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A student voice of Saint Louis University since 1921

Vol. XCVI No. 12

Panel talks identity in the classroom By PATRICK HYLAND Staff Writer

On Monday, Nov. 21, 2016, a panel of students and professors addressed “the role our individual identities and experiences play during classroom discussion” as described in an email SGA sent to all students. The panelists included Dr. Karla Scott (communication and African American studies) and Dr. Laurie Shornick (biology) along with students Noelle Janak (African American studies and women and gender studies), Graham Vogt (Spanish, economics, and international studies), and Grant Mayfield (political science and communication) who served as moderator of the panel discussion. Scott, who teaches in both communication and African American studies, first pointed out that some identities are “agent identities,” meaning that they are afforded power and privilege. Shornick, a biology professor, then shared her personal experience of being

harassed by a professor while she was a student in college. As one of three women in the biology department of her university at the time, Shornick noted that the professor’s actions went without comment by other students and faculty. She explained that, “[Her] only recourse was to change my major.” Janak, who now studies African American studies and women and gender studies related to the feeling of not going to class because she did not feel safe to be there. She recounted how one of her white, male professors continually shut down students of color from contributing to the classroom discussion. Often fearing retribution and simply not being understood, Janak shared how she often will not say things in class because she does not want to deal with the aftermath. Noting how varying perspectives and identities can be shared in teaching, ShorSee “Identity” on Page 3

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Political Round Table hosts event on the state of St. Louis

Kristina DeYong / The University News

PRT: Michael Allen, PhD, spoke to students about the many issues facing St. Louis City and the surrounding region. By KRISTINA DEYONG Staff Writer

As many were preparing to leave St. Louis for the Thanksgiving holiday last Monday evening, a group of close to 100 gathered at 5:30 in the Sinquefield Room to discuss the condition of the city. The event, entitled “A

City on the Rise: The Cost of Prosperity,” was hosted by Political Round Table, a non-partisan political organization at SLU. It included a free formal dinner and was open to the public. For the first half of the evening, attendees heard from Michael Allen, founder and director of the Preservation Research Office in St.

Louis. He spoke at length about the successes and signs of growth St. Louis has seen recently and condemned the panic over “urban crisis” in St. Louis and other cities. “It is harmful ideology to call cities victims of ‘urban crisis,’” Allen said. “These same issues, this same crisis, has been going on for

decades. This state of emergency mentality tends to lead to short-term solutions.” Allen also spoke of the deep divide between St. Louis City and County. He stressed the need for the state to begin to fund its cities equally in relation to its See “PRT” on Page 2

‘Jesuits and the Arts’ Symposium this April at SLU By MEGAN HAMMOND News Editor

Courtesy of Silvana Siddali

JESUITS: This poster is from the musical production “Let’s Get Together,” directed by Jesuit Fr. Daniel Lord.

On April 18, 2017, the Saint Louis University libraries, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Jesuit Archives: Central United States is hosting the third annual Jesuit Student Research Symposium. The theme is “Jesuits and the Arts.” Dr. Silvana Siddali of the department of history, Tim Achee from Pius Memorial Library and Dr. Dave Miros from the Jesuit Archives began the symposium. Siddali explained that the three of them were surprised and disappointed that SLU was not conducting any events concerning Jesuit history. 2014 marked the bicentennial of the Jesuit restoration after the Jesuit order had been repressed. After being founded again, the first generation of Jesuits came to the United States to conduct missionary work. Achee, Miros and Siddali felt that the bicentennial should be celebrated at SLU and that students should be involved. The symposium was created and both under-

of the University’s president graduate and graduate stuand shared that people were dents presented their papers inquiring about SLU’s past on Jesuit history. with race. In response, the After their success, the research project concernthree decided to host the ing SLU and slavery was event annually. The next started and is currently beyear’s theme was about race ing researched by several and the Jesufaculty memits. bers from the Siddali For the 2017 d e p a r t m e nt said the controversies at symposium, the of history. foremost and around theme concerns The researcher is Ferguson inspired the the Jesuit influence Dr. Nathaniel trio to cover on art. The Jesuits Millett. The projthe topic. The focus was on have had an impact ect will be featured SLU and slavon various art ery, but there forms, whether it prominently among SLU’s were also preis stained glass, bicentennial sentations on Native Ameri- architecture, music programs in 2018. cans and Jesuor even plays. Siddali its. shared that The race the SLU and and Jesuits slavery project showcases synposium was well-rethe mission of the symposia: ceived, but Siddali said that “We were hoping that these attendees were somewhat symposia would bring our surprised by SLU’s history students more in line with with slavery. Jesuit history.” The symposium brought For the 2017 symposium, to light that SLU really had the theme concerns the Jenot done anything about suit influence on art. The Jetheir negative history. suits have had an impact on Siddali went to the office

various art forms whether it is stained glass, architecture, music or even plays. Siddali expressed her excitement about working with students from various disciplines on their research. Surprisingly, Jesuits have even been involved with theatrical performances. Siddali said there are several plays that can be found in the Jesuit Archives. Beginning the call for papers now, the deadline for proposals is Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. Both undergraduate and graduate students can submit proposals. The proposal will be reviewed by a panel and presentations will be 20-minutes long. Final papers are due Monday, April 10, 2017. Contact Dr. Silvana Siddali at siddalis@slu.edu with questions or for more information. Siddali said she will even assist with topic choices. All are invited to attend the symposium to hear presentations on April 18, 2017. It will be held in Saint Louis University Museum of Art (SLUMA) and there will be food and refreshments.

INSIDE SCOOP: The 1975 performs stellar concert at the Peabody Page 5

ARTS

SPORTS

Women’s volleyball reaches A-10 final

Trump’s Cabinet picks are a sign of what’s to come

Page 7

Page 9

OPINION


2 December 1, 2016

NEWS

PRT: St. Louis’ problem of division is highlighted pens in neighborhoods, and college students tend to be more rural or suburban ara little insulated in their eas. dorms,” Roddy said. “Nation“Much of the money and al politics are a lot easier to power has been transferred follow, and so many college out of the city to the substudents know they’re gourbs, yet the city governing to end up moving somement is blamed for regional where else. I think it’s hard to problems,” Allen said. “The get really interested in local city must stop being seen as government until you settle a separate land.” down a little bit. When you He emphasized the need own your house, you’ll care a for the next generations to little more about your neighbecome involved in reshapborhood.” ing local politics, and stuDenish Jaswal, president dents had a of Political chance to do Roundtable, St. Louis is just that dursaid that this ing the secinterest in a city that is ond half of local politics starkly divided the evening. is exactly between affluence Once Alwhat the and poverty... len finished State of St. continually staying his address, Louis event with our bounds the night was is meant to opened up encourage. of affluence and for discus“St. Louis privilege is a sion. is a city that disservice to the Each of is starkly city we call our the numerdivided behome. ous dinner tween aftables set up Denish Jaswal, PRT President fluence and were desigpoverty, and nated with we feel that a different topic of interest, continually staying with including politics, homelessour bounds of affluence and ness and poverty, start-ups, privilege is a disservice to the transportation, media and city we call our home,” Jasmore. Each table and its topwal said. “[Political Roundtaic was assigned at least one ble] works to bridge the gap expert in the area. between these two realities At the politics table, alof St. Louis with this event derman Joseph Roddy of every year.” Ward 17 and alderwoman Alderwoman Davis spoke Marlene Davis of Ward 19 of the importance of linking talked with students about political involvement with the complexities of politics serving the community you and the importance of local are a part of. “Being involved involvement. in politics is hard work! It’s “Most of the important not just sitting around in stuff that’s going on hapa suit, looking important, Continued from Page 1

Kristina DeYong / The University News

PRT: Students pose for a picture after Dr. Michael Allen’s talk on the problems facing St. Louis City in the Sinquefield State Room in DuBourg Hall. The talk focused on the many factors that continue to divide those in the St. Louis area. saying things that make no sense half the time,” Davis said. “You’ve got to know and understand and be willing to do what is needed to help people. That means spending Saturdays cleaning lots, cleaning alleys, helping paint porches...communities welcome volunteers for their projects.” This advice comes at a time when student interest

in politics is at a high point. “This past election cycle has definitely amped up interest in politics here at SLU,” Jaswal said. “Hopefully, some of this will lead to more than just isolated talk and translate into action. Given Trump’s upcoming controversial presidency, I think that there is much room for both talk and action from people who previously felt that politics did not affect

them or those that they cared about. It has definitely jolted folks to become more aware, so I hope their interest is maintained.” Davis, too, hopes that young people will continue to be interested in politics. “Older generations have not made an effort to bring young people aboard so that they can get direct information and knowledge,” she said. “We just said ‘we got

this,’ and did our own thing. But there’s nothing you can’t learn by educating yourself.” Roddy encouraged students to read local newspapers like the Post-Dispatch, citing them as more credible than most ideologically driven websites. He mentioned that all committee meetings are available to watch on YouTube, and all board meetings are on public access cable.

The Clock Tower Accords impact Free massages on enrollment efforts offered in Pius

during finals

By PATRICK HYLAND Staff Writer

stress, but those that do should let the therapist know beforehand. Massage Therapists from Anne recommends getIndigo Massage and Wellting the most out of a masness will be on campus from sage appointment by “engagMonday, Dec. 5 to Friday, ing in deep, slow breathing Dec. 9, offering morning, and entering into a state of afternoon and evening apstillness.” She notes that the pointments for students proven benefits of massage at no charge. The program include: “relief of muscle is funded by the Wellness tension, reduction of stress, Fund, which all University improvement in blood and students pay into each selymphatic flow, soft tissue mester. relaxation and over-all menStudents are eligible for tal and physical well-being.” one free massage during Anne believes that stuthe week of final exams, and dents should actually considcan choose between a chair er regular massage therapy massage or table stretchsince, “Students experience ing. All massages will take periods of time dealing with place on the lower level of high levels of stress and Pius Library, in room LL6. pressure.” Massages, in fact, The room is located at the “can provide a release of bottom of the staircase next para-sympathic chemicals to Eienstein (seratonin, Bagels. Stuendorphins) Massage therapy dents must and reduce is more helpful schedule an the chemicals appointment than medications released by using the the sympathic for back pain, links pronervous sysespecially low vided in this tem (adrenback pain. week’s SGAalin, epinephWeekly Up- Anne Childers, owner of Indigo rine).” These date email. Massage and Wellness very chemiA n n e cals can afChilders, fect overall owner of Indigo Massage performance and self-awareand Wellness, which is the ness, according to Anne. company that will be providOther tips of getting the ing the massages to students, most out of a massage are says that “There is recent redrinking a lot of water both search that shows that masbefore and after the massage, sage therapy is more helpful eating wholesome foods, exthen medications for back ercising regularly, resting as pain, especially low back much as possible, drinking pain.” Anne also notes that, alcohol only in moderation “A common misconception and not overeating. with pain is that where you Appointments begin at feel the pain is where the 10 a.m., Monday through problem is. This isn’t always Friday, and end at 3 p.m., true. There are referred pain before picking up again at 7 patterns and we look at the p.m. and running until 9 p.m. body as a whole when asSpots are available for 42 sessing pain.” Students are students each day, and will encouraged to let the masserve 210 students throughsage therapist know of any out finals week. Students pain or tension before their should have their SLU ID massage. Not all students are ready to show the therapist aware of where they carry at their appointment time. By PATRICK HYLAND Staff Writer

Courtesy of SLU

Clock Tower: SLU seeks to aid local students through college preperatory programs with the underserved in and ton and Washington, D.C. around the Normandy and Research conducted by Shaw neighborhoods, acboth outside agencies, as cording to Smith. well as within SLU, indicated With the additional staffthat SLU could increase the ing in pre-college and access underrepresented student programs and student finanpopulation by broadening cial services, SLU increased recruitment beyond tradiits outreach efforts throughtional high school students. out the metro More loarea by ofcally, the enfering more enUniversity officials hanced college readirollment plan ness, college have found that not is to include admissions all area schools “multiple acand financial cess points” are resourced aid workfor first-genwell enough to shops. In eration col2015-16, SLU support all types of lege and disenrollment advantaged and retention college preparatory students to management become Bilprograms. staff suplikens. The ported over new transfer 110 of such ar tic ul ation programs. In addition, the plan will start with St. Louis Office of Admission now Community College in the makes at least two visits each launch of the 2+SLU proyear to high schools with the gram, which will operate as highest underrepresented a bridge and college complestudent populations in each tion effort for all area high of the University’s metropolschool graduates. Serving as itan focus markets: Chicago, a dual admission program, New Orleans, Memphis, students will take prescribed Denver, Los Angeles, San classes at any St. Louis ComJose, Dallas, Houston, Bosmunity College campus.

Participating students will be admitted to SLU as long as they maintain a minimum college GPA of 2.75 in at least 10 college courses. A GPA of 3.25 will make a student scholarship-eligible. An earlier article on the Clock Tower Accords, published on Nov. 3, 2016 mentioned that there was no update from the University in regards to a possible national conference on racial equality. Dr. Jonathan Smith, Chief Diversity Officer, has since clarified that, indeed, the University is planning on holding just such a conference in the Fall of 2017 or the Spring of 2018. Smith also clarified that while there may not be an officially designated “diversity speaker series,” certainly the spirit of that accord is being met through funding he has been able to offer to bring speakers such as Janet Mock to campus. Mock is a transgender rights activist and author of the New York Times bestseller, “Redefining Realness.” She is scheduled to speak in March.

The Clock Tower Accords website tells only part of the story about the University’s efforts to support community-based initiatives. While many initiatives are detailed in the October 2014 agreement, not all of them originated at that time. The University has made efforts towards at least some of the initiatives long before October of 2014. In fact, Jay Goff, VP of Enrollment and Retention Management mentions the University’s efforts and commitment towards diversity as the main reason why he came to SLU in the first place, back in 2012. The fifth Clock Tower accord specifically mentioned developing bridge and summer programs to better support students in the Normandy and Shaw neighborhoods. William Perkins, Director of Pre-College and Access Programs recently highlighted how the University has worked on partnership programs with Roosevelt High School in the Shaw neighborhood, creating a bridge program to improve the college readiness skills of middle and high school students. The University also agreed to increase its support for schools in the immediate area. In working within the geographic zone around SLU’s campus, University officials have found that not all area schools are resourced well enough to support all types of college preparatory programs. The larger educational gap that exists cannot be bridged through a simple tutoring program, for instance. According to Dr. Jonathan Smith, the issue is larger than just dropping a dozen undergrads off to tutor students once a week. The University plans to continue investigating ways to work


NEWS

December 1, 2016

Let Us Introduce You: Matthew Gannon By PETER FURLOW Contributor

Junior Matt Gannon can be seen (or heard) all across campus. If you haven’t seen him giving tours to prospective students as a SLU Ambassador, you may have seen him enthusiastically sporting his orange Oriflamme shirt. Or you may have heard him on his own KSLU radio show, “MG²,” which airs every Monday at 6 p.m. Because of this involvement, as he walks down West Pine there are seemingly no strangers. But it was not always this way. Gannon arrived at SLU as the only person from his all-boys Jesuit high school in Washington D.C. He came to SLU originally because he was interested in the engineering program at SLU as well as his firm commitment to the Jesuit mission. SLU allowed him the opportunity to experience a new beginning in an unfamiliar place. He had an interesting campus visit that lead to his decision to attend SLU. “I flew out with my dad. I had a 101-degree fever when I went on my tour. I was very sick. I figured that if when I felt basically like death I still enjoyed the school that that’s probably a good sign.” He has since been extremely satisfied with his

Courtesy of Matthew Gannon

LUIY: Junior Matthew Gannon hails from Washington, D.C. and is a computer science major and music minor. decision to attend SLU even though his plans have deviated. Instead of studying engineering, Gannon is pursuing a major in computer science and a minor in music. His experiences and unique perspective have shaped his involvement on campus. Gannon expressed his appreciation of SLU 101 and Oriflamme. He believed these fostered a close-knit community that allowed him to feel comfortable in a place where he was essentially a stranger. He knew the positive impact that these firstyear experiences had.

This led Gannon to get involved with both SLU 101 and Oriflamme. His summer after sophomore year was his first time as a SLU 101 leader. Gannon has been involved with Oriflamme for two years, and he is going to be doing it for his third year. In his first year he was the floor leader for 4C of the Griesedieck complex. The next year he was a team leader. Now he is one of the coordinators. His current role is to help new leaders be successful and to organize and try to make Oriflamme

even better. “I get a lot out of [the First-Year Experiences]. It is still service, but a different kind. That is how I rationalize it. It is a service that is very tangible to me and personal since I have background being on the other side of things. I know how much it helps.” His other major involvement is KSLU. This all began with a simple declaration from his father. Gannon’s father informed him that he would be tossing out the Steinway piano that was getting no use in their home. As an act of defiance, Gannon decided to enroll in piano lessons at SLU. That experience combined with a “History of Jazz” class that he thoroughly enjoyed caused him to wish to pursue a music minor. In these classes he was introduced to friend and cohost of “MG²”, Matt Gottsacker. This hour-long show comprises an eclectic variety of music compositions from both Gannon and Gottsacker’s extensive vinyl collections. What started as a hobby for Gannon may turn in to his future. He intends on combining computer science and music to possibly work with computer music software or even to perhaps teach music to high schoolers in the future.

Identity: Panel composed of students and faculty discuss their identities in college

Q&A with Matthew Gannon:

Q. What is your favorite spot on campus? In my hammock in between the campus ministry building and the clock tower. Q. Do you have any advice to future and current students? Take advantage of the older people who are reaching out to you. It baffled me how close I got to the seniors when I was a freshman … They were still willing to take me under my wing. You can make genuine connections and really learn a lot from those who have already been through it all. Q. What band would you see at any venue? The concert would be Bon Iver at Red Rocks, or honestly anyone there. That venue is unreal.

THE SLU SCOOP All Information Provided by Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Tuesday, November 17 5:46 p.m. INFORMATIONAL A Saint Louis University housekeeping employee reported that she had discovered a used syringe in the lower level unisex restroom earlier in the morning. The housekeeping employee had notified her supervisor, cleaned the area, and discarded the syringe prior to Public Safety being notified.

Thursday, November 17 10:06 p.m. TRESPASSING An individual, who was reported by Saint Louis University maintenance staff as being observed at two different bike racks on campus, was detained by Public Safety officers, and found to have a set of wire cutters in his possession. The subject, who had no affiliation with the University, was subsequently conveyed to the Wool Center holdover, for further investigation. A Regional Justice Information Systems computer check revealed no active holds on the subject, but did reveal a number of previous arrests. The subject was released with a warning for trespassing.

Wednesday, November 16 1:28 p.m. PROPERTY DAMAGE / CRIMINAL A Saint Louis University student reported the theft of his wallet and contents, along with his cellular phone, from his backpack that he had left in an unlocked locker in the first floor men’s locker room. The student declined contacting St. Louis Metropolitan Police. Building management was made aware of the incident, along with the Department of Public Safety Investigator

Patrick Hyland / The University News

IDENTITY: Students gathered to listen to faculty members Dr. Karla Scott and Dr. Laurie Shornick and students Noelle Janak and Graham Vogt talk about their identities and experiences. Grant Mayfield moderated the panel.

be shared in teaching, Shornick told of how she now uses images from a genetic counseling journal to teach pedigrees to students. As biology teaches, there are not simply men and women. “Nothing in biology is absolute; everything in biology happens on a spectrum.” Shornick mentioned how chromosomes come from the egg and sperm, not necessarily the mother and father. Scott then highlighted that, “You can argue to change someone’s opinion, but you cannot argue to change someone’s experience.” She also recognized the work that professors need to do in order to explore various identities with students. “As professors, we must

create an environment from a “witnessing whitewhere you can go there with ness” faculty group, and us.” mentioned that a similar Scott is a first-generation group for students will begin college graduate and from a meeting next semester. family a few generations reStill receiving emails moved from from past slavery. She students, explained Scott knows Some folks get how the the power of listened to more work of the education. than others, what Civil Rights “ T h e can you do to Movement work I do, I create that space is still going believe, can on, and that transform for others to feel ultimately, as society.” listened to? she put, “We As a tenhaven’t been ured profesDr. Karla Scott at this for sor, she also very long.” mentioned Discourthe latitude aged that other professors such a privilege can afford were refusing to discuss Ocher when dealing with other cupy SLU in the classroom, faculty and administrators., Scott shared that, “I take the Especially in regards to mission very seriously. That the mission, adding, “I will is why I haven’t left.” hold these Jesuits accountShornick shared how able.” she has personally benefited The mission was also im-

Continued from Page 1

portant to Janak. “I came to SLU, and I stayed at SLU because of the Jesuit mission.” Calling herself a student first and an organizer second, Janak feels compelled to “call SLU on some of its problematic behavior,” such as its progress, or lack thereof, towards fulfilling the Clock Tower Accords, or partnering with a food service company that supports for-profit prisons. Both Occupy SLU and the Ferguson Movement, Janak shared, have kept her here, knowing that “There are people here who want to do good, just work.” During the questionand-answer period, Scott brought attention to the fact that “Some folks get listened to more than others,” and challenged others with the question, “What can you do to create that space for others to feel listened to?”

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Thursday, November 28 11:43 a.m. ACCIDENTAL INJURY A Visitor to College Church fell on the steps while exiting through the Northeast doors. Church staff contacted 911 and DPS. St. Louis Fire Department Medic unit #23 responded. The victim had a small abrasion to the top of the head but denied injury and refused medical attention. The victim walked to his vehicle and left the area without further incident. Photos taken and attached to report.

Friday, November 29 1:19 a.m. VMCSL Officer responding to a “confirmed odor” assist with Res. Life was handed 3 bags containing small amounts of a green leafy substance by the occupants of the room. All three occupants admitted to smoking marijuana in the dorm room.

Be a Responsible Billiken STOP. CALL. REPORT. 314-977-3000 witness.slu.edu dps.slu.edu


4 December 1, 2016

GAMES

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&

Arts Entertainment Sofar Sounds redefines live music

December 1, 2016 arts@unewsonline.com Tess Brock, Arts Editor Natalie Riopelle, Assoc. Arts Editor

‘Moana’: A princess with power, personality By CHANDANA KAMARAJ Staff Writer

Courtesty of Sofar Sounds St. Louis

MUSIC: Kevin Buckley, from the St. Louis-based group Grace Basement, performs for the Sofar Sounds’ “Songs from a Living Room Series.” By TESS BROCK Arts Editor

It’s happened to everyone before. Excitedly, you decide to go see a live show, but it doesn’t turn out as planned. The sea of people in the venue makes it nearly impossible to move. It takes you 20 minutes and $10 to buy one beer. And, it can be hard to focus on the artist while everyone around you is glued to their phones. Far too often live shows get bogged down with these distractions that take away

from the experience. Sofar Sounds wants to solve that. Started in 2009 by a few friends frustrated after a disappointing and disruptive show in London, the group began hosting intimate performances in their own homes. Sofar Sounds quickly took off and has now spread to nearly 300 cities all over the world. The Sofar experience has developed into an original way to experience music. You sign up online to reserve your spot at a show. However, the catch is you don’t

know who the artists are or where the show is located until the day of the gig. Sofar focuses on the element of surprise. Debuting in Aug. 2015, Sofar St. Louis now has over a thousand members according to city director Chris DiGiacomo. “What’s really key to our growth is making sure each experience is different from the next because that’s one thing that I felt was lacking in St. Louis,” says DiGiacomo. “We have all these venues, and we have all these artists. They’re all

playing, but sometimes it’s the same people that show up to the same place, and it can feel like a routine. We just wanted to change things up.” In the past year, Sofar has held shows in some of St. Louis’s most unfamiliar spots. From a pumpkin patch to an old firehouse to a rock climbing gym, there are few places that are off limits for a Sofar show. “These are See “Sofar” on Page 6

‘Fantastic Beasts’: Relive the magic By NATALIE RIOPELLE Associate Arts Editor

It’s always hard when good things come to an end. The end of a vacation. The end of an absorbing book. The end of a delicious piece of cake. Sadness marks each of these occurrences, but sadder still was the ending of what, for many, had become their childhood’s foundation: Harry Potter. Those generations fortunate enough to be children while the books came out were simultaneously those generations unfortunate enough to still be children when they stopped. Following the seventh and final book release came the fleeting reinvigoration conjured by the movies— a brief re-immersion into that most magical of worlds. Once the movies, too, stopped fell those doldrums that signify that a chapter of childhood had now finally come to a close. Then, suddenly, years after the last Harry Potter movie premiered, like the answer to a prayer the sleeping children within us didn’t even know they were praying, the promise of new magic: “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” First released on Nov. 18, “Fantastic Beasts” dives back into J.K. Rowling’s world of witchcraft and wizardry, but this time set in 1926 New York City. Eddie Redmayne plays Newt Scamander, a simultaneously ingenious and clueless wizard with a propensity for befriending some interesting creatures. Equipped with a briefcase brimming with magical creatures, Scamander enters New York to quickly find himself caught up in an

Courtesty of Warner Brothers

ENCHANTING: Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) and Tina Goldstein (Katherine Waterston) team up. unfolding drama, for some of which he could be to blame. Meanwhile, a mysterious force has begun to terrorize the city, wreaking havoc and risking the exposure of the entire wizarding world. Trouble is definitely a’brewing. The film’s focus switches quickly between various plot lines: one centered squarely on the shenanigans of Mr. Scamander and the other trailing behind Percival Graves, a high official in America’s version of the Ministry of Magic, Magical Congress of the United States of America (MACUSA). New characters are introduced with rapidity, including Jacob Kowalski, a Muggle (called a No-Maj in the States) cannery worker who dreams of owning his own bakery. Soon he is swept into the wizarding world, a realm he never dreamed existed. At times these jumps to new characters and new

settings became a wee bit jarring—too much happening too soon and then all at once. Visually, the movie is stunning. Intricate CGI paints the “fantastic beasts” into believable animals, each with their own personalities, tendencies and instincts. Witchcraft becomes reality as teacups float across the screen and walls rebuild themselves at the wave of a wand, inviting us all to participate in the magic. The well-crafted special effects work perfectly with the actors, all existing comfortably in one believably enchanted world. It must be said: a jump back into my childhood “Fantastic Beasts” was, but perfect it was not. I may be the only person in the history of forever to say Johnny Depp should not have been in a movie, but really he should not have been in this movie—however, at the

risk of spoiling anything, his character will remain nameless. When an actor or actress appears in a movie and all that can be seen is that actor, Houston, you’ve got a problem. As soon as Depp appeared in the scene, the magic wavered for a moment. This is not always the case with recognizable actors, like Eddie Redmayne and Colin Farrell who blend seamlessly into their characters, but it has certainly become the case with Johnny Depp. It may be that he’s simply played too many “wacky” characters or that all of those characters have somehow become interchangeable, but his appearance in “Fantastic Beasts” came as a wholly disappointing surprise. Apart from Johnny Depp’s unnecessary arrival into the film, watching “Fantastic Beasts” brought a glowing feeling of home. Though the plot jumped sometimes with abrupt quickness, the movie was, on the whole, a joy to watch. Children dream of magic, of witches and wizards, and mythical creatures; Harry Potter brought these things to them and “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” allowed those dreams to soar again. Although J.K. Rowling’s book series will always outshine any of the Harry Potter universe’s movies, one cannot but feel grateful in seeing them come to life on the big screen. “Fantastic Beasts” has now become part of the wizarding world, with four more in this series to follow, and will remind you what all that magic, the magic of Harry Potter, the magic of childhood, felt like all those years ago.

atoa and the villain Te Ka. The highlight of the story is how powerful the Ron Clements and John main character is. Moana is Musker return to Disney a Polynesian princess who after “The Princess and the finds her moral compass and Frog” with the powerful sense of direction as she navPolynesian tale, “Moana.” igates through the endless The film revolves around waters in the film. Disney the chief ’s daughter, Moana, attempts to create a powervoiced by Auli’i Cravalho, ful and brave character who who goes against her parents’ fights her own battles as she wishes and explores the reefs explores her identity and ulto obtain the goddess Te Fitimately fights for the wellti’s heart while confronting ness of her people. Disney the demigod Maui, played makes a strong move with by Dwayne Johnson, who this one after portraying had initially stolen the heart. their previous female leads Moana learns how to find as the damsel in distress, like her true calling and continue in “Tangled”. the traditions Dwayne Johnof her family son plays an heritage. Disney attempts to equally powThis film create a powerful erful role as begins as Moaand brave character Maui, who alna learns from though seems her grandwho fights her big and strong, mother about own battles as she has multiple the paunamu stone that was explores her identity. internal weaknesses, such initially stolen as the fear of by the demigod not being acMaui in hopes of taking up cepted, which he gets over the power of Te Fiti. From by the support from Moana. that moment, Moana dreams With themes of feminism of exploring the ocean but is and feminist power being often stopped by her father, highlighted, it can be seen Chief Tui, who insists that here that Moana is constantexploring the ocean is unly helped by her grandmothnecessary, as food, water er and she in return helps and shelter can be found on the male lead Maui gain his land. During this time, howpower. ever, the island of Motunui Another highlight of the begins to suffer, as the cofilm are the musical pieces conuts darken and the food used throughout the film. becomes scarce. Moana Composed by Lin-Manuel takes this as a calling to go Miranda (“Hamilton”), Opeconfront the demigod Maui taia Foa’i and Mark Manand restore the stone to the cina, the soundtrack of the heart of Te Fiti. Throughout film was very powerful, as the journey, Moana gains her it brought in a sense of desense of special direction by termination and provided a simply following the nature glimpse of the struggles that and stars. She does this while both Moana and Maui had learning how to navigate through the unknown territory while also facing the giSee “Moana” on Page 6 ant coconut crab name Tam-

Courtesty of Walt Disney

EXPLORATION: Moana (voiced by Auli’i Cravalho) is a Polynesian princess whose journey through the movie brings her closer to her culture.


6 December 1, 2016 What’s up in STL this week?

ARTS

The 1975 bring ‘The Sound’ across the pond By Tom Bergan Senior Staff Writer

Foxing Dec. 10, 7:00 p.m. Delmar Hall Hailing from St. Louis, Foxing is an indie rock group with a devoted fanbase.

“Allied” In theaters A World War II film starring Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard, “Allied” questions loyalty and trust in the marriage of two intelligence officers.

“Finding Neverland” Dec. 6-18 Fabulous Fox “Finding Neverland” tells the beloved story of Peter Pan with twists not seen in J.M. Barrie’s classic.

Pop music is not supposed to be good. At best it should be a “guilty pleasure” for the listeners, but nothing more. It is supposed to be something anyone can dance to while remaining mindnumbingly simple in its lyrics and complexion. It is supposed to be dominated by solo artists, who have limited knowledge when it comes to instrumentation. So what happens when all of these expectations of what pop music is supposed to be are thrown out the window? The result is The 1975, a group of gentlemen from Manchester, England who make top-notch music for the masses. When listening to The 1975, one can never be too sure if it is a band from 2016 or 1986. They magically blend flares of modern music with sounds that could easily be mistaken for new wave artists such as Depeche Mode or The Cure. This is part of their unique appeal, being able to seam the two together flawlessly. And while there are indeed other artists of today that attempt to recreate sounds of the past, more often than not it ends up as a lackluster tribute and nothing more. The lads from across the pond brought their show to St. Louis thon Nov. 30 to a packed crowd at the Peabody Opera House. Though a seated venue may seem unconventional for a band of The 1975’s nature, it turned out to be the perfect location to play host to an evening that may go down as one of the best shows of the year. Before The 1975 took the stage as the main attraction of the evening, Brooklyn duo Phantogram warmed the audience up with an hourlong set of their own. Fresh off of a long year touring as Big Grams, their project with Big Boi of Outkast, the band is back to themselves

Courtesy of Emily Brady

LED: The 1975 had the Peabody Opera House stage filled with tall rectangular LED lights that changed to colorful, captivating backgrounds with each song change. in support of their new album “Three.” The band’s set sprinkled old hits with new, but struggled to get the audience engaged. Despite loop-driven, dream-like dance anthems such as “Don’t Move” and “When I’m Small,” the vast majority of the crowd remained seated during their set. The lack of energy from the crowd did not deter the band, who ripped through their catalog with the same intensity and energy that they would have brought at a headlining show or festival performance. Though Phantogram played a great set in their own right, it was obvious that everyone in attendance was patiently waiting for The 1975, and at 9:00 they received exactly that. The house lights gradually dimmed as their mostly instrumental track “The 1975”

blared over the speakers, and the band walked out to deafening roars that could have only been matched at a One Direction concert. Without missing a beat, the band jumped into the immediate one-two punch of “Love Me” and “UGH!,” two standouts from their 2016 release, “I Like It When You Sleep, for You Are So Beautiful yet So Unaware of It.” Singer Matty Healy’s accent-tinged voice combined with goofy yet smooth dance moves took center stage, making the crowd swoon with excitement. The energy of the band bled into the audience, the entire crowd screaming along with every word. The LED backdrop of giant rectangles brightly created hues of red and blue that brought the show to a new level of sensory engage-

ment, forcing the 3,100 pairs of eyes in attendance to glue to the stage with its entrancing glow. The jam-packed setlist pulled heavily from their most recent album, though their 2013 self-titled release was not forgotten. Old favorites such as “Girls,” “Sex” and “Chocolate” received some of the liveliest reactions of the evening, transforming the opera house into a dance hall with the opening chords of each of these songs. Upbeat, dance-driven tunes are not The 1975’s only trick. The slow-burning ballad is another song type the band has mastered, as evidenced by perfect breakup anthems “A Change of Heart” and “Somebody Else.” Both of these songs created phenomenal moments within the show, but the most poignant moment of the concert came from their

song “Paris.” Healy asked the crowd to have a moment completely in the present, without any phones out. The crowd happily obliged, and there wasn’t a screen to be seen in the audience as Healy sang about “romanticizing heroin,” a beautiful feat to occur in a time where everyone often feels the need to have their phone out. If Tuesday night proved one thing, it is that The 1975 are everything pop music needs to be. We need more artists who can perfectly combine sounds of past and present without sounding uninspired. We need more performers who can put on a show of a lifetime without backup dancers and costume changes. But until that becomes the norm for the genre (if it ever does), we can take solace in the fact that we still have The 1975.

Sofar Sounds St. Louis Moana: Culture and strength Continued from Page 5 to go through. The pieces were also true to the Polynesian culture, as many of the lyrics were in both English and the Tokelauan language. Many of the pieces included various traditional chants, placed in the scenes in which Moana realized that it was her turn to take on the responsibility and go on the journey for her people. Along with the music, the various details that were placed throughout the film were very true to the Polynesian culture. The memorable details include the various

Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker” Dec. 2, 8:00 p.m. Powell Symphony Hall The symphony plays pieces from Tchaikovsky’s classic ballet, just in time for the holiday season.

tattoos that were on Maui’s body which showed the story of the heritage, culture and his own story. Moana is a very significant film, as it challenges gender roles and social norms of society today. Bringing back an ethnic strong female lead, Disney brings back to mind strong characters like Mulan. This film is a very-much-needed inspiration especially in society today, and allows us to remember the strength of women while also allowing us to appreciate the structure and heritage of other cultures.

Courtesy of Sofar Sounds St. Louis

ORIGINAL: Ira Wolf performs at Climb So iLL, one of the many unique locations where Sofar St. Louis has hosted a show.

Steve Byrne Dec. 1-3 Funny Bone St. Louis Former star of Sullivan & Son on TBS, Byrne has now embarked on a comedy tour based on his own unique background.

not just venues. These are unique spaces that otherwise never have live music in them,” DiGiacomo said. The lineup of performers follows the same surprising and unconventional pattern. The artists selected for each show come from all over the country, but Sofar tries to have one local artist at each performance. There is no opener or headliner at a Sofar show in hopes that the audience treats each act with equal re-

spect. DiGiacomo says, “It’s about discovering, but it’s also about leveling the play-

These are not just venues. These are unique spaces that otherwise never have live music in them.

Continued from Page 5

Chris DiGiacomo, Sofar Sounds St. Louis city director

ing field. Each band is paid and treated equally.” Other protocol for a So-

far Show? Keep the phone usage to a minimum, and don’t talk during the performances. Again, the goal is to get back to the focus of what live music is really about, which can be difficult if you are constantly chatting with your neighbor or texting on your phone. As the Sofar St. Louis community continues to expand, there will be diverse artists and unusual venues popping up around town, so Sofar can continue giving St. Louis concert-goers a magical music atmosphere.

Courtesy of Walt Disney

PRINCESS: Moana, the daughter of Chief Tui, comes to inherit a position of great responsibility.


Sports

December 1, 2016 sports@unewsonline.com Lauren Tondl, Sports Editor Vivek Gorijala, Assoc. Sports Editor

Men battle for 2-4 record

Sharpshooting carries women By BOBBY STILWELL Staff Writer

By BOBBY STILWELL Staff Writer

While most students were enjoying Thanksgiving and preparing to finish the semester, women’s basketball was keeping busy, playing Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville (SIUE), Bradley, Morgan State, Little Rock and Southeastern Missouri State (SEMO). The Bills went 4-1 in this set of games. The Bills first faced SIUE on Nov. 17, winning 9049. When coupled with the 90-point win at Loyola Marymount, this is only the second time in program history that the women’s team has scored 90 points in consecutive games. The 20062007 team was the first to accomplish this feat. SLU got to work early with a 24-2 run in the first quarter. With this run, SLU led 28-4 at the end of the quarter. SLU ended up taking a 35-point lead in the second quarter, before settling for a 50-17 lead at the half. Senior center Sadie Stipanovich scored 20 and pulled down 10 rebounds, her second consecutive double-double, and 12th of her career. Sophomore guard Jordyn Frantz shot 3-for-6 from 3-point range, with a career-high eight assists. Next up for the Bills was a

Over the holiday break, men’s basketball saw a lot of action, playing Eastern Illinois University, BYU, Alabama and Samford. The Bills went 1-3 in this set of games. The Billikens first faced Eastern Illinois University at Chaifetz on Nov. 17, winning 74-69. This was the second win in a row for the Billikens. EIU gained a 19-13 lead early in the first half from an 8-0 run, but SLU fought back with an 11-0 run of their own to go up by five points with 8:25 to go in the first half. The Panthers rallied back with an 11-0 run and a lastsecond tip-in to take a 44-33 lead to the locker room. The Billikens rallied back in the second half, starting off with a 15-0 run, quickly erasing the halftime deficit and more. It was all SLU until EIU drained a 3-pointer with 8:39 left to tie the score at 5757. The Panthers briefly took a two-point lead, but junior guard Davell Roby drilled a 3-pointer to put the Bills back on top. Senior guard Mike Crawford scored off a fast-break to pad the lead. EIU kept the game close, but the Billikens would hold on for the win. Senior forward Reggie Agbeko and Roby led the scoring for SLU with 18

See “Women” on page 8

See “Men” on page 8

Volleyball drops championship match to Dayton in five-set nailbiter By VIVEK GORIJALA Associate Sports Editor

Saint Louis University women’s volleyball nearly turned home-court advantage into a surprise conference championship victory in the 2016 A-10 conference tournament. They fell in only five sets to the Dayton Flyers in the finals after getting past Davidson and Rhode Island to reach that matchup. Before the championship tournament started, SLU senior outside hitter Danielle Rygelski was named Atlantic 10 Conference Player of the Year. She is only the third Billiken volleyball player to ever receive the award, and the first since Sammi McCloud won the award in 2009. Rygelski won the award based on strong performances all season. She earned a record seven Atlantic 10 Conference Player of the Week awards throughout the season. She led the entire NCAA in kills per set (6.01), total points (710.5) and total kills (627). She also led the A-10 in aces per set (0.53, seventh in the NCAA), attacks per set (13.61, fourth in the NCAA), points per set (6.77, second in the NCAA) and total attacks (1429, seventh nationally). Rygelski also has the sec-

CHEER

ond-best (31 versus George Mason), third-best (29 versus Davidson), sixth-best (26 versus Illinois State) and 12th-best (24 versus GW) three-set kill totals in the NCAA this season, showing her prowess in short games. She finished second amongst all NCAA volleyball players in kills, with exactly 2,000 kills, the most that a Billiken has ever had in the rally-scoring era. Rygelski, an education major, also earned a spot on the conference All-Academic team. The senior has a 3.58 cumulative grade point average. She was the clear leader for the Billikens as they faced the Davidson Wildcats in the first championship match. The first match for the No. 3-seeded Billikens came against the Davidson Wildcats, who the Billikens had just beaten in their final homestand of the regular season. The Billikens repeated the feat, downing the Wildcats by a score of three sets to one. The first set saw Rygelski tally five kills, three aces and three digs to lead SLU to a 25-17 set victory. The Billikens defense was quite strong in the first set, holding Davidson to only a .050 attack percentage. Then, in the second set, Rygelski erupted for 11 kills, but the

JEER WHO TO CHEER BIG TEN FOOTBALL Ohio State is ranked second; Michigan is fifth; Wisconsin is sixth; Penn State is eighth. Big Ten Football appears to have regained their title from the SEC as the strongest football conference in the country. However, the SEC has Alabama, considered the best team in football, and it remains to be seen if they can be dethroned.

Swimming places fourth By LAUREN TONDL Sports Editor

gen also had a good game, with 42 assists to go along with 10 digs to record her first career double-double. Paulson finished the match with 10 kills and a .412 attack percentage. Junior middle blocker Lauren Leverenz had 7 kills on 12

Both the men’s and women’s squads competed in the TYR Invitational at Northwestern University on Nov. 18-20. The men finished in fourth place overall, and the women earned seventh place. The men had several finalists in the meet. In the 50-yard breaststroke, freshman Collin O’Brien earned fourth place, with a time of 25.70. Senior T.J. Decker also competed, placing sixth with a time of 26.04. Decker competed in three other events: the 100-yard breaststroke (third place, 56.21), 200-yard breaststroke (fourth place, 2:04.23) and the 100-yard IM (eighth place, 53.19). Junior Ryan McCoy finished in fourth in the 500yard freestyle (4:32.94). In the 50-yard butterfly, he placed third with a time of 21.88. His strongest performance was in the 100-yard butterfly, when he earned second place with a time of 47.74, a NCAA “B” Cutline race. Freshman Grant Streid took seventh place in the 50-yard backstroke with a time of 23.69. He also placed

See “Volleyball” on Page 8

See “Swimming” on Page 8

Photo courtesy of Bill Barrett

LIFT: Junior outside hitter Nenye Okoro leaps up to place the ball over two blockers during the Atlantic 10 Championships in Chaifetz Pavillion. SLU earned second place. Billikens just barely held on for the victory, 25-23. After the break, the Wildcats came out strong with a 25-21 set victory, which came despite another torrid performance from Rygelski, who recorded nine kills. In the final set, which SLU won 25-14 to close out the game, senior middle blocker Taylor

Paulson and junior outside hitter Nenye Okoro took some of the scoring load off of Rygelski by scoring five kills each. In the match, Rygelski was the standout performer. She had 28 kills, eight digs, six aces, a block and an assist to go along with a .302 attack percentage. Senior setter Ashley Ga-

FEAR WHO TO JEER JOSE MOURINHO The English Football Association charged Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho with improper conduct after kicking a water bottle during Manchester United’s match against West Ham. This is the latest in a long list of questionable behavior from Mourinho, and it reflects badly on his temperament.

WHO TO FEAR GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS A slow start to the season is a distant memory for the Golden State Warriors, who have won 11 straight games. It is a long season, and it is still hard to determine whether they will return to their regular season heights from last year. However, adding Kevin Durant has made them the NBA’s team to beat.


8 December 1, 2016 Tweet of the week

@GolfChannel According to a report, @TigerWoods will be making his return with a new sponsor and golf ball.

Scores from the week

SPORTS

This week in sports Thursday, Dec. 1

Friday, Dec. 2

St. Louis Blues 7 p.m. v. Tampa Bay Lightning

Shamrock Fighting Championships Vengeance 7:30 p.m. @ River City Casino and Hotel

Saturday, Dec. 3

Sunday, Dec. 4

Men: Bills struggle to gain momentum

Men’s Basketball

The Billikens bounced back from a 44-33 deficit going into halftime. Billikens 62 BYU 79 Sophomore guard Jermaine Bishop scored a career-high 27 points. Billikens 57 Alabama 62

Billikens 64 Samford 68 SLU did not recover after trailing by 11 at halftime. Women’s Basketball Billikens 90 SIUE 49 The Bills scored 90 points in consecutive games for the second time in history. Billikens 68 Bradley 58 Senior forward Olivia Jacubicek recorded her first career double-double. Billikens 71 Morgan State 43 SLU shot a record-tying 60 percent from the field. Billikens 43 Little Rock 56 SLU couldn’t hold off Little Rock’s run at the end in SLU’s first loss this season. Billikens 68 SEMO 58 SLU never trailed throughout the game. Volleyball Billikens 3 Davidson 1 The team had 14 aces, six coming from senior outside hiter Danielle Rygelski. Billikens 3 Rhode Island 2 The women upset the Rams, setting the tone in the first set by hitting .368. Billikens 2 Dayton 3 Rygelski tallied a careerhigh 35 kills in the championship loss.

Tuesday, Dec. 6

Wednesday, Dec. 7

Men’s Basketball 7 p.m. @ Wichita State Women’s Basketball 7 p.m. v. Indiana State

Martial Arts 5 p.m. @ Affton White

Women: Rise to 3-1, dominate competition on home court Continued from Page 7

Billikens 74 Eastern Illinois 69

The men dropped the decision despite having a 54-45 lead with 5 minutes to play.

Monday, Dec. 5

Swim/Dive NINJA Competition Jingle Hike Challenge Eastern Illinois Relays @ 8 a.m. @ Team Central All day @ HeartLands Charleston, Ill. Gymnastic Academy Conservancy Women’s Basketball 2 p.m. v. Eastern Kentucky Men’s Basketball 7 p.m. v. Kansas State

Saint Louis Athletics

DECISION: Redshirt freshman forward Elliott Welmer looks for freshman guard Zeke Moore down the court at Chaifetz Arena on Nov. 17 against Eastern Illinois. Continued from Page 7

points each. Freshman forward Elliott Welmer scored 15 points, and sophomore guard Jermaine Bishop tallied 14 along with a careerhigh eight assists. After the win over EIU, the Billikens traveled to the MGM Garden Arena in Las Vegas for the Men Who Speak Up Main Event. On Monday, Nov. 21, the Billikens first faced BYU, a 92-62 loss. The Billikens fell behind 11-0 early in the game, but bounced back with 12:40 left in the first half. A 7-0 run pulled the Billikens within three of the lead. BYU went up by 10 with four minutes left in the half, but the Billikens clawed back again, pulling within four on a 3-pointer by Crawford. A 3-pointer by freshman forward Jalen Johnson late in the first half helped the Bills pull within seven at the half. The Billikens utilized a 10-0 run to pull within five with 12:12 left in the game. However, with

the Billikens in foul trouble, BYU utilized runs of 19-1 and 22-4 to take the victory. Bishop scored a gameand career-high 27 points, shooting 11-for-23 from the field, and 4-for-9 from 3-point range. Agbeko had 10 rebounds. Crawford and freshman Zeke Moore had nine points each. In the second game at the MGM Garden Arena, played on Wednesday, Nov. 23, the Billikens fell to Alabama, 62-57. The Billikens carried a 54-45 lead with 5:25 left to play, but committed six turnovers while Alabama simultaneously got hot at 3-point range, managing to hit four 3-pointers to rally for the victory. Roby led the way in scoring with 15 points. Agbeko posted a double-double, scoring 10 points with 10 rebounds. The Billikens came back home to play Samford this past Tuesday. The game was a nail-biter down to the final buzzer, but the Billikens lost 68-64. Early on, the Bil-

likens won the tip and made the first basket, but Samford went on 12-4 and 18-4 runs to otherwise dominate the first half. The Bills headed to the locker room down 3928. In the middle of the second half, the Billikens came to life, going on a 14-6 run to come within two points of tying. Another 7-4 run late in the half brought the Bills within one point of tying. Samford and SLU kept the game close, but the Billikens were unable to catch up as Samford hit two free throws with seconds left to take the game. Defensively, the Billikens managed to keep Samford from scoring for a 4-minute period in the first half, forced 9 turnovers and managed to force Samford to commit a 10-second violation. Crawford scored 16 points, pulled down six rebounds and picked up five assists. Bishop scored 15 points, picking up two rebounds and two assists. Welmer scored 10 and pulled down nine rebounds.

Nov. 20 road trip to Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., where they pulled out a 6858 win over the Braves. The Billikens trailed 10-8 after one quarter, but embarked on a 16-2 run in the second to gain a 33-20 advantage at the half. SLU then scored on seven of its first 11 possessions in the third quarter, building its lead to 53-38 at the end of the quarter. Junior guard Jackie Kemph scored a career-high 21 points, and chipped in with a career-high six assists. Senior forward Olivia Jakubicek scored 11 and pulled down 10 rebounds, her first career double-double. After the happy trip home, the Billikens faced Morgan State on Nov. 23. The result was a decimating 71-43 win for SLU. The Billikens started off early again, using a 13-0 run to gain a 2212 advantage after one quarter. The advantage grew to 19 points in the second quarter before the Bears struck back and SLU took a 39-24 lead to the locker room at the half. SLU shot 80 percent in the third, growing their lead to 64-39 heading into the final quarter. The fourth quarter was extremely defensive, with SLU only scoring nine points the entire quarter. However, the Bills built their lead early and were able to hold the Bears off for the win. Kemph shot 6-for-6 from the field, and 3-for3 on free throws, tallying game highs of 15 points and seven assists. Frantz scored 14 points, chipping in three assists and two steals. The Billikens next traveled to Little Rock over Thanksgiving break. Little Rock handed SLU its first loss of the season, a heartbreaking final of 56-43.

Again, the Billikens struck early, jumping ahead 19-11 after the first quarter. However, Little Rock capitalized on a scoreless start to the second quarter for SLU, and used an 11-0 run to jump out to a 22-19 lead. The Bills were able to go back on top 25-24 after a Kemph free throw, a 3-pointer by junior guard Jenny Vilet and two free throws by junior forward Maddison Gits. Little Rock struck back to take a 28-25 advantage to the locker room. SLU and Little Rock traded the lead back and forth until Little Rock scored with 1:30 left in the third. That started the 20-6 run that gave Little Rock the victory. Frantz scored 15 points, Vilet pulled down 10 rebounds and scored eight points, and Gits tallied six points and eight rebounds. The Billikens next traveled to Cape Girardeau on Nov. 22 to take on SEMO, winning 89-50. Throughout the game, SLU never trailed, and got on the board rather late in the first quarter, with Stipanovich hitting a jumper with 8:52 left to play. This ignited the offense, which scored on 19 of 24 possessions in the first half. The Bills eventually jumped out ahead 47-21 as they headed for the locker rooms at halftime. The Billikens came back out and kept scoring, but the Redhawks kept the lead right around 40 points throughout the second half. Jakubicek picked up her second career double-double, scoring 12 points and grabbing 11 rebounds. Stipanovich scored 16 points and grabbed six rebounds. Notably, the team went 8-8 at the free-throw line, converting every attempt. Next, the women will take on Eastern Kentucky at home on Dec. 3 at 2 p.m.

Volleyball: Rygelski goes out with a bang

Swimming: Glenesk shatters two records in TYR Invitational

offense with four service aces. Meanwhile, Leverenz had nine kills and two blocks against the Rhode Island Rams. Finally, SLU faced off against No. 1 seed Dayton in the final, and went in as clear underdogs because the Dayton Flyers had already defeated SLU twice in 3-0 sweeps in the regular season. The Billikens won the first set 25-21 with eight kills on nine attacks from Okoro. However, Dayton hit .516 as a team in the second set to win 25-20. SLU’s offense was also strong, with a .324 attack percentage, but Dayton’s attack was too potent. Rygelski had a strong second set, with 10 kills on 15 attempts. The Billikens then took the third set 25-23 behind seven kills from Rygelski and four kills on four attacks from Paulson. Rygelski then had nine kills in the fourth set, but the Flyers still won the contest 25-20. The decisive fifth set then went against SLU, as the Billikens lost 15-9 because of a .471 attack percentage from Dayton. Rygelski’s senior season proved to be a great one, as she had an NCAA-record 715 kills. That is the most single-season kills in the 25-point rally scoring era. She also ended with exactly 2000 career kills, and be-

While the women may have had a low team fineighth in the 200-yard butish, junior Mina Glenesk terfly with a time of 1:52.16. brought her A-game, breakO’Brien also showed ing two SLU records in two his skills in the 200-yard of the three races in which IM, and his time of 1:52.21 she competed. She earned earned him eighth place in third in the 500-yard freethe event. He also competstyle, making the new SLU ed in the 200-yard freestyle record 4:53.76. In the 1650(eighth place, 1:42.66) and yard freestyle, she took sevthe 100-yard breaststroke enth place with a time of (third place, 57.45). 17:05.15. She also competed Other competitors for in the 200-yard freestyle, the men inposting a fifthcluded Senior place finish Nick Jessee, Junior Mina Glenesk (1:52.29). who placed F r e s h seventh in the brought her A-game, breaking two SLU man Savan200-yard freestyle with a records in two of the nah Nichols time of 1:41.16 three races in which competed in the 100-yard and freshshe competed. butterf ly, man Keegan earning sixth Paulson, who place (53.39), earned sixth the 50-yard butterfly, earnplace in the 100-yard backing seventh place (26.05), stroke with a time of 50.74. and the 200-yard butterfly, Junior Jeremy Goodison batagain taking seventh place tled through a long distance (2:05.35). swim, the 1650-yard freeSenior Olivia Garrett style, and placed in fifth with succeeded in her event, the a time of 16:07.26. Freshman 50-yard butterfly, by placing Scott Street was close behind second with a time of 24.99. with a seventh-place finish in Fellow senior Alexa Gross the same race (16:11.08). posted a seventh-place finSenior Austin Nguyenphu ish in the 100-yard IM with was the only male that won a time of 59.37. his event on SLU’s team. He Select members from the smoked the competition in two teams are competing in the 200-yard breaststroke the USA Swimming Winter with a time of 2:01.75. Nationals in Atlanta, Ga. In the 200-yard butterfly, through Dec. 3. The team sophomore Isaiah Williams will swim in the Eastern Iltook third place with a time linois Relay Meet on Dec. 3. of 1:49.87.

Continued from Page 7

swings for a .417 attack percentage, and Okoro had nine kills and 10 digs, barely missing a double-double. The Billikens then faced off against No. 2 seed Rhode Island, a team that had defeated SLU in Rhode Island earlier this season. However, the first set went to the Billikens 25-20, behind perfect attack percentages from Paulson and Leverenz, who had four and two kills, respectively. Rhode Island then squeaked out a victory in the second set, 25-23, despite six kills from Rygelski. After the break, Rhode Island’s offense was snuffed out by the SLU defense, and posted a .000 attack percentage compared to SLU’s .429 attack percentage. Rygelski had six kills on six attacks in the third set. Rhode Island then won the fourth set 25-20 to push the game to a decisive fifth set. In the pressure-filled tiebreaking set, SLU prevailed 15-11 because of Okoro and Paulson each having two kills without an error on four attacks. Rygelski was the best attacker in the match, notching 25 kills and 11 digs for her 14th double-double of the season. Junior libero Mackenzie Long led the Billiken defense with 14 digs, but also chipped in on

came only the second Billiken to reach 2,000 career kills and the only one to reach the milestone in the rally-scoring era. She finished with 15 double-doubles on the season. Okoro also chipped in with her second doubledouble of the season, with 15 kills and 14 digs. Meanwhile, senior setter Ashley Gagen finished her career on a strong note, earning a career-best 53 assists in her final game. Paulson had 10 kills and a .364 attack percentage against the Flyers, and she ended her career with a .296 attack percentage, tying Megan Gilbert for sixth on SLU’s all-time list. While SLU’s loss to the Flyers was a heartbreaking five-set affair, SLU can be proud of their achievements as a relative underdog and will look to regroup next season. They will have to cope with the loss of several starters, including outside hitter Danielle Rygelski, who has provided much of their offensive output this season, Taylor Paulson, who has been a reliable starter and strong defender at the middle blocker position, and setter Ashley Gagen, who showed some of her best form in her career towards the end of the 2016 season in A-10 conference play.

Continued from Page 7


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Opinions Editorials

December 1, 2016 opinion@unewsonline.com Trevor Rogan, Opinion Editor

Editorials are opinion pieces written by the Editorial Board of The University News. The editorials printed in this space represent the opinion of The University News. Commentaries and Letters to the Editor represent the opinions of the signed authors, but do not necessarily represent the opinions of The University News.

Trump’s Cabinet picks will shape the nation Distinguishing an individual from the people with whom they associate is no simple task. Although an individual’s personality varies according to the situation, the people one spends most of their time with can inform the observer of the type of person the individual is. All of the values and preferences of the individual may not be shared by his or her friends, but there is reason to suggest that they may act in similar ways. President-elect Donald Trump is no different than any other individual. The businessman has chosen many of his Cabinet members and advisors, and the choices inform the American people of the type of administration they are to expect for the next few years. Regardless of whether his picks are ideologically or strategically based — if he shares their political goals or if they have been chosen for their loyalty — the presidentelect will likely rely heavily on them for his policy agenda, especially because he has never held political office and lacks the expertise typically expected from the nation’s highest office. This means that they will determine the course of the nation, and this means that his choices are of immense importance. Already, there are signs that this course may be something different than our country has ever known. Cabinet members should understand their duties to the country and should work together with the president as an effective team. However, many of Trump’s selections seem out of place or out of sync with the president-elect’s intentions. His

Sophie Lappe / Illustrator choice for Education Secretary, Betsy DeVos, has no experience in government, and neither she nor her children have ever attended a public school or college. Ben Carson, the former neurosurgeon and presidential candidate, was tapped for the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development position, but he has acknowledged concern in his ability to perform. Armstrong Williams, a business manager who is close to Carson, said that the retired neurosurgeon noted that he “feels he has no government experience,” which might “cripple the presidency.” Reince Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee, will be Trump’s Chief of Staff, and Stephen Bannon, former executive chair of far-right website Breitbart News, will be the President-elect’s Chief Strategist. Both will be “working as equal partners” in contributing to the administration, according to Trump. These two officials are not likely to cohere. While both were loyal to Trump throughout his scandal-filled campaign, they come from vastly different political positions, with Priebus embodying the Republi-

can political establishment Trump lambasted during his campaign and Bannon representing the alt-right movement. This partnership does not bode well for the Trump administration. The choice of Jeff Sessions for Attorney General and Steven Mnuchin for Treasury Secretary do not bode well for the country at large, nor its vulnerable citizens. Sessions, a senator from Alabama, is infamous for his racist attitudes. Denied by a Senate committee in 1986, Sessions failed to be appointed to a federal judgeship because his former colleagues informed the committee that he had used racial slurs and joked about the Klu Klux Klan. They claimed that he said the hate group was “okay, until he learned that they smoked marijuana.” Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs executive, was the president-elect’s campaign finance chairman. In 2009, Mnuchin gathered a group of billionaire investors to buy the failed mortgage lender IndyMac and renamed the bank OneWest Bank, which gained notoriety for sudden foreclosure on loans given to delinquent homeowners. Over 36,000 homes were foreclosed under Mnuchin. As Attorney General, a

position which which must be confirmed by the Senate, Sessions would threaten the legitimacy of our legal system. As Treasury Secretary, Mnuchin would threaten low-income citizens and promote increased wealth inequality. By choosing Mnuchin, Trump has displayed that he will not maintain his campaign promises to the common people. Although he ran his campaign as a populist, his selection for Treasury Secretary demonstrates that he is no man of the people. His Transportation Secretary is Elaine Chao, the wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell — the supreme established politician, the longest-serving senator in Kentucky history. His promise to “drain the swamp” seems unlikely. In the aftermath of a wild election night, Trump gave a restrained victory speech in which he calmed some of the country’s fears about his new role in government. Over the last few weeks, he has taken back some of his more controversial campaign promises, such as jailing his opponent, Hillary Clinton. He has settled the minds of many Americans; perhaps he will be a reasonable president. However, his Cabinet choices tell otherwise. “You are who you surround yourself with,” the saying goes. As president, Trump will have to make many hard decisions he is not prepared to make. Let us hope not that Trump is a different man than his campaign promises suggest, but rather that his cabinet-level confidants and other advisors are different people than their actions would have us believe.

Letters

to the editor The University News reserves the right not to publish any letters that are deemed intentionally and/ or inappropriately inflammatory, more than the 300word limit or unsigned by the orginal author. The following are letters and/or website comments. Because the identities of website posters cannot be verified, all website comments should be treated as anonymous. Actual letters to the editor may be submitted online at unewsonline.com or e-mailed to opinion@unewsonline.com. Please include your cell phone number.

“ “ “

Quotes of the Week

You can make genuine connections and really learn a lot from those who have already been through it all. Matthew Gannon, junior, page 2

” ” ”

We need more artists who can perfectly combine sounds of past and present without sounding tacky. Tom Bergan, sophomore, page 6

We know that 100 percent renewable energy is 100 percent possible. Stephen Wald, sophomore , page 10

Senior send-off: Arts editor reflects on time at UNews

By TESS BROCK Arts Editor

After unsuccessfully finding a club I liked my freshman year, I aimed to find my

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place as sophomore year approached. I walked through the sea of sweaty freshmen at the SLU fair and eventually wandered up to the UNews table. Since I was a journal-

ism major, I knew it would be pretty stupid of me to pass up an organization that was literally what I studied. The Arts section was the perfect fit for me. I’m that annoying person at dinner always talking about the latest and greatest movies and shows you should see. And if you have ever read any of my stories, you know I love music. I started writing reviews of films and concerts that semester, but then went abroad. When the Arts Editor position opened up for the next year, I knew it was the job for me. I wanted to get more involved by really getting into the planning behind a newspaper. I like to call my junior year at the paper as my “golden year.” I got to interview one of my favorite bands, Kodaline, as well as a countless number of underrated acts like Run River North, Moon

Taxi and Judah and the Lion. My writing got stronger, and I grew to appreciate the hard work that goes into journalism. I got to be in the newsroom every Wednesday night (to nearly one in the morning) with some of the best people. I miss poring over the Arts pages with Natalie while giving her boy advice (which she never followed). I miss arguing with Ryan about nearly everything. I miss the comments Alex and I wrote to each other when copy editing stories. I miss Emily and I secretly supporting Hillary while everyone praised Bernie. I miss every single other person on Ed. board that year because even though they drove me crazy sometimes, we were the definition of a close-knit newsroom. I mean, we even spent our spare time going to a Korean karaoke bar in a deserted

strip mall in Creve Coeur. If that isn’t love, I don’t know what is. This past semester, I have loved getting to know the new Ed. board. Everyone has surpassed my expectations. Even though we have had some pretty big obstacles, we have churned out solid issues every week. And I want to give a special shout out to our Editor-in-Chief Kyle for holding us together, especially when I would come to him every week with a new problem to solve. Some other things I have learned while being Arts Editor? Oxford commas make my soul die a little bit. InDesign is a mystical maze you must learn to navigate. Dr. Meyer is a saint who fuels the newsroom with delicious snacks, and he taught me everything I know about grammar. Write the stories that are fun to write, and write the stories that make you

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want to throw your laptop at the wall. Pulled quotes and large pictures can be your best friend. Coming up with a good headline can take you all night. And for the love of God, someone please give the UNews some money to get new computers. Graduating SLU is sad enough, but leaving the UNews is one of the hardest parts. I will always appreciate the good old-fashioned journalism I learned here, and I will always remember the amazing people I have met along the way. If I can end on one thing, it’s please continue to read the UNews (and please stop using it during sorority recruitment to block out the windows). Because tucked away in the BSC, there is a group of the hardest-working students at SLU working their asses off every week to bring you the stories you need to read.

“Freedom of the press–print, online and broadcast–is a basic right in a democratic society and is valuable in promoting the development of students as socially responsible persons ... The University News is a student voice, not the student voice. The views of The University News are the expressions of the students involved ... If [The University News] can represent a point of view around which discussion may develop, it serves a legitimiate and needed purpose.” - From The University News’ Charter

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10 December 1, 2016

OPINIONS & EDITORIALS

Governor-elect Eric Greitens Castro: An imperfect hero can make Missouri green

Stephen Wald

With an election season full of heated rhetoric and divisive attacks behind us, it’s time to start addressing the real and substantive issues that affect all Missourians. At the forefront of these issues is climate change, its consequences and how we can combat them. Climate change is real. Temperatures are increasing, ice caps are melting, sea levels are rising and biodiversity is being lost. The evidence of climate change is there, and the consequences are too great to ignore. As a citizen who goes to school in St. Louis, which, according to the American Lung Association, is one of the 20 most ozone-polluted cities, I am sick and tired of Missouri politics holding back the state’s push for a greener, safer state. The public health risks associated with global warming are too great to ignore, not to mention the increase in natural disasters we’ve seen across the world. According to a report on spending associated with climate change conducted by the Center for American Progress, just in the U.S. alone, FEMA issued more than $67 billion in grants to assist communities and individuals devastated by extreme weather and wildfires. When will our politicians learn that global warming will cost us in so many ways if we don’t take

action to combat it? We know that we can achieve healthier communities with a livable future for kids growing up today here in Missouri but to get there we must transform the way we produce and consume energy. This is where our governor-elect, Eric Greitens, can be a strong leader for our state. With a change in gubernatorial power comes a great opportunity for Greitens to be a champion for renewable energy. He can be the leader he promised us to be, by pushing for renewable energy in Missouri and supporting the Clean Power Plan. As a student living in St. Louis, I now hold the governor-elect responsible for fighting against the effects of of global warming that are visible in my city. This has got to start with a commitment to 100 percent clean, renewable energy here in Missouri. We know that 100 percent renewable energy is 100 percent possible. In the first quarter of 2016, 97 percent of all new electricity that came online in the United States was wind and solar. Moreover, renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies are quickly falling in cost. Between 2009 and 2014, the cost of solar electricity in the United States fell by 78 percent and the cost of wind energy fell by 58 percent. In many parts of the United States, wind is now the cheapest source of electricity. Over the past 15 years, growth in renewable energy worldwide — especially solar energy — has outpaced most forecasts, event those made by environmental activists. Furthermore, at least seven detailed studies on clean energy — conducted

by academics, government agencies and nonprofits — suggest that we have the tools to make a transition to a renewable energy future. The momentum for 100 percent renewable energy is building. Corporate leaders like Apple, Google, Facebook and Johnson and Johnson have all made commitments to 100 percent renewable energy. Cities such as San Diego, Aspen, Colo. and Greensburg, Kan. all agree that the future is 100 percent renewable energy. Moreover, this past week, over 50 events were held for the 100% Committed. 100% Renewable. Week of Action for Renewable Energy, coordinated by Environment America and The Climate Reality Project. College students, community leaders, health professionals, elected officials and others from California to Maine to Florida joined the call for a 100-percent-renewable future. Missouri’s renewable energy summit was held at the Urban Chestnut Brewery in The Grove, opening a dialogue on renewable energy and global warming among over 100 people. We can build the kind of future we should want and certainly need for Missouri — one powered 100 percent by clean, renewable energy. The science is there, the technology is there and the public is increasingly enthusiastic about moving forward. We need one key ingredient: political will. If our elected officials create a vision and a framework for 100 percent renewable energy, it will transform the recent acceleration of renewables into an unstoppable force for the future.

Feeling grateful despite ‘tumultuous’ election

Garrett Ziegler

We have just gone through what many consider to be the most tumultuous presidential election in American history. While there are certainly some characteristics that seem unprecedented, a deeper look into presidential politics reveals that the 1828 campaign featured Adams supporters jeering that Andrew Jackson’s deceased mother was a “common prostitute” and Jackson supporters claiming Adams was guilty of “pimping” for Czar Alexander I. While these disturbing details do not make the sting of the 2016 election disappear, they point to a larger truth: We’ve come a long way, and ignoring history makes one bitter and also less grateful. Stepping away from the Presidential election, let’s consider the common lamentations of millennials: WiFi is down, income inequality is rampant, college is too expensive and only the well-todo have opportunities for social advancement. I’ll admit that millennials have a knack for identifying problems but lack the historical awareness and humility necessary to properly address them. Since the beginning of the 21st century, America has gone from clunky Nokia phones to 4G speeds for Instagram. While this rate of innovation may seem commonplace for us, bear in mind that the computer revolution took place over three decades and only the fairly

wealthy could afford PCs 15 years into the movement. Nearly everyone with disposable income today owns a cellphone, if not an iPhone. Ignorance of how far Silicon Valley has come can cause a procrastinating 20-year-old to grumble about Snapchat speeds, not realizing that most humans throughout history have traveled days to deliver a single letter. Income inequality was a hotbed of debate this election cycle. While automation and globalization are certainly scary for the unskilled and those unwilling to move for new work, free trade has lifted one billion people out of subsistence poverty. Almost every economist on the Left and the Right admits that free trade is a net positive for wealth creation and national security. Hear me out: The country has done very little for displaced workers, and foreign labor standards must improve, but the global supply chain is here to stay. And we should be grateful! Those who are worried about the future often underestimate their personal comparative advantage. Income inequality can only be solved through creativity, and gratitude for the safety net in the first place can steer us away from economic illiteracy. College is too expensive, but the medicine my friends on the Left propose would be much worse than the current ailment. The elephant in the room that drives up cost is not tenured professors but the growing administrative state and “centers” that run well-meaning but bloated programs. College tuition has risen much faster than inflation, yes, but not for the reasons that many suggest. Perhaps gratitude for the opportunity (not the right) to

attend college would cause some to critically examine how the government subsidies are being spent. Lastly, I want to touch on the lack of opportunity. While many beat around the bush and refuse to acknowledge the breakdown of the American family, millions of children in poor, urban centers are being left behind. Nevertheless, the internet has created opportunities for nearly every occupation. It has been the greatest disintermediation in the history of the world, I would argue, toppling middlemen who previously created self-interested barriers to entry. Are you an aspiring journalist? Create a free WordPress site. Interested in Physics? Take advantage of Khan Academy videos. Want to reach out in order to entrepreneur? Simply tweet! The modern world is chock-full of opportunities for enterprising self-starters. If you are really committed to providing opportunity, start with good families and internet access. Gratitude can only begin with awareness that this period in history is the most affluent and leisure-filled. I am not suggesting that overflowing gratitude soften into idleness; Aristotle told us the Golden Mean is always situated between two extreme vices. But I would simply ask my fellow classmates and those disappointed by this past election to be cognizant of just how good we have it. A dose of gratitude can lead to better solutions for solving the issues millennials care so much about. America is not perfect, but its problems inspire envy to most of the world. Let us ponder the meaning of Thanksgiving more deeply and thereby commit ourselves to form the more perfect Union we

Christopher Winston

Who was Fidel Castro? Was he a vicious killer and dictator that aimed missiles at the United States and neighboring islands? No. Was he a living god, the greatest Marxist-Leninist known to humankind, the equal of Vladimir Lenin, Mao Tse-Tung or Joseph Stalin? No. Castro contributed little in the way of theory or universal practice for those who study and struggle for liberation. The military theory of focoísmo, which was based on the experiences of the Cuban Revolution, had its day in the U.S. from the 1960s to the 1970s. It quickly played itself out as not suited for our conditions, not reliant on the masses and generally not a universal or suitable method for waging revolutionary struggle. In terms of managing the economy of the island, Castro and his Party also fell short. “Burn Down the Cane Field!: Notes on the Political Economy of Cuba” and “Evaporation of a Myth” provide thorough analyses of the fatal and treacherous errors that Cuba made under Castro, leading to its development being stifled and its people continuing to labor in the sugarcane fields for a new Soviet master. Both are accessible online. As a Marxist-LeninistMaoist, my line on Castro and the Cuba that he led are that they were not actually socialist and that Cuba

has never been a socialist country. Castro toyed with Marxist-Leninist rhetoric, of course, but he was no communist. That being said, it is objectively better for the Cuban people that the Cuban Revolution succeeded. Countless Cubans have paid tribute to the individual they see as their liberator from the clutches of Yankee imperialism. Despite all of the attempts by the United States and other enemies to kill him, he lived, his people lived and those who struggled for national liberation in the United States and elsewhere knew that they had comrades just 90 miles from the belly of the beast itself. The morale that Castro gave to millions of oppressed black and brown people in Latin America — the image of someone that looked like them jamming his boot into the rotten face of the Yankee devil, into the face of the enemy, daring to call the United States to task — inspired revolutionary activity up and down the Americas. As a black person, it is objectively better for my people that the Cuban Revolution succeeded than if it had not. He argued his case and the case of all who groaned under mountains of imperialism before the United Nations. Before his revolution, black and brown Cubans spent day and night bent over in cane fields making money for the white elite that colonized and exploited the island. First, it was the Spanish, and then the Americans took the island by force and installed a series of puppet dictators. The Mafia then came and set up a series of casinos, hotels and brothels, turning the island into a gangster’s paradise. The revolution led by

Castro and others swept the island of this filth, and the education and health care system established under the leadership of Castro were the best in the region. Cuban doctors are loved and respected from Haiti to Guatemala, and in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Castro attempted to deliver needed relief to the masses of people of the Gulf Coast region, the people that the U.S. government left to drown and starve. What can we learn from Fidel Castro? What relevance has this old Cuban to our struggles? For one, the Revolution shows us that Yankee imperialism is not invincible. Secondly, his experience shows us that when one fails to become self-reliant, one commits a deadly error and harms the people they claim to struggle for. Thirdly, his support for national liberation movements in Puerto Rico, the United States mainland and the rest of the world show us the importance of international solidarity. As the fascist Operation Green Hunt kills hundreds of comrades in Indian jungles every year and the Filipino people heroically struggle for new democracy and for socialism, as the people of the Standing Rock reservation endure water cannons in sub-freezing temperatures and rubber-coated steel bullets and Presidentelect Donald Trump and his clique prepare fresh hell for us, the voice of Fidel Castro is with us. And it says: Continue to struggle, to rebel, to fight for a better world! Don’t just sit at home and tune out the world around you. Don’t just complain. Organize and fight. Hasta la victoria siempre!

Remembering the ‘little things’ when the world seems bleak

Fiona Clair

When I think of happiness, I think of Disney World. It’s cliché — I know. But for me, traditions, imagination, fun and laughter are all forever tied to the man and his mouse. Every other year since I was four, my dad’s family has taken a big trip to Disney as a sort of reunion. We all live in different places across the country, so there are very few times when we can actually get everyone together. Every trip is a little different — new people, new babies, new significant others, new rides, new memories — but every trip is magical. For me, this is a concrete happiness in my life, and those are not easy to come by, so I hold on tight. I think in today’s world it is really easy to find ways to be angry and sad and anxious, but a lot of times we forget to be happy. Emotions are not goals; they are feelings no different from hunger or fatigue. We are not meant to be happy 24/7, and when we look at happiness as a life goal, we miss out on the journey. We miss the little moments in life that make us laugh, that make us happy to be alive. We miss acknowledging the important of moments. Take for example this

Thanksgiving break. I always go into breaks with a lot of expectations that usually do not work out in my favor. This break I had plans to see all these friends I had not seen since the summer, hanging out with them all night, doing wild teenage things, but in reality, I spent a lot of time at home watching Gilmore Girls. It is easy for me to look back on this break and say it was awful, but I would be discrediting some amazing memories. I got to see my family on Thanksgiving and eat some incredible food, and I saw the movie “Moana,” which lit up my life as most things Disney do. I had a blast spending way too much money on Friday in honor of my favorite consumerist holiday, and I got to celebrate my stepgrandma’s 90th birthday on Saturday in true “Kelly” fashion. I heard stories of the time said 90-year-old grandma got “absolutely smashed” when she was younger, and I had way too much fun playing board games with my best friend and her family late into Saturday night. And on Sunday, my half-sister was born. T h e s e were moments. These were not big life events that shape my life trajectory; they were small events that made me happy. The discrediting of small joyous moments is what leads us to see the world through a cynical lens, and I do not think we realize how destructive that is. Yes, 2016 was a pretty rough year. A lot of people are really angry with the current state of our nation.

We are not meant to be happy 24/7, and when we look at happiness as a life goal, we miss out on the journey.

People are dying, refugees are suffering and racial and religious divides are all too present. There is sadness is our hearts, and there is anger in our souls, and it is easy to take these things and pretend that the year was awful and not a single good thing came from it. It makes the narrative more seamless, but it is not true. We cannot live our lives like this. As the holidays approach us — whatever those holidays might mean for you — it is a perfect time to stop and think about the things that made you happy this past year, or even in each passing day. There is something about a well-decorated house, street or town that makes it so easy to smile. Even though there is a lot of negativity surrounding the consumerist values of Christmas, there is an undeniable light that shines through the cold and darkness. It is a perfect time to feel happy, to acknowledge the funny little things that make us laugh throughout the day. It is also, undeniably, time to feel cold, to feel humbled and to feel loss though as well. So what do we do? It starts with remembering to smile when we feel the urge. Talk about the thing that makes you upset, even if that thing is the election, and if you think everyone in the world is done talking about it, trust me — they are not. Look back over the year and try to remember something to be grateful for. I firmly believe that finding even just one little thing can redeem so much hate and sadness in our hearts. And finally, enjoy moments of happiness. Do not look just for happiness, do not aspire for happiness, do not discredit happiness. Radiate it.


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December 1, 2016

11

The temperature is dropping quickly, so here are a few photos to remember warmer times. The following pictures were taken by SLU students for a photojournalism project with the theme, “#HammockLife.� Enjoy!

Photo courtesy of Adilyn Mueller

Photo courtesy of Emma Carmody

Photo courtesy of Amelia Jade Maxwell

Photo courtesy of Brenna Tilkes

! s w e N

U e h t m o r f s a m t s i r h C y r r e M

Photo courtesy of Michelle Peltier


12 November 17, 2016

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