanelli, Amagansett, New York. Seller: Winston Ellis Bradley and Melissa Reid Bradley, Fairfield. Property: 32 Lookout Drive South, Fairfield. Amount: $1,225,000. Filed June 7. Forkan, Jeffrey and Jeanette Griffin, Mamaroneck, New York. Seller: Robert T. Clemmens and Donna A. Clemmens, Wilton. Property: 13 Ridgecrest Road, Stamford. Amount: $1,299,000. Filed June 8. Gaines, Nathan Daniel and Lindsay Elizabeth Gaines, Fairfield. Seller: Marc Sailer, Fairfield. Property: 680 Stillson Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,017,000. Filed June 11. Gavronsky, Lisa Rachel and Gadi P. Gavronsky, Stamford. Seller: Nathaniel J. Belknap and Patricia A. Belknap, Stamford. Property: 37 Fieldstone Road, Stamford. Amount: $850,000. Filed June 10. Kennedy, David, Stamford. Seller: Andrew Sheffield, Los Angeles, California. Property: 32 Pine St., Unit 1A, Norwalk. Amount: $265,000. Filed June 10. Kevelson, Adam Daniel and Rebecca Miriam Kevelson, East Nassau, New York. Seller: Donald Cole, Stamford. Property: 342 Rock Rimmon Road, Stamford. Amount: $1,008,872. Filed June 9. Konduru, Duttatreya and Minodora Amarascu, Norwalk. Seller: Elizabeth Necatera, Norwalk. Property: 238 W. Cedar St., Norwalk. Amount: $470,000. Filed June 7.

JULY 19, 2021

31


Facts & Figures Lama, Chenga, Elmhurst, New York. Seller: Bradley C. Little and Melissa S. Discala, Norwalk. Property: 14 Macintosh Road, Norwalk. Amount: $470,000. Filed June 9

Philiph, Andrew, London, United Kingdom. Seller: Jennifer Yorke, Greenwich. Property: 14 Fox Run Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2,600,000. Filed June 9.

Lapolla, Michael and Grazia Lapolla, New Canaan. Seller: Stanley Veksler and Galina Veksler, Norwalk. Property: 50 Aiken St., Unit 326, Norwalk. Amount: $300,000. Filed June 11.

Pisano, Francesco A., Stamford. Seller: Andrew Duffy and Daniel Duffy, Norwalk. Property: 3 Valley View Road, Unit 40, Norwalk. Amount: $320,000. Filed June 11.

Marcheschi, Ginamarie and Lawrence Marcheschi, Norwalk. Seller: Miguel Estrada, Norwalk. Property: 43 Nash Place, Unit B, Norwalk. Amount: $299,000. Filed June 7. Mariano, Samuel Joseph and Zixuan Mariano, Pine Brook, New Jersey, Seller: Ilona Sobocinska, Norwalk. Property: 14 1/2 Fairview Ave., Unit C1, Norwalk. Amount: $331,000. Filed June 9. Mendoza, Fausto and Blanca I. Mendoza, Stamford. Seller: Joseph S. DeMarsico and Lori B. DeMarsico, Stamford. Property: 46 Saint Charles Ave., Stamford. Amount: $575,000. Filed June 8. Monteforte, Roger, New York, New York. Seller: Davis J. Anderson and Kristen M. Anderson, Greenwich. Property: 25 Upper Cross Road, Greenwich. Amount: $5,475,000. Filed June 7. Morris, Matthew and Jessica Morris, Glen Ridge, New Jersey. Seller: John Joseph Philbin and Margaret Philbin, Fairfield. Property: 76 Dill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $885,500. Filed June 7. Nigro, John, Patterson, New York. Seller: Dooae Kwon, Stamford. Property: 49 Glenbrook Road, Unit 302, Stamford. Amount: $275,000. Filed June 10. O’Laughlin, Matthew and Melinda O’Laughlin, Riverside. Seller: Ryan D. Erb and Mary M. Callison, Riverside. Property: 26 Chapel Lane, Riverside. Amount: $2,650,000. Filed June 11. Pasacreta, Paul and Karen Blasi, Norwalk. Seller: Sandra Bria, Norwalk. Property: 19 Lakewood Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $459,000. Filed June 8.

32

JULY 19, 2021

Reben, Margarita H., Stamford. Seller: William A. DeMartino, Stamford. Property: 197 Bridge St., Unit 13, Stamford. Amount: $309,000. Filed June 7. Ricci, Jean Marie, Norwalk. Seller: Christopher Coppolecchia, Norwalk. Property: 71 Aiken St., Unit I-8, Norwalk. Amount: $349,000. Filed June 8. Robina, Gonzalo, New York, New York. Seller: Mercedes Leskiw, Riverside. Property: 65 Summit Road, Riverside. Amount: $1,952,000. Filed June 10. Ryan, Sean W. and Sabrina Ayral Ryan, Brooklyn, New York. Seller: Andrew A. Allegretta and Jennie A. Allegretta. Fairfield. Property: 244 N. Pie Creek Road, Fairfield. Amount: $836,000. Filed June 8. Sinclair, Andrew and Emily Hawkins, Brooklyn, New York. Seller: Andrew Heath and Sandra Kurimai, Cos Cob. Property: 77 Orchard St., Cos Cob. Amount: $1,750,000. Filed June 8. Small, Joshua Lewis and Jennie Gila Small, Stamford. Seller: Melissa Litwak and Daryl S. Litwak, Stamford. Property: 77 Fieldstone Road, Stamford. Amount: $886,500. Filed June 7. Stevens, Nicholas G. and Emily Rabon Hall, Newtown, Massachusetts. Seller: John J. Grogan and Elisia M. Grogan, Fairfield. Property: 201 Edgewood Road, Fairfield. Amount: $629,000. Filed June 8. Tascher, Daniel and Erin Tascher, Branford. Seller: Sebastiano Arduini, Fairfield. Property: 499 Hemlock Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,100,000. Filed June 9.

FCBJ

WCBJ

Traupman, Christian Gabriel and Elisabeth Rose Traupman, Stamford. Seller: Constance Felicity Marshall and Thomas James, Blacksburg, Virginia. Property: 6 Sheldrake Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,211,000. Filed June 8.

Heath, Andrew and Sandra Heath, Greenwich, by Douglas I. Bayer. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 10 Brookridge Drive, Greenwich Amount: $2,817,500. Filed May 27.

Reben, Margarita H., Stamford, by Gerald M. Fox. Lender: Prosperity Home Mortgage LLC, 14501 George Carter Way, Suite 300, Chantilly, Virginia. Property: 197 Bridge St., Unit 13, Stamford. Amount: $247,200. Filed June 7.

Voytovich, Jacob and Rita Voytovich, Stamford. Seller: Attilio Meucci, Stamford. Property: 38 Campbell Drive, Stamford. Amount: $1,051,000. Filed June 10.

Hind, Timothy and Kerry Gillespie-Hind, Fairfield, by Pamela Shepli. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 965 Old Post Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,124,300. Filed May 28.

Russ, Matthew J., Greenwich, by Kathryn L. Braun. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodwar Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 38 Circle Drive, Greenwich Amount: $87,575. Filed May 25.

Wagstaff, David Justin and Maite Wagstaff, New Rochelle, New York. Seller: Tracy Farr and Hanna Farr, Darien. Property: 23 Hartford Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $780,000. Filed June 8.

MORTGAGES Bilik, Randy C., Norwalk, by Scott Rogalski. Lender: Freedom Mortgage Corp., 951 Yamato Road, Suite 175, Boca Raton, Florida. Property: 72 Ledgebrook Drive, Unit 16-8, Norwalk. Amount: $185,215. Filed June 11. Bueckman, Daniel and Blake Bueckman, Stamford, by Jonathan T. Hoffman. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 62 Akbar Road, Stamford. Amount: $532,500. Filed June 10. Carey, Vincent M. and Patricia B. Carey, Greenwich, by Michael J. Jones. Lender: US Bank National Association, 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 3 Azalea Terrace, Cos Cob. Amount: $548,000. Filed May 26. Fisher, James A. and Pamela S. Viglielmo, New York, New York, by Jeremy E. Kaye. Lender: First Republic Bank, 111 Pine St., San Francisco, California. Property: 221 Willow St., Southport. Amount: $100,000. Filed May 24. Giraldo, Marino and Marybel Giraldo, Norwalk, by John R. Hall. Lender: Home Point Financial Corp., 9 Entin Road, Suite 200, Parsippany, New Jersey. Property: 4 Phillips St., Norwalk. Amount: $164,999. Filed June 10.

Konduru, Duttatreya and Minodora Amarascu, Norwalk, by Donald H. Brown. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 238 W. Cedar St., Norwalk. Amount: $423,000. Filed June 7.

Sharma, Vikas and Anjall Sharma, Fairfield, by Sarah F. Summons. Lender: Pentagon Federal Credit Union, 7940 Jones Branch Drive, Tysons, Virginia. Property: 520 Queens Grant Road, Fairfield. Amount: $246,300. Filed May 25.

Louie, Daniel P., Norwalk, by Aaron Charney. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodwar Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 31 Tierney St., Norwalk. Amount: $303,641. Filed June 9.

Tananbaum, Brenda, Fairfield, by Michael R. Kaufman. Lender: Union Savings Bank, 226 Main St., Danbury. Property: 71 Southport Ridge, Fairfield. Amount: $548,250. Filed May 27.

Mendoza, Fausto and Blanca I. Mendoza, Stamford, by John Moranski. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 46 Saint Charles Ave., Stamford. Amount: $460,000. Filed June 8.

Zheng, Zhe and Jingyi Chen, Stamford, by Stephen J. Schelz. Lender: MLD Mortgage Inc., 30B Vreeland Road, Suite 200, Florham Park, New Jersey. Property: 1611 Washington Blvd., Apt. 101, Stamford. Amount: $178,500. Filed June 11.

Morales Duran, Luis Ivan and Sonia M. Arpi Barzallo, Norwalk, by Janine M. Becker. Lender: Warshaw Capital LLC, 2777 Summer St., Suite 306, Stamford. Property: 2 Raymond Terrace, Norwalk. Amount: $412,000. Filed June 8. O’Connor, Sean and Gina O’Connor, Stamford, by Elizabeth Carmen Castillo. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 29 Gaymoor Circle, Stamford. Amount: $100,000. Filed June 9. Perez, Emilio and Carolina Perez, Greenwich, by James Kavanagh. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 22 Nicholas Ave., Greenwich Amount: $580,000. Filed May 28. Raimo, Dolores, Greenwich, by Casey M. O’Donnell. Lender: Bank of America, NA, 101 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 17 E. Lyon Farm Drive, Greenwich Amount: $752,000. Filed May 24.

Zuleta, Julie E.G., Fairfield, by Thomas V. Battaglia. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 132 Division Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $351,600. Filed May 26.

NEW BUSINESSES

El Torito Americano, 62 Pequot Drive, Stamford 06902, c/o William David Garcia. Filed May 25. Executive Recruitment, 6 Landmark Square, Stamford 06901, c/o Denice Lapolice. Filed May 21. Gary Blaustein Associates, 189 Bedford St., Stamford 06901, c/o Florian Court. Filed May 25. Gary Blaustein Associates, 189 Bedford St., Stamford 06901, c/o Relation Insurance Services Select Inc. Filed May 25. La Tertulia De Stamford, 126 Myrtle Ave., Unit 3, Stamford 06902, c/o Karla A. Argueta. Filed June 2. Massage Envy, 1014 High Ridge Road, Stamford 06905, c/o Dellsino Corp. Filed June 2. Petra RMS, 6 Landmark Square, Stamford 06901, c/o Sunstar Insurance Group LLC. Filed June 2. Resource Management Group, 201 Broad St., 10th floor, Stamford 06901, c/o Denice Lapolice. Filed May 21. Rr Paving Masonry, 79 Plymouth Road, Stamford 06906, c/o Rafael Ridolfi. Filed June 2. Scott’s Real Estate, 54 Judy Lane, Stamford 06906, c/o Pamela E. Scott. Filed June 2. Veronica’s Unisex Salon, 1130 E. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Veronica Obando. Filed May 26.

Avelino Family Barbecue, 761 Den Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Sarah Avelino. Filed June 1.

PATENTS

Bitcoin Depot, 1125 E. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Lux Vending LLC. Filed May 24.

Inline water separators. Patent no. 11,058,981 issued to Jacob Gerlach. Assigned to Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford.

Bitcoin Depot, 118 Broad St., Stamford 06901, c/o Lux Vending LLC. Filed May 24. Cinco de Mayo, 109 North St., Stamford 06901, c/o Jose R. Perez. Filed May 28.

FCBJ

WCBJ

Method and display device for detecting connection failure of display driver integrated circuit. Patent no. 11,062,632 issued to Havent Chen. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford.

32


LEGAL NOTICES LDash7 LLC Arts. of Org. filed NY Sec. of State 04/21/21. Princ. off. loc.: Westchester Cty. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o LDash7 LLC, 465 Tuckahoe Road, Suite # 1019, Yonkers, New York 10710. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62882 Notice of Formation of RevoSpinNY LLC filed with SSNY on May 24, 2021. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 9 West Prospect Ave, Suite 208, Mount Vernon, NY, 10550. Purpose: Any lawful activity. #62883 Arcady Advisors, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 5/27/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Beth N Smayda, 67 Midchester Ave., White Plains, NY 10306. General Purpose #62884 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF OTHER GUYS MEDIA PRODUCTION LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/07/2021. Office Location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is 315 Westchester Avenue, Port Chester, NY 10573. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62885 Notice of Formation of Signatory Capital Advisors, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with NY Secy. Of State on May 20, 2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Signatory Capital Advisors, LLC, 56 Woods Lane, Scarsdale, NY 10583, principal location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62886 137 Groton Avenue LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on March 1, 2021. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 179 Riverview Ave, Tarrytown, NY 10591. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62887 Notice of Formation of That Jazz Show, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 2/23/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2063 Van Cortlandt Ci, Yorktown Hts., NY 10598. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62889

Notice of Formation of Alex Apartments LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/04/2021. Office location: Westchester County. Princ. Office of LLC: 6 Oak Hill Circle, Pleasantville, NY 10570. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principle office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. #62891 Notice of Formation of ACE HOME & BUSINESS, LLC filed with SSNY on 5/26/16. Business Location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to ACE HOME & BUSINESS, LLC, 10 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown, New York 10591 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62892 Notice of Formation of NSF Beauty Consulting LLC filed with SSNY on 5/20/21. Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 310 Carroll Close, Tarrytown, NY 10591. (LLCís Prim Bus Loc) Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62893 Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC). The name of the LLC is: TAION LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) office on: March 23, 2021. The County in which the Office is to be located: Westchester County. The SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is: 2005 Palmer Avenue, Suite 1112, Larchmont, New York 10538. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62894 Resort Little, LLC. Filed 4/23/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 1112 Wilmot Road, Suite 274H, Scarsdale, NY 10583 Purpose: All lawful #62895 Notice of Formation of Political Video Advertising LLC, a domestic, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 06/08/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 46 Crest Drive, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. #62896

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NYFILMMAKER PRODUCTIONS, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2-9-21. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: NYFilmmaker Productions, LLC, 47 Riverdale Avenue, Suite A152, Yonkers, NY 10701, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful business activity. #62897 VIVA VERDI! LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/17/2021. Off. Loc: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail a copy of any process to VIVA VERDI! LLC., 420 South Riverside Avenue, #131, Croton on Hudson, New York, 10520. Purpose: all lawful. #62898 Notice of Formation of Croton Corners LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/10/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Hans Tokke, 124 Grand Street, Croton-onHudson, New York 10520. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62899 Bannock Holdings LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 6/10/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 1075 Central Park Ave., Ste. 205, Scarsdale, NY 10583.General Purpose #62900 ESCOS CONSULTING, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Sec. of State of (SSNY) on 06/11/21. Office in Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC to Marvin A. Escobar, 15 Piping Rock Drive, Ossining, NY 10562. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. #62901 Green Archers Business Solutions, LLC has filed articles of organization with the secretary of State of NYS on June 1, 2021. The office of the company is located in Westchester County, NY. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of limited Liability company, upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served on him/ her is Green Archers Business Solutions, LLC, 20 Cabot Avenue, Elmsford, NY 10523. The company is organized to conduct any lawful business for which a limited liability company may be organized. #62902

Vesta 260 LLC. Filed 3/19/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: c/o NMC Property Management, 629 Fifth Ave, Suite 105, Pelham, NY 10803 Purpose: All lawful #62903 MDA Property LLC. Filed 5/11/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 130 Winfred Ave, Yonkers, NY 10704 Purpose: All lawful #62904 Notice of formation of R9G LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the NY State Secretary of State on 04/16/2021. NY office location: Westchester County. The secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The secretary of State shall mail a copy of any such process against the LLC to 41 Winthrop Dr, Cortlandt Manor, NY 10567. Purpose: Real Estate Rental. #62905 Notice of formation of Essjay Properties LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the NY State Secretary of State on 04/15/2021. NY office location: Westchester County. The secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The secretary of State shall mail a copy of any such process against the LLC to 41 Winthrop Dr, Cortlandt Manor, NY 10567. Purpose: Real Estate Management and Development. #62906 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Davies SI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Davies SI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity #62907 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Golden VI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Golden VI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62908

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Grace TI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 30, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Grace TI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity #62909 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company ("LLC"). Name: Grace Pl LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York ("SSNY") on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Grace Pl LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity #62909-1

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Jefferson TI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 22, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Jefferson TI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62910

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Rockwell TI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Rockwell TI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62912

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Oak CI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Oak CI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity #62911

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Stuhr GI LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 21, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Stuhr GI LLC, c/o Mountco Construction and Development Corp., 700 White Plains Road, Suite 363, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62913

Sealed bids will be received as set forth in instructions to bidders until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, August 05, 2021 at the NYSDOT, Office of Contract Management, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Bids may also be submitted via the internet using www.bidx.com. A certified cashier’s check payable to the NYSDOT for the sum specified in the proposal or a bid bond, form CONR 391, representing 5% of the bid total, must accompany each bid. NYSDOT reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Electronic documents and Amendments are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/ opportunities/const-notices. The Contractor is responsible for ensuring that all Amendments are incorporated into its bid. To receive notification of Amendments via e-mail you must submit a request to be placed on the Planholders List at www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/const-planholder. Amendments may have been issued prior to your placement on the Planholders list. NYS Finance Law restricts communication with NYSDOT on procurements and contact can only be made with designated persons. Contact with non-designated persons or other involved Agencies will be considered a serious matter and may result in disqualification. Contact Robert Kitchen (518)457-2124. Contracts with 0% Goals are generally single operation contracts, where subcontracting is not expected, and may present direct bidding opportunities for Small Business Firms, including, but not limited to D/W/MBEs. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/handicap and income status in consideration for an award. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 01: New York State Department of Transportation 50 Wolf Rd, Albany, NY, 12232 D264554, PIN SWZE21, Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Essex, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Ulster, Warren, Washington, Westchester Cos., Work Zone Traffic Control for Project Development Activities, Regions 1 & 8., Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $20,000.00), Goals: MBE: 5.00%, WBE: 10.00%, SDVOB: 6.00%

FCBJ

WCBJ

JULY 19, 2021

33


2021

NOMINATE TODAY SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JULY 16 at westfaironline.com/csuite2021/

HONORING LEADERSHIP AND OUTSTANDING ORGANIZATIONS IN WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY.

EVENT DATE: October 14, 2021 • 5 pm Nominations may be entered for those who work in the following roles, or who manage these responsibilities. For more, visit westfaironline.com/events

NOMINATION CATEGORIES: Chief Financial Officer (CFO) or the controller / financial leader Chief Technology Officer (CTO/CIO) or the technology executive Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or the top executive Chief Operating Officer (COO) Chief Medical or Marketing Officer (CMO) OR NOMINATE YOUR SENIOR EXECUTIVE THAT DESERVES HONORS, ACCOLADES OR ACKNOWLEDGMENT. WestfairOnline

PRESENTED BY:

For event information, contact: Fatime Muriqi at fmuriqi@westfairinc.com. For sponsorship inquiries, contact: Marcia Pflug at mpflug@wfpromote.com or 203-733-4545.

Profile for Wag Magazine

The Business Journals - Week of July 19  

The Business Journals - Week of July 19  

Profile for thewagmag

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded