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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL December 2, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 48 Photo illustration by Bill Fallon

YOUR ONLY SOURCE FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS NEWS | westfaironline.com

FCBJ this week LIBRARY INC. The Westport Library is a study in resource availability … 6

MakerBot opens store, minds in Greenwich NEXT INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION SMELLS UNLIKE FIRST ONE

PB STAYS PUT An incentive package helps keep the tech giant local … 9

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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DAVID LEWIS ON JOBS The picture brightens, if maddeningly slowly … 11 A BEST BET FOR POWER? Abest in Norwalk smiles on a windy day … 19

MEDIA PARTNER

Stamford Mayor-elect David Martin and Kathryn Emmett, the city’s director of legal affairs as of Dec. 1.

STAMFORD’S NEW TEAM

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As Stamford’s Mayor-elect David Martin prepared to assume the mayor’s office Dec. 1, he selected kathryn Emmett to run Stamford’s legal department. Attorney Michael Cacace of Stamford-based law firm Cacace, Tusch & Santagata served as chairman of Martin’s transition team legal committee.

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CUSTOMIZED AND TARGETED TRADING PLATFORMS

he future is here and can be found on Greenwich Avenue. No longer is 3-D printing some far-flung idea of the future, it’s yours for $2,200. Earlier this month, MakerBot opened two new stores in Greenwich and Boston to complement its flagship store in Manhattan. The store exclusively sells 3-D printers, 3-D scanners and related printing materials. For just over the price of a new MacBook Pro, tech enthusiasts will have a new gadget to play with this holiday season. Whereas 3-D printers were previously reserved for engineering labs or for hobbyists who built their own, now anyone with enough spare cash and ingenuity can own one. “The main goal of this store is to show people how it works, so you can see, touch and even smell 3-D printing,” said Bre Pettis, MakerBot CEO, during the store’s grand opening Nov. 22. “Smells good.” Similar to an ink-jet printer, the MakerBot desktop printer “prints” with a corn-based plastic “ink” from the bottom layer up, producing a 3-D product. From bracelets and trinkets to robotic hands, the company offers blueprints for more » MakerBot, page 8

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Barbara Netter, scourge of cancer on the genetic level By Frank Pagani

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here is new hope in the fight against cancer, thanks to the landmark research in cancer cell and gene therapy that is successfully treating and healing patients in clinical trials,” said Barbara Netter, president and co-founder of the Stamfordbased Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy (ACGT). “We’re excited by the tangible results from the clinical trials ACGT has funded and the promise that this therapy holds as a viable treatment option for cancer patients.” She added, “It is a means of targeting specific gene and cell mutations, thereby reducing or eliminating the side effects of traditional chemotherapy and radiation treatments.”

At a time when government funding for medical research has been reduced, sustaining ACGT’s critically needed innovative research has infused Netter and other members of the board of directors with an even stronger commitment to keep the organization on the path to success.

As the nation’s only not-for-profit exclusively dedicated to cancer cell and gene therapy treatments for all types of cancer, ACGT to date has awarded more than $24 million in grants to 42 prominent researchers in the U.S. and Canada. “It’s important to note that gene therapy was only an emerging field when we began,” she said. “The innovative research, led by some of the most renowned scientific minds, has spurred tremendous progress toward eradicating cancer in a relatively short period of time.” Among the notable breakthrough clinical trials she cites are those conducted by fellow Dr. Carl June and his team at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. The team successfully wiped out the leukemia cells in nine patients during their study and immunotherapy treatment efforts. Another is Dr. Michel Sadelain, director, Center for Cell Engineering at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, who led an unprecedent-

ed clinical trial that guided five patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia into complete, molecular remission with no detectable cancer cells. At a time when government funding for medical research has been reduced, sustaining ACGT’s critically needed innovative research has infused Netter and other members of the board of directors with an even stronger commitment to keep the organization on the path to success. “The fact of the matter is that without this foundation, research and understanding of gene and cell therapy would suffer tremendously,” Netter explained. ACGT will seek partnerships with biomed companies and investors as it embarks on a strategic course of action to expand its donor base. To accomplish that goal, ACGT will leverage the unique combination of features and capabilities it has amassed in becoming the unique not-for-profit leader in its field. Among them is the fact that 100 percent of donations contributed go directly to research. Another is ACGT’s Scientific Advisory Council comprised of 16 of the nation’s preeminent gene therapy physicians and researchers. They are responsible for establishing the scientific criteria to review all grants, developing strict accountability guidelines as well as making recommendation for funding to the board of directors. Moreover, ACGT is uniquely positioned in its specialized field by having access to the top scientific minds at hundreds of medical universities and institutions. A graduate of New York University and Iona College where she earned an M.S. as a pastor counselor and went on to have a successful private practice as a psychoanalyst, Netter marvels at how the “stars became aligned” a dozen years ago when she and her husband, Edward, got involved with gene therapy. It started with the loss of their daughterin-law to breast cancer. Then, they met Dr. Savio Woo of Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Dr. Michael Lotze of the University of Pittsburgh who introduced

2 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Barbara Netter, president and co-founder of Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy

the Netters to the possibilities and potential of cell and gene therapy for cancer patients. “My husband and I were so enormously enthusiastic about putting our energies and resources into this field, which was just beginning to emerge,” she recalled. Up until two and a half years ago, Netter had served as chairman of the ACGT’s special events. Following the death in 2011 of Edward, who had been a distinguished philanthropist and business leader, she assumed his role leading the foundation. She finds strong similarities in the evolution of both herself and the foundation. “In the beginning, the work we did

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at ACGT was based on faith, not unlike the spiritual faith that was central to my studies as a pastoral counselor. In both cases, it’s ultimately about striving to help people. Now, ACGT has results that have given hope to cancer patients that are truly palpable.” Netter also likens the work she did as a therapist and that of the foundation’s scientific investigators as disciplines that seek answers to what lies hidden. As for the foundation’s future, she likes to quote Sadelain whose unprecedented and successful clinical trial turned around the lives of five cancer patients: “This is the beginning of a golden age in cancer treatment.”

A Nov. 25 story on the Ernest C. Trefz School of Business misidentified the corporate positions of Ernie Trefz’s sons, who are principals of the Trefz McDonald’s Restaurant Group. Christian Carl Trefz is president and Paul Daniel Trefz is vice president.


‘Help wanted’ for the MD set

Insurance changes bring new staffing challenges BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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ry out “Is there a doctor in the house?” at your nearest hospital and the answer may very well be no or at the very least, yes, but they’re busy. Across the nation, there’s a desperate need for doctors, nurses and medical specialists. And with the Affordable Care Act the demand for health care providers will be even greater. Millions of people, who previously didn’t have access to health care, will be scheduling appointments and seeking care.

the health care industry, the company is ready for a rapid expansion, said Andrea Light, Teed’s chief operating officer. “There’s a crisis in the health care industry,” Light said. “Recruiting is a highend tool for advertising to get physicians to join a hospital or group. They have a lot of problems finding the right providers.” Some doctors might not keep up on their licenses or credentials, while oth-

ers don’t have the best customer service skills or can’t keep up with the number of patients they need to see in an hour, Light said. Weeding out the weaker applicants, Teed will try to match physicians with where they want to work and what they want to do. Most of the placements Teed makes are the result of cold calling practicing providers or resident medical students. They also keep an active online

presence, do mailings and attend medical conferences. Light estimated there are roughly 800,000 practicing doctors alone, on top of all the graduating medical students, nurses and other medical providers the firm could reach out to. “There’s more than enough work to expand our staff,” Light said. “It’s limitless to us.”

Straight up the hill and firm, Z.

“Millions will have access to health care, where in the past it was unavailable. I expect they’ll take full advantage of that.”

Yep. Got it.

— Shawn Teed, Teed & Co.

For Teed & Co. in Norwalk, this means growth. A national physician recruitment agency, the firm places about 80 physicians and health providers a year. In the next three to five years, owner Shawn Teed hopes to double that number. “Millions will have access to health care, where in the past it was unavailable,” Teed said. “I expect they’ll take full advantage of that.” “As long as the market continues the demand for providers, we’ll do our best to position ourselves to assist hospitals and medical offices with their particular needs,” he added. Just over a year ago, the firm tripled its footprint by moving into the old offices of Kayak Software Corp. in Norwalk and has since hired about eight new employees. Acting on a conscious effort to grow the company, it has bought all new phone systems and computers, as well. Teed started the company in 2000 after his employer, Weatherby Heathcare, sold to a competing recruitment firm. Ready for a change and a “better work environment,” Teed said he decided to strike out on his own and build something new. Now with the onslaught of changes in

Team McGladrey Golfer Zach Johnson and his caddie, Damon Green.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL

PERSPECTIVES

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Who’s game for presidential roulette?

olls don’t win elections or start wars, but they pass the time as well as the NFL at the office water cooler. Quinnipiac University’s polling center in Hamden is among the top in the nation and, just in time for the new year, it has released a raft of “what if” matches and mismatches to enliven the office party when you throw that adage about religion and politics to the wine-aided wind. Prognostications come with cave-

ats that include: Dewey did not defeat Truman; the 2012 White House race wasn’t the 2000-style nail-biter we were warned about; and Christine Quinn prematurely measured for drapes at New York City’s Gracie Mansion. Florida comprised Quinnipiac’s Petrie dish of 1,646 registered voters for 2016. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton are tops in their respective party primaries and run neck and neck in Florida

SPEaKING oF … PoLLS

“I haven’t trusted polls since I read that 62 percent of women had affairs during their lunch hour. I’ve never met a woman in my life who would give up lunch for sex.” – Humorist Erma Bombeck

“I’m going to be the nominee. It’s very hard not to look at the recent polls and think that the odds are very high I’m going to be the nominee.” – Former presidential candidate Newt Gingrich

“you cannot be driven by the polls. The polls change all the time; they’re easily manipulated by whoever wants to ask those poll questions; they go up; they go down.” – Former Vice President Dick Cheney

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Or write to: Fairfield County Business Journal 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 www.westfaironline.com

in an early look at the 2016 White House race, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released recently. Clinton tops U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio and other possible Republican candidates, the independent poll finds. Gov. Bush gets 22 percent in a hypothetical GOP primary with Rubio at 18 percent, New Jersey Gov. Christopher Christie at 14 percent and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas at 12 percent. No other candidate tops 9 percent, with 12 percent undecided. Clinton sweeps a Democratic primary with 70 percent, followed by Vice President Joseph Biden at 9 percent and no other candidate above 4 percent. Ten percent are undecided. Head to head, Clinton gets 47 percent to Bush’s 45 percent. She tops other Republicans: • 45-41 percent over Christie; • 50-43 percent over Rubio; • 51-41 percent over U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky; • 50-42 percent over U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin; • 52-36 percent over Cruz. Florida voters say 56-39 percent that Clinton would make a good president, the best score of any candidate, followed by Christie at 45-35 percent, with Bush at 46-44 percent. All other candidates get negative scores.

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Fairfield County Business Journal (USPS# 5830) is published Weekly, 52 times a year by Westfair Communications, Inc., 3 Gannett Drive, White Plains, NY 10604. Periodicals Postage rates paid at White Plains, NY 10610. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Fairfield County Business Journal: Westfair Communications, Inc., 3 Gannett Drive, White Plains, NY 10604. More than 40 percent of the Business Journal is printed on recycled newsprint. © 2013 Westfair Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited

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4 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal


New mayor taps Emmett for legal post Looks to continue Stamford’s success

Stamford Mayor-elect David Martin and Kathryn Emmett, the city’s director of legal affairs as of Dec. 1.

By Bill Fallon bfallon@westfairinc.com

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tamford Mayor-elect David Martin made his first cabinet-level appointment Nov. 21, naming Kathryn Emmett director of legal affairs. Afterward, Martin briefly addressed Stamford’s economy. He said citizens could expect what he termed “a revamping,” calling the early effort “a work in progress.” “We’ve had a lot of success here and we look to continue that success,” he said. “I have a very hopeful belief about the future.” Emmett accepted the legal post in a sun-splashed Stamford Government Center press conference. She, like the new mayor, assumes official duties Dec. 1. The transition has already begun with the transfer of information and cases to her supervision. “I can’t tell you what a great honor and privilege this is,” she said, standing beside Martin at the lectern. “I could not be more honored or more humble.” She called the city’s legal challenges “exciting and a challenge.” Emmett’s resume features Harvard undergraduate and Yale Law School degrees. In 1989, she was a founder of the law firm Emmett & Glander. She was a visiting scholar at Yale Law School and served as a judge of the Connecticut

Superior Court, 1982-88. She is a litigator and served as president of the Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association. Emmett is admitted to the Connecticut and California bars, but is for now in “inactive status” in California.

Emmett accepted the legal post in a sun-splashed Stamford Government Center press conference. She, like the new mayor, assumes official duties Dec. 1. The transition has already begun with the transfer of information and cases to her supervision. — Kathryn Emmett Her credentials also avail her of practicing before the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut; the U.S. Court of Appeals’ Second, Fourth, Fifth and 11th Circuits; as well as before the U.S. Supreme Court. Her current local duties include treasurer of the Board of the Stamford Downtown Special Services District and board member of the Ferguson Library. Mayor Michael Pavia, who won the seat in 2009, did not seek re-election.

Citrin Cooperman Corner Timing Is Everything: Smart Strategies For Tax Savings BY MARK MOTTEL, CPA CITRIN COOPERMAN It’s been almost one year since the country faced tremendous uncertainty over taxes, with the “fiscal cliff” front and center in the news. While the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA) passed in January 2013 and prevented tax increases for many taxpayers, high earners may actually end up paying higher taxes for 2013. So as the year draws to a close and you begin your tax planning, this is an ideal time to take a closer look at the changes instituted by ATRA as well as earlier tax acts and provisions that will now come into effect. HOW TIMING CAN AFFECT YOUR INCOME AND DEDUCTIONS: When it comes to taxable income over $400,000 for single taxpayers, $425,000 for head-of-household filers, and $450,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly ($225,000 for each married spouse filing separately), there’s a new top rate of 39.6% to consider. If your income comes close to this threshold and you have control over your income and deductions, you just might be able to save on taxes with careful timing and planning. • Defer income – if your tax rate will be lower in 2014, it may make sense to defer bonuses, self-employment income, IRA withdrawals, etc. until 2014. • Accelerate deductions – similarly, you might reduce your taxes for 2013 by accelerating deductions from 2014 to 2013. • Bunch deductions – certain miscellaneous itemized deductions are deductible for regular tax purposes to the extent they exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income. Bunching those deductions into one year may allow you to exceed the 2% limit. Keep in mind, these strategies might not be effective for everyone because of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). If you are subject to the AMT, your tax planning may be dramatically different. THE NEW 0.9% MEDICARE TAX & WAYS YOU CAN SAVE: You can also save on Medicare tax with careful timing of your wages or selfemployment income. For 2013, taxpayers must pay an additional 0.9% Medicare tax on FICA wages and self-employment income over $200,000 per year ($250,000 for joint filers and $125,000 for married filing separately). If your income is close to these thresholds, your timing strategies as explained above could also help minimize

or avoid this tax by shifting income between 2013 and 2014. The strategy is to keep both your 2013 and 2014 income below the applicable thresholds for the extra 0.9% tax. If you’re an employee, be aware that your employer might not be withholding the tax when they should. If you are self-employed, make sure you review your estimated taxes with respect to this new tax. WHEN YOUR DEDUCTIONS AND EXEMPTIONS PHASE OUT: The right timing and planning can also increase the tax benefits from your itemized deductions and exemptions. For 2013, the amount of your adjusted gross income affects the deductible amount of your exemptions and deductions. This rule was not in place from 2010-2012, but it’s back for 2013. As your income rises, the deductions and exemptions phase out. One way to reduce your adjusted gross income is to make retirement plan contributions – it will reduce your adjusted gross income and increase the tax benefits from your itemized deductions and exemptions. ASSET SALES & THE NEW INVESTMENT INCOME TAX: As you rebalance your stock portfolio, pay attention to the new 3.8% tax – it’s in addition to the regular capital gains taxes. Long-term capital gain tax rates are still significantly less than short-term capital gain tax rates: the maximum long-term capital gain rate is 20% for assets held more than 12 months, while the maximum short-term capital gain rate is 39.6% for assets held 12 months or less. The actual capital gain tax rate depends on your taxable income, so careful timing of the sale of your assets could significantly affect the tax that’s due. With all the changes instituted by these new laws and the additional complexities involved, proper tax planning is necessary now more than ever. Understanding these new tax rules and careful timing can make all the difference in planning for the future. About the author: Mark Mottel is a partner based in Citrin Cooperman’s White Plains office. He has more than 30 years of accounting experience and specializes in real estate taxation and sophisticated tax planning for businesses and high net worth individuals. Mark can be reached by phone at (914) 949-2990 or via email at mmottel@citrincooperman.com. Citrin Cooperman is a full-service accounting and business consulting firm with offices in White Plains, NY; Norwalk, CT; New York City; Livingston, NJ; and Philadelphia.

A MESSAGE FROM CITRIN COOPERMAN FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013

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‘True partners’

Westport explores what today’s libraries can be BY MARY SHUSTACK mshustack@westfairinc.com

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nyone who enters the Westport Library for the first time is in for quite a treat and maybe even a few surprises, including job-search seminars. There is art to admire and a coffee bar for lingering, gifts to purchase and cutting-edge technology at your fingertips. And most telling is the fact that there are no “shh-ing” librarians lurking about the oversize building on the banks of the Saugatuck River. This is not, as they say, your mother’s library — though it certainly is still a place filled with thousands of books and magazines where great value is placed on reading, intellect and creative thinking. But it goes far, far beyond that. And that’s exactly how Maxine Bleiweis, the library director for the past 15 years, likes it. “The way we operate is to open the windows and the doors and invite everybody in to be partners with us,” she says. “We’re true partners as opposed to us offering and them partaking.” The library, in fact, is known for meeting the needs of the community, offering more than 1,400 programs each year. Just skim a recent newsletter to get a glimpse into what’s included, from Jane Austen Day activities to a mystery-book discussion, a job-search seminar to a documentary screening, a tech-help session to a gathering of the chess club. As Bleiweis says, people could come in and sit alone at a computer to create a business plan, learn about e-books or take part in a language conversation group where the various options include Japanese, Russian, French and Hebrew. “These are people who have come together from all walks of life and have come together for that language,” she says. “That’s kind of a metaphor for the library.” Others may simply sit in the Great Hall and read the latest best seller. “The perfect library has space for both — quiet sanctuary and the lively exchange of ideas.” This is the kind of place that creates its annual report with elements that can only be seen with 3-D glasses. “It’s just like the library,” she says. “You’re learning something new and having a good time doing it.” Bleiweis came on as director in 1998. “Nobody knew how libraries were going to be impacted by the Internet,” she says.

Maxine Bleiweis in the Westport Library. Photo by Mary Shustack.

What has happened, she says, is “the coming together to sort it all out as a community.” Community is a big word for Bleiweis. “The public library has no boundaries in terms of traditional age, demographics, stages of life,” she says. “It’s very much an open platform. That’s the magic of it. It’s the ultimate democracy.” Her goal, she says, is to have the Westport Library be “Apple Genius Bar meets MIT lab meets Chautauqua.” It seems she is well on the way to that goal. “Libraries used to be errands, now they’re destinations,” she says, noting the average length of stay has gone from 5 minutes to 2 hours. “I’ve always been in charge,” Bleiweis says with a smile. Her career has found her in leadership roles in a handful of libraries, starting in New Jersey. “I decided I wanted to have more fun with it, so I became a director,” she says. Her path would bring her to Connecticut where her last stop before Westport would be 18 years in Newington.

6 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

“I liked people and I liked books, so I decided at 12 I was going to do this,” she says. Now living in the Black Rock section of Bridgeport, Bleiweis says she savors the job that never becomes tiresome. “The perfect day for me is meeting with lots of different people and hearing from lots of different vantage points.”

It’s ideal since Bleiweis admits her vision is always forward. “I am never ‘in the moment,’” she says. Instead, she’s always thinking of the next steps, “imparting what the library is and can be for people.” Forget thinking outside the box; she says, “I don’t even know that there is a » » Library, page 13


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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013

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8 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

CEO Bre Pettis at the grand opening of MakerBot in Greenwich.

MakerBot — » From page 1

than 100,000 objects on Thingiverse, an online community for 3-D print hobbyists. Just five years ago the company was selling build-your-own 3-D printer kits where users had to wear magnifying goggles to place wires together before soldering them in a toaster oven. Now it takes just minutes to hours to create an object, whereas older printers took days to weeks. Once the plastic ink is heated, it smells like waffles. “It’s not science fiction anymore,” Pettis said. “When people hear about 3-D printing, they think, ‘Okay, that’s something that space engineers use.’ And it’s true. Some of our customers include (NASA and Lockheed Martin) … but with this machine, it’s easy and accessible enough that anyone could use it. The hard part is that we have to tell people that.” In addition to the store opening, the company also recently launched the MakerBot Academy initiative to put a MakerBot printer in every school

in the United States. By registering at DonorsChoose.org, donors can purchase a printer at 25 percent off for teachers who have requested one. The donation is tax deductable. “We’re creating a whole new industry here,” Pettis said. “This something they can point to and say I made this.” “Manufacturing is coming back,” he added. “We don’t want the next generation to get left behind.” Jenny Lawton, MakerBot president and a longtime Greenwich resident, said she plans to personally fund every Connecticut school that signs up, for as long as she can afford it. “We’re leading the next industrial revolution,” Lawton said. “We allow people to take their creativity, ideas and thoughts and actualize them in the physical world.” “This is a huge goal but it’s absolutely achievable if everybody comes together and supports their community to make sure we put these in the hands of our kids,” Lawton added. “If kids know how to change the world, the world’s going to change a lot faster. It’s just an incredible project.”


Pitney Bowes stays in Stamford Multimillion-dollar package provides INCENTIVE BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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ith a $27 million incentive package from the state, Pitney Bowes plans to stay in Stamford. The mail and information technology company announced in September possible plans to leave “the city that works,” after selling its international headquarters, located near Stamford’s Harbor Point development project. Under Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s First Five program, the company will receive a $15 million loan, of which $10 million will be forgiven if the company creates 200 jobs in five years. Additionally, the company is set to receive up to $10 million in urban and industrial site reinvestment tax credits; a sales and use tax exemption of up to $1 million for capital improvements; and a $1 million job training grant. “Pitney Bowes has been a fixture in Connecticut for over 90 years and has exciting growth plans for its future in areas such as digital commerce and location intelligence,” Malloy said in a press release. “We are proud that the next chapter for this great company will be written in Connecticut.” Between its Stamford, Danbury and Shelton offices, Pitney Bowes employs roughly 1,600 people. The move comes at a time when the company is faced with several restructuring initiatives, in light of a difficult economy and dwindling postage revenues. After the company sold its headquarters, CEO Marc B. Lautenbach, reportedly said search plans for a new headquarters would include Stamford, but would not be limited to the city. The company is the 11th to receive a package under the First Five program, designed to attract and retain larger employers. “Our long-standing commitment to Stamford and the state of Connecticut is stronger than ever,” Lautenbach said in a press release. “On behalf of all of our employees around the world, I want to thank Gov. Malloy and his team for establishing a true partnership with our company. Today’s agreement allows us to continue to make investments in Connecticut as we deliver value for our shareholders and clients.”

Previous Pitney Bowes headquarters outside construction on Harbor Point.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013

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The Business Council Honors Michael Wathen with the Wheeler Business Leadership Award For over 30 years, The Business Council of Fairfield County has awarded the Walter H. Wheeler, Jr. Business Leadership Award to a member of the Fairfield County business community to demonstrate its commitment to volunteer leadership, and to offer a role model for all businesspeople to emulate. Walter H. Wheeler, Jr. served as CEO and Chairman of Pitney Bowes Inc. for three decades and as explained by Pitney Bowes’ President & CEO Marc Lautenbach, “was a vi-

sionary in recognizing the importance of what is now called human capital, while virtually creating the modern concept of corporate citizenship.” On November 12, The Business Council and its membership joined to honor, Michael Wathen, partner, PwC LLP. Chosen for his long engagement history as a volunteer, a fundraiser and a board member for a wide range of civic and social organizations, he has been a regional leader in the areas of education and

A special thank you to this year’s Walter H. Wheeler, Jr. Business Leadership Award Committee: The Ashforth Company Bank of America Merrill Lynch Connecticut Light & Power Day Pitney LLP Deloitte Diserio Martin O’Connor & Castiglioni LLP Finn Dixon & Herling LLP First County Bank First Niagara General Electric Company Harbor Point Development KPMG LLP Morrow & Co. Nestlé Waters North America Inc. O’Connor Davies, LLP

People’s United Bank Pitney Bowes Inc. Purdue Pharma L.P. PwC LLP Robinson & Cole LLP Shipman & Goodwin LLP Stamford Hospital Tauck, Inc. TD Bank Towers Watson UIL Holdings Corporation United Rentals, Inc. Webster Bank Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Xerox Corporation

(from l to r): Michael Wathen accepts the 2013 Walter H, Wheeler, Jr. Business Leadership Award from Marc Lautenbach, President & CEO, Pitney Bowes Inc.; John Stewart, President & CEO, Purdue Pharma L.P. and 2012 Honoree Jim Torgerson, Chairman & CEO, UIL Holdings Corporation.

workforce preparedness. In addition, his commitment to build the capacity of area non-profit organizations has allowed them to strengthen their ability to serve our community. Specifically, Wathen worked with Junior Achievement and Inroads to help underserved youth prepare to successfully enter the workforce, become financially literate and

learn the skills to assume corporate and community leadership. He also participated in BuildOn’s and United Way’s efforts to create social change that breaks cycles of poverty and produces healthy, well-educated families. More about the event and Mr. Wathen’s comments are at www.BusinessFairfield.com.

GET RECOGNIZED FOR YOUR WORKPLACE WELLNESS PROGRAM Submissions due by January 6, 2014 For more information please contact Tanya Court, Director, Public Policy & Programs at 203-705-0668 or visit www.BusinessFairfield.com

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10 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

#BCFairfieldCo


BY DaVID LEWIS

I

A chronically flawed process

nterviewing and selection is one of the most critical parts of the life cycle of any business. It determines to a great extent the level of success or failure of each company in that the performance of those we choose to work for us has a direct effect on how well we deliver our products and services. Yet something so critical and so impactful is usually so poorly executed. It’s rushed. It often is about gut feel vs. strategic execution. Sadly it often results in poor choices and frustrating results. It does not have to be this way. Here are some key steps to take that will help improve how your firm assesses and selects your future hires.

It’s become cliché for some to say that the most important asset in any business is the people. while it may be cliché it also usually is true. As such we need to invest as much time and effort into selecting those assets as we do in any other part of our operation. It’s important to have a plan. Most companies have prospective hires see anywhere from two people in the firm to perhaps five or more. Instead of having an uncoordinated screening efforts get everyone together who is part of the interviewing process and divide up the roles. Establish who is going to ask what questions, cover what aspects, inform on what levels, and so on. You will collectively cover more ground this way; eliminate wasting time asking the same questions over and over; and then have more information to share and use in your decision. Just because you have had to participate in an interview, usually as a candidate, does not mean you know how to interview. Too many hiring managers are just clueless when it comes to knowing what to ask, how to ask it and then how to interpret the responses received. Even worse is the hiring manager who thinks the interview is about them, talking on and on about the job and company, assessing the candidate by how many head nods and points of agreement and acceptance have occurred. With this in mind, get your managers some form of

INDUSTRY INSIGHT

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RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT FINANCE

David Lewis

training on how to interview and how to properly assess the candidate. Even with the training and a strategic interview process today’s candidate is better schooled and better prepared to answer the questions often posted in the average assessment process. Unfortunately the answers received may not necessarily be indicative of the candidate’s true feelings, abilities or interests, but instead just a set of responses the candidate thinks we want to hear that will help them get the job. As such the use of pre-hire testing tools has become all the more critical. Using a mix of personality profiling tests, designed to assess organizational fit and personal style, as well as skills testing for things like math, writing, specific software use and even organization, all will help validate your findings from the interview or give you some reason to reconsider your selection. It’s become cliché for some to say that the most important asset in any business is the people. While it may be cliché it also usually is true. As such we need to invest as much time and effort into selecting those assets as we do in any other part of our operation. Consider then taking a more thoughtful approach to a process that often gets less attention than is truly warranted. David Lewis is president/CEO of Fair�ieldCountyJobs.com, the region’s most proli�ic job board with more than 100,000 visitors a month to view jobs from more than 4,000 area employers. His monthly reports talk to the condition of the job market as measured by data from his sites as well as data from state, federal and industry sources in the public domain. Learn more at Fair�ieldCountyJobs.com.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 11


ASk ANDI

BY aNDI GRaY

Learn to work ‘on’ your business No matter what I do, it seems like I’m always getting pulled back into daily tasks. I know that my job as owner is to focus on building the business. But there are so many things that need to get done and I can’t afford to let things fall apart when the people around me can’t do it all. THOUGHTS OF THE DAY: Working “in” the business instead of “on” it can cost you. You can’t afford not to let things fall where they may when it looks like the people around you can’t do it all. Check into your growth rate — if things are falling apart, you may be trying to grow too fast. Ultimately your business will be run by someone else — use that visual to get focused now on what you have to do. Research shows that the majority of business owners in the U.S. — actually more than 90 percent of all businesses — spend most of their time working “in” and not “on” the business. Research also

shows that when business owners work “in” the business, net income over the years tends to flatline. If there are profitable years, much of those profits eventually get plowed back into the business during down cycles. The perceived risk of having things go wrong on a day-to-day basis is overshadowed by the reality of having a business that cannot stand on its own. The owner cannot take time away from the business to enjoy the rewards of what has been built for fear things will stall, or worse, decline, in his/ her absence. Consequently, hard work over the years turns into more of the same. Perhaps, most disturbing of all, when the long term focus is working “in” the business instead of “on” the business, exit value is nowhere near what it could be. When ready to exit, owners struggle to find a ready buyer willing to take over a business that depends on the ongoing involvement of the seller. To the extent that a buyer can be found, the value of the business is severely discounted due to inconsistent performance, lack of a strong, secure management team and inadequate systems. Now that I have your attention, let’s talk about another way to do things.

Learn to get out of the way. Make people fix the problems they create. Stop rescuing. In order for other people to learn, you have to let go. Give people specific assignments. Put the assignments in writing as job descriptions, process descriptions and agreements on conditions of success. Teach employees how to do what’s been written down. Don’t let them off the hook when things go wrong. Ask them to describe how they plan to fix the situation. Then hold their toes to the fire while they do it. Make sure employees understand the important role they play in building the company’s future. Have both short-term and long-term plans in place, with progress measures. Assign teams to oversee what’s going on. Talk with employees about the importance of teamwork. No individual heroes or heroines. Everyone is responsible for the success of the company. If problems crop up, ask the team to solve them instead of you personally jumping in to pick up the reins. Get regular reports on progress. Help the team brainstorm how they will know when the problem is fixed. Then ask everyone

to stay on task to get there. If things start to fall apart, check on whether the company overall is trying to take on too much, too fast. A growth rate of 10 percent to 15 percent, year-over-year, should be fast enough to stay ahead of inflation, and slow enough to allow time to catch and fix mistakes before they become big problems. Have a vision that includes exiting the business. Ensure that others know how to run the business in your absence. Use vacations as test runs. Looking for a good book? Try “Work Toward Reward: Building Business Value Today for a Well Deserved Future” by Chia-Li Chien. Andi Gray is president of Strate�y Leaders Inc., strate�yleaders.com, a business-consulting �irm that specializes in helping small to midsize, privately held businesses achieve doubled revenues and tripled pro�its in repetitive growth cycles. Interested in learning how Strate�y Leaders can help your business? Call now for a free consultation and diagnostic process: (877) 238-3535. Do you have a question for Andi? Email her: AskAndi@Strate�yLeaders.com. Visit AskAndi.com for an entire library of her articles.

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12 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal


Library — » From page 6

box.” And to have a job where that mindset is both admired and respected is invaluable. “It just feels good, and you feel so fortunate that you found what you were put here to do.” And Bleiweis’ efforts have been recognized, as she was named Outstanding Librarian by the Connecticut Library Association in 2011. But honors and awards are not what it’s all about.

“The public library has no boundaries in terms of traditional age, demographics, stages of life,” she says. “It’s very much an open platform. That’s the magic of it. It’s the ultimate democracy.” — Maxine Bleiweis

Bleiweis says she’s been visited by the director of the Boston Public Library and Skyped with librarians in Anchorage, Alaska. “It’s very flattering people want to know what we’re thinking,” she says. “As far as I’m concerned, it’s our obligation to share.” She says in Westport that thinking goes back to the original 1908 building which had the words “open to all” on its façade. “I think that libraries are about people,” she says. And “all” includes a community that is rich in talent, a space filled with entrepreneurs and philanthropists, writers and filmmakers, actors and artists. It’s about working with this community to serve its needs, from the practical to the fanciful. “At every stage of life we need some different information or perspective,” she says. Young people, she notes, embrace the library, particularly its MakerSpace, a showpiece introduced in 2012 where people are encouraged to “connect, invent and create.” It’s a popular draw, especially for the younger audience that Bleiweis says is far from apathetic. “When you find what you want to

focus on, they’re there,” she says. And for them, the library sometimes provides a true respite, free from school and family concerns. “Nothing follows you here,” she says. “It’s a clean slate.” And it’s a busy slate, as Bleiweis notes that the library answers about 200,000 questions a year and during Hurricane Sandy became a “literal port in the storm,” offering heat, food and WiFi. None of it would be possible, she adds, without solid community support. She says that 80 percent of the library budget, approximately $5 million, comes from the town, with the remainder from private funding. “If you’re a community that values education, that values intellect and improvement, you’re going to do that,” she says. Support is constant, including for the annual late-spring gala, “Booked for the Evening,” a benefit event that has featured director Martin Scorsese and poetmusician-author Patti Smith. “We’re like a thought incubator, and when you have the best minds, you have to have the best material,” she says, which leads her to again discuss that innovative MakerSpace. The centerpiece is a 3-D printer that has fueled imaginations young and old, helping people to share their stories. She in turn shares that the library has recently been awarded, with partners Southern Connecticut State University and the Connecticut State LibraryDivision of Library Development, a $250,000 federal grant to further develop this offering and help establish how other libraries can become places of what she calls “participatory learning.” Westport, she adds, has also become known in the publishing world as “a great venue for speakers in terms of great audiences.” Though the library itself is vast and impressive, demand has meant that sometimes patrons are turned away. A new building project, a private-public partnership, is under way. She offers a look at an artist’s interpretation of the glistening glass structure soon to be built. Bleiweis says it’s three-and-a half years from opening, a time that will include a two-year construction period. The design, she says, “just ‘strips away the façade’ and says ‘Come in, and when you come in, the sky’s the limit.’” Though still a ways off, Bleiweis says the library makes changes every day, such as introducing a new logo, “The Westport Library …” “What that means is we’re incomplete without you,” Bleiweis says. “You finish the sentence.”

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BEWARE Outside companies are soliciting BUSINESS JOURNAL readers for plaques and other reproductions of newspaper content without our consent. If you or your firm is interested in framing an article or award from our newspaper or obtaining a reprint of a particular story Please contact

Marcia Rudy of Westfair Communications directly at (914) 694-3600 x3021.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 13


Jobless rate lowest since ’09 BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

T

he unemployment rate in Connecticut dropped to 7.9 percent in October, according to the most recent labor report. The rate is the lowest since the economic recovery began in February 2010. The unemployment rate decreased by one-tenth of a percentage point in both October and September, from 8.1 percent in August. The rate hasn’t been below 8 percent since April 2009. Over the last year the state has added about 10,000 nonfarm jobs and decreased its unemployment rate from 8.4 percent in October 2012.

Due to the federal government shutdown, the release of September’s labor reports were delayed and added to October’s data release. Roughly 4,100 jobs were lost in September, led by cuts in leisure and hospitality, financial activities, business services and manufacturing. By comparison, the labor market remained flat in October, losing just 100 positions. All of the losses came from the government sector, while the private sector added 1,000 new jobs. Growth primarily occurred in education and health care; construction and mining; and leisure and hospitality. The labor losses in September and October, however, may have been the result of uncertainty leading up

to the federal shutdown and seasonal adjustment issues in public education, according to Labor Department officials. “The weeks leading up to the federal government shutdown, evidently, led to increased economic uncertainty and hiring indecision across the state,” said Andy Condon, director of the DOL Office of Research, in the report. “On a positive note, the state’s unemployment rate has declined for two months in a row primarily driven by a reduced number of unemployed individuals.” Of the 121,200 nonfarm jobs lost in the recession, the state has recovered roughly 49 percent, or 58,900 jobs. Over the 44-month period of recovery, the state has added an average of 1,339

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14 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

positions per month. For the first 10 months of the year the state has added 11,000 jobs, which is slightly better than in 2012, when the state added 9,600 by October. In both 2011 and 2010, the state added 10,400 jobs, showing the employment recovery has been modest, but consistent. In October, the BridgeportStamford-Norwalk region was the only labor market to post job losses in the state, losing 900 jobs during the month. Danbury gained 200 jobs and Hartford added the most: 1,500 jobs in October. Labor officials said losses in lower Fairfield County may have been attributed to the Metro-North commuter rail closure at the beginning of the month.

fter three years of implementing Bridgeport’s BGREEN 2020 initiative, the city has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 55,000 metric tons – the equivalent of a year’s worth of electricity for 7,600 homes. Under Mayor Bill Finch’s direction, more than 100 organizations and individuals in 2010 drafted the 10-year plan, aimed to transform the city into a greener, healthier and better place to live. Since then, more than 150 projects in support BGREEN 2020 have been completed or are underway, according to a three-year progress report. By creating a new energy district and park; promoting energy efficiency and implementing a new recycling system, the city is well on its way to reducing its energy consumption by 10 percent by 2020. The city has already acted on enough projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 162,000 metric tons once completed. The amount is the equivalent of 377,312 barrels of oil. Among the city’s biggest accomplishments is the establishment of the EcoTechnology Park, designed to showcase the city’s renewable and cogenerative energy production. There, Dominion is in the process of building the largest fuel cell plant in North America, which is expected to power more than 15,000

homes by the end of 2013. The city, in partnership with the Bridgeport Regional Business Council, is also purchasing an anaerobic digester at the wastewater treatment facility to convert sewage into energy and a hot water pipeline to use heat for the city’s solid waste mass burn facility. The energy generated will be used to power nearby industrial buildings and heat offices and apartments. “In just three years, we have made significant progress and are already seeing a great deal of success with a citywide reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, new green businesses moving into our eco-technology park, and increased recycling rates,” said Finch, announcing the three-year progress report. “We created BGREEN 2020 to create jobs, save taxpayers’ money and fight climate change.” The public-private plan is supported by the Fairfield County Community Foundation and funded by city, state and federal dollars, in addition to private investments. More than 2,500 trees have been planted, recycling rates have increased 64 percent and access to healthy foods has expanded through farmers markets, community gardens and urban agriculture. “Despite all of our progress, we still have much to do,” Finch said. “But I hope that our collective success in embracing and implementing the BGREEN 2020 plan will inspire us all to make Bridgeport the best it can be.”


THE LIST Biotech Firms

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY.

F

Listed alphabetically. Name, address, phone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

Top local executive(s) Year company established

Aptuit L.L.C.

Stuart E. Needleman President and chief operating officer 2004

2 Greenwich Office Park, Greenwich 06831 422-6600 • aptuit.com

Arvys Protein

Yelena Sheptovitsky President and co-founder 2005

76 Progress Drive, Stamford 06902 304-2495 • arvysproteins.com

Biodel

Errol De Souza President, CEO and director 2003

100 Saw Mill Road, Danbury 06810 796-5000 • biodel.com

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. 900 Ridgebury Road, P.O. Box 368, Ridgefield 06877 (800) 243-0127 • us.boehringer-ingelheim.com

FAIRFIELD COUNTY NEXT LIST: DECEMBER 9 CORPORATE SECURITY FIRMS

BIOTECH FIRMS

Description

Pharmaceutical services company that delivers early to mid-phase drug development solutions

Contract research organization that specializes in custom protein services; offers protein biochemistry expertise to the life science, biotechnology and pharmaceutical C17 communities

Develops forms of insulin and other peptide hormones for diabetes treatment and its complications

Paul Fonteyne President and CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim USA 1885

Focuses primarily in the therapeutic areas of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, diseases of the central nervous system, metabolic diseases, virology and oncology

Derek Chalmers CEO, president and director 2004

Biotechnology company focused on developing therapeutics to treat human diseases associated with pain and inflammation

Cara Therapeutics 1 Parrott Drive, Shelton 06484 567-1500 • caratherapeutics.com

MannKind Corp. 1 Casper St., Danbury 06810 798-8000 • mannkindcorp.com

PerkinElmer Inc. 710 Bridgeport Ave., Shelton 06484 925-4600 • perkinelmer.com

Purdue Pharma L.P. 1 Stamford Forum, 201 Tresser Blvd., Stamford 06901 588-8000 • purduepharma.com

SibTech Inc. 115A Commerce Drive, Brookfield 06804 775-5677 • sibtech.com

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals* 1 Stamford Plaza, 263 Tresser Blvd., Stamford 06901 564-1552 • spinifexpharma.com.au

Alfred E. Mann Chairman and CEO 1991

Biopharmaceutical company focused on therapeutic products for patients with diseases such as diabetes and cancer

Robert F. Friel Chairman and CEO 1937

Uses advanced biotechnology for varied purposes from critical therapeutic and disease research and prenatal screening, to environmental testing and industrial monitoring

John H. Stewart President and CEO 1892

Pharmaceutical company engaged in the research, development, production, sales and licensing of prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines and hospital products

Joseph M. Backer CEO 1992

Primarily focuses on the optimization of biopharmaceutical proteins for multiple applications

Tom McCarthy CEO 2005

Clinical-stage biotechnology company specializing in the development of products for the treatment of pain

Questions or comments, call (914) 694-3600, ext. 3005. Source: Company information obtained from company websites and respondents. * Company is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 15


One change can change everything Change is happening in big ways and small. Middle market companies are searching for the next disruptive innovations, looking to cloud-based solutions, eyeing foreign markets, considering M&A transactions. At Deloitte Growth Enterprise Services, we’re right there with you. Providing knowledge, insight, and services tailored to the changes you see in the world. And your company. To learn more about Deloitte Growth Enterprise Services, contact Steve Gallucci at +1 203 708 4075 or email us at dges@deloitte.com Gain insight with Perspectives, our series of reports, webcasts, and events for mid-market and privately held companies at www.deloitte.com/us/dges

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16 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal 1601-67007_DNA_Westchester_CB.indd 1

10/31/13 3:26 PM


SPECIAL REPORT

ENERGY

An energy platform to stand on

MARkET INNovAToRS ‘REDuCE CoST, ENCouRAGE uPTAkE’ of RENEwABlES BY BILL FaLLoN bfallon@westfairinc.com

N

aeem Hukkawala, 42, and Kapil Mohindra, 39, are veterans of many Wall Street markets and with their new venture, Stamford-based Skystream Markets, they are taking on renewable energy. The renewable energy market, according to Hukkawala and Mohindra, was growing, yet it lacked the technical oomph they and their team of 16 Skystream employees have been providing since their 2011 initial trading platform rollout. Other markets in the future may receive similar IT-market know-how if they suffer from what the Skystream founders uncovered in the nascent renewable energy arena: an industry with a tech trading deficiency. “We look at markets that are growing rapidly and if there’s not an electronic trading technology, we look to build and deliver that,” said Mohindra in a conference call with the Business Journal. “Renewable energy is our first — there was really a lack of trading tools there that are found in other industries.” Hukkawala, who has an MBA from New York University with a background in commodities, trading and investing, was also a specialist in credit markets, which he called “good experience in how to build exchange markets.” Mohindra’s background (Boston University, Solomon Bros.) prompted Hukkawala to note, “We share a lot of the same type of experience and background. Between the two of us we’ve seen every major marketplace.” They refer to each other as “a second set of eyes, a second set of opinions. Together, we’re very good at communicating the end product in a much stronger way.” The company’s first trading platform in 2011 they term an “auction type,” featuring multiple sellers for a single buyer or multiple buyers for a single seller. In 2012, Skystream made something of a quantum leap to a so-called “dynamic type” market trading platform, allowing and managing many bidders and many sellers simultaneously. The company’s trading platform

for renewable energy credits, called RECStream, is now used by, among others, 75 utilities. Markets are fueled by concerns that span commodities, regulatory changes and new products, said Mohindra, “They move very quickly.” On the heels of a teleconference interview, they answered several questions: In June you debuted your “multivintage” functionality that has allowed traders “to express a price view on the forward curve and transact ‘outrights and strips’ on an anonymous basis.” What does this mean for ener�y traders and, eventually, for ener�y users? “We’ve developed technology that delivers superior pricing information, which in turn makes these markets more efficient,” Hukkawala said. “This is an important point because efficient markets reduce the cost of capital for renewable energy development and encourage the uptake of renewable energy. As these markets grow, which we think they will, consumers can expect to see more of the energy that they use coming from renewable sources.” You claim a track record in launching and growing successful trading platforms that companies use across numerous market segments. Can you give an example of such a market segment and how your products help? “Skystream Markets has customized

trading technology for various segments of the marketplace,” Mohindra said. “Our technology solves core problems that clients face when trading. Several of our platforms exemplify this approach. Skystream created a competitive auction platform to help producers of solar energy monetize their SRECs (solar renewable energy certificates) for as many years into the future are possible. These transactions lock in the economics of the project to provide a return to investors and clarify the cash flow of the project. This is key for getting solar projects off the ground. We’ve helped a number of utility-scale solar development companies get their projects going. On a separate side of the market, Skystream has built its core trading platform, RECstream, which enables the largest renewable traders and utilities to value RECs across the state programs and renewable technologies including solar, wind, geothermal and biomass. RECstream is used daily by more than 75 utilities, energy commodity funds and scale renewable producers.” You say you are expanding into new areas such as research, data and hedging products. Have you found that in answering the trading platform need you have created other avenues for growth? any future plans in the ener�y arena? other market plans for 2014? “As in any growth market, the demand for information and trading technology

increases over time,” Hukkawala said. “Skystream’s customers are interested in products and services that complement and expand trading. This includes fundamental research and innovative new trade ideas.” “As a pioneer in the REC (renewable energy certificate) market, Skystream invests in new products in response to growing interest from core producers and traders of renewable energy,” Mohindra said. “In addition to RECs, Skystream is constantly evaluating developments and innovation in the energy arena. Expansion into other growing environmental commodities markets is a logical next step for the business.” The company, which participated in the state’s quasi-public finance entity Connecticut Innovations, employs 16. Besides its corporate headquarters in Stamford, it operates a sales and brokerage in New York City and a smaller office in Boston focused exclusively on sales. “We’re incredibly proud of our team,” Mohindra said. “It’s not just about Naeem and me. For their hard work and implementation, they are leaders in the market of building these platforms.” Why did you base your business in Stamford? “We moved to Stamford in 2012 when Connecticut Innovations invested in our technology,” Hukkawala said. “Stamford is a hub for the financial services industry and Connecticut has a track record of ongoing, successful efforts to promote clean energy locally. There is a strong talent pool in Stamford that is well suited for our business. In addition, a lot of our business comes from renewable energy producers and utilities in New England states so it is strategically important to us to be located in Connecticut.” What’s the outlook for 2014? “We’re very excited about 2014,” Mohindra said. “We’re continuing to grow our team and trading platform to keep pace with our market’s growth. We’re expanding into new areas such as research, data and hedging products. 2014 will be an important year as we are scaling up our business to reach renewable energy producers and commodities traders across North America.”

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 17


Power where shingles once ruled

Our waste-to-energy programs power over one million homes. In Connecticut, we power 64,000 homes. Find out more at www.wheelabratortechnologies.com

Program ENERGIZES home solar installations BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

T

he statewide program to increase home solar panel installations is thriving in Fairfield County. Solarize Connecticut recently launched its latest 20-week campaign in Stamford to get more residents to purchase and install solar panels onto their homes. The program offers a 20-percent-off discount for installations in addition to state-sponsored financing programs to eliminate up-front cost barriers. By state mandate, the Clean Energy

campaign, respectively added 73 and 51 solar installations by the end of the 20-week campaigns. Similar programs have also recently launched in Easton, Redding, Trumbull, Newtown and Greenwich. “You can see how this dramatically scales up the adoption of solar in the state,” Wall said. “The goal, ultimately, is to offer this to more and more communities and reduce the energy output and resources required to generate electricity.” By hosting the 20-week, group-buying campaigns, the installers are able to offer lower prices than is typical, Wall

Residents typically pay $4.50 per watt for solar energy on the solar marketplace if they don’t have solar panels. If they do install the panels, however, they’re electric bill could be as low as $16 — to cover the monthly service fee — if no other energy is needed beyond what the house generates.

One house = One thousand homes

In the right hands, waste is a powerful thing. The need for renewable power is greater than ever. That’s why Wheelabrator is using the resources at our disposal to create the energy equivalent of saving over 13 million barrels of oil per year. It’s a bright idea that’s good for both our economy and environment. In Bridgeport, we convert post-recycled waste into enough clean energy to power 64,000 Connecticut homes and businesses.

For more information, call 203 579 2607 Ext. 2212.

©2013 Waste Management, Inc.

18 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA), which runs the Solarize programs, must support 30 new megawatts of residential solar by the end of 2022. So far it has already approved 15 MW in less than two years. “It’s a great opportunity for residents to go solar and start saving on their electrical bills immediately,” said Bob Wall, a CEFIA associate director of outreach. Residents typically pay $4.50 per watt for solar energy on the solar marketplace if they don’t have solar panels. If they do install the panels, however, they’re electric bill could be as low as $16 — to cover the monthly service fee — if no other energy is needed beyond what the house generates. If a home generates more energy than it needs, utility companies provide a credit. Of the municipalities to participate in the roughly 1-year-old program, each has more than doubled the total number of solar systems previously existing. Residents in Fairfield and Westport, two the first four towns to host a Solarize

said. However buying a solar system isn’t cheap. Even after the total price of the system is reduced by up to 20 percent through the program and state and federal incentives are applied, the typical out-of-pocket expense is $10,000 on a 7 kilowatt solar system. To ease the burden, CEFIA offers two loan products: one with no money down and another with a down-payment option. There are also leasing opportunities with a lower long-term return. It’s an investment, but likely one of the cheaper opportunities that will pop up, Wall said. The discounts and incentives will likely decrease next year. Residents in the Fairfield County towns currently hosting campaigns will have until February or April to sign up for a system. Until then, the campaigns will be hosting workshops and meetings to answer residents’ questions about the systems and how they work. Throughout the state, roughly 450 customers have purchased an installation through the completed campaigns.


Power blowin’ in the wind ABEST INCREASES RENEwABlE PuSh

avoidance is 18,600 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions. The environmental benefit compares to taking two cars off U.S. roads for a year or not burning nearly 1,000 gallons of gasoline, according to data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Beyond these environmental benefits, enrollment also helps grow the green-power market, creating new revenue to keep existing renewable projects operational and fund new projects. Greater use of U.S.-made renewable energy translates to less reliance on imported sources of electricity, greater energy security and an economic stimulus through green job creation and additional tax revenue. Frank Rosa, Abest CEO.

A

best Power & Gas L.L.C., an electricity and natural gas supplier with offices in Norwalk and the Northeast region, and Georgia-based Sterling Planet, billed as the nation’s leading retail provider of renewable energy and other carbon-reduction assets, have reached a deal for Abest to offer wind-power options to its customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey. Sterling Planet will supply customers of Abest with Green-e Energy certified renewable energy certificates (RECs) from wind-power projects. Customers can match 50 percent or 100 percent of their use of conventionally produced electricity with RECs to lessen the environmental impacts of conventionally produced electricity with zero-emissions wind energy. The average residential customer can expect to pay an additional 50 cents daily for wind energy at the 100 percent level. “We’re excited about providing our residential and business customers the ability to choose to reduce the environmental impact of their everyday lives,” said Abest Power & Gas CEO Frank Rosa. “We all use electricity, so we all have an impact. Now electricity users in the markets we serve can erase that impact by simply making a choice.” Enrolled customers will avoid the emissions of carbon dioxide and its equivalent greenhouse gases that would otherwise result from electricity use. For the average U.S. residence using 1,000 kilowatt-hours monthly, the annual

Businesses enrolling for Abest wind power can claim a “greenup” of their electricity use to meet their environmental goals, strengthen their brand and demonstrate environmental stewardship to customers. Businesses using large amounts of electricity can request a quote for a wind power greenup. Sterling Planet’s RECs are Green-e Energy certified, which means “stringent standards for environmental integrity and consumer protection are upheld.” Each REC represents all the bundled environmental benefits of 1,000 kilowatt-hours of renewable power. “Sterling Planet is pleased to extend our green reach with this offer of renewable energy to Abest customers,” said

Mel Jones, Sterling Planet president and CEO. “The benefits of this sustainable energy extend beyond the environment. Wind power is home-grown, USA-made power that strengthens the economy, increases energy diversity and contributes to greater independence from imported fuels.” Abest provides energy rate plans — “economical and secure” — for businesses and homes. It is a subsidiary of publicly traded Corporate Resource Services. Since 2000, the Atlanta-based Sterling Planet has offered business and residential customers renewable energy certificates as a way to reduce the impacts of electricity use. — Bill Fallon

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gaultenergy.com FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 19


BY JoE MURTaGH

W

Know the goal, know the destination

hat’s the single biggest thing you can imagine that will grow your business? To reach a worthwhile business goal you must ask yourself this question and visualize the answer. Rather than shooting for the stars, we often don’t aim high enough and settle for “good” rather than the greatness we could achieve. We fail to inspire the people around us and deny everyone, including our customers, the opportunity to enjoy the personal fulfill-

ment that comes from reaching a worthy goal. Missiles and commercial aircraft constantly seek their destination using highly sophisticated systems that continuously monitor feedback signals and adjust their course using their navigational computers. To work however, they must be programmed to know their goal or, in this case, destination. The human mind is an incredibly sophisticated goal-seeking mechanism

that, just like a missile or airplane, can be programmed to reach a new destination. Every individual and business has an existing pre-programmed self image and is capable of changing it. Start by defining a clear, ambitious goal that you’re confident about achieving and clearly communicate it. But a goal alone isn’t enough. Everyone involved must have a deep personal belief in the ability to achieve it. This isn’t about skill or competence. Many businesses filled with skilled and competent people fail. It’s about confi-

when Thomas watson founded IBM, he did his research, gathered data and then developed a clear picture of what the company would look and act like when completed.

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20 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

dence. That confidence can be developed through gathering data, research, training and visualization. When Thomas Watson founded IBM, he did his research, gathered data and then developed a clear picture of what the company would look and act like when completed. He then trained himself and his people to visualize his goal as if it were already done. You, like Watson, can train yourself and organization to develop the ability to focus on the goal, which is the key to visualization. Dr. Denis Waitly has studied and counseled winners in every field from Apollo astronauts to Super Bowl champions. “The human being is the only creature on the earth that can direct his

or her future by choice. You choose what you are looking for in the future through the repeated use of your creative imagination. The way you perceive your world defines the world in which you live.” Visualization supercharges the goal and accelerates it becoming reality. David Novak author of Taking People With You says, “People will get on board with your goal when they understand it, when they know what they’ll get out of it and when they know that you are as invested in it as they are. Only then will they truly feel accountable for doing their part to make it happen.” They must know that you are totally committed. In A Bias for Action by Heike Bruch and Sumantra Ghoshal they say ‘commitment’ means, “Taking ownership for the ultimate outcome. You must take time for conscious reflection, for considering your alternatives and for asking yourself if the project feels right.” Do you really want it? Is it exciting? Does it match your personal values and beliefs? Can you stand behind it both rationally and emotionally?” To achieve big goals train yourself and organization to clear negativity and leverage strong emotions through visualization. What will your goal look like when it’s accomplished? Can you picture the customer buying it? Using it? Being happy with it? This visualized picture will support you through your most difficult times. So what is the single biggest thing you can imagine that will grow your business? Clearly define a “big” goal, research and communicate it and get everyone onboard by explaining how achieving it helps them. Cement success using visualization. This column is provided by Joe Murtagh, The DreamSpeaker, an international motivational speaker, meeting facilitator and business trainer. For questions or comments contact Joe@TheDreamSpeaker. com, TheDreamSpeaker.com or call (800) 239-0058.


BY aNDREW F. MCGRaDE

V

Energy, a potential investment opportunity

olatility in the global economy creates opportunities for investors to take advantage of emerging trends in the marketplace. The rise of a powerful middle class, coupled with a growing need for essential resources, is driving the demand for energy throughout the world. Consequently, the United States is making strides

The united States is now on course to become energy independent with our oil supply being the fastest growing out of any country in the world in 2012. Although the country still imports roughly 25 percent of its energy, certain catalysts have come together recently to make selfreliance come forward as a true possibility.

toward becoming energy independent through various business and technological innovations. This newfound independence opens up investment prospects in the financial market. The United States is now on course to become energy independent with our oil supply being the fastest growing out of any country in the world in 2012. Although the country still imports roughly 25 percent of its energy, certain catalysts have come together recently to make self-reliance come forward as a true possibility. The stimulus for this began with the boom in extracting natural gas and oil from shale rock formations via fracking. All of this has been made economically feasible due to technological innovation. New tools such as 3-D seismic mapping and horizontal drilling made natural gas and oil not only discover-

able, but also recoverable. Solar panels are becoming cheaper and more effective today in the renewable energy sector. Moreover, the growing popularity of hybrid cars is also an important factor in our progress. With the United States becoming energy independent, one must take a look at the financial implications emerging as a result. The shift in the energy industry will have a major impact on the U.S. economy — changes in manufacturing, a potential increase in consumer spending and the creation of more jobs in infrastructure roles. These changes will also have an impact on the investing community.

The government’s stated goal of an energy-independent U.S. generates investment potential across the oil and natural gas sectors. Looking a few years ahead, upgrades to the natural gas delivery network mean investment opportunities lie in companies who replace old pipelines or install new ones. The United States Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that 100 years of natural gas are recoverable, presenting an opening to invest in exploration and extraction. Fracking, while still controversial, is likely to increase, meaning that cleaner fracturing technologies will continue to develop. Therefore, as coal-fired power plants convert to natu-

ral gas plants, investing prospects arise. Additional investment opportunities are developing across the oil and natural gas industries in storage facilities, hydraulic fracturing, local distribution and energy companies. Adapting to a constantly transforming world is a challenge for any investor, but what one must always remember is that it is also a potential opportunity. As the U.S. continues to be more and more resourceful, now is the time to consider the energy sector as a crucial investment strategy. Andy McGrade is managing director and market investment director at U.S. Trust in Fair�ield County.

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Fesitive holiday events shine in Ridgefield visitors have long been drawn to Ridgefield for our quaint Main Street, historic landmarks, inspirational open spaces and vibrant cultural happenings. At no time of year does our town shine more than during the holiday season. This festive season officially begins with our holiday Stroll friday evening, Dec. 6, 6-10 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., when our downtown comes alive with holiday revelry — The Ridgefield Chorale carolers, horsedrawn carriage rides and ice sculptors line the streets as our stores open their doors to welcome holiday shoppers. you’ll find unique gifts for everyone on your list in our shops as you stroll downtown Ridgefield. Begin or end with the holiday Boutique at the historic lounsbury house. opportunities to find unique gifts for all ages abound all month. If you miss the holiday Stroll, the keeler Tavern Museum is hosting a holiday Boutique featuring local crafters Dec. 10-15 and The festive home Show runs all month at the Ridgefield Guild of Artists. for those who shop early, our performing arts organizations offer many opportunities to get into the holiday spirit, as well. In addition to the events already listed, the Ridgefield Chorale presents a holiday Pops concert Dec. 8 and the Ridgefield Playhouse presents the Nutcracker Dec. 14, 15 and the holiday Spectacular Dec. 19, 20. Enjoy lunch or dinner at one of our wonderful restaurants and take in a show. or, if you need a break from the hustle and bustle, visit the grounds of weir farm National historic Site, which have inspired artists since J. Alden weir, pioneer of American Impressionism, established this creative refuge for friends and fellow artists in 1882. or, enjoy a few moments of inspiration at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. founded in 1964 and dedicated to fostering innovative artists and encouraging creative thinking, the Aldrich is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art. The current exhibition explores the relationship between music and art. for more information on upcoming events, please visit destinationridgefield.com or ridgefieldartscouncil.org. I invite you to join us this holiday season, or anytime, to experience Ridgefield. It’s a wonderful town!

Rudy Marconi first Selectman Town of Ridgefield

The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT:

RIDGEFIELD A ROCKAPELLA HOLIDAY AT RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE

with the success of the Tv smash “Glee” and a cappella groups reigning at the Corner of Cool on college campuses, there is clearly a hunger for exciting live vocal performance. A single concert opens a window on practically the whole history of vocal music from vintage Mills Brothers through jazz and rock to current hip hop. Join the group, Rockapella, which has worked with everyone from Disney to Spike lee as members lead us in a night of holiday favorites. from the Dreidel song to “o holy Night” to the very funny “The Christmas Song.” All ages will enjoy this amazing show. Thursday Dec. 12, with special guests The Ridgefield high School Madrigals. for more info, visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org.

FESTIVE HOME NOW OPEN AT RIDGEFIELD GUILD OF ARTISTS

The white-walled galleries have been transformed into a holiday emporium at Ridgefield Guild of Artists for the 9th annual festive home event. Eleven local designers donate their time and talents to create inspiring holiday vignettes featuring guild member artwork becoming the backdrop for the merry marketplace. The galleries are brimming with hundreds of items for home decorating and gift-giving. Shoppers will find unique, hand-selected and handmade items. festive home is the guild’s largest fundraiser of the year and brings in muchneeded resources, helping to keep the doors open and programs running. The event continues through Sunday Dec. 22 with extended shopping hours. The guild is at 34 halpin lane, Ridgefield. visit rgoa.org for more information.

A VERY HOLIDAY POPS Start your holiday season on the perfect note with the Ridgefield Symphony orchestra. “A very holiday Pops” takes place Saturday, Dec. 7, 8 p.m., at Ridgefield high School and features vocalist Jessica Medoff singing “I’ll Be home for Christmas,” “white Christmas,” and “Santa Baby,” to name a few. A talented children’s chorus from farmingville School joins the orchestra for “Jingle Bell Rock” and the orchestra performs leroy Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride,” “March of the Toys” from “Babes in Toyland,” and Corelli’s “Christmas Concerto,” all under the baton of conductor Jeffrey Grogan. we’re “giving the gift of music” by videotaping the concert, which will be shared with all patients in Danbury hospital over the holidays. for tickets and information, visit ridgefieldsymphony.org or call (203) 438-3889.

HOLDIAY PIANO BAR(N) looking for a great way to usher in the holidays? how about spending an entertaining evening filled with live music, talented performers and good company? Maybe even shake out of your comfort zone and hop on the stage yourself? Join us for a very special holiday Piano Bar(n), friday Dec. 13, and Saturday Dec. 14, when we’ll bring the Manhattan club scene to the Ridgefield Theatre Barn. Singers, with the accompaniment of pianist Tom Morris, will offer their favorites while encouraging the audience to sing songs almost everyone knows. Guaranteed to be a fabulous night, so don’t miss out. And if you bring a donation for the Ridgefield food Pantry, we’ll give you a glass of wine to enjoy along with the music. for more info, visit ridgefieldtheatrebarn.org

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 22 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL aTTaCHMENTSFILED Sport-N-Life Distributing L.L.C. and Gilbert Beck, Stamford. Filed by Scalfani Properties L.L.C., by Peter V. Lathouris, Stamford. Property: 70 Apple Tree Drive, Stamford. Amount: $75,000. Filed Nov. 13.

aTTaCHMENTSRELEaSED Gunther, Frederick W. and Gunther Homes Inc., Trumbull. Released by Atlantic National Trust L.L.C., by Mark C. Valentine, Stratford. Property: 128 Fernwood Road, Trumbull. Filed Nov. 14.

CoURT CaSES

BRIDGEPORT DISTRICT COURT BJ’s Wholesale Club Inc., et al. Filed by Santina Zuiewski. Plaintiff’s attorney: Moukasher & Walsh L.L.C., West Hartford. Filed Nov. 15. Case no. 6039354. Brennan Associates, et al. Filed by Raffaele Gagliardi. Plaintiff’s attorney: Rodie & Connolly P.C., Stratford. Filed Nov. 15. Case no. 6039357. Capital Donuts L.L.C., et al. Filed by Homeland Builders Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Green & Gross P.C., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 6039385. Carlson Construction L.L.C., et al. Filed by Acranom Masonry Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Murphy, Laudati, Kiel, Buttler & Rattigan, Farmington. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6039284. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

Centerplan Construction Company L.L.C., et al. Filed by Kamco Supply Corporation of New England. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert A. Ziegler, Plainville. Filed Nov. 13. Case no. 6039305.

The Community Action Committee of Danbury Inc. Filed by Hispanic Center of Greater Danbury Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cramer & Anderson L.L.P., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6014018.

City Supermarket Corp. d.b.a. Fine Fare Supermarket, et al. Filed by Olga Arizmendi. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cohen & Wolf P.C., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Case no. 6039298.

STAMFORD DISTRICT COURT

Colony Green Condominium Association Inc., et al. Filed by Gaye Lynne Eschert. Plaintiff’s attorney: Lori A. DaSilva-Fiano, Fairfield. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6039264. DJ Petrucci L.L.C. Filed by Mabey Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: London & London, Newington. Filed Nov. 13. Case no. 6039304. Ducci Electrical Contractors Inc., et al. Filed by Jaclyn Bellino. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert Jay Levine, Providence, R.I. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6039285. Mother of Mary Inc. d.b.a. St. Ann Club. Filed by Patricia A. Delyonas. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ottomano & Johnson L.L.C., Westport. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 6039386. Polidor L.L.C. Filed by Taylor Interior Design Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Sugarmann & Sugarmann, New Haven. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6039241. Unity Fuels d.b.a. Grease Lighting. Filed by Bridgeport Biodiesel L.L.C. Plaintiff’s attorney: Jeremy David Platek, White Plains, N.Y. Filed Nov. 14. Case no. 6039334.

DANBURY DISTRICT COURT Alliance Energy L.L.C., et al. Filed by Katie Delinski. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura, Ribeiro & Smith, Danbury. Filed Nov. 15. Case no. 6014060. Graphline Inc., et al. Filed by Fedex Techconnect Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Brian S. Cantor, Fairfield. Filed Nov. 15. Case no. 6014055. Kellogg Hardwoods Inc., et al. Filed by Michael Edward Breede. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cuddy & Fedder L.L.P., Stamford. Filed Nov. 13. Case no. 6014048.

All Seasons Restoration & Roofing L.L.C. Filed by Hartford Underwriters Insurance Co. Plaintiff’s attorney: Weinstein, Weiner, Ignal, Vogel & Shapiro, Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Case no. 6020421. Anthem Health Plans Inc. Filed by Pamela Moss, et al. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ury & Moskow L.L.C., Fairfield. Filed Nov. 14. Case no. 6020428. Buxton Pond Farm Corp. Filed by Cedar Lodge Farms Corp. Plaintiff’s attorney: Harold R. Burke, Greenwich. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6020400. MJM Stone Supply of Stamford Inc. Filed by Shannon Hill Stone Co. Plaintiff’s attorney: Greene Law P.C. Farmington. Action: The plaintiff has brought a contract-collection suit against the defendant. Filed Nov. 12. Case no. 6020387. Town of Greenwich, et al. Filed by Minerva Lachira. Plaintiff’s attorney: Richard H.G. Cunningham, Stamford. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 6020443.

SUPERIOR COURT Midland Credit Management Inc. Filed by Angelo Framularo. Plaintiff’s attorney: Joanne S. Faulkner, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought a consumer credit suit against the defendant. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 13cv01712. Nationwide Property & Casualty Insurance Co. Filed by Barbershop L.L.C. Plaintiff’s attorneys: John H. Lindsay and Jeffrey J. Rea. Action: The plaintiff has brought an insurance suit against the defendant. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 13cv01722. Progressive Casualty Insurance Co. Filed by Amity Excavation & Construction Services. Plaintiff’s attorney: Candace Veronica Fay. Filed Nov. 20. Case no. 13cv01736.

Spanlite Polylite Legacy Ltd., et al. Filed by Lumivisions Architectural Elements Inc. Plaintiff’s attorney: Carlos J. Cuevas. Action: The plaintiff has brought a trademark infringement suit against the defendant. Filed Nov. 19. Case no. 13cv01729. TokenEx L.L.C. Filed by Protegrity Corp. Plaintiff’s attorney: Stephen P. McNamara, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought a patent suit against the defendant. Filed Nov. 18. Case no. 13cv01719.

DEEDS

COMMERCIAL 29 Imperial Avenue L.L.C., Westport. Seller: MCP Imperial Avenue L.L.C., Westport. Property: 29 Imperial Ave., Westport. Amount: $800,000. Filed Nov. 18. BRBW2889L.L.C. Seller: 2889 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. Property: 2889 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Chiu, Rafael MD (one-half interest). Seller: John P. Simses Jr., Trumbull. Property: Unit 107, Hawley Lane Office Center, Trumbull. Amount: $300,000. Filed Nov. 14. Greenwich Estates L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: Alfred J. Padilla, Greenwich. Property: 4 Dearfield Drive, Unit 5 Dearfield Medical Center, Greenwich. Amount: $435,000. Filed Nov. 18. GRT 2013 L.L.C. Seller: Vivian Simons, Weston. Property: 5 Ladder Hill Road, Weston. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Platt Building L.L.C., Southbury. Seller: Tilson Financial L.L.C., Newtown. Property: 9 Pearl St., Sandy Hook. Amount: $139,000. Filed Nov. 15. ROB Hat Realty L.L.C. Seller: L.O.R. Management L.L.C., Danbury. Property: 27 E. Pembroke Road, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Sound Garrett Bridgeport L.L.C. Seller: Sprint Communications Company L.P., Bridgeport. Property: 577 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13.

WRT-Highgrove Property L.P., Boston, Mass. Seller: 70 Forest Street Marketing L.L.C., Chicago, Ill. Property: 70 Forest St., Stamford. Amount: $80 million. Filed Nov. 13.

QUIT CLAIM Mesiya, Mohammed Farooque, Guilford. Seller: Michael J. Mesiya, Stamford. Property: 35 W. Broad St., Unit 422, Stamford. Amount: $200,000. Filed Nov. 12.

RESIDENTIAL 10 Wakeman L.L.C., Westport. Seller: Ester Burroughs, Westport. Property: 292 Post Road East, Westport. Amount: $675,000. Filed Nov. 15. 21 Dryden Street L.L.C. (one-half interest), Stamford. Seller: Patti and Teodoro Melchionno, Stamford. Property: 21 Dryden St., Stamford. Amount: $122,500. Filed Nov. 12. 21 Dryden Street L.L.C. (one-half interest), Stamford. Seller: Anna Cataldo, Stamford, and Antoinette Giannotti, Valrico, Fla., and Ralph Gentile, Hackettstown, N.J. Property: 21 Dryden St., Stamford. Amount: $122,500. Filed Nov. 12. 415 GA Acquisition L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Dietrich Family L.P., Stamford. Property: 417 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $4.6 million. Filed Nov. 15. 445 Holland Hill L.L.C. Seller: Scott Lawton, Fairfield. Property: 445 Holland Hill Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Advanced Funding L.L.C. Seller: Lillian and John C. Anderson, Norwalk. Property: Lot 22, Block D, Map 774, Norwalk. Amount: $202,000. Filed Nov. 15.

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Akter, Rashada. Seller: Baboo Khan and Mohammad Kashif, Bridgeport. Property: 65 to 67 Poplar St., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Al-Obidee, Enass and Mohammed Al-Azdee. Seller: Esperanca Alves, Monroe. Property: 108 Jockey Hollow Road, Monroe. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Alves, Jose D. Seller: Charlene Carr, Bridgeport. Property: 95 Saunders Ave., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 23


NEWSMAKERS plus awards and events NEW ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AT PALACE

GREAT EATS, GREAT CAUSE

Stamford’s PALACE THEATRE embarks on its next chapter with the appointment of new producing artistic director, B.T. MCNICHOLL, a veteran of the Broadway theater community. McNicholl will oversee productions at the historic 1927 Palace and a soon-to-be-completed Off-Broadwaysized playhouse. Four blocks away is The Palace’s sister theatre, the state-of-the-art RICH FORUM, currently leased by NBC Universal as a television production studio. “I’m thrilled to take the reins of these beautiful theaters, so close to the vibrant arts and resources of Manhattan,” said McNicholl. “Our stages will be teeming with artists engaged in large productions, small plays and new works that will continually entertain, engage and enlighten.” He will continue to helm productions in New York.

KNIGHT BROWN JOINS BIG APPLE IP GROUP

New York City-based AXINN, VELTROP & HARKRIDER L.L.P. announced Fairfield County resident DELPHINE KNIGHT BROWN has joined its intellectual property group as a partner. She will be based in the fi rm’s New York office. A litigator, Knight Brown has tried numerous intellectual property and commercial cases involving a wide range of industries and products, including pharmaceuticals, medical devices, computer software and hardware and business methods and processes.

Nearly 140 people attended the BRIDGEPORT HOSPITAL FOUNDATION 25th anniversary wrap-up event in Shelton, “An Evening with Giada,” featuring Food Network star and cookbook author Giada De Laurentiis. The Nov. 6 event included a VIP reception at Il Palio Restaurant and a discussion moderated by DIANE SEMBROT, editor of Fairfield Living magazine, at the neighboring R.D. Scinto Auditorium.

Among those on hand were, from left, DR. ROBERT FOLMAN, co-medical director, NORMA F. PFRIEM Cancer Institute, and his wife TOBY; Dr. Richard Freedman; GIADA DE LAURENTIIS; DR. FREEDMAN’S wife, NANCY; MARYELLEN KOSTURKO, senior vice president, patient care operations; and MARC BRUNETTI, vice president, administration. Seated from left are LYN SALSGIVER, senior vice president, planning and marketing; and Brunetti’s mother, ANNE.

WELLS FARGO HELPS CAROLINE HOUSE

CITIZENS’ APPS RING A BELL

Many of us in the United States have been taught at an early age the importance of saving. For many immigrants though, their national economy and banking systems aren’t as trustworthy and many need to be introduced to the banks in the U.S. WELLS FARGO store manager JUSTIN RAMSTECK and banking associate MARLENE JONES gave a presentation to the students of Bridgeport-based Caroline House on “Banking 101.” The students were taught how to open an account, how the money can grow with interest and that a bank is a safe place to keep their money. Caroline House bills itself as a beacon of light in the inner city. Ramsteck said; “Wells Fargo is committed to serving our community. We truly appreciate what Caroline House does and enjoyed speaking to the women about banking and the services Wells Fargo provides that will benefit them.”

Providence-based CITIZENS BANK’s mobile banking apps for iPhone and Android have earned Javelin Strategy & Research’s 2013 Highest Mobile Banking Smartphone Ratings Award for 2013, following its review of customer ratings in the Apple App Store and in Google Play. The bank maintains multiple branches in Fairfield County. Citizens Bank’s average customer rating of 4.5 of 5 stars for both iPhone and Android tied with the highest in the industry as reported by Javelin this week. In 2012, Javelin recognized Citizens Bank’s mobile apps as “best integrated apps” in the industry.

24 Week of December 2, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal


AMERICARES’ DECADE OF CARE IN LATIN AMERICA

GREENWICH HOLIDAY WEEKEND

DaTES

DECEMBER

5

Stamford-based AMERICARES is celebrating 10 years of providing affordable, high-quality medical care in El Salvador. The AmeriCares Family Clinic in rural Santiago de Maria opened in November 2003. Since then, patients have made more than 380,000 visits for primary and specialty care, including obstetrics, gynecology, ophthalmology and dentistry. The clinic draws more than 45,000 people annually.

GREAT PLACE TO CO-WORK

The fifth annual GREENWICH HOLIDAY STROLL WEEKEND will usher in the season with a multitude of activities and entertainment for the whole family Saturday Dec. 7, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday Dec. 8, noon-5 p.m. Downtown Greenwich will be filled with fun festivities, such as horse drawn carriage rides, live singing performances, professional ice sculptors, bouncy castles, a food truck village, live reindeer and photos with Santa and more than 100 Greenwich merchants and restaurants offering special promotions, refreshments and in-store activities. Parking will be free all weekend. Saturday’s parking is provided by the TOWN OF GREENWICH DEPARTMENT OF PARKING SERVICES.

DECEMBER

14

THE SKINNY ON EXECUTIVE SEARCH

The STAMFORD INNOVATION CENTER at 175 Atlantic St. in Stamford has a remade interior to match the grandness of its old civic architecture. Part of the state’s INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM, the center and its co-working space and sharing ethos represent Stamford as “the city that co-works.” The center hosts Hacker Night every Tuesday, 5-10 p.m., a networking/pizza get-together for marketers and tech people, among other pro-startup programs and activities.

GREENWICH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY hosted a presentation by RUSSELL REYNOLDS at Vanderbilt Education Center Wednesday Nov. 20. Reynolds discussed his book, titled “Heads, Business Lessons from an Executive Search Pioneer.” He offered insights into the critical role of executive search in today’s business world. Reynolds is the founder and chairman of RSR Partners, a leading executive and board search fi rm that recruits corporate directors, CEOs and senior executives in a broad range of industries.

FIRE LESSONS A network of private medical practices known as N1Health is renting out The Ridgefield Playhouse, 80 East Ridge, and invites the community to come, free of charge, to a powerful film called “Escape Fire,” Thursday Dec. 5, 7 p.m. A reception runs 5-6:45 p.m. in the lobby. After the screening, there will be a discussion and Q&A with Dr. Thomas V. Cigno and Dr. Erin Martin (featured in the film). For reserved seats (free), call the box office at (203) 438-5795 or visit online at ridgefieldplayhouse.org.

BUSINESS FINANCE OPEN FORUM Join Women’s Business Development Council finance expert Chris Schoen for an opportunity to address your most pressing business finance issues. Monthly discussions will tackle real-life issues facing today’s small business owner. Become conversant with your business financial position, increase revenue, forecast and predict cash flow. Saturday Dec. 14, 9:30 a.m-12:45 p.m., WBDC office, 184 Bedford St., Suite 201, Stamford. Preregistration required, but no charge. For more information, call (203) 353-1750.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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on the record Anastasi, Catherine M. and John S. Anastasi. Seller: Lucile Arnaz Luckinbill and Laurence G. Luckinbill, Weston. Property: 22 White Oak Lane, Weston. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Anderson, Douglas. Seller: Richard Walsh, Wilton. Property: 38 Fawn Ridge, Wilton. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. Andreassi, Cristina D., Stamford. Seller: Abdellatif Tazi, Stamford. Property: 300 Broad St., Unit 801, Stamford. Amount: $257,000. Filed Nov. 15. Arendt, David C. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 106 Pinewood Trail, Trumbull. Amount: $226,750. Filed Nov. 14. Ashford, Samantha L. and Orlando D. Ashford, Greenwich. Seller: Laura Ruffolo, North Kingston, R.I. Property: 55 Cutler Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed Nov. 12. Bakhtiarova, Galina and Mikhail P. Pivovarov. Seller: Connie L. Meyers, Bridgeport. Property: 33 to 55 Montgomery St., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Battaglia, Anthony. Seller: Chrise Della-Donna, Monroe. Property: 8 Diane Drive, Monroe. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Bennett, Melissa S. and David Bennett, Greenwich. Seller: Lorinda Bryan and Robert Shaftoe, New York City. Property: 375 Stanwich Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2.6 million. Filed Nov. 15. Bhirud, Pankaj, Stamford. Seller: Maxine Konrad, Stamford. Property: 44 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 12C, Stamford. Amount: $200,000. Filed Nov. 15. Blau, Peter, Weston. Seller: U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 302 Lyons Plain Road, Weston. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 1.

Calafiore, Anna and Joseph Biancanelli. Seller: Theodore G. Phillips, Trumbull. Property: 92 Salem Road, Trumbull. Amount: $650,000. Filed Nov. 15.

Darold, Jean M. and William C. Butler. Seller: Bobbie B. and Gerald J. Logan, Trumbull. Property: 26 W. Lake Road, Trumbull. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18.

Ferreira, Marcus. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 151 City View Ave., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13.

Guzzoni, Victoria and Adrian Guzzoni. Seller: Debra L. Cherney and Hartley T. Berstein, Weston. Property: 16 Pilgrim Lane, Weston. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 15.

Camche, Jamie and Glenn P, Camche, Norwalk. Seller: Jeri and John C. Skinner, Westport. Property: 11 Roosevelt Road, Westport. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Nov. 18.

Davey, Theodore E. Seller: Deborah and Marc Aloysius DeSilva, Norwalk. Property: Lot 40, Map 6428, Norwalk. Amount: $515,000. Filed Nov. 13.

Fiorentini, Gianna M. Seller: Hope R. Bray, Danbury. Property: 15 Belmont Lane, Unit 15, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12.

Hall, John R. Trustee, Stamford. Seller: S&M Associates, Stamford. Property: 359 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $500,000. Filed Nov. 14.

De Paula, Marta and Clauco De Paula. Seller: Mary B. and David R. Janasek, Danbury. Property: Map 2906, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13.

Foell, Takako and Daniel B. Foell, Riverside. Seller: Tara HeppekausenBoris and John S. Boris, Piedmont, Calif. Property: 14 Staf Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Nov. 18.

Canaj, Roza and Flamur Canaj. Seller: John P. Fenton, Trumbull. Property: 4758 Madison Ave., Trumbull. Amount: $200,000. Filed Nov. 12. Cavalier, Jenna and Justin Cavalier. Seller: Stephanie J. and James P. Kovac, Norwalk. Property: Unit 1A, Briarwood Condominium, Norwalk. Amount: $338,000. Filed Nov. 14. Charles, Marleena. Seller: Danielle and Derek Graser, Bridgeport. Property: Lot 106, Jackson Ave., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Chen, Yexin and Danjun Ye, Westport. Seller: Amy M. Ruda, Westport. Property: 6 Charcoal Hill Common, Westport. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed Nov. 15. Codfish Hill Construction L.L.C. Seller: Edward Faustino and David J. Faustino, Danbury. Property: Parcel A, Map 3287, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. Corbett, Sandra and Christopher William Reda. Seller: Maureen and Kathleen Dickman, Fairfield. Property: 34 Miro St., Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Cottrell, Christine B. and Arthur M. Cottrell. Seller: Elizabeth A. Rivas and Michael F. Pomer, Property: 40 Lockwood Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. Cristaniello, Lisa M. and Louis Cristaniello. Seller: Hudson City Savings Bank, Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 32 Cedar Road, Wilton. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12.

Bokhari, Farrah S. and Hans L. Christensen, Westport. Seller: Dimitrios P. Smyrnios, Westport. Property: 38 Bermuda Road, Westport. Amount: $5.9 million. Filed Nov. 18.

Crolla, Barbara A. and Alfred J. Crolla. Seller: Renita and William Last, Norwalk. Property: Unit BDUB1, Vantage Point Condominium, Norwalk. Amount: $17,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Bova, Robyn B. and Paul J. Bova, Stamford. Seller: Paul J. Sawyer III, Stamford. Property: 48 Lakeview Drive, Stamford. Amount: $625,000. Filed Nov. 13.

Cui, Hong. Seller: Claudia Bennett, Bridgeport. Property: Unit 123, Building 25 Candlelight Terrace Condominium, Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18.

De San Juan Paschoal, Carolina and Rodgrigo P. Placido, New York City. Seller: Isabel Lyra and Gary Leeds, Greenwich. Property: 3 Dingletown Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2.1 million. Filed Nov. 12. Debeikis, Emilijius. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 15 Candlelight Drive, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Deepdale Holdings L.L.C., Westport. Seller: Juli and Dimitrios Smyrnios, Westport. Property: 33 Sherwood Drive, Westport. Amount: $868,000. Filed Nov. 15. Dietrich, Lauren and Richard A. Dietrich, Greenwich. Seller: Moira V. Burke, Cos Cob. Property: 11 Meadow Drive, Cos Cob. Amount: $739,600. Filed Nov. 15. Dinardo, Melissa. Seller: Karen A. and Philip S. Avallon, Fairfield. Property: 255 Lalley Blvd., Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Dowling, Melissa and Sean Dowling, Stamford. Seller: Cecilia M. McCarton and Sigurd H. Ackerman, Stamford. Property: 97 Sagamore Road, Stamford. Amount: $925,000. Filed Nov. 13. Downer, Suzanne, Redding. Seller: Valerie Leach Suske and David Suske, Bethel. Property: 18 Grand St., Bethel. Amount: $355,000. Filed Nov. 15. Durden, Melissa and Daniel Durden. Seller: Rhea S. Bai, Trumbull. Property: 39 Preston Road, Trumbull. Amount: $230,000. Filed Nov. 12. DV Fairfield L.L.C. Seller: Fairfield CFD L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 4536 Congress St., Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Falzone, Paul. Seller: John Alzalone, Norwalk. Property: Lot B, Map 7130, Norwalk. Amount: $200,000. Filed Nov. 13.

26 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Galazka, Sebastian. Seller: Nora Louise Pomianowski, Trumbull. Property: 48 Flint St., Trumbull. Amount: $247,500. Filed Nov. 18. Gamboa, Louis. Seller: Susan R. and Matthew J. Bottone Jr., Norwalk. Property: Parcel 1, Lots 13 and 15, Map 302, Norwalk. Amount: $325,000. Filed Nov. 13. Garcia, Victor M. Seller: Carlos Andrade, Bridgeport. Property: 16 Acton Road, Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Garrison, Christine E., Stamford. Seller: Leslie Glenn, Stamford. Property: Garage 3, Building 3, Stamford. Amount: $18,500. Filed Nov. 13. Gieschler, Simone and Andras Bauer. Seller: Lorraine P. Vigliotti, Danbury. Property: 1304 Eaton Court, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Gizicki, Maren and Alexander Gizicki, Stamford. Seller: Belinda Martin and Michael Larison, Stamford. Property: 369 Haviland Road, Stamford. Amount: $580,000. Filed Nov. 15. Gonzalez, Antonio. Seller: Lucia Coluccelli, Bridgeport. Property: 23 Hubbell St., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Grayson, Kathryn and Andrew Grayson. Seller: Cynthia S. Lannon, Fairfield. Property: 70 Queens Grand Drive, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 15. Grotefeld, Anne. Seller: Karen A. Ross, Fairfield. Property: 198 Toilsome Hill Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. Guan, Christine and Indra Sen. Seller: Kareem Claxton, Bridgeport. Property: Unit 780I Seaview Village Condominium, Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13.

Handlon, Matthew, Stamford. Seller: Irene Hagenbuch Sanjana, Stamford. Property: 19 Vineyard Lane, Stamford. Amount: $1 million. Filed Nov. 15. Harriss, Monica S. and Brett C. Harriss, Riverside. Seller: Maria Leamon Nedder and Rita E. Leamon, Maria Alison Leamon and Jerry P. Leamon, Cos Cob. Property: 3 Long Meadow Road, Riverside. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed Nov. 18. Hayden, Katherine M. Seller: CSCW L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: Unit 3A1 Southport Woods Condominium, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 15. Helderman, Carolyn M.D. and Mark W. Helderman. Seller: Sally L. and Scott W. Mohr, Fairfield. Property: 322 Harbor Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Hermann, Justine and Christopher C. Hermann, Greenwich. Seller: Darren D. Bahar, Stamford. Property: 96 Strawberry Hill Road, Unit 3, Stamford. Amount: $150,000. Filed Nov. 13. Herzing, Lawrence J., Bethel. Seller: Fisk Management L.L.C., Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 329 Riverside Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed Nov. 14. Home Renewers L.L.C. Seller: U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 82 Woodcrest Lane, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Hurley, Tiffany B. and John F. Hurley. Seller: Anne Bongo Sission, Monroe. Property: 78 Old Colony Road, Monroe. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. James, Cecelia M. Seller: Toll CT III L.P., Newtown. Property: 214 Center Meadow Lane, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Joaquim Construction L.L.C. Seller: Elizabeth Ann Aiken, Trumbull. Property: 51 Elberta Ave., Trumbull. Amount: $150,000. Filed Nov. 18.

Jordan, Sharon. Seller: JVS Builders L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 1300 N. Benson Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Kapadia, Dipesh S. Seller: Barbara Hubbard, Danbury. Property: Unit 21, Building 2 Village Square, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Kastanaras, George. Seller: Michail F. Georgescu, Fairfield. Property: 257 Bennett St., Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. KAV Development L.L.C. Seller: Anne G. Haffey, Bridgeport. Property: Unit 75 Ameridge Condominium, Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. KAV Development L.L.C. Seller: Sue and James Kosinski, Bridgeport. Property: 67 Eckard St., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. Kelly-Mcsherry, Katrina and Paul P. McSherry, Stamford. Seller: Edwina Pease Bender, Naples, Fla. Property: 49 Kensington Road, Stamford. Amount: $310,000. Filed Nov. 13. Kim, Sun Tae, Weston. Seller: East Coast Conference of the Evangelical Church of America Inc., Weston. Property: 6 Maple St., Weston. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 4. Klein, Karen. Seller: Louise and Darron Antill, Fairfield. Property: 111 Taylor Place, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 15. Kovac, Stephanie J. and James P. Kovac. Seller: Victor Klimchenko, Trumbull. Property: 22 Blackberry Road, Trumbull. Amount: $432,500. Filed Nov. 14. Koven, Ashley Elyse and Joshua Michael Watson. Seller: Property Renovations L.L.C., Property: 227 High St., Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. Kurzman, Carol and Robert Kurzman, Scarsdale, N.Y. Seller: Lauren M. and Massimo De Paola, Stamford. Property: 77 Havemeyer Lane, Unit 216, Stamford. Amount: $740,000. Filed Nov. 12. Lancia, Jennifer and Christopher Lancia. Seller: William Rogers, Monroe. Property: 208 Josies Ring Road, Monroe. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 13. Langschultz, Michael A., Stamford. Seller: Rosanna E. and Morgan E. Curran, Stamford. Property: 232 Sun Dance Road, Stamford. Amount: $436,000. Filed Nov. 15.


on the record Leo, Maura and John P. Leo, Marblehead, Mass. Seller: Heather and William C. Hambleton, Greenwich. Property: 9 Roberta Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $3.05 million. Filed Nov. 14.

Beam, Gabrielle E. and David A. Beam, et al. Creditor: Aurora Loan Servicing L.L.C., Dallas, Texas. Property: Lot B, Map 11640, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 13.

McDowell, Todd M., et al. Creditor: US Bank N.A., Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 710 to 712 Connecticut Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Antonio, Diane M., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 1 Oak St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Cardenas, Luis E., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Main Street Acquisition Corp., Norcross, Ga., Property: 267 Summerfield Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Levenson, Ellen, Stamford. Seller: Mabel E. Scott, Stamford. Property: Parcel B, Briarwood Lane, Stamford. Amount: $292,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Brady Lewis, Sue E. and John C. Lewis. Creditor: US Bank N.A., Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 7 Acre Drive, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

MERS. Creditor: The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 89 Briar Brae Road, Stamford. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Ashley-Spooner, Althea, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., Property: 90 Waller Road, Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Carreiro, Carla L. and Louis Carreiro, Bethel. $594.10, in favor of Jennings Oil Co., Danbury, by Philip H. Monogan, Waterbury. Property: 5 Rotella Drive, Bethel. Filed Nov. 15.

Backus, Thomas, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, Property: 90 Griffin Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 12.

Cedeno, Nancy, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 44 Sleepy Hollow Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Lin, Linda and James Sun, Greenwich. Seller: Brodnax Family L.P., Palm Coast, Fla. Property: Lot 53, Map 57, Greenwich. Amount: $422,500. Filed Nov. 12. Liu, Ting and Xiaobo Liu, Stamford. Seller: Ridgeview Hills Inc., Stamford. Property: 638 Hope St., Unit 6, Stamford. Amount: $476,000. Filed Nov. 14. Lockhart, Rebecca L., Southport. Seller: Joseph L. Bruha, Stamford. Property: 335 Emery Drive East, Stamford. Amount: $1.01 million. Filed Nov. 15. Lubus, Mark S. Seller: Bank of America N.A., New York City. Property: 7 Tanmar Drive, Danbury. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 12. Manders, Diane and Thomas W. Manders, Stamford. Seller: Advance Funding L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 41 Rockridge Lane, Stamford. Amount: $635,000. Filed Nov. 13. Mazzarella, Anthony. Seller: Victoria R. Ferrara-Loris and Michelle Loris, Fairfield. Property: 72 Oldfield Road, Fairfield. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 14. McDonald, Cathleen and Paul Colasante. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: Unit 24 Grover’s Common Condominium I, Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18. McDonald, Clasate T. Seller: Jose Serrata, Bridgeport. Property: 106 Steuben St., Bridgeport. Selling price not available. Filed Nov. 18.

FORECLOSURES Alvarado, Guadalupe, et al. Creditor: Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: Unit 238 Nob Hill Condominium, Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 18. Alves Ribeiro, Heilo. Creditor: Kondaur Capital Corp., 36 Lincoln Ave., Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 14.

Brown, Winston. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 652 to 654 Capitol Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Nunez, Brunilda and Juan D. Nunez, et al. Creditor: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 8 Rose Lane, Unit 22-3, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 13.

Camacho, Irma L. and Antonio M. Camacho. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 29 Porters Hill Road, Trumbull. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 18.

Rocco Martinez, Martha and Isabel Cristina Martinez, et al. Creditor: Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Pasadena, Calif. Property: 141 to 143 Milne St., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Daugherty, Bonnie, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 15 Scuppo Road, Unit 505, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 18.

Sherwood, Renee L. and Raymond H. Sherwood. Creditor: Citimortgage, Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 30 Spruce Mountain Road, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Davidson, Gary, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Jacksonville, Fla. Property: 93 Old Orchard Lane and Lot A1 Old Orchard Lane, Stamford. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 15.

Wheway, James L. Jr., et al. Creditor: Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: Unit 94, Building 5 Candlelight Terrace Condominium, Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12.

Fiore, Jennifer M. a.k.a. Jennifer Long, et al. Creditor: Capital One Bank N.A., Laurel, Md. Property: 38 Duncan Drive, Greenwich. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 15. Futyma, Jan, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., San Diego, Calif. Property: 37 Albin Road, Stamford. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 13. Juarez, Norma G., et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Jacksonville, Fla. Property: 92 Lafayette St., Unit 5, Stamford. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 15. Leal, Delio and Celio Leal, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 6 Woodside Ave., Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 14. Lozada, Charles, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 176 Cedar St., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 12. Makari, Leila, et al. Creditor: The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 1482 Iranistan Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed Nov. 14.

FORECLOSURES BY SALE Meco, Arben, Watertown. Appointed committee: Derek Mello, Property: 46 Middlebury St., Stamford. Amount: $252,000. Docket no. 12cv6015265S. Filed Nov. 12.

JUDGMENTS Adames, Euvige, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 16 Coalpit Hill Road, Unit 1, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Aleszka, Elizabeth, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Emergency Services, Danbury, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 126 Triangle St., Unit 14, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Andrade, Matozinho, Danbury. A debt in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem, N.Y., by Linda Strumpf, New Canaan. Property: 37 Clapboard Ridge Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Banks, Aimme, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 12 Harvard Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 13. Betolatti, Patricia, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 35 Liberty Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Bonos, Anthony Jr., Danbury. A debt in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 20 E. Pembroke Road, Unit 16, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Brandao, Waldir M., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of FIA Card Services N.A., Andover, Mass., Property: 475 Glendale Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Brockett, Teemerose, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 25 Mountainville Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Burgos, Wanda and Herman Burgos, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of HOP Energy L.L.C. d.b.a. Kaufman Fuel, Bridgeport, Property: 260 N. Bishop Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Cain, Annmarie, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of RAB Performance Recoveries L.L.C., Paramus, N.J., Property: 427 Hawley Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Campbell, Johnny, Stamford. $834.49, in favor of Waterside Financial Inc., Cheshire, by Scarlett A. Tracey, Cheshire. Property: 105 William St., Stamford. Filed Nov. 15. Capital Investors Group L.L.C. and Patrick B. Kelly Sr., et al., Stratford. $10,763.31, in favor of People’s United Bank, Bridgeport, by Paul A. DeGenaro, Stamford. Property: 535 Wigwam Lane, Stratford. Filed Nov. 18.

Cerullo, Deniselor, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 55 Mill Plain Road, Unit 22-4, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Conklin, George, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury EMS, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 7 Crown St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Conley, Alan, Stratford. $4,848.60, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 150 Coe Ave., Stratford. Filed Nov. 18. Cooper, Anne and Sanford Cooper, Trumbull. A debt in favor of Associates Neurologist Southern Connecticut, Fairfield, by Michalik, Bauer, Silvia & Ciccarillo L.L.P. Property: 46 Rose Ave., Trumbull. Filed Nov. 12. DaCosta, Antoinette, Danbury. A debt in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 34 Valley Stream Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Darr, Carol J. and Richard Darr, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 16 Jackson Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 13. De Almeida, Jessica a.k.a. Jessica Weprek, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Office of Physician Services P.C., Danbury, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 17 Harding Place, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. De Lozado, Fanny, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Office of Physician Services P.C., Danbury, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 12 Moss Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Devin, Bernard, Fairfield. A debt in favor of Stamford Federal Credit Union, Stamford, Property: 225 Bennett St., Fairfield. Filed Nov. 14.

Dishuk, Maryann a.k.a. Maryann Fiorentino, Danbury. A debt in favor of American Express Bank F.S.B., New York City, by Mark A. Sank, Stamford. Property: 55 Mill Plain Road, Apt. 3-5, Danbury. Filed Nov. 13. Evuen, Igbo M., Danbury. A debt in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 76 Grand St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 18. Feliz, Ilana A., Danbury. A debt in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 20 Ninth Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Feng, Leland, Danbury. A debt in favor of RAB Performance Recoveries L.L.C., Paramus, N.J., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 8 Strawberry Hill Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Fortunato, Barbara a.k.a. Barbara Ghnassia, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., Property: 9 Beachview Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Greene, Jessica L., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 29 W. Wooster St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Guagliano, Steven M., Bethel. $15,531.70, in favor of Connecticut Light and Power Co., Hartford, by Alexander G. Snyder, Waterbury. Property: 76 Edgelake Road, Sandy Hook. Filed Nov. 14. Guzman, Mercedes L., Danbury. A debt in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: Kohanza St., Unit 2-45, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Harding, Bethe, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 97 to 99 Park Ave., Unit 54, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Hartofilis, Michael, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 23 Hamilton Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

INVESTMENT FUND based in Greenwich, CT is looking for a Research Associate. Please send resumes by mail to Denise Zambardi, Controller, Axiom International Investors LLC, 33 Benedict Place, 2nd Floor, Greenwich, CT 06830.”

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 27


on the record Heredia, Fabiola, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 29 Osborne St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

McLaughlin, Shirley D., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of United Illuminating Co., New Haven, Property: 1245 Kossuth St., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Hulsie, Debra, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 10 Mountainview Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Medlow, Valerie a.k.a. Valerie Olmstead, Danbury. A debt in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 209 Stadley Rough Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Johnson, Kevin, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Bridgeport Hospital, New Haven, Property: 921 Hancock Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 12.

Middlemass, Dawn E., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., Property: 260 Vincellette St., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Johnson, Pamela, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Bridgeport Anesthesiology, Stratford, Property: 844 Lakeside Drive, Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 18.

Moody, Oliver J., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of HBR Trumbull L.L.C., Property: 102 to 104 Park Terrace, Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Jowdy, Jefferey, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 14 Flintlock Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Morales, Carmen M., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., Property: 679 Park St., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

Katzman, Daniel, Westport. $3,243.73, in favor of Red Baron Carpet Cleaning L.L.C., Newtown, by Patrick L. Kennedy, Manchester. Property: 7 Bauer Place, Westport. Filed Nov. 15. Lee, Lisa, Danbury. A debt in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 1 Craigmoor Terrace, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Lofthus, Diane, Weston. $41,229.85, in favor of Norwalk Hospital Association, Norwalk, Property: 9 Scatacook Trail, Weston. Filed Nov. 1. Lopes, Jean, Danbury. A debt in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 42 Hillandale Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18. Maisonave, Miguel, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury EMS, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 7 Wilks Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Makris, Melissa, Westport. $18,521.50, in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem, N.Y., by Linda Strumpf, New Canaan. Property: 17 Tamarac Road, Westport. Filed Nov. 18. Marin, Gilberto, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of NCEP L.L.C., Property: 257 Hanover St., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Martines, Lynn, Wilton. A debt in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., Property: Wilton. Filed Nov. 12.

Newkirk, Barbara, Bethel. $8,399.89, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 68 Beach St., Bethel. Filed Nov. 18. Novella, Joseph A. Jr., et al., Danbury. A debt in favor of Ridgefield Supply Co., Ridgefield, Property: 33 Valerie Lane, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Powell, Eloise, Stratford. $3,962.16, in favor of Bureaus Investment Group Portfolio 15 L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Nathan G. Johnson, Pawtucket, R.I. Property: 235 Garibaldi Ave., Stratford. Filed Nov. 18. Ramos, Efrain N. a.k.a. Efrain Negron, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Bridgeport Anesthesiology, Stratford, Property: 761 Boston Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 18. Rashid, Mohammad, Danbury. A debt in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 3 Del View Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18. Ressa, Jennifer M., Danbury. A debt in favor of Connecticut Light and Power Co., Hartford, by Alexander G. Snyder, Waterbury. Property: 46 Pembroke Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 14. Rivas, Ramona, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 20 Briarwood Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Rodriguez, Julio E., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 15 Bergh St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Pagano, Ronald R., Danbury. A debt in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 14 Bittersweet Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Rodriguez, Melissa, Danbury. A debt in favor of Silver Hill Hospital Inc., New Canaan, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 10 Scuppo Road, Unit A5, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Pelerin, Kate, Danbury. A debt in favor of Yale-New Haven Hospital Inc., New Haven, by Nair & Levin P.C., Bloomfield. Property: 154 Stadley Rough Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Ross, Robert W., Stratford. $8,744.71, in favor of Discover Bank, Andover, Mass., by Nathan G. Johnson, Pawtucket, R.I. Property: 220 Stonybrook Road, Stratford. Filed Nov. 18.

Perez, Adolfo, Danbury. A debt in favor of FIA Card Services N.A., Andover, Mass., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 19 Aaron B. Samuels Blvd., Unit 1, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Sanchez, Jose Sr., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 10 Pahquioque Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Perez, Sabrina, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 18 Highland Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Perry, Cheryl M., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 3 Haley St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Santander, Lucio A., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 10 Lincoln Ave., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Seisdedos, Ana C., Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 18 Thorpe St., Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Siguenza, Claudio, Danbury. A debt in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 8 Wixon Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

28 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Smith, Joy E., Bethel. $2,559.29, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., 13 Garella Road, Bethel. Filed Nov. 18. St. Pierre, Kellie A., Danbury. A debt in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 19 E. Pembroke Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Stephenson, Jodain a.k.a. Jodain Gordon, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Southbury Ambulance Association Inc., Property: 45 Evers Place, Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 12. Storms, Joyce, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 20 Tarrywile Lake Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12. Tshibangu, Marie Claire, Bridgeport. A debt in favor of Bridgeport Hospital, New Haven, Property: 1480 Noble Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Vieira, Sidna, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Flanagan & Peat, Danbury. Property: 1 Raymond Place, Unit B, Danbury. Filed Nov. 13. Vinchkoski, Keith, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 44 Cedar Drive, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18. Zapotocky, Darren P., Bridgeport. A debt in favor of FIA Card Services N.A., Andover, Mass., Property: 214 Iranistan Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13.

LIENS

Salehzadeh, Ahmad, 31 Hettiefred Road, Greenwich. $26,032.39. Filed Nov. 18.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSFILED

Salehzadeh, Ahmad, 31 Hettiefred Road, Greenwich. $30,585.13. Filed Nov. 18.

1392 East Putnam Avenue L.L.C., 1392 E. Putnam Ave., Old Greenwich. $69,965.86, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed Nov. 12.

Salehzadeh, Ahmad, 31 Hettiefred Road, Greenwich. $16,107.12. Filed Nov. 18.

Advanced Carpentry Construction Inc., 36 Mill Plain Road, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Saxe A Phone Services L.L.C., P.O. Box 2142, Stratford. $5,331.51, payroll taxes. Filed Nov. 18.

Allen, Alfred L., 40 North St., Stamford. $132,039.42, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 13.

Tangredi, Rock J., 20 E. Pembroke Road, Unit 41, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Biagioni, Sergio, 34 Condor St., Greenwich. $4,364.98. Filed Nov. 13.

Torres, Julio Benjamin, 8 South Ave., Apt. 3R, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

Chiaiza, Becker, 372 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. $230,402.09, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 15.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED

Gallatins Golden Rack Inc., 268 Atlantic St., Stamford. $2,810.24, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed Nov. 13.

Abelha, Vanessa and Anildo Abelha, 5 Nabby Road, Apt. C136, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Giovannini, Michael J., 7 Beardsley Parkway, Trumbull. Filed Nov. 18. Harris, Carroll R. and Charles S. Harris, Norwalk. Filed Nov. 13. Horizons East L.L.C., 351 Courtland Ave., Stamford. $10,595.28, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed Nov. 13.

Bevmax L.L.C., 17 Cedar St., Unit 19, Stamford. $11,769.17, payroll taxes. Filed Nov. 13. Chiapetta, Karen L., 264 Davis Ave., Apt. 2, Greenwich. $26,076.12, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 18. Funston, Lisa and Seth Heyman, 101 Florence Road, Riverside. $39,392.01, 1040 tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 18.

J&V Stone L.L.C., 117 Henry St., Stamford. $20,034.34, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed Nov. 13.

Gadtaula, Yaduandan, 33 Albin Road, Stamford. $245,179.24, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 13.

Ladson, Leroy, 82 Ralsey Road, Stamford. $59,070.12. Filed Nov. 13.

James, Beau, 14 Ridge Lane, Weston. $108,662.39. Filed Nov. 12.

Ladson, Leroy, 82 Ralsey Road, Stamford. $22,230.49. Filed Nov. 13.

Kobrin, Stephen W., 3 Charlottes Way, Danbury. Filed Nov. 18.

PAG Greenwich M1 L.L.C., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. Landlord: Watson Enterprises Greenwich Real Estate L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 262 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Term: 15 years, commencing July 18, 2011. Filed Nov. 12.

Mota, Helio, 19 Somers St., Unit F2, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Morgan, D. Grant, 92 Hunting Ridge Road, Greenwich. $348,056.22, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 18.

PAG Greenwich M1 L.L.C., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. Landlord: Watson Enterprises Greenwich Real Estate L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 217, 252 and 261 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Term: 15 years, commencing July 18, 2011. Filed Nov. 12.

Phillips, Robert J., 266 Brooklawn Road, Stratford. $105,014.26, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 18.

Zhang, Haolan, Danbury. A debt in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Howard Lee Schiff P.C., East Hartford. Property: 7 Padanaram Road, Unit A17, Danbury. Filed Nov. 12.

LEASES

O’Grady, Kevin M., 31 Old Kings Highway, Weston. $4,045.31. Filed Nov. 4.

PLT Landscape Contractors Inc., 334 Soundview Ave., Stamford. $8,398.77, payroll taxes. Filed Nov. 13.

Welch, Frank G., 20 Spring St., Apt. B2, Stamford. $34,886.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 13.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSWITHDRAWAL Sands, Alan, 1117 E. Putnam Ave., Riverside. $113,405.14, tax debt on income earned. Filed Nov. 12.


on the record MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED National Healthcare Association Inc., Fairfield. Filed by T.J. & Son Inc., Property: 118 Jefferson St., Fairfield. Filed Nov. 12. RV V Lockworks L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by Summers Group Inc. d.b.a. Rexel CLS, Hartford, Law Offices of Charles Z Miller, West Hartford. Property: 119/121 Town St., Stamford. Amount: $5,576.07. Filed Nov. 12.

Anderson, Anthony, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 360 Nutmeg Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Aurillo, James L. Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Bayview Loan Servicing, Coral Gables, Fla. Property: 1250 Kossuth St. and 115 Pearl St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18.

MECHANIC’S LIENSRELEASED

Avila, Angel P. (estate), et al., Danbury. Filed by Bendett and McHugh P.C., Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 1 Berkshire Place, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Corpus, Yannah and Carleto Rimando Corpus Jr., et al., Stratford. Released by Milford Stone L.L.C., Milford, by Nebojsa Mrvic. Property: 80 Evergreen Drive, Stratford. Amount: $2,800. Filed Nov. 18.

Barbieri, Kim, et al., Trumbull. Filed by Hunt, Leibert & Jacobsen, Hartford, for Caliber Home Loans Inc. Property: 32 Beardsley Parkway, Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Schiavi, Marie Isabelle, Greenwich. Released by Barchella Landscape & Masonry Corp., Port Chester, N.Y., by Wendy Borchella. Property: 38 Cedarwood Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $6,050. Filed Nov. 18.

LIS PENDENS 50 Miles Street L.L.C., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for MTAG Caz Creek CT L.L.C. and MTAG Services L.L.C. Property: 50 Miles St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Abedanjo, Rashidat, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 35 Beau Vue Terrace, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Alexandre, Marie B., Bridgeport. Filed for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 1 Lorraine St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Allen, Gertrude and Willie Mae Allen, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for MTAG Caz Creek CT L.L.C. and MTAG Services L.L.C. Property: 372 Wilmot Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. American Legion Inc., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 56 Clifford St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14.

Beaucicaut, Marie Y., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Everbank, Islandia, N.Y. Property: 130 Hale Terrace, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Bogdan, Istvan, et al., Bethel. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 60 Buttonball Drive, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $167,000, dated August 2003. Filed Nov. 14. Bond, Jennifer and Damon Bond, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 1146 Capitol Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Campbell, Larry, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Deutsche Bank Trust Co., New York City. Property: 504 to 506 Wilmot Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Cancel, Pedro, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 209 Lewis St., Bridgeport. Filed Nov. 13. Capone, Jennie B. and Kittie Williams, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for First Stone Ridge Cooperative Corp. Property: Stone Ridge Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 18.

Cardillo, Anthony, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 206 Willowbrook Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $450,000, dated April 2007. Filed Nov. 15. Cayo, Venante, et al., Norwalk. Filed for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: Map 6721 Riverside Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Central Connecticut Coast YMCA, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 431 to 435 Kossuth St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the Plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14. Central Connecticut Coast YMCA, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 443 to 449 Kossuth St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14. Chandler, Elaine and James Chandler, Norwalk. Filed for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: Lot A, Map 9938, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Colon, Evellis, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for the city of Bridgeport WPCA. Property: 52 Kent Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Crowell, Berth B. and David J. Crowell, Wilton. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: Lots 16 and 16A, Map 1668, Wilton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Davis, Charlie, et al., Norwalk. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: Dover St., Unit 1, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Dias, Joanne, Trumbull. Filed by Bendett and McHugh P.C., Farmington, for Hudson City Savings Bank, Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 211 Fernwood Road, Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Doherty, Eileen M., et al., Fairfield. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 1063 Reef Road, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18.

Earthmovers Inc., Newtown. Filed by Steven R. Kolodziej, Cheshire, for Highland HC L.L.C., 123 to 125 S. Main St., Newtown. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed Nov. 18. Eastern Savings Bank and First American Title Insurance, Greenwich. Filed by Christopher Coughlin, for Christopher M. Coughlin. Property: 1 Random Road, Greenwich. Action: plaintiff seeks relief for damages to real property. Filed Nov. 15. Federal Arms Condominium Association Inc., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for MTAG Caz Creek CT L.L.C. and MTAG Services L.L.C. Property: Unit 209, Federal Arms Condominium, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Fils, Simon, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 31 Burnsford Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Garrison, Pamela D., et al., Danbury. Filed by Hunt, Leibert & Jacobsen, Hartford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 17 Cherokee Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Gifford, Christine and Alexander Gifford, et al., Wilton. Filed for Fairfield County Bank, Ridgefield. Property: Lot 24, Map 1652, Wilton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Giles, Ella H. and William D. Giles Jr., et al., Trumbull. Filed by Hunt, Leibert & Jacobsen, Hartford, for OneWest Bank F.S.B., Pasadena, Calif. Property: 37 Louis St., Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Gonzalez, Ivette and Eduardo Otero Ortiz, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 520 Evers St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Gurevich, Eleanor and Alexander Gurevich, et al., Fairfield. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 238 to 240, 248 to 250 and 268 Post Road, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Gurevich, Eleanor and Alexander Gurevich, et al., Fairfield. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 222 Post Road, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Gustafson, Theresa and Robert C. Gustafson, et al., Bethel. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 23 Payne Road, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $123,000, dated February 2004. Filed Nov. 14. Hargraves, Patricia A., et al., Bethel. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 8 Vera Drive, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the amount of $300,000, September 2005. Filed Nov. 18. Hogan, Kevin J., et al., Stamford. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 240 Seaside Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $390,000, dated October 2009. Filed Nov. 15. Hunter, Evelyn A., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 530 Platt St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Joseph, Therese and Pierre Antoine Joseph, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 63 to 65 Waldorf Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14. Kalam, Abul, et al., Stamford. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 114 Maple Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $442,250, dated January 2006. Filed Nov. 15. Kohanek, Deborah and Stephen Kohanek, et al., Danbury. Filed for Waterfall Victoria Master Fund Ltd. Property: 24 E. Gate Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Lopez, Emerita and Reyes Umanzor, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: Lot 110 Nutmeg Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Martin, Ilse, Fairfield. Filed for, Zenko Inc., Unit 93, Beach Condominium, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Mazza, Juan, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Deutsche Bank Trust Co., New York City. Property: 344 Fifth St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18.

McCall, Monica L. and Mark J. McCall, et al., Weston. Filed by Hunt, Leibert & Jacobsen, Hartford, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 3 Kirsten Place, Weston. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. McKee, Virginia and Lewis McKee, et al., Newtown. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 22 Lake Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage, dated September 2003. Filed Nov. 15. Membreno, Edgardo, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 228 Mountain Grove St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Mendez, Enoc and Edward E. Ortiz, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 276 Gregory St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Miller, Paul F. and Thomas McMahon, et al., Fairfield. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 67 Howard St., Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Morales, Manuel, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 923 Kossuth St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Morales, Olga and Marlon Morales, Monroe. Filed for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 76 Hillside Lane, Monroe. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Morataya, Celio, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 338 Brooks St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Morici, Athena, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 423 to 425 Courtland Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14. Munoz, Martin, et al., Stamford. Filed by Julian J. Castignoli, Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 75 Hope St., Apt. 29B, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $224,000, dated December 2004. Filed Nov. 15.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 29


on the record Northeast Fire Prevention Inc., et al., Stamford. Filed by Matthew T. Wax-Krell and Mark A. Rosenblum, Hartford, for M.J. Daly L.L.C. Property: 159 to 163 Franklin St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed Nov. 12.

Quintuna, Delia N. and Holger F. Perez, Danbury. Filed by Bendett and McHugh P.C., Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 61 Davis St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Ocampo, Maria A., Stamford. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank Trust Co., New York City. Property: 11 Albin Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $472,500, dated June 2006. Filed Nov. 13.

Resolute Holdings Ltd., Greenwich. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for CitiMortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 558 Lake Ave., Greenwich. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1.1 million, dated October 2007. Filed Nov. 18.

Orciuch, Edward F. Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Reverse Mortgage Solutions Inc. Property: Lot 12 Waller Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Ritacco, Umile, et al., Stamford. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 7 Fourth St., Unit 4B, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $214,200, dated September 2011. Filed Nov. 13.

Patel, Shash, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 42 Willow Ridge, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18. Pawloski, Patricia E. and Johns S. Pawloski, et al., Danbury. Filed by Pullman & Comley, for Lake Waubeeka Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 7 Sage Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Pearl harbor L.L.C.; Prime Investment L.L.C.; Salem Five Mortgage L.L.C.; Skyline Investments L.L.C.; and Suncrest L.L.C., Bridgeport. Filed for United States of America, 96 to 98 Beechwood Ave., 307 to 309 Dover St., 407 Logan St. and 260 to 264 Pearl Harbor St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12. Perez, Sone C. and Nurlly M. Rosario, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 317 Chopsey Hill Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Petix Smith, Karen A. and James P. Smith, Danbury. Filed by Bendett and McHugh P.C., Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 156 Long Ridge Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 18.

Rivera, Sandra, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for the city of Bridgeport WPCA. Property: 108 to 110 Merriam St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13. Robinson, Judith and Douglas J. Robinson, et al., Fairfield. Filed for First Niagara Bank N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 248 Euclid Ave., Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Ruano, Juan, et al., Stamford. Filed Emily M. Denyer, Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 33 Charles Mary Lane, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $438,750, dated March 2005. Filed Nov. 15. Samuels, Lisa, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 268 Willow St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Sanon, Jacques, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for PHH Mortgage Corp., Mount Laurel, N.J. Property: 40 Rockland St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13.

Phang, Juliette, Bridgeport. Filed for the city of Bridgeport WPCA. Property: 74 to 76 Yacht St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 12.

Savitt, Jordan K., et al., Stamford. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 251 Saddle Hill Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $373,000, dated December 2006. Filed Nov. 15.

Posada, Sergio A., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Flagstar Bank, Jackson, Mich. Property: 325 Harral Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12.

Solano, Alfonso, Bridgeport. Filed for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 744 to 746 Brook St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 13.

Somers, Linda S. and Scott M. Somers, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Deutsche Bank Trust Co., New York City. Property: 107 Robin St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14.

415 GA Acquisition L.L.C., Greenwich, by Michael L. Goldman, Norwalk. Lender: GPS Funding L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 415 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $4.9 million. Filed Nov. 15.

Stalvey, Arlene, et al., Stratford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 125 Sanford Place, Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $256,300, dated February 2011. Filed Nov. 18.

Cocco Properties L.L.C., Westport. Lender: Fairfield County Bank, Ridgefield. Property: 1 Hillandale Lane, Westport. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Nov. 15.

Stamford Hospitality L.L.P., et al., Stamford. Filed by Bruce L. Elstein, Bridgeport, for Kesco L.L.C., Milford. Property: 2701 Summer St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed Nov. 12. Staton, Corrie E. and Anthony Staton, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 211 Golden Rod Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 12. Viera Lopez, Elba, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Bayview Loan Servicing, Coral Gables, Fla. Property: 1220 to 1224 Pembroke St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14. Viglione, Yupin N., et al., Bridgeport. Filed for MTAG Caz Creek CT L.L.C. and MTAG Services L.L.C. Property: Unit 87 Foxledge Condominium, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 18. Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Danbury. Filed for Sterling Woods Master Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 1503 Cypress Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Nov. 14.

Datatill L.L.C., Westport. Lender: Fairfield County Bank, Ridgefield. Property: 53 to 55 Saugatuck Ave., Westport. Amount: $740,000. Filed Nov. 15. WRT-Highgrove Property L.P., Boston, Mass., by Riener & Braunstein L.L.P., Boston, Mass. Lender: Keybank N.A., Boston, Mass. Property: 70 Forest St., Stamford. Amount: $150 million. Filed Nov. 13.

NEW BUSINESSES

Reckless Life Companies, 20 Frash St., Stratford 06615, c/o James Maiers. Filed Nov. 18. Rosy Image Consulting, 8112 Avalon Valley Drive, Danbury 06810, c/o Rose Lorenti. Filed Nov. 14. Shoreline Counseling Centers, 225 Main St., Westport 06880, c/o Neil Ratan. Filed Nov. 15. Spring Market, 11 Spring St., Danbury 06810, c/o Rosa M. Rodriguez. Filed Nov. 12.

Barbafallo Landscaping, 23 Kohanza St., Danbury 06811, c/o Michael L. Barbagallo. Filed Nov. 12.

PATENTS

Baskets From Heaven, 102 Southfield Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Suzanne M. Diddel. Filed Nov. 8.

Color job reprint set-up for a printing system. Patent no. 8,587,833 issued to Daniel Bray, Rochester, N.Y. and Aaron M. Burry, Ontario, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corporation, Norwalk.

Danbury Crush, 18 Jackson Drive, Danbury 06811, c/o Jason Gregory. Filed Nov. 13. East Side Building & Construction, 19A Peace St., Danbury 06810, c/o Edilson P. Carvalho. Filed Nov. 12.

MORTGAGES

Epic Destinations, 111 Main St., Danbury 06810, c/o Daniel V. Afonso and Jose C. Afonso. Filed Nov. 12.

30 Week of December 2, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Nails & More by Dawn, 7 Backus Ave., Danbury 06810, c/o Hee Jung Cho. Filed Nov. 13.

Western CT Builders, 8 Capitola Road, Danbury 06811, c/o Geradette Nicole Medeiros. Filed Nov. 18.

Ecua Forest Home Improvements, 12 Tilden Road, Danbury 06810, c/o Abraham Lliguicota. Filed Nov. 13.

29 Imperial Avenue L.L.C., Westport. Lender: Bankwell Bank, New Canaan. Property: 29 and 29A Imperial Ave., Westport. Amount: $440,000. Filed Nov. 18.

Ivy League Designs, 20 William Street West, Greenwich 06830, c/o Laura Harper. Filed Nov. 12.

Accelerated Media, 44 Oakridge Road, Trumbull 06611, c/o Eric Bugeja. Filed Nov. 12.

Wilson, Frances and Easton Wilson, et al., Bridgeport. Filed for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 360 Kent Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed Nov. 14.

Commercial

Heladio Landscaping & Home Improvement, 22 Patch St., Apt. A, Danbury 06810. Filed Nov. 18.

Epic Cultural House, 111 Main St., Danbury 06810, c/o Daniel V. Afonso and Jose C. Afonso. Filed Nov. 12.

Fluidbody Rolfuis, 107 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich 06830, c/o Gerald Caffrey. Filed Nov. 21. Flying Colors Home Improvements, 32 Jackson Drive, Danbury 06811, c/o Joseph Deinhardt. Filed Nov. 14. GD Services, 35 Corporate Drive, Trumbull 06611, c/o M.A.D. Collection Agency L.L.C. Filed Nov. 18.

Determining a number of objects in an IR image. Patent no. 8,587,657 issued to Yao Rong Wang, Webster, N.Y.; Zhigang Fan, Webster, N.Y.; and  Lalit Keshav Mestha, Fairport, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.  Dual color matching feedback control method and system for hiding infrared markings and other information. Patent no. 8,587,832 issued to Martin Edward Hoover, Rochester, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.  Electrophotographic apparatus. Patent no. 8,588,634 issued to Edward Graham Zwartz, Mississauga, Calif.; T. Brian McAneney, Burlington, Calif.; Eric Rotberg, Toronto, Calif.; Richard P. N. Veregin, Mississauga, Calif.; Valerie M. Farrugia, Oakville, Calif.; and Jordan H. Wosnick, Toronto, Calif.  Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.

Flow-coatable PFA fuser topcoats. Patent no. 8,588,669 issued to Qi Zhang, Milton, Calif.; Yu Qi, Oakville, Calif.; Gordon Sisler, St. Catharines, Calif.; Carolyn Moorlag, Mississauga, Calif.; and Nan-Xing Hu, Oakville, Calif.  Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Generation of digital electrostatic latent images and data-communications system using rotary contacts. Patent no. 8,587,622 issued to George Cunha Cardoso, Webster, N.Y. and Mandakini Kanungo, Penfield, N.Y.  Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Methods and systems for managing risk-management information. Patent no. 8,589,273 issued to Denis Michael Creeden, Sandy Hook; Jesse Glionna, Stamford;  Martha Cecilia Poulter, Newtown; John Stephen Kaptinski, Stamford; James Robert Persico, Stamford; William Roy Doolittle, Trumbull; Ryan Stuart Cascade, Scarsdale, N.Y.; Amanda Jenks van Heyst, Norwalk; David Andrew Ernst, Alpharetta, Ga.; Kathleen Mary Chomienne, Alpharetta, Ga.; Robert Wayne Bellish, Ossining, N.Y.; and Robert Francis Crowley, Armonk, N.Y.  Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y.

Method for securely merging multiple nodes having trusted platform modules. Patent no. 8,589,672 issued to Shiva R. Dasari, Austin, Texas; Lee H. Wilson, Austin, Texas; Scott N. Durham, Raleigh, N.C.; Sumeet Kochar, Apex, N.C.; William B. Schwartz, Apex, N.C.; and Kenneth A. Goldman, Norwalk. Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y.  Photoreceptor charging and erasing system. Patent no. 8,588,650 issued to Gerald F. Daloia, Webster, N.Y.; and Michael A. Doody, Manchester, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Semantic parsing of objects in video. Patent no. 8,588,533 issued to Lisa Marie Brown, Pleasantville, N.Y.; Rogerio Schmidt Feris, White Plains, N.Y.; Arun Hampapur, Norwalk; and Daniel Andre Vaquero, Santa Barbara, Calif. Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y. 


BUSINESS CONNECTIONS ECONOMY

EVENTS

Jobs: Disappointment Follows Shutdown

Connecticut Transportation Summit

T

C

he federal government shutdown forced the Connecticut Department of Labor to postpone its monthly jobs report for September. When the numbers finally found daylight, they were anything but encouraging. “We lost 4,100 jobs in September and another 100 in October,” CBIA economist Pete Gioia said. “So, overall the report was disappointing.” Gioia noted that the state gained 11,600 jobs since this time last year, led by the construction sector’s 5,200 new positions. “Other sectors are not doing as well, and unfortunately two of them are very high value industries,” Gioia said. “Manufacturing and financial services are down in jobs year over year and this is something that is a concern for the economy.” Connecticut’s unemployment rate did fall two-tenths of a point since August to 7.9%. It has not been below 8% since April 2009. The labor department said uncertainty leading up to

the October 1 federal shutdown and seasonal adjustment issues in public education may have impacted the September and October figures. “The September and October reports are sending mixed signals about Connecticut’s labor markets,” said Andy Condon, the agency’s research director. All six labor market areas lost jobs in September, with all but Waterbury registering small declines. Waterbury lost 1,000 jobs in that month before rebounding in October with 1,000 new positions. Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford added 1,500 jobs in October, while New Haven gained 600 positions, followed by Danbury and Norwich-New London with 200 apiece. Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk lost 900 jobs in October, the only labor market area with declines for the month. Connecticut has recovered 58,900, or 48.6% of the jobs lost during the March 2008-February 2010 recession.  Read more at gov.cbia.com

Techniques That Worked

9. Repaired a piece of company’s equipment.

 Philip Byrd, Chairman, American Trucking Associations; President and CEO, Bulldog Hiway Express

10. Sent a message in a bottle.

 Jack Condlin, President, Stamford Chamber of Commerce

Techniques That Failed

 Pete Gioia, Vice President and Economist, CBIA

1. Back-flipped into the room. 2. Brought items from interviewer’s online shopping wish list.

1. Contracted a billboard outside of employer’s office.

3. Sent a fruit basket to interviewer’s home address, which the interviewer had not given her.

2. Gave a resume on a chocolate bar.

4. Did a tarot reading for the interviewer.

3. Showed up in a suit with a red T-shirt with a message—“Hire me, I work hard.”

5. Dressed as a clown.

4. Asked to be interviewed in Spanish to showcase his skills.

Join us at the first-ever summit on Connecticut transportation issues, where we release results of the 2013 Connecticut Transportation Survey and get reactions, insights, and commentary from regional and national transportation experts. We’ll also hear from legislators and senior state transportation officials on priority projects and funding strategies.

 Anna Barry, Deputy Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Transportation

Memorable Job Candidates ould you hire job seekers who sang their interview, dressed as a clown, or printed their resume on a chocolate bar? CareerBuilder asked 2,076 hiring managers and human resource professionals to share the most memorable methods candidates have used to stand out from the crowd, and whether their creativity got them hired.

How do highway congestion, a crumbling infrastructure, and other bottlenecks affect Connecticut’s businesses and economic vitality? What’s the solution—and who pays for it?

Featured speakers include:

HUMAN RESOURCES

W

NBC’s America’s Top States for Business 2013 ranks Connecticut as having the second worst transportation infrastructure in the U.S. A new study ranks Bridgeport-Stamford 7th among the nation’s large urban areas with the worst major roads; New Haven and Hartford aren’t far behind, in 16th and 20th place.

6. Sent interviewer some beef stew with a note saying “Eat hearty and hire me.”

 Mario Smith, President, Waters Construction Co.; Past Chairman of the Board, Connecticut Construction Industries Association Sponsored by UIL Holdings Corp., this event is presented by CBIA, the Stamford Chamber of Commerce, Connecticut Construction Industries Association (CCIA), and Motor Transport Association of Connecticut (MTAC).

Date

Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013

5. Crafted the cover letter like an invitation to hire her rather than a request.

7. Placed a timer on interviewer’s desk and told interviewer he would explain in three minutes why he was the perfect candidate.

6. Climbed on a roof the employer was repairing and asked for a job.

8. Sent interviewer a lotto ticket.

Place The Sheraton Stamford Hotel 700 East Main St., Stamford

9. Wore a florescent suit.

Cost

7. Performed a musical number on the guitar. 8. Volunteered to help out with making copies when he saw interviewer’s assistant was getting frazzled.

10. Sent in a shoe to “get their foot in the door.”  Read more at cbia.com/hr

SCAN TO REGISTER!

Time 8:30 am–noon

CBIA/CCIA/MTAC/Stamford Chamber of Commerce members, $50; nonmembers, $60

 Register at cbia.com/events

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of December 2, 2013 31


POWERFUL WOMEN in

FINANCE

A power-packed discussion by women who’ve made it. COMMITTED TO DATE:

CARLA HARRIS

SUNI P. HARFORD

MANAGING DIRECTOR Emerging Managers Program, Morgan Stanley Investment Management

MANAGING DIRECTOR AND REGIONAL HEAD OF MARKETS North America, Citigroup Inc.

January

16 11:30 a.m.

PEYTON PATTERSON PRESIDENT AND CEO Bankwell Financial Group

The College of New Rochelle 29 Castle Place New Rochelle

Program and lunch

MODERATOR

{complimentary}

ELIZABETH BRACKEN-THOMPSON Partner, Thompson & Bender SPONSORS

CO-FOUNDERS AND HOSTS

THE COLLEGE OF NEW ROCHELLE | WESTFAIR COMMUNICATIONS INC. (Westchester County Business Journal, HVBiz Fairfield County Business Journal, WAG magazine)

Reservations: Please visit westfaironline.com or contact Holly DeBartolo at (914) 358-0743


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