Page 1

PLUS

VOLUM E 2 3 / I S S UE 2 6 / J UN E 2 7 , 2 0 1 9

FIREWORKS DOS AND DON'TS

EYES IN THE SKY SAVING S'MORES

FIRE LOOKOUTS REMAIN A KEY TOOL

(MOSTLY) YEAR-ROUND FIREPITS


– Do it all for one low monthly payment

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

2

OUR NEW, YEAR-ROUND SUBSCRIPTION PASS Deadline June 30


The Source Weekly 704 NW Georgia Ave., Bend, OR 97703 t. 541-383-0800 f. 541-383-0088 bendsource.com info@bendsource.com EDITOR Nicole Vulcan editor@bendsource.com

REPORTER/WEB EDITOR Chris Miller miller@bendsource.com REPORTER/CALENDAR EDITOR Isaac Biehl isaac@bendsource.com COPY EDITOR Richard Sitts FREELANCERS Josh Jardine, Teafly Peterson, Jim Anderson, Lisa Sipe, Jared Rasic, Caitlin Richmond SYNDICATED CONTENT Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsney, Brendan Emmett Quigley, E.J. Pettinger, Pearl Stark, Tom Tomorrow, Shannon Wheeler PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Darris Hurst darris@bendsource.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Shannon Corey shannon@bendsource.com ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Amanda Klingman amanda@bendsource.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Ban Tat, Chris Larro, Ashley Sarvis, Robert Cammelletti advertise@bendsource.com OFFICE MANAGER Bethany Jenkins bethany@bendsource.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sean Switzer CONTROLLER Angela Switzer angela@bendsource.com PUBLISHER Aaron Switzer aaron@bendsource.com

NEWS—Fireworks Dos and Don’ts p.7 Here’s the lowdown on how to enjoy the Fourth of July—and not burn your house or Pilot Butte down in the process. FEATURE—Prepping for wildfire season p.10 In an issue focused on fire—58 students from various state and federal agencies train to become wildland firefighters in Central Oregon. Keely Damara introduces some of the firefighters preparing for the upcoming fire season.

3

SOUND—Lyle Lovett p.15 The veteran singer is touring this summer with his Large Band. Alan Sculley reports his shows are about the band as much as the lead singer. CULTURE—Turning the seasons p.29 A local DJ is bringing a new solstice celebration to Central Oregon. Isaac Biehl talks to Joshua Jacobs about his vision and what the summer solstice means to him. CHOW—Saving S’Mores p.31 With fire bans seemingly happening earlier every year, Nicole Vulcan shows how people can still enjoy a fire pit (mostly) year-round. NATURAL WORLD—No really, we need bugs p.39 Without insects, who would pollinate our fruit, or give fish bugs to munch on? Jim Anderson reports on the vitality of the sometimes annoying bugs that make the world as we know it. Photo by Tracy Keene

The first annual Pride 5K & Drag Dash kicked off Central Oregon Pride in Drake Park in Bend on June 22. Every runner received a tiara and special guest judges D'auntie Carol, Kristen Beck and Barb Campbell judged the costume contest.

On the Cover: Photo by Keely Damara. Design by Shannon Corey. Call for Artists: If you're interested in being a SW featured artist, email: darris@bendsource.com.

Opinion 4 Mailbox 5 News 6 Source Picks

13

Sound 15 Live Music & Nightlife

Events 23 Artwatch 29 Chow 31 Screen 35 Outside 37 Real Estate

41

Advice 43

EXCLUSIVE THIS WEEK IN:

Astrology 43

Start your day with Central Oregon’s best source for news and local events. SIGN UP AT: BENDSOURCE.COM/NEWSLETTERS

Smoke Signals

46

Puzzles 47

WILD CARD Paul Butler NATIONAL ADVERTISING Alternative Weekly Network 916-551-1770 Sales Deadline: 5pm, Mondays Editorial Deadline: 5pm, Mondays Calendar Deadline: 10am, Mondays Classified Deadline: 4pm, Mondays Deadlines may shift for special/holiday issues.

keeping it real... • Guaranteed Lowest Prices in Central Oregon • Huge In-Stock Selection

The Source Weekly is published every Thursday. The contents of this issue are copyright ©2019 by Lay It Out Inc., and may not be reprinted in part or in whole without consent from the publisher. Cartoons printed in the Source Weekly are copyright ©2019 by their respective artists. The Source Weekly is available free of charge at over 350 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the Source Weekly may be purchased for $1.00, payable in advance. Anyone removing papers in bulk will be prosecuted on theft charges to the fullest extent of the law. Writers’ Guidelines: We accept unsolicited manuscripts and comics. Visit our ‘Contact Us’ webpage for freelancer guidelines.

19

• Immediate Delivery

NO

Bogus “Sales”

NO

Gimmicks

NO

Waiting

• Financing Available

NO

• Locally Owned

NO

Comission Sales Fuzzy Furniture Math

Hwy 20 East across from Pilot Butte • Locally Owned • FurnitureOutletBend.com

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

REPORTER Keely Damara keely@bendsource.com

IN THIS ISSUE

COVER


Market of Choice OPINION Legislators who flee are the epitome is hiring! of government waste WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

4

Join our culinary team! Apply now to be a part of our fun, fast-paced kitchen team, preparing delicious dishes with people who are passionate about food. • Entry level jobs starting at $13/hour, experienced cooks starting at $16-19/hour • Medical, dental & vision insurance • 401(K) savings plan • Paid time off

Apply online today! marketofchoice.com/careers

M RKET OF CHOICE Family-owned, independent Oregon grocer for 40 years!

115 NW Sisemore St. | Bend

If you’re concerned about the state of representative democracy, it should concern you that the Republican senators of the Oregon State Legislature are opting to stay away from the Capitol in the name of opposing a bill aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions and combating climate change. The 11 senators—which include Sen. Tim Knopp, who represents Bend and the surrounding area, say the Cap and Invest legislation, already passed in the Oregon House, will do damage to manufacturing and timber jobs. Proponents of the bill say HB 2020 will actually grow Oregon’s economy. Under a similar Cap and Trade bill, California’s economy grew from the 8th-largest world economy to 5th-largest over the past decade, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. In a well-functioning legislature, senators make their arguments, cast votes and go home to their districts to hear if they made the right decisions. Come election time, they get a real-time performance review. That’s doesn’t seem to be how Oregon Republicans operate. Unfortunately, Knopp believes that rather than serving his entire district that his role as a senator is to serve Republicans. Here are some of the comments he made to the Oregonian last week, which should give voters in this district pause. In a story published on OregonLive Thursday, Knopp said, “I feel no constitutional obligation to stand around so they [Democrats] can pass their leftist progressive agenda for Multnomah County that my constituents don’t happen to agree with,” Knopp stated. “I think that’s true for every other Senate district that’s out there that’s represented by Republicans.” Leaving aside the fact that the other members of the Democratic majority in the Senate are from all across Oregon, let’s look at Knopp’s district. The number of Knopp’s consituents who are Republicans are actually outnumbered by Democrats. According to Oregon Centralized Voter Registration information, there were 32,243 registered Democrats in Senate District 27 as of June 3, along with 31,280 Republicans and 35,773 non-affiliated voters. One would assume, upon taking the position as Senator, Knopp would represent all—or even a majority of—voters in his district. Sen. Knopp and 10 other senators in this state are abdicating their duties because the voters of Oregon elected people to their districts who do

not adhere to these Republicans’ vison for Oregon. This tactic by Republicans will have ramifications beyond the climate change bill. Other bills—including ones amending the death penalty laws, and another that would amend zoning laws to allow for duplexes in some areas currently zoned single-family—can’t go anywhere without the quorum the 11 senators provide to the Legislature. While we don’t believe walkouts should be an option for any minority in the Legislature, it’s especially galling to see this happen over an economic fight. Were this a question of morality—or one that delved into a topic that wasn’t so overwhelmingly agreed upon by the majority of Oregonians—it might be a different story. But this is a battle over climate change, and history will bear out that time was indeed running out on taking serious action. Those 11 Republicans contend that HB 2020’s emergency clause doesn’t give Oregonians the opportunity to fight back with a referendum. Republicans argue that Oregon doesn’t need to be the poster child for environmental leadership on cap and invest programs aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions, because our state’s contributions are relatively so small on the global scale. But we should not forget that the effort to ban chlorofluorocarbons started right here in our state too— and led to a worldwide ban that effectively saved the ozone layer in the ensuing decades. In addition, more than 100 countries with economies smaller than Oregon’s have already taken up the charge. Small efforts add up. What’s more, we should not forget that Oregon’s economy is already being negatively affected by climate change. Remember the drops in tourism—a big driver of the local economy—during the summer wildfire seasons of recent years? We do. Here in Bend, the dollars brought in through the transient room tax go directly into the City’s general fund—which in turn funds roads, police, fire and other important services. It’s OK in politics to have your ideas be out of favor. Senators should make their case and then vote. If indeed the majority of Oregonians believe that climate change and the process for reducing greenhouse gases is misplaced, the ballot box will tell. Running away and doing nothing is, in general, not a way to win over voters. Tim Knopp should get back to work. Our district depends on you.


O

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?

Letters

DRIVERS LICENSES FOR ALL OREGONIANS MEANS SAFER ROADS

John Hummel, Deschutes County District Attorney, recently stated, “If we pass this law (HB 2015), we’ll be safer.” Washington and California issue driver’s licenses to qualified immigrants and have fewer drivers who haven’t met state driving standards, Hummel added. Over 80,000 immigrants and citizens are expected to apply for the standard license and pay fees to expand the state highway fund. The Latino Community Association asks you to tell your state senators to vote “yes” on HB 2015. For more information visit http://www.oneoregon.org/who-we-are or Causa Oregon at https://causaoregon.org — Denise Holley and Brad Porterfield, Latino Community Association

LIGHTMETER

5 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

When we travel, we want to believe all drivers passed an exam on the rules of the road and a driving test. But in Oregon some did not; they are excluded because they lack documents required by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to obtain a license. This makes it difficult to buy insurance and makes our roads less safe for everyone. Oregon will begin issuing a Real ID license in mid-2020 that requires a Social Security card and proof of citizenship or legal presence. This will allow Oregonians without a passport to meet the federal requirement to board a plane after October 2020. But Oregonians who are older, homeless, born in a different state, fleeing domestic violence, or awaiting legal status or citizenship, may not have documents to qualify for that license. On June 18, the Oregon House approved HB 2015, the Equal Access to Roads Act. It would let DMV issue a standard Class C license to any Oregonian who passes the driving tests and presents identification and proof of state residency. Now the measure goes to the State Senate. In 2008, Oregon barred driver’s licenses for immigrants and others without the required documents. Once their licenses expired, they relied on licensed friends and relatives to get around or risked driving without a license. Driving is essential to travel to work in rural areas without public transit. Because of this, driving is not a privilege, it is a right. Denying people this right has unintended consequences. A local immigrant student with a DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) permit recently shared at a forum in Bend that she was offered scholarships to attend Portland State University. But she chose to stay in Bend to drive her parents since they cannot get a driver’s license. It might not seem logical to allow immigrants without permission to live in the U.S. to have a driver’s license. However, what is not logical is our federal government refusing to allow immigrants to come here to fill jobs in a legal manner. Businesses in the East Cascades region reported 3,708 unfilled positions in May, according to the Oregon Employment Department. They cannot find workers. Our workforce is aging and our citizens’ birthrate isn’t keeping up. We have over 11 million unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. because Congress lacks the will to change our laws. Oregonians can’t fix our immigration system, but we can fix the state policy decision that restricts access to licenses.

Send your thoughts to editor@bendsource.com. Letters must be received by noon Friday for inclusion in the following week’s paper. Please limit letters to 250 words. Submission does not guarantee publication. Opinions printed here do not constitute an editorial endorsement of said opinions. Letter of the week receives $5 to Palate!

IN RESPONSE TO, “FOR THE LOVE OF CATS” ON 6/20

While I appreciate the concern expressed in your article, For the Love of Cats, in which the author advocates for sterilization of feral cats and returning them to the wild, it fails to mention the havoc these cats cause for natural and valuable wild things, ie. BIRDS! While I can’t quote statistics, I have seen numerous articles indicating the great toll taken on wild birds! This may sound heartless to animal lovers, but euthanizing may make more sense than Trap-Neuter-Return! Even tame house cats take a terrible toll on wild birds! — Peter Clark

IN RESPONSE TO, “BUCKET LIST: TOUR WITH GRATEFUL DEAD, JEFFERSON STARSHIP AND THE COMMODORES” ON 6/20

Last weeks ‘Bucket List’ article about JiveRadio was indeed well written and largely accurate. BUT, it was primarily about me, which is OK, but I’m no DJ. People should know that the bulk of our weekly specialty programming is done by two women in their 60’s and 70’s with nearly a century of radio experience between them and they are better than ever; Diane ‘Di’ Michaels “The Diatollah of Rockinrollah” has been a boss jock on commercial radio since the ‘70’s and holds several national awards for her work, and Michele ‘Sister Tiny’ Busk was on the original air crew of the legendary KFAT radio in Gilroy, CA in the late ‘70s. The sound of the Jive is what it is because of the talents of these two women. They’re not the best at what they do, they’re the only ones who do what they do. Thanks again, and keep sourcing! — Jeff Cotton

Great view of Mt. Bachelor from @brockoli6. Tag @sourceweekly on Instagram to get featured in Lightmeter.

WHAT IF WE’VE BEEN WRONGLY FRAMED?

Everything is viewed through a frame. Presidential debates media frames as a sporting event—“jabbing an opponent,” “blind-sided by a question,” “hitting a home run.” But, when I asked owners of food & drink establishments to switch their TVs from sports to this week’s Democratic debates, two confided that it would be bad for business. Viewing sports is a healing ritual that allows us to drink and argue with emotional conviction, and manage to get along once the contest is over. Politics is something else. A winner-loser sports frame trivializes a contest that, at its core, is about what our future will be. I prefer to frame these debates as tryouts for the next Democratic Administration. Unfortunately, to be cast, candidates must all try out for the major role, President of the United States. It’s a daunting role to play. So, as you watch these debates, cut them some slack. Imagine you are a casting director being asked in what role that candidate might shine. You may find yourself saying: “She’d make a great Attorney General!” “Maybe Secretary of State or U.N. Ambassador?” “Wow! That’s got to be Secretary of Energy!” “Finally, someone with heft playing Secretary of Housing and Urban Development!” This positive frame empowers both candidates and ourselves as we consider what this production might look like once

it is mounted. Hopefully, it is one full of creative moments, stirring lines, and emotional payoffs befitting its expense. — Gregg Heacock

Letter of the Week:

Gregg, thanks for the letter. Come on in for your gift card to Palate! —Nicole Vulcan

Summer & deck dining are here! Happy Hour

Served daily from 3:00 - 6:30pm in the lounge and on the lounge patio!



475 SW Powerhouse Drive (541) 389-8998 www.anthonys.com Anthony’s at the Old Mill District


NEWS

City to Repeal Bag Ban WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

6

In July, the City Council will vote to repeal its ban to comply with the new statewide ban on single-use carryout bags By Chris Miller

B

end’s ban on single-use plastic bags was set to go into effect July 1—with enforcement officially beginning on Jan. 1, 2020. That is, until the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 2509, banning the use of the bags statewide. That’s set to go into effect Jan. 1. Although Gov. Kate Brown hasn’t signed the bill into law, she is expected to do so soon. According to Anne Aurand, City of Bend communications director, the state bill is similar to Bend’s, but also adds in banning plastic restaurant take-out bags. Also, the state bill set the fee for purchasing single-use, non-plastic bags at at least 5 cents, compared to the 10 cents in the City’s code. Aurand said informational materials and enforcement will become projects of state government, but the City is supportive and still encourages residents to “Bring your bag, Bend!” The statewide bill doesn’t stop shoppers from using plastic bags for the packaging of bulk items such as fruit,

veggies, nuts, grains or small hardware items like nails, bolts or screws. According to the text of HB 2509, a “single-use checkout bag” is defined as a bag made of paper, plastic or any other material that is provided by a retail establishment to a customer at the time of checkout—and is not a recycled paper checkout bag, a reusable fabric checkout bag or a reusable plastic checkout bag. Instead of providing the single-use bags, according to the state bill, retailers may give its customers reusable fabric checkout bags at no cost as a promotion on 12 or fewer days in a calendar year. They may also provide recycled paper checkout bags or reusable plastic bags at no cost to people who have a voucher issued under the Women, Infants and Children Program, or use an electronic benefits transfer card issued by the Department of Human Services (EBT). Blake Shappell, store manager of Grocery Outlet, said his store stopped using single use plastic bags earlier this month. Shappell and one of his cashiers

Grocery Outlet Manager, Blake Shappell bags a customer's purchase in a recycled paper bag. Starting Jan. 1, 2020, people that don't bring their own reusable bags to the grocery store may be charged 10 cents for a bag.

said they understood why the City is setting aside its bag rules in lieu of following the state—especially because it will give customers more time to get used to the new rules. Restaurants will be able to package people’s leftovers in recycled paper bags at no cost to the customer or give reusable plastic bags at no cost to people who have the EBT cards, according to the text of the bill. In December 2018, when the City Council preliminarily approved to “Un-bag Bend” it did so without

unanimous support. Councilor Bill Moseley said during the Dec. 5 meeting that he thought it was more of a state government decision, and Councilor Justin Livingston said flatly that he wouldn’t support the ban at all, citing a study done by the University of Arizona on the health risks of reusable bags. Retailers who violate the bill could face a Class D violation and a maximum fine of $250, according to the text of the state bill. Each day a retailer commits a violation would be considered a separate offense.  

MUSIC ★ ART ★ JUGGLERS ★ COMEDY ★ DANCE ★ BEAUTIFUL CRAFTS ★ SPOKEN WORD ★ PARADES MAGIC ★ VAUDEVILLE ★ ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOLUTIONS ★ FUN FOR KIDS ★ AMAZING FOOD ★ MUCH MORE

DON’T MISS A MINUTE! GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY: TICKETSWEST.COM OR 800�992�8499 ENTERTAIMENT SCHEDULES AND MORE INFORMATION AVAILABLE AT OREGONCOUNTRYFAIR.ORG


NEWS

City of Bend Fire Department

Fireworks Dos and Don’ts

Last year, a man lit Pilot Butte on fire. This year, city leaders are coming out en masse to prevent illegal fireworks and respond to complaints By Chris Miller Fireworks are part of the American DNA. They’re how we celebrate Independence Day, New Year’s Eve and other milestones. Used responsibly, they can garner oohs and awes from people sitting in lawn chairs watching the colors explode overhead and listening to the sonic booms. However, if used irresponsibly, fireworks can cause property damage and even loss of life. According to the National Fire Protection Agency, on average each year, fireworks start 18,500 fires, cause an average of three deaths and 40 injuries and result in $43 million in property damage. Last July 4, a 29-year-old Bend man accidentally lit Pilot Butte on fire with an illegal firework. The blaze burned about 10 acres and left 27,000 people without power. Alan Stout got 90 days in jail and was ordered to pay about $20,000 in restitution. Bend Fire Department’s Battalion Chief/Public Information Officer Dave Howe said the way the winds were blowing that day, the fire easily could have jumped Hwy 20, and if it had been a little drier last year, it would have. “The biggest issue with fire spread in a wildland fire is the ember storm and flaming brands, which can blow out ahead of a flaming front and ignite spot fires as much as one-quarter to one-half mile downwind,” Howe said. “So we ask people to remove anything combustible for 5 feet around

any wooden structural element like a house, a fence or a deck.” This year, the City of Bend is pairing police officers with fire inspectors for an Illegal Fireworks Task Force to respond exclusively to illegal fireworks calls in late June and early July, according to the City. The Task Force is scheduled for the nights of June 27 to June 28 and July 3, 5 and 6. Bend Police Department Lt. Clint Burleigh said July 4 is the department’s busiest day of the year for fireworks and fireworks complaints. He said Bend PD is planning on having its staff occupied throughout the 24-hour period of July 4—hence, the Task Force will be not responding to calls that day. The City said the Task Force will patrol areas where data have shown a higher use of illegal fireworks. Burleigh said the usage areas are fairly spread out, and said the Mountain View Neighborhood Association has done a great job working with residents to get more specific information on what they’ve witnessed over the past several years. “We are working on where to focus from the data of previous years and any additional information that has been given to us by some of our community members,” Burleigh said. Howe said the department averages about 28 to 32 calls per day, but on July 4, that number goes up to between 50 and 60, including medical, fires, traffic crashes and other calls. Burleigh said the PD’s call data comes from 911 calls,

The July 4 fire on Pilot Butte in 2018.

so they don’t have exact numbers, but the highest firework complaint calls have come on July 4 for the last three years. Illegal fireworks in Oregon include any type that fly, explode, eject balls of fire or move across the ground more than 6 feet or into the air more than 12 inches—including “sky lanterns.” Examples of illegal fireworks are M80s, bottle rockets, Roman Candles and mortars. Homemade fireworks are also considered illegal by the state. Legal fireworks include sparklers, ground bloom flowers and base fountains. According to the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, the sale, possession or use of illegal fireworks is a Class B misdemeanor, with a maximum sentence of six months in jail and a $2,500 fine. Users of illegal fireworks can also face potential civil penalties of up to $500 per violation, restitution for damage to property and fire suppression efforts and other criminal charges like

Runny Noses Don’t Keep “Regular Business Hours” That’s why COPA pediatricians are here 7 days a week — every weeknight until 8, plus weekends and holidays. The COPA Pediatric Nurse Advice Team answers your calls 24 hours a day, every day. So, regular hours to us means we’re always here for you.

Pediatrics on your kid’s schedule (541) -389-6313 • COPAKids.com P

E

D

I

A

T

R

I

C

C

E

N

T

E

R

O

F

E

X

C

E

L

L

E

N

C

E

7 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

reckless burning or criminal mischief. Burleigh said the PD plans to issue citation and seize illegal fireworks during the Task Force. According to City of Bend code, people who are cited face a $750 fine in addition to the state fines. Fireworks went on sale statewide June 23. Howe said people should follow some basic tips to keep their property safe while using legal fireworks. He recommends using fireworks in an area cleared of combustible materials—like bark mulch—at least 30 feet from anything that can burn, like a house, fence or barn. Howe said to have a hoseline at the ready and submerge spent fireworks in a bucket of water after waiting for them to cool for 30 minutes. For furry friends, Howe said people should put dogs in the house, preferably in a quiet interior room with a fan or other white noise-making device on. Already this year, three brush fires have started in Bend. Howe said the tall grasses will be dry and cured by July 4 and the best way to prevent a brush fire is to avoid using fireworks, and to remind people that legal ones can start fires as well. The Bend July 4 Fireworks Festival is set to get cracking at 10pm when the mortars start launching on Pilot Butte. People can see the display from most locations in Bend with a view of the Butte. Howe says people who want to watch fireworks should leave them to the pros. “The use of illegal fireworks, by definition is against the law,” Howe said. “It is very risky in terms of fire safety—people’s houses can burn down, devastating wildland fires can start, fireworks can maim hands and faces and the fuse lighter is responsible for any and all damage that his device may cause, including the costs of fire suppression.”  


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

8

Follow us on Instagram @sourceweekly

Summer Humm-Fest Series Humm Kombucha Taproom - 1125 NE 2nd Street, Bend, OR 97701

JUNE 29 1 PM • Manzanita Grill food truck • Featuring 4 exclusive new Humm Kombucha flavors • Music by 3Thirds and Anything but Vanilla • $5 growler fills

AUGUST 3 5 PM • Kombucha Mama throwback celebrating 10 years $5 growler fills, Kombucha Mama schwag • Kombucha Mama growler giveaways • Manzanita Grill food truck • Live music by MOsley WOtta

FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY INCLUDES:

Wildflower Display | Botanic Garden Tours Meet a Beekeeper | Hummingbird Walks Honey Tastings | Children’s Crafts & Activities Gardening Resources | Vendors & Food Truck ADMISSION:

AUGUST 31 5 PM • $25 cases of Pineapple Turmeric, Blackberry, Cucumber Lime Mint, and Ginger Joy • Crafty kombucha cocktails featuring exclusive flavors

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 Y E A R S - K O M B U C H A M A M A

$10/adult, $5/child


NEWS

Regional Roundup Found this week in

Both Sides Find Signs Of Victory In Gresham Bakery Supreme Court Decision

9

PARK FLOAT& NOW OPEN

In A Break From The Past, Oregon Sheriffs Change Their Approach To Gun Laws Early this past June, Coos County Sheriff Craig Zanni was in his Coquille, Oregon, office fielding an email from a sovereign citizen. The sender was claiming that the Oregon state government doesn’t have grounds to operate because it can’t provide him with a copy of the 1859 state constitution. Jonathan Levinson, OPB Sovereign citizens reject the legitimacy of the state and federal government. All of it: taxation, currency, the courts and, of course, gun laws. Zanni says a significant number of people in his southern Oregon county, population 69,000, hold similar views. Except for the rare exception, he says they’re not dangerous. —Jonathan Levinson, OPB

Gov. Kate Brown Prepares For Special Legislative Session, Republicans Threaten Walk Out Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced on Wednesday that she is preparing to call a special legislative session for the first week of July. In what amounts to a chess move by the governor, Brown declared her intentions while Senate Republicans remain in the state Capitol but have threatened to stage a walkout. A vote on a controversial climate bill is looming and Oregon Senate Republicans are hoping to prevent Democrats from passing the legislation. — Lauren Dake, OPB

float the river in

easy steps Start at Park & Float on Simpson Ave. with parking, tube rentals, life jackets and a shuttle service everything you need for a great day on the river.

Start at Park & Float.

Virtual tour, maps & shuttle information at bendwhitewaterpark.com Courtesy OPB

Gear up.

Go float.

Return or repeat via the shuttle.

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday threw out an Oregon court ruling that fined the Christian owners of a Gresham bakery $135,000 for refusing to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. But the court again chose to sidestep the issue of what protection the ConCourtesy OPB stitution’s guarantee of religious freedom gives business owners charged with discrimination for refusing service to samesex couples. Instead, the highest court has placed another, narrower question front and center in the case: whether the state of Oregon was biased in its treatment of the bakers in the case, Aaron and Melissa Klein. —Amelia Templeton, OPB


FEATURE

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

10

PREPARING FOR WILDFIRE SEASON S In the midst of heightened awareness about the risk of wildfires, dozens train to become qualified wildland firefighters Story and photos by Keely Damara

Students from various state and federal agencies learn to dig line during a live fire exercise south of Sisters on June 20. Keely Damara

ummer has arrived, with fire season right on its tail—and the memory of last year’s destructive wildfires aren’t far from the collective minds of various state and federal agencies tasked with preventing and responding to Oregon wildfires. Last week, 58 students from various agencies received several days of training organized by the Central Oregon Fire Management Service to become qualified wildland firefighters. In addition to in-class training that focused on communication and team-building skills, the students spent June 20 training in a live fire exercise just south of Sisters. We tagged along. Larae Guillory, assistant fire management officer with the Sisters Ranger


11 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Jacob Soliz, 27, has served the last five years with the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One, a U.S. Navy Seabee battalion. “I’m always open to new ideas and doing different things,” said Soliz. “I’ve done a wide variety of things throughout my course in the Navy, but this happens to be one of the off-the-wall ones that I didn’t think I would be doing, but so far, I’m really enjoying it.”

“We refer to each other as family because, you know, our lives are in each other’s hands. And we really need to build trust.” — ROLYN MILLER

Rolyn Miller, 19, works for the U.S. Forest Service and is a student at OSU-Cascades, where she studies natural resources. “I just moved to Bend this year and I want to feel like I’m a part of the Bend community and not just some person from the (Willamette) Valley who moved across the Cascades,” said Miller.

District and “burn boss” for the live fire exercise, said the students spent the day learning how to attack fires directly and indirectly utilizing hand tools. “They’re doing what we call ‘direct attack’— which is, they’re building a hand-line perimeter to contain the fire directly on the fire’s banks,” said Guillory. “The other piece of what they’re learning today is really just to work within the Incident Command System.” The Incident Command System is the glue that holds together the various agencies that respond to wildfires—setting up a structure of command, and breaking groups down into small, manageable sizes for better communication. During the live fire exercise June 20, trainees could be heard passing messages, as well as the occasional high five, down the line from person to person—like a giant game of telephone. Rolyn Miller, 19, works for the U.S. Forest Service and is a student at OSU-Cascades, where she studies natural resources. Building strength of character and giving back to the community are both important to her in a career choice, she said, and firefighting

fulfilled both those while also allowing her to be outdoors. The classes leading up to the live fire exercise focused a lot on team building—something Miller said is important in their line of work. “We refer to each other as family because, you know, our lives are in each other’s hands,” said Miller. “And we really need to build trust.” Guillory said the interagency training program in Central Oregon is unique in that it gives students the experience of working with the same future wildland firefighters they’ll likely encounter when fighting fires in the region. “We work really closely with our municipal partners as well as state partners and contractors and other agencies,” said Guillory. “It’s a really good opportunity for them to get, essentially, the live fire and really what they would be doing if they were to head to an incident here in Central Oregon—because those are the same people that they would encounter on an actual fire.” Of the 58 students who went through the training last week, 35 are USDA Forest Service personnel, 15 Bureau of Land Management staff, seven people from Oregon Military Department and one U.S. Navy sailor. The newly qualified wildland firefighters will return to their agency posts, prepared to fight fires this summer under the command of more experienced firefighters.


COMMITTED TO TAKING CARE OF WOMEN IN OUR COMMUNITY No one knows women like we do.

12 WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Our caring providers have been trusted by women in Central Oregon for over 20 years, and we’re proud of the differences we’ve made in the lives of our patients and families. As our community has grown, so has our healthcare family. With a commitment to compassionate and comprehensive care, we’ve added new doctors and staff and are currently taking patients. We’re here for you every step of the way — at every age, every stage and every milestone.

eastcascadewomensgroup.com | (541) 389-3300

BIKE PASS SALE

$189 SALE ENDS JUNE 30 Summer is in full swing and the bike park is open for riding! Get your bike pass now and enjoy lift-served downhill biking that offers everything from beginner trails to the newest technical, advanced flow trail, Redline (scheduled to open August 2019).


SOURCE PICKS THURSDAY

6/27

6/27 – 7/2

SATURDAY 6/29

TUESDAY 7/2

CENTRAL OREGON SOLSTICE CELEBRATION HEALERS, ARTISTS, MUSICIANS

13

SATURDAY 6/29

MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD AND ZIGGY MARLEY AMPHITHEATER SHOW

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON & THE STRANGERS CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS SHOW

You guys know the drill. Don’t miss out on a chance to see Franti back in Bend alongside Ziggy Marley (an eight-time Grammy winner!) for a rockin’ show to get the weekend started early. Doors at 5pm. Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 SW Shevlin Hixon Dr., Bend. $59.50/adv., $65/day of show.

THURSDAY 6/27

INNER LIMITS CD RELEASE PARTY BLUES & ROCK

DESCHUTES BREWERY 31ST ANNIVERSARY PARTY BEER, MUSIC AND FUN

Eugene-based band Inner Limits is celebrating the release of its debut album, “Hit The Highway.” The project features the band’s take on a variety of classic blues arrangements. Then Inner Limits has a second album of rock covers coming out next month – maybe at the show you’ll get a sneak peak of those works, too! 9-midnight. Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 SW Century Dr., Bend. $12.

The oldest brewery in Bend is celebrating its 31st birthday! Featuring live music from The Mostest, GBots & The Journeymen and Tone Red. While you’re there enjoy some luau-style eats and sample the official release of the Black Butte XXXI Anniversary Porter. 5-10pm. Deschutes Brewery Public House, 1044 NW Bond St., Bend. No cover.

Three-time Grammy winner Kris Kristofferson is coming to Bend! You might be familiar with his work as part of the Highwaymen with Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings. Or you might even be familiar with his brilliant songwriting chops– penning hits like “Me and Bobby McGee,” “Sunday Mornin’ Comin’ Down” and more for other artists. Doors at 5pm. Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Dr., Bend. $42 + fees.

TUESDAY 7/2

SATURDAY 6/29

FRIDAY 6/28

LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND GRAMMY WINNER

ALTER EGO LIP SYNC BATTLE ON STAGE

Lyle Lovett is bringing his ultra-mashup of blues, folk, gospel and jazz to the Les Schwab Amphitheater. In all honesty, Lovett might actually bring the house down. Read more about Lovett in this week’s Sound section. Doors at 5pm. Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 SW Shevlin Hixon Dr., Bend. $45 + fees.

Riff Cold Brew is unveiling its new Sparkling Coffeefruit Tea in cans! To help celebrate they’re hosting a night of epic lip sync battles. If you perform, you’re automatically entered to win a $100 Riff gift card. 5-10pm. Riff Taproom, 555 NW Arizona Ave., Bend. No cover.

SUNDAY 6/30

SATURDAY 6/29

GRANGER SMITH & EARL DIBBLES JR. COUNTRY TUNES

CRUXAPALOOZA 7 YEARS OF CRAFT BEER

Born and raised Texan Granger Smith is no stranger to the music scene. He taught himself how to play guitar at 14 and never looked back. His alter ego, Mr. Earl Dibbles Jr., is definitely a little more of a character and possibly a handful. It’ll be one heck of a show! 7-10pm. Oregon Spirit Distillers, 740 NE First St., Bend. $25.

Collier is a very skilled multi-instrumentalist– and her three Blues Award Nominations speak for themselves. Having played saxophone since the age of nine and earning her degree from the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Collier spends most of her time touring the world. It’s a treat to have her here in Central Oregon. 9-11pm. Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 SW Century Dr., Bend. $12.

8

Enjoy 30 beers on tap, live music, games, food and more as Crux Fermentation Project celebrates its seventh year of bringing delicious beer to Central Oregon. If you’re feeling extra fun, partake in a 5K fun run to kick things off in the morning. 11am-10pm. Crux, 50 SW Division St., Bend. No cover.

VANESSA COLLIER BAND BLUES, FUNK AND SOUL

E.T. July 2

234TH ARMY BAND

MUPPETS FROM SPACE

July 7

July 9

TOO SLIM & THE TAILDRAGGERS July 17

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

StefanBrending/WikiMediaCommons

The first Central Oregon Solstice Celebration will include, yoga, music, food, an artist’s bazaar, vendors, live painting, a fire show and more. This is an alcohol–free event. Learn more about the gathering in our culture section. 10am-11:45pm. Powell Butte Community Center, 8404 SW Reif Rd., Powell Butte. Free. Donations accepted.


14

IT ’S TH E

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

FOU RT H OF J U LY ! VI S IT OR EG ROWN FOR YOU R HOLI DAY WE E K E N D E S S E NTI A L S ! U P TO

20% OFF

S E LECT ITE M S I N -STOR E (BEGINNING WEDNESDAY, JULY 3RD)

BEND’S NEWEST LUXURY SPA

INDEPENDENCE DAY GRILL + LIVE MUSIC

JULY 4TH

11AM - 4PM

COMPLIMENTARY ADMISSION

50 MINUTE DETOX HERBAL MASSAGE + DEEP FOREST FOOT CURE FOR $135

15% OFF VITAMIN C15 + RETIONL FACIAL 50 MINUTES

EXP. 6/30/19

3075 N Hwy 97 Suite 100, Bend • 541.323.8883 driftspabend.com

HERE ARE SOME DETAILS: • Grilled Souvlaki and burgers, chips and slaw available for purchase • Souvlaki - Greek spiced pork skewers • Local (T-Bone Ranch accross the street) grass fed beef burgers. • Kettle chips • Organic Slaw - made with organic Cretan olive oil, Avocado Oil, and our own wine vinegar made with a centuries old family held “mother” (which is why we call it “Aunt Mary’s Mother”) • Music by The Opal Springs Boys • Wine, beer, softdrinks, and water available for purchase. • Please no outside beverages — and no pets.

541.546.5464 • 15523 SW Hwy 97, Culver maragaswinery.com


S

SOUND

Loving his Large Band

By the end of his Amphitheater show, Lyle Lovett wants you to know more about each of his (many) touring musicians By Alan Sculley Michael Wilson

Following his tour, Lyle Lovett heads back to the studio to produce his first new album in seven years.

Curb Records (and its parent company, Universal) before releasing his self-titled debut album in 1986. Lovett stepped back to take stock of how the music industry was changing before deciding how he would move forward. Finally, last November Lovett signed with Verve Records, a label also owned by Universal, and his familiarity with the parent company played a big role in Lovett’s decision. “I always worked more closely with the MCA side of the record deal than Curb,” Lovett said. “So I like the company. They administer my publishing as well. I’ve been with two publishing companies over the years, Criterion Music and PolyGram, and Universal bought

Open Seven Days a Week

Come see us at our

NEW PERMANENT LOCATION!

550 S.W. Industrial Way Suite 152 GOODLIFE BEERS ON TAP!

BOOK ONLINE AT BENDBARBER.COM

both of those publishing companies. So I have a relationship with Universal anyway.” Lovett said he has not yet settled on the songs that will go on his next album. But he can say one thing with some certainty: There won’t be a unifying concept to the songs.” “The theme really is just my life experience,” Lovett said. “With just about every song I’ve recorded, I can point to something I’ve experienced, either gone through or something that I observed or happened that was real. And then writing about it is a great way to remember that, really, that experience. Writing about it, in a personal way, for me, it helps me to appreciate some of

the things I’ve gotten to live through.” Lovett said fans can expect the album to feature the kind of diversity that has characterized his previous albums – and the musical range of his live shows (including the June 29 show at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend). The new songs could incorporate any number of styles, including country, soul, blues, bluegrass, rock or horn-accented swing and jazz. And when recording sessions begin, Lovett will approach the new album with the same goal that’s behind which songs he chooses to perform at each concert and how the songs are arranged for live performance. He wants to showcase his band. “By the end of the show, I’d like everyone in the audience to feel as though they’ve gotten to know everybody on stage,” he said. “So that’s really how the arrangements, the live arrangements come from that. It really is a matter of thinking of ways to expand a song or take a song in a direction that would allow someone in the band to be featured. So we might expand some of the solos and include instruments and solo sections that might not be on the recording. It’s a way to say ‘Hey, check this guy out because he’s really good.’”

Lyle Lovett and his Large Band Sat., June 29. 6:30 pm Les Schwab Amphitheater 344 SW Shevlin Hixon Dr., Bend GA $45

Caring for your pets 7 days a week / Urgent Care DOCTORS BYRON MAAS, LAUREN STAYER, ERIN MILLER, TABITHA, JOHNSTON & MEGAN KINNEAR

BENDVETERINARYCLINIC.COM 360 NE QUIMBY AVE 382-0741

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

T

his summer, Lyle Lovett is once again doing an extensive tour of the U.S. This means he gets to experience one of his favorite aspects of being a musician on a nightly basis.    “I just appreciate them so much,” Lovett said of his touring musicians, which over the years he has deployed in various configurations, from a small acoustic combo up to his Large Band, which has had as many as 16 members. “I mean, nothing gives me a greater thrill in my musical life than to get to stand in the middle of them and listen to them. I get to do that every night. So just to stand there and listen to them think, that’s really what it amounts to, it’s just fun.” But it’s been some time since he’s had that experience in the studio. That’s because Lovett has gone seven years since he last released a studio album.  An end to the drought of new Lovett music is on the horizon, as he plans to enter the studio in November to make a new album. Because “Release Me” and 2009’s “Natural Forces” were made up mostly of songs written by Lovett’s favorite artists, this will be his first album of primarily original songs since his ninth album, the 2007 release, “It’s Not Big It’s Large.” The long gap between albums has partly been a function of the titanic changes that have occurred in the music industry—namely, downloading and streaming.  “Release Me” marked the end of the record deal Lovett signed with MCA/

15


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE 16


S

Source Material

A few of music’s infectious highlights from the month of June to keep you plugged in

LOCAL’S BIN: Groovasaur EP The debut project from Bend’s Groovasaur slightly reminds me of the soundtrack to Spyro The Dragon — which is probably my favorite video game soundtrack of all time (If you didn’t know, it was actually scored by The Police’s Stuart Copeland). One reason is its mystical cover, and the other is simply the music. The self-titled EP is a breezy instrumental project, filling your ears with rapid runs of keys, dreamy guitar riffs and sturdy drum beats. It’s jazzy. It’s rocky. It’s funky. It’s Groovasaur.

keeps the music light and wandering– almost like you’re adrift at sea or slowly flowing on the Deschutes River. His light falsetto is a gently placed overlay to the groovy, yet relaxing instrumentation on the album. I highly recommend mellowing out to the Fruit Bats– it’s a perfect soundtrack for basking in the glows of the sun.

NATIONAL BEATS: “Junk” - Carlie Hanson This 19-yearold Wisconsinite is a special talent. Not only can she craft pop masterpieces, but she might even start beatboxing in the middle of one—which is exactly what Hanson does on “Bored With You,” the lead track. The young singer combines elements from rock, hiphop and pop into an even-keeled blend that’s fun to listen to. Hanson’s lyrics are raw anecdotes from her teenage years and everyday life– but they aren’t always easy. “Hazel,” a punk-laden distress call, is actually a song about one of her friends going through a rough and drug-filled patch, Hanson told Billboard. So if you’re expecting cookie cutter, bubblegum pop then you might want to look elsewhere. It’s Hanson’s edge that truly makes her shine.

“Gold Past Life” – Fruit Bats One of the earlier bands big on the alternative folk scene was Chicago’s Fruit Bats. The original project of Eric D. Johnson—also formerly of the Portland-based band, The Shins—has seen a lot of changes throughout the years but has held center with Johnson as the nucleus. On “Gold Past Life,” Johnson

REGIONAL FIND: “Bleu”- Dave B. Dave B. is really good at rapping—and matter of fact, at singing, too. As one of the Pacific Northwest’s own, the Seattle-based artist already has one of my most-played albums of the year and it just came out this month. Dave commands attention with his unique and shapeshifting tone—in the same manner that Andre 3000 and Q Tip have done for years. “Bleu” is a 10-track mix of summertime hip-hop and R&B that sounds just as good in the daylight as it does during a twilight walk to the nearest Safeway. And to top it off, the run of “Peace,” “Window” and “Darling” might be the best opening sequence I’ve heard this year.

FIVE FOR THE ROTATION “That’s Life” – 88-Keys with Mac Miller and Sia

“Like a Kennedy” – Joywave “belong” - slenderbodies “No Bullets Spent” – Spoon “Açaí Bowl” – Dominic Fike

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Isaac Biehl

17


Providing private, compassionate euthanasia services for your cats & dogs in the privacy of your pet’s home.

Best Of 2 019

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

18

CENTRAL Oregon

BALLOT ISSUE It's time to vote for the Stars of Central Oregon! The Best of Ballot Issue contains the actual ballot our readers use to vote for the winners of the highly coveted Best of Central Oregon Reader Poll! This issue will also be on stands during the busy holiday weekend when Central Oregon is sure to be bustling. Don't miss your opportunity to campaign for votes and reach eager tourists and active locals by advertising in this one of a kind publication.

RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! JUNE 27 On Stands: JULY 3

Ad deadline:

541.647.6810

MobileCatandDogVet.com MobileCatandDogVet@gmail.com

COME CELEBRATE IN DOWNTOWN BEND & DRAKE PARK

July 4th PET PARADE

& Old Fashioned

FESTIVAL Sponsored by

Start out at the Pancake Breakfast in the park with Bend Sunrise Lions Club: 8:00 - 11:00 am

SINCE 1932, IT’S THE PET PARADE! Parade Lineup: 9:00 am ★ Parade: 10:00 am Parade in costume with your pet or stuffed animal on pulled wagons, bikes or trikes or watch all the action on the parade route.

AFTER THE PARADE, HEAD TO DRAKE PARK FOR THE OLD FASHIONED FESTIVAL! 11:00 am - 4:00 pm ★ Over 100 artisans, live music, games & food! ★ LIVE MUSIC presented by ★ OLD FASHIONED GAMES for kids of all ages! presented by ★ FAMILY FUN AREA: Fish Fling • Flush-a-Duck • Fire Truck • Games & More! ★ COMMUNITY ENTERTAINMENT brought to you by Bend Park & Recreation District

PARADE DETAILS & PARKING:

Downtown road closures from 8:30 am–Noon. Best parking: Outer perimeter of downtown & parking garage • Alternative transportation encouraged • Bike valet at Drake Park Newport / Greenwood Parking Garage Oregon

Minnesota

Bond

Downtown Bend

Lava

N Wall

• All ages welcome • No registration necessary. • Lineup is at the School Administration Building parking lot on Wall Street. • Pets must be leashed. • Clean up after your pet. • No rabbits, cats or aggressive dogs. • Large animals need to arrive early. • Do not give away animals. • No solicitation, commercial floats, motorized vehicles, motorcycles or distribution of anything, including candy.

Brooks

MO R E I N FO : 5 4 1 .3 83. 0800 adve r t i se @ b e ndso urce. com

Libby Hays, DVM

Franklin

Louisiana Parade Start & Finish

School Admin. Bldg.

Staging Area (9 - 10 am)

Thank you to our sponsors! ADA parking available on Bond St. by staging area, in parking garage and on Riverside Blvd.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (541) 389-7275 OR VISIT

bendparksandrec.org


LIVE MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

CALENDAR

>

Tickets Available on Bendticket.com Submitted

26 Wednesday

The Capitol Bass in the Basement Ep 6 :

episcool / Luxora Major + Friends Let’s keep the spirit of community and music alive with a gathering of festive souls: Luxora, Chellybean, Tphunk, Alx. 9pm-2am. $5.

Angels’ Lair (Kerry’s Place) Nina Gerber

The Commons Cafe Conner Cherland Live

& Chris Webster In Concert Chris Webster is a soul singer. Her voice conveys a passion that connects with the longings of her audience. Guitarist Nina Gerber has a unique ability to completely free herself within an eclectic range of styles. 5pm. $20.

All ages. Check out more at www.connercherland.com 6-8pm. No cover.

The Lot One Mad Man A one-man-band

demonstrating electronic groove with smooth vocals and soulful additions. 6-8pm. No cover.

The Astro Lounge Bingo with Janney to

Velvet Laura May Music Laura May is an up and coming independent singer-songwriter reigning from the pacific northwest. 8-10pm. No Cover.

benefit Oregon Wild 6-8pm. 6-8pm. $1-5 per game.

Bend Brewing Company Thomas T Duo Acoustic Blues. 6-8pm. No cover.

28 Friday

Bevel Craft Brewing Live Music at The

Patio: Lande/Michalis With Lande/ Michalis! No cover.

The Brown Owl Guardians of the Under-

dog Live music by Guardians of the Underdog. 7-10pm. No cover.

Cabin 22 Local Day w/ UKB Trivia at Cabin 22 It’s fun and free to play! Enjoy Central Oregon pint specials, all day, all night! Prizes include Cabin 22 gift cards! 7pm.

Cabin 22 Corrupted Kin A night of folk rock.

Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down

Checkers Pub The Edge Band Looking

7-10pm. No cover.

and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

Hub City Bar & Grill Karaoke What’s your go-to karaoke tune? 9pm.

JuJu Eyeball, Bend's own Beatles tribute band, is performing at McMenamins on 6/26.

Immersion Brewing Geeks Who Drink Pub

by local musicians like MOsley WOtta, Jeshua Marshall and others. 6-8pm. No cover.

Trivia 6-8pm. No cover.

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Rockin’ Robin

Karaoke Rockin’ Robin takes our stage, running Bend’s #1 karaoke show. 7-11pm. No cover.

Level State Beerhouse Bend Comedy Pub Trivia All ages until 9pm! 7pm. No cover.

The Lot Wednesday Open Mic Night Hosted

27 Thursday

sicians welcome to the downtown living room. Bring your instruments and your friends. Everyone else come on by and support the local music scene. 21 and over. 6pm. No cover.

Maverick’s Country Bar & Grill Karaoke

Come sing your heart out every Wednesday night at Maverick’s! 9pm. No cover.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

The Astro Lounge Rockin’ Robin Karaoke

Hub City Bar & Grill Karaoke What’s your go-to karaoke tune? 9pm.

Rockin Robins karaoke every Thursday. $5 Jamesons all night. Come and sing your heart out. 9pm-1am. No cover.; Sing your favorites on a rockin’ good system, every Thursday! 9pm-1am. No cover.

BrightSide Animal Center NPT Benefit

for Brightside Animal Center This month we support Brightside Animal Center. Featuring Da Chara Duo (Steve Thorp and Kimberly Rogers), Rosemarie Witnaeur and Fran Harmony. Special Guest Jamie Morris. Come enjoy some great music/great cause. 6-8pm. No Cover.

Northside Bar & Grill Acoustic Open Mic

The Brown Owl Turkey Buzzards An evening of Americana music performed by Turkey Buzzards. 7-10pm. No cover.

Pour House Grill Trivia Mondays at Pour

House Grill Trivia Mondays at Pour House Grill w/UKB Trivia on the bigscreen projector! Bend South’s entertaining free to play trivia experience! Enjoy beer and food specials with us in the East bar/dining room at 7pm weekly! 7-9pm. No charge.

River’s Place Scott Foxx & Friends Amer-

icana, island vibes and strong harmony make this group something special not to be missed! 6-8pm. No cover.

Seven Nightclub Hump Day Karaoke Every Wednesday night! 8pm. No cover.

Sisters Saloon & Ranch Grill Texas Hold ‘em Poker Join us for Poker Night upstairs at The Saloon! First hand dealt at 7pm, so grab a seat early! 7pm. $20 buy in.

The Domino Room As Cities Burn w/ All Get Out & Many Rooms As Cities Burn have garnered tremendous respect for their progressive take on the post-hardcore genre. 8pm. $16.

Juju Eyeball Bend Oregon has a Beatles cover band? They do now, luv. From She Loves You to She’s So Heavy, JuJu Eyeball takes an exciting and exacting look at The Beatles catalog. 7-10pm. No cover. Join us for open mic every Wednesday. 6pm.

Come join your friends and neighbors in the alley behind Deschutes Brewery Pub in celebration of our 31st anniversary. 5-10pm. No cover.

7th Street Brew House Bow Wow Bingo Benefitting the BrightSide Animal Center in Redmond. 6:30pm.

M&J Tavern Wed Night Open Mic All mu-

Deschutes Brewery Public House Deschutes 31st Anniversary Party

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market

‘Dancing in The Garden’ Live music, food, dancing, friendships & fun! Band listing and more information at CELovejoys.com. 5-7pm. Free.

Cabin 22 KC Flynn & Friends KC Flynn will be playing acoustic rock and country, along with a rotating lineup of local musicians. Every other Thursday, 7-9pm. No cover.

Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

Currents at the Riverhouse River-

house Music Series Highlighting local Central Oregon talent, the Riverhouse music series focuses on genres ranging from bluegrass, acoustic, indie, blues, jazz, singles and duos. 7-9pm. No cover.

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Thursday Trivia Inquisitive Simian presents In it to Win It Trivia Thursdays. 7-9:15pm. No cover. Les Schwab Amphitheater Michael

Franti & Spearhead and Ziggy Marley Franti co-headlines his show at the LSA with reggae icon Ziggy Marley. Doors 5pm. Music 5:30pm. $59.50/adv., $65/day of show.

Northside Bar & Grill Six Pack Local 6 piece eclectic rock band playing classic pop covers. 7:30pm. No cover.

River’s Place Blackstrap Bluegras Catchy originals that give a nod to the roots of Americana music. 6-8pm. No cover.

Seven Nightclub Bend Comedy Open Mic All

forward to another great night of live music at Checkers! 8-11:30pm. No cover.

Crux Fermentation Project The Jess Ryan Band Driving, twang-inflected, psych-infused rock. 6-9pm. No cover. Hub City Bar & Grill Michalis Patterson Tim Cruise plays every Friday night! 5-8pm. No cover.; 90’s Grunge rock. 9pm. No cover. Juniper Golf Course and The View Tap and Grill Appaloosa Band No cover, all ages

event. food and beverages available. Reservations appreciated. 5-8pm. No cover.

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar A Blue Stick A local favorite playing Blues and contemporary. This is a 21 and over event. 7:30-10pm. No cover. Lava Lanes Karaoke Night Come sing with us! 8pm-Midnight. No cover.

On Tap Clyde From The Milltailers Banjo and guitar driven Ragtime, Dark Folk & Americana. 6-8pm. No cover. Riff Taproom Alter Ego Lip Sync Battle Every performer will have a chance to win prizes, including a $100 Riff Gift Card. 5-10pm. no cover. Seven Nightclub Bend Comedy Presents Emma Arnold and Beth Norton Comedians. 8-10pm. $8/adv., $10/door.

Seven Nightclub & Restaurant DJ SMUVE This weekend we’ve got DJ SMUVE for the parties! 9pm-2am. No cover before 11pm.

performance types are welcome! Each performer will have 5 minutes. Signup by 7:20pm. Ages 21+ 7pm.

Silver Moon Brewing Quick & Easy Boys w/

Seventh Mountain Shane Smith & The

The Capitol DJ Theclectik Mixing all genres

Saints with Eric Leadbetter Shane Smith and the Saints unleash a spirited, four-part harmony sound. 6:30pm. $19.

Chase Christie Soul, Funk and heavy dance jams from Portland, OR 9-11:45pm. $5.

from Hip Hop, Throwbacks-Currents, Reggaeton, R&B,R emixes, EDM. 21 and over. 10:30pm-2am. No cover.

Seventh Mountain Resort Shane Smith

The Pickled Pig RExDOn RExDOn is known for

Sisters High School Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band Acclaimed singer-songwriter Josh Ritter is celebrating the release of his tenth studio album Fever Breaks. 7pm. $35-$60.

The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse Byndi +

& the Saints Hints of folk, rock, country and Americana. 8pm.

playing the classics we all know and love to sing along. Dinner is served 5-8:30pm. 6-8pm. No cover.

Tay and the JangLahDahs & My Evergreen Soul Tay and the JangLahDahs specializes in mixing colorful, harmonic blends of Folk, Rock, Soul and

Submitting an event is free and easy.  Add your event to our calendar at bendsource.com/submitevent

19 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

10 Barrel Brewing Co. 10 Barrel Blitz to the Barrel Watch the fastest pro MTB racers battle it out for the 5K purse, along with beer chugging at the finish line and arm wrestling championships after. 4-9pm. No cover.

Strictly Organic Coffee Company Songwriters’ open Mic w/ Victor Johnson Popular and welcoming venue for experienced and brand new performers to play their original material. 6-8pm.


BIKES MAKE LIFE BETTER

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

20

X

BEERS - BIKES - BOARDS

JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER POO L SCH EDU LES ONL INE

summer’s here RECREATION SWIM FEES FREE UNDER 3 $5 AGES 3 - 18 $5 ADULTS WITH PAID CHILD For even more value, buy a pass!

Sure to put a smile on your face, Juniper features an Outdoor Activity Pool - a water wonderland with a two-story tall flume slide, interactive water features and a beach entry. It’s just one of Juniper’s four pools for: • OPEN RECREATION SWIM • FAMILY SWIM

Sagebrush Cycles and Skjersaas have joined force under one roof with a Bar! Come Join the Community. 345 SW Century Dr Bend, OR 97702 www.sagebrushcycles.com @sagebrushcycles @skjersaas @skjersaas_pub 541-389-4224

BIKES MAKE LIFE BETTER BEERs - BIKES - AND BOARDS

Sagebrush and Skjersaas have joined forces under one roof with a Bar, COME JOIN THE COMMUNITY

• PARENT & CHILD SWIM • LAP SWIMMING & WATER RUNNING Visit bendparksandrec.org for daily schedules and pass options.

Juniper Swim & Fitness Center 800 NE 6th St. (541) 389-7665 bendparksandrec.org

x 345 SW CENTURY DR BEND, OR www.sagebrushcycles.com 541-389-4224 insta @sagebrushcycles / @skjersaas


LIVE MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

Submitted

Psych into a timeless, freak-folk spirit-of-advice. 6pm. Free.

Cabin 22 Local Day w/ UKB Trivia at Cabin 22

All day. All night! 7-9pm. It’s Free, Just be there!.

Thump Coffee - NW Crossing Akins &

Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down

Aosmos Join us for some great music, pizza, drinks and sunset!! 7-9pm.

and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

Hub City Bar & Grill Karaoke What’s your

Tower Theatre Boogie Wonderland 8pm.

go-to karaoke tune? 9pm.

Tumalo Feed Co. Steak House The

Trivia 6-8pm. No cover.

$17-$32 (plus historical preservation fees).

Immersion Brewing Geeks Who Drink Pub

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Rockin’ Robin Karaoke Rockin’ Robin takes our stage, running Bend’s #1 karaoke show. 7-11pm. No cover.

Volcanic Theatre Pub Tenth Mountain Division At Volcanic Tenth Mountain Division stand out in the Colorado music scene. 9-11pm. $10.

Level State Beerhouse Bend Comedy Pub Trivia 7pm. No cover.

M&J Tavern Wed Night Open Mic Goes to Last Call or last musician. 21 and over. 6pm. No cover.

29 Saturday

Maverick’s Country Bar & Grill Karaoke 9pm. No cover.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

Bend Brewing Company Roma Ransom Old-Time Traditional Ballads paired with Romanian Roots. 6-8pm. No cover.

Sonny Hess Joni Mitchell Tribute 7-10pm. No cover.

Northside Bar & Grill Acoustic Open Mic

The Brown Owl Derek Michael Marc An eve-

Join us for open mic every Wednesday. 6pm.

ning of live music by Guardians of the Underdog. 7-10pm. No cover.

Cabin 22 Johnathan Piere Project Soul music. 7-10pm. No cover.

Checkers Pub The Edge Band They play all

Pour House Grill Trivia Mondays at Pour Catch the Colorado-based Tenth Mountain Division at the Volcanic Theatre Pub on 6/28.

rents. 21 and over 10:30pm-2am. No cover.

On Tap The Bluegrass Collective. 6-8pm. No

Tower Theatre Boogie Wonderland 8pm.

cover.

CHOW Bobby Lindstrom Bobby Lindstrom on

Tumalo Feed Co. Steak House The

guitar, slide and harmonica and Ed the Whistler playing old school blues, rock ‘n roll and original tunes. 10am-1pm. No cover.

Legendary Pat Thomas Pat is a one man band featuring easy listening country. June 28-29, 7pm. No cover.

& Garfunkel Tribute The Graduates are a Simon & Garfunkel covers project. 6-8pm. No cover.

The Domino Room The Claypool Lennon

Tumalo House Concert Moors & Mc-

your favorites on the “Edge” with classic rock. 8-11:30pm. No cover.

Delirium An old-school approach to a psychedelic space rock record. 7 & 8pm. $27.50. 7 & 8pm. $27.50.

Double J Saloon Bend Comedy Special Event: Emma Arnold at Double J Saloon Comedians Emma Arnold and Beth Norton perform at Double J Saloon. 8-10pm. $8/adv., $10/door. High Desert Museum In a Landscape: High

Desert Museum Hunter Noack performs live outdoors on a nine-foot Steinway as he presents IN A LANDSCAPE: Classical Music in the Wild, an outdoor classical music concert series. 6:30pm. $0-$25.

Hub City Bar & Grill The Graduates Open

mic at Hub City. 2-6pm. Free.; Simon and Garfunkel tribute band on tour from Washington. 8pm. No cover.

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Rockin’ Robin

Karaoke Rockin’ Robin takes our stage, running Bend’s #1 karaoke show. 8pm-12:30am. No cover.

Lava Lanes Karaoke Night Come sing with us! 8pm-Midnight. No cover.

Les Schwab Amphitheater Lyle

Lovett & His Large Band Grammy-award winning singer and songwriter Lyle Lovett has defied categorization for nearly two decades, bridging the sounds of folk, jazz, gospel, blues and R&B. Doors 5pm. $45.

M&J Tavern Get Down at the M&J Live music

by Dr Green Dreams and Helga! Local music, best bar in Bend and all the cool kids! Let’s Get down! Remember to please tip the Bands! 21 and over. 8pm. No cover.

Niblick and Greenes at Eagle Crest

Lindy Gravelle Singer-Songwriter-Pianist performs originals and popular covers. 7-10pm. No cover.

On Tap Downhill Ryder 5-7pm. No cover. Seven Nightclub & Restaurant DJ SMUVE This weekend we’ve got DJ SMUVE for the parties! 9pm-2am. No cover before 11pm.

Sisters Saloon Melanie Rose Dyer Trio

Folk-rock with three part harmonies. 7-10pm. No cover.

The Capitol DJ N8ture Mixing all genres from Bass, Remixes, Throwbacks, Hip Hop and cur-

$17-$32 (plus historical preservation fees).

Cumber House Concert 6-9:30pm. $20 donation to the artists.

Volcanic Theatre Pub Inner Limits CD Release Party w/ Company Grand Inner Limits is an energetic blues/funk/rock group based in Eugene, OR. 9pm-Midnight. $12.

30 Sunday Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

Hub City Bar & Grill Open Mic All welcome

Open Door Wine Bar The Graduates - Simon

2 Tuesday The Astro Lounge Tuesday Trivia Prizes, drink specials and a mental challenge. 8-10pm. Free. Athletic Club of Bend Kris Kristof-

ferson & The Strangers Three-time Grammy winner Kris Kristofferson comes to Bend. 5pm. $42 + Fees.

House Grill Trivia Mondays at Pour House Grill w/UKB Trivia on the bigscreen projector! 7-9pm. No charge.

Seven Nightclub Hump Day Karaoke Every Wednesday night! 8pm. No cover.

Sisters Saloon & Ranch Grill Texas Hold ‘em Poker First hand dealt at 7pm, so grab a seat early! 7pm. $20 buy in. The Capitol House in the Basement Ep 7.5

: Welterweight / Nick Ash + Friends Featuring WelterWeight, Nick Ash, Jules Juke, NIIX and PURRfessor. 9pm-2am. $5.

The Lot Wednesday Open Mic Night Hosted by local musicians like MOsley WOtta, Jeshua Marshall and others. 6-8pm. No cover.

4 Thursday

Craft Kitchen and Brewery Comedy Open Mic Sign up at 7:30. Starts at 8pm. Free to watch. Free to perform. No cover.

7th Street Brew House Bow Wow Bingo

GoodLife Brewing Woody & Sunshine Folk duo from Arkansas. All ages. 6-8pm. No cover.

The Astro Lounge Rockin’ Robin Karaoke

Benefitting the BrightSide Animal Center in Redmond. 6:30pm.

Hub City Bar & Grill Tim Cruise Classic

Rockin Robins karaoke every Thursday. $5 Jamesons all night. Come and sing your heart out. 9pm-1am. No cover.

Cabin 22 KC Flynn Flynn will be playing acous-

Chris Sing your favorite songs with DJ Chris. 6pm. No cover.

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Acoustic Jam Night with Scott Fox Scott Fox hosts our Tuesday Night Acoustic Jam night. Listen to some of our better musicians in town. 7:30-9:30pm. No cover.

River’s Place Sunday Funday Trivia + Happy

Northside Bar & Grill The Vandels Jazz

to sing or play an instrument, just come on in and get on Gordy’s signup sheet. 4-7pm. No cover.

Northside Bar & Grill Karaoke with DJ

Hour UKB Trivia is hosting our Sunday Funday of Trivia. Free to play and prizes to win. Happy hour during trivia. Grab your team and join the fun! 4-6pm. No cover.

Silver Moon Brewing Not Cho’ Grandma’s

Bingo Ready for the best bingo experience of your life? Each week we average $1,000 in cash giveaways! Games start at $1 and work towards $5 as the day goes on. 10:30am.

The Capitol Rockin’ Robin Karaoke Sing some hits for fun — happy hour all night! 8pm.

Wild Oregon Foods Harry Potter Trivia at

Wild Oregon Foods Free to play, all ages event! 6-8pm. Free to play!.

1 Monday The Astro Lounge Astro Open Mic Sign up at 7pm. 8pm-Midnight. No cover. Broken Top Bottle Shop The Fair Trade

Boogie Band A mix of afro-beat classic,s old school funk, latin jams and modern psychedelia. 7-9pm. No cover.

Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

rock. 6-9pm. No cover.

music 6pm. No cover.

The Platypus Pub Tuesday Night Trivia (and a board game?) 8-10pm. Free.

The Commons Cafe Storytellers Open Mic

tic rock and country, solo this week. Every other Thursday, 7-9pm. No cover.

Corey’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Come on down and sing your favorite tune! 9pm-1am.

Crux Fermentation Project 4th of July

Reggae Music Live reggae music by Delta NIne with special guest Santino Cadiz. Free 3pm.

Currents at the Riverhouse Riverhouse

Sign up starts at 5pm. 6-8pm.

Music Series 7-9pm. No cover.

The Lot Trivia Tuesday ries. 6-8pm. Free.

The Domino Room 4th of July Bash Fea-

Volcanic Theatre Pub Vanessa

Collier Band Vanessa weaves funk, soul, rock, and blues into every powerful performance. 9-11pm. $12.

3 Wednesday The Astro Lounge Bingo with Janney to benefit Oregon Wild 6-8pm. $1-5 per game. Bend Brewing Company Clyde From The

Milltailers Banjo and guitar driven Ragtime, Darkfolk and Americana. 6-8pm. No cover.

Bend Golf & Country Club First Wednes-

day Jazz Call ahead to reserve your seat as seating is limited. First Wednesday of every month, 6-8pm. $10.

Bevel Craft Brewing Phillip Austin We’re

stoked to have lead singer of Bend’s “Sleepless Truckers,” Phillip Austin back again at The Patio. No cover.

turing; Separating The Seas, Designer Disguise, Corvus, The Clumzys, and Within Sight. 6pm. $11.49.

Hub City Bar & Grill Karaoke What’s your go-to karaoke tune? 9pm. Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar Thursday Trivia Inquisitive Simian presents In it to Win It Trivia Thursdays. 7-9:15pm. No cover. LRS Country Music Festival LRS Country Music Festival The LRS Country Music Festival is back in Central Oregon this July 4-7. 3-11:45pm. Varies. Seven Nightclub Bend Comedy Open Mic All

performance types are welcome! Each performer will have 5 minutes. Signup by 7:20pm. Ages 21+ 7pm.

Strictly Organic Coffee Company Songwriters’ open Mic w/ Victor Johnson Popular and welcoming venue for experienced and brand new performers to play their original material. 6-8pm.

21 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Legendary Pat Thomas Pat is a one man band featuring easy listening country. -29, 7pm. No cover.


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

22

Import Performance Auto Repair

* FREE Loaner cars * Same day repairs Text only line for * appointments (541) 378-4920

We work on all makes and models! Bend’s Sprinter Specialists 541-382-9599 • Importperformanceusa.com

It’s coming!

oil

dr. jolly’s

oil

Wednesday, July 10th WWW.JOLLYBEND.COM • 541-508-2708 • 415 SE 3RD ST. BEND, OREGON


EVENTS

CALENDAR

Pixabay

MUSIC

East Coast Swing No partner required. Wednesdays, 6-7pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541-4011635. Cooperdancecompany@gmail.com. $10/ class, $40/month. Free Barre Class Please bring a water bottle & yoga mat. Mondays, 8:30-9:30am. Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 NW Newport Ave, Bend. Contact: 541-410-2826. info@synchronicitywellnesscenter.com. Frist class free, $9 drop in, and $30 for 4 classes.

Cascade Highlanders Pipe Band Practice A traditional bagpipe and drum band with

Intro to Latin Dance - Level 1 Dance partner not required but encouraged. Tuesdays, 5:306:20pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: info@LatinDanceBend. com. $12/drop-in.

members from the Central Oregon area. E\Mondays, 5:30-7pm. Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 NE 27th St., Bend. Contact: 541-633-3225. pipersej@yahoo.com.

Community Orchestra of Central Oregon Rehearsals COCO welcomes all

musicians to come have fun with us. A variety of players. A variety of music. No auditions. Annual negotiable fee. Wednesdays, 6:30-9pm. Mountain View High School Auditorium, 2755 NE 27th St., Bend. Contact: 541-306-6768. cocomusicmakers@gmail.com.

The Deschutes Caledonian Pipe Band Practice The Deschutes Caledonian Pipe Band

is looking for experienced players to join and perform with the group. Wednesdays, 6-8pm. Through Dec. 30. Abilitree, 2680 Twin Knolls Dr., Bend. Contact: info@deschutescaledonian.org.

High Desert Harmoneers Local Chorus of 25 years looking to expand. Four part Acapella Barbershop Harmony for men and women. Mondays-Sundays, 6:30-9pm. First Presbyterian Church, 230 NE 9th., Bend. Contact: 541-2414315. Free.

In a Landscape: Classical Music in the Wild The outdoor concert series comes

to the 1904 Miller Family Ranch with pianist Hunter Noack and a 9-foot Steinway grand piano. Explore the ranch while listening to the music via wireless headphones. June 29, 6:30-8:30pm. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754. info@highdesertmuseum.org. $25.

Jazz/Blues Vocalist Nicole Stromsoe with Dorian Michael Enjoy a thoughtful

selection of material accompanied by guitarist, Dorian Michael. July 3, 6-7pm. Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-312-1032. lizg@deschuteslibrary.org. No cover.

Wednesday Night Kirtan Devotional group

singing. It is yoga for the heart that connects us with our divine, inner nature and the one Spirit that unites us all. Wednesdays, 7-9pm. Bend

JUN 28

Level 1 West Coast Swing We will go over

some more patterns and technique in level 1. Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541401-1635. Cooperdancecompany@gmail.com. $12/class, $40/month.

Level 2 West Coast Swing This class goes

Learn the fundamentals of the Argentine Tango at Sons of Norway Hall.

Community Healing Center, 155 SW Century Drive, Suite 133, Bend. $10.

Greenwood Ave., Bend. $8.

West African Drumming Mondays, Level

not required but encouraged. Tuesdays, 7:308:20pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541-325-6676. info@ LatinDanceBend.com. $12/class, $40/4-Class package, $65/monthly unlimited.

1 students will learn traditional rhythms, and experience the brain-enhancing, healing and joyful benefits from David Visiko. On Thursdays, Level 2 & 3 students will build on your knowledge, technique and performance skills. Mondays, 5:30-6:30pm and Thursdays, 6-7:30 and 7-8:30pm. Djembe Dave’s Home Studio, 63198 NE de Havilland St., Bend. Contact: 541-7603204. DjembeDave@yahoo.com. $15/class.

DANCE

Adult Intermediate Level Jazz Dance

Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm. Get a Move On Studio, 63830 Clausen Drive, Suite 202, Bend. $12 donation, first class free.

Argentine Tango Class & Practica No partner needed. Four-week fundamentals class begins the first Wednesday of every month, 6:30-7:30pm. Followed by intermediate lesson at 8:15pm (recommended after 4 weeks of fundamentals). Wednesdays, 6:30-7:30pm. Sons of Norway Hall, 549 NW Harmon Blvd., Bend. Contact: 907-299-4199. admin@centraloregontango.com. $5/class. Aziza Bellydance Showcase Family-friendly, all-ages. Tips encouraged. June 29, 7:30-9:30pm. Silver Moon Brewing, 24 NW

JUN 28

Bachata Turn Patterns Dance partner

Beginning Cuban Salsa Learn fun steps

that can be danced solo, with one partner, or within a circle. No partner necessary. Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30pm. Drake Park, 777 NW Riverside Blvd., Bend. Contact: 541-325-6676. info@ LatinDanceBend.com. Free.

Beginning WCS lesson & Dance

Fridays, 7pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541-401-1635. Cooperdancecompany@gmail.com. $10/lesson, $5/dance.

Bend Ecstatic Dance Visit: BendEcstatic-

Dance.com or FB Bend Ecstatic Dance. Tuesdays, 7pm. Bend Masonic Center, 1036 NE Eighth St., Bend. $10-12 sliding scale.

Bend Lindy Exchange Weekend workshops will be taught by guest Instructors from Boise City Swing June 29th and June 30th. Social dance will be held June 29th from 7-10pm. For more information please visit bendlindyhop.com Every other day, 11am-2pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: aganswingdance@gmail.com. $10-$60.

JUN 29

over concepts of west coast swing as well as a few more patterns. Really dive into what west coast swing is and how to dance it, while learning the core concepts. Contact Jenny Cooper for questions, 541-401-1635. Thursdays, 7:308:30pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541-401-1635. $30/ month.

Lindy Hop Class Beginner lesson from

7-8pm and Intermediate lesson from 6-7pm. Partner not required. Sundays, 6-8pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. $10/drop-in.

Lindy Hop Social Dance June 29, 7-9pm. The Vibe Dance Center, 740 NE 3rd St, Bend. Contact: aganswingdance@gmail.com. $10.

Odissi Indian Classical Dance Tuesdays, Noon-1pm. Naji’s Midtown Yoga, 369 NE Revere Ave., Bend. Contact: tenley@templetribalfusion. com. Salsa Turn Patterns Dance partner not required but encouraged. Tuesdays, 6:30-7:20pm. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: 541-325-6676. info@LatinDanceBend.com. $12/class, $40/4-Class package, $65/ monthly unlimited. Scottish Country Dance Class No experience or Scottish heritage necessary. Weekly classes include beginner & advanced dances. Mondays, 7-9pm. Sons of Norway Hall, 549 NW Harmon Blvd., Bend. $5/class, first class is free.

JUN 30

KSJJ 102.9 PRESENTS COMEDIAN: JASON TENTH MOUNTAIN Dionysus Presents STEWART DIVISION HAMMERED HERSTORY GRANGER SMITH FEAT. at The Capitol

at Volcanic Theatre Pub

LOCAL TICKETING POWER

at The Capitol

EARL DIBBLES, JR. at Oregon Spirit Distillers

BENDTICKET .COM

23 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Bella Acappella Harmony Chorus Seeks women and girls who love to sing and harmonize. High and low voices, all levels, ages 15 and above. Tuesdays, 6:30-9pm. Aspen Ridge Retirement, 1010 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend. Contact: 541-728-9392. bellaacappellasai@gmail.com. $35/membership.


Turning Your Fantasies into Reality 24/7!

BRING IN THIS COUPON AND GET 10% OFF Starting at $2 per gram, best prices in Oregon.

LINGERIE, NOVELTIES, ADULT TOYS, AND SO MUCH MORE! SALES • RENTALS • VIEWING

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

24

20% Off

Entire Purchase! 815 NE GREENWOOD AVE, BEND MON-SAT 9AM-10PM, SUN 9AM-8PM 541.389.1043 TopShelfMedicine.com

We will match the price from any central Oregon dispensary to be your one stop shop!

ATM

312-8100

197 NE THIRD ST, BEND

ALSO, VISIT US IN LAKEVIEW AND NEWPORT OR COMING SOON!

DO NOT OPERATE A VEHICLE OR MACHINERY UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THIS DRUG. FOR USE ONLY BY ADULTS TWENTY-ONE YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN. • IN THE OLD TRAX BUILDING NEXT TO STARS CABARET

SENIORS GET 10% OFF AND VETERANS GET 15 % OFF

every year since we opened!

541.385.RIBS 2670 N Hwy 20 Near Safeway

Redmond:

343 NW 6th Street

541.923.BBQ1 NEW HOURS

Tuesday - Sunday, 11am - 9pm

www.baldysbbq.com


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT Pixabay

Square Dance Lessons Thursdays-Sundays, 6-8pm. Pine Forest Grange Hall, 63214 Boyd Acres Rd., Bend. Contact: 541-382-7014. dance@bachelorbeauts.org. $5/first class, $75/15 additional lessons.

”Phoenix, Oregon”“Phoenix, Oregon,” tells the tale of two buddies in their midlife state who quit their jobs and decide to open up a bowling alley that serves the world’s greatest pizza. Sounds like a recipe for fun. June 26, 7-8:30pm. GoodLife Brewing, 70 SW Century Dr., Bend. $8. Day After Bachelorette Viewing Party

THEATER

Tuesdays. Through July 23. Crater Lake Spirits Downtown Tasting Room, 1024 Northwest Bond Street, Bend. Contact: 541-480-3483. booing@ craterlakespirits.com. Free.

She Loves Me Set in a 1930s European

ARTS / CRAFTS

4th Friday Art Stroll in Sisters Visit some

Art in the Garden Join Bend art and crafters

as we welcome summer in the gardens at The Cosmic Depot. June 29, 10am-4pm. The Cosmic Depot, 342 NE Clay Ave., Bend. Contact: 925-2623729. deborahahall@bendbroadband.com. No cover.

Art Workshop: Pulling Images from the Past into Print Explore the use of images and icons in layered prints through monotype, drypoint, and three image transfer techniques to add layers and meaning to your art. Noprintmaking experience necessary. See website for dates and times. http://bendartcenter.org June 28, 6-8pm. Bend Art Center, 550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 180, Bend. Contact: 541-330-8759. $140 members; $175 non-members plus $25 materials.

Artist Studio Tour A self-guided map tour

around Sisters featuring 25 artists working in their working studios giving demonstrations: painters, potters, jewelers, glass artists, photographers and sculptors. Meet the artists and view their work, up-close-and personal. June 29, 10am-4pm and June 30, 10am-4pm. Downtown Sisters, Hood Avenue., Sisters. Contact: 541549-9552. events@sistersartsassociation.org. No cover.

Call to Artists Red Chair Gallery is looking for one 2D and one 3D artist. All 2D painters will be considered. 3D artists for first consideration will be in woodworking, metal, fabric or anything of an unusual nature. Please pick up a membership packet at the gallery. Fridays. Red Chair Gallery, 103 NW Oregon Ave., Bend.

Decorate a Clay Figure Create a 3D vision board, celebrate an occasion, or just express yourself. All materials included. Wed, June 26, 5:30-8:30pm, Mon, July 29, 5:30-8:30pm and Wed, Aug. 21, 5:30-8:30pm. Artists’ Gallery Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Dr. Suite 19, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4382. janetmarieart@gmail. com. $45.

Decorate a Clay Figure to Express Yourself Children 12+ with adult. Preregistra-

tion required. Wed, May 22, 5:30-8:30pm, Wed, June 26, 4:30-7:30pm, Mon, July 29, 4:30-7:30pm and Wed, Aug. 21, 5:30-8:30pm. Artists’ Gallery Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Dr. Suite 19, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4382. janetmarieart@gmail. com. $45.

DIY 3D Printing Use code TS10 to save 10%

off this class. June 27, 5:30pm. DIY Cave, 444 SE Ninth St. Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-3882283. info@diycave.com. $65.

Figure Drawing Salon Develop your skills

at our live model figure drawing salon hosted by Workhouse studio members Christian Brown and Abney Wallace. This drop-in salon features a live nude model in a sequence of poses. All levels are welcome but no instruction is provided. Participants are encouraged to bring their own easel

Brush up on your painting skills with one of the various classes held in Central Oregon.

and materials. Tuesdays, 7-9pm. The Workhouse, 50 SE Scott St., Suite 6, Bend. $15/door.

Fourth Friday Art Stroll Fourth Friday Art

Stroll at Hood Avenue Art with featured artists JoAnn Burgess and Elyse Douglass. JoAnn is a landscape pastel/mixed media artist who is featuring her most recent mixed media piece “Garden Delight.” Elyse Douglas from Douglas Jewelry will be featuring her unique sunstone jewelry. Music by Dave Skelton. June 28, 5-7pm. Hood Avenue Art, 357 W Hood Ave., Sisters, Sisters. Contact: 541-719-1800. info@hoodavenueart.com. No cover.

Garden Art Workshop Do you want to make some flowers that will keep their color year round? How about a birdbath? Markers for your herb garden? Come to Tumalo Art Farm and I’ll help you make your vision for your garden art come to life. June 27, 6pm. Tumalo Art Farm, 66405 Cline Falls Road, Bend. $50.

Intro to Soldering - Silver 3-Stack Learn the basics of soldering and the art of creating beautiful sterling silver rings. You’ll use a micro torch for soldering, learn how to size, shape, and texture your rings. Take home new skills and 3 sterling silver rings! No experience necessary. Small personal class. July 3, 6-8pm. DIY Cave, 444 SE Ninth St. Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541.388.2283. $65.

Knit Infinity Scarves at Fancywork Yarn Shop Learn how to make an infinity

scarf with instructors at Fancywork Yarn Shop. Needles,yarn, and pattern are provided. This is an intermediate level class specifically geared to those that already know the basics of knitting, but all levels are able to register and attend. June 28, 1-3pm. Fancywork Yarn Shop, 200 NE Greenwood Avenue, Suite 2, Bend. Contact: 541312-1063. paigef@deschuteslibrary.org. No cover.

Learn to Knit Get started on the path to creat-

ing your own treasured handknits! This class will give you a solid foundation of the fundamentals of knitting. Thursdays, 5:30-7pm. Fancywork Yarn Shop, 200 NE Greenwood Avenue, Suite 2, Bend. Contact: 541-323-8686. hello@fancywork. com. $5.

New Members Exhibit SageBrushers

Art Society presents its annual New Members Exhibit, featuring paintings in various media by new members of the society. Visit the gallery and enjoy the artistic talent of new members of our community. Wednesdays-Fridays-Saturdays, 1-4pm. Through June 29. Sagebrushers Art Society, 117 SW Roosevelt Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-617-0900.

Now Exhibiting: Randy Redfield: Transitions/Transformations Steeped in

the genre of color field painting, Randy Redfield extends it by making use of various media: in addition to paint, pencil and sandpaper the artist has begun combining his painting with recyclable sculpture. http://bendartcenter.org Thursdays-Saturdays, 10am-6pm. Through June 30. Bend Art Center, 550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 180, Bend. Contact: 541-330-8759. Free.

Paint Night: Lucky Horseshoe Never

painted before? No worries, this painting is for all skill levels! Bring your friends/family members out for a fun night of painting at Wild Ride Brew! June 26, 6pm. Wild Ride Brewing, 332 SW Fifth St., Redmond. $35.

Painting with Paper with Rebecca Sentgeorge Join Rebecca Sentgeorge for this

two-day workshop introducing techniques combining collage and painting. A supply list provided upon registration. Deadline June 15. June 29, 10am-2pm and June 30, 10am-2pm. Sagebrushers Art Society, 117 SW Roosevelt Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-527-5468. rsentgeorge@gmail.com. $120 for the two-day workshop.

SageBrushers Art Society present Terry Solini and Jennifer Starr June

1-July 31. The Wine Shop & Tasting Bar, 55 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend.

Showcasing paintings by SageBrushers artist Kendra West Come enjoy this selection of the artist’s favorite works in watercolor and watercolor collage – while picking up your favorite fresh foods! June 1-30. School House Produce, 1430 SW Highland Avenue, Redmond.

Sisters Round Up of Gems Fun, family

event under the shade trees of Creekside Park in Sisters. Crystals, Gems, Minerals, Fossils, Beads, Agates, Dinosaur Eggs, Meteorites, Sunstone, Opal, Agates, Cabs, Rough & Polished Rock & lots of happy vendors! So much fun & weird stuff. July 4-6, 9am-5pm. Sisters City Creekside Park, Hwy 20 and Jefferson St., Sisters. Contact: 619-920-0464. karmicbeadsandgems@yahoo.ciom. Free.

Water-wise Gardening Series - Pollinator Gardens Look into the fascinating

world of native bees and learn how you can transform your yard into a water-wise pollinator garden June 26, 6pm. Hollinshead Barn, 1237 NE Jones Rd., Bend.

PRESENTATIONS + EXHIBITS Birds, Bees & Pesticides: A historical review June 26, 6:30-8pm. Sunriver Nature

Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4394. info@sunrivernaturecenter.org. $10.

Pictures in the Sky There are stories in the

stars. Come learn how stars got their names, as well as the myths and stories behind the constellations. June 27, 6-7pm. East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road, Bend. Contact: 541-312-1032. lizg@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

Saturday Bird Walk Join expert local birder and nature photographer Tom Lawler to discover the rich bird habitats of Sunriver. With Tom’s keen eye and guidance, you will spot and learn to identify a variety of species found throughout Sunriver. Walks are presented in partnership with East Cascades Audubon Society. Saturdays, 8:30-11:30am. Through Aug. 31. Sunriver Nature

perfumery, we meet shop clerks, Amalia and Georg, who, more often than not, don’t see eye to eye. After both respond to a “lonely hearts advertisement” in the newspaper, they now live for the love letters that they exchange, but the identity of their admirers remains unknown. Join Amalia and Georg as they discover the identity of their true loves... and of all the twists and turns along the way! Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30pm and Sundays, 2pm. Through June 30. CTC Cascades Theatre, 148 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend. $20/ adults, $21/seniors + students.

WORDS

Author Event: The Mirror Pond Murders by Ted Haynes When attorney Sarah

Chatham is asked to claim, for local Indians, a girl’s skeleton found at the bottom of Mirror Pond, she learns she has a personal connection to the victim of a crime. Set in Central Oregon, the murder/mystery combines danger, suspense, and intrigue. June 28, 6-7pm. Roundabout Books, 900 NW Mount Washington Drive, #110, Bend. Contact: 541-306-6564. sandra@roundaboutbookshop.com. Free.

Current Fiction Book Club Please join

us for Current Fiction Book Club. We will be discussing Tin Man by Sara Winman. July 3, 6pm. Roundabout Books, 900 NW Mount Washington Drive, #110, Bend. Contact: 541-306-6564. Free.

ETC.

Central Oregon Solstice Celebration Come celebrate the changing of the

seasons at the Powell Butte Community Center on June 29th! We have an all-day festival in store, featuring the best that Central Oregon has to offer! Featuring local vendors & artists, yoga, DJs, workshops, and more! June 29, 10am-11:45pm. Powell Butte Community Center, 8404 SW Reif Rd., Powell Butte. Contact: 541-639-7927. joshuaLjacobs@gmail.com. Donation-Based (Suggested $5-$15).

Granger Smith feat. Earl Dibbles, Jr. My life changed when I was 14

years old and decided I would teach myself to play guitar. This was motivated by two things: I thought the guitar would make girls pay attention to me, and the fact that George Strait played one. June 30, 7-10pm. Oregon Spirit Distillers, 740 NE First St., Bend. $25.

Hammered Herstory The ladies are back again for hammered historical shenanigans; this time the theme is “Women Behaving Badly." June 29, 8-10pm. The Capitol, 190 NW OREGON AVE, Bend. $10. Preventative Walk-In Pet Wellness Clinic Saturdays, 10am-1:30pm. Bend Spay &

Neuter Project, 910 SE Wilson, Suite A1, Bend. $10/office visit.

VOLUNTEER

American Red Cross Disaster Action Team Members Needed American Red

Cross Disaster Action Team Volunteers Needed. Ongoing. volunteercentraloregon.org, 2804 SW Sixth Street, Redmond. Contact: 503-528-5624. Volunteer.cascades@redcross.org.

Bat Survey Volunteer Info Session The Northwestern Bat Hub at OSU-Cascades is looking for volunteer citizen scientists to help survey

25 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Water in the West Historian Patricia Limerick, a renowned scholar, director of the Center of the American West and professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will share her insights on issues surrounding water in our region. She’s written widely on the challenges facing Westerners today and guided discussions that seek open dialogue and more. June 27, 6-7pm. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754. info@highdesertmuseum.org. $7, Members receive a 20% discount.

FILM EVENTS

20 Art Galleries in Sisters: Have a great time, beautiful art, good company, refreshments, music, demonstrations, hors d’œuvres, plus additional sponsoring restaurants and food venues for during and following the stroll. Fourth Friday of every month, 4-7pm. Free.

Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4394. info@sunrivernaturecenter.org. $5.


July 12-14, 2019

MAIN STAGE

5 PM

DANIELLE KELLY SOUL PROJECT 7 PM KALIMBA 9 PM

Friday Saturday

ERIN COLE BAKER 11:30 AM VICTORY SWIG 1 PM THE RIVERSIDE 3 PM BRANDON PRINZING & THE OLD REVIVAL 5 PM HILLSTOMP 7 PM FLOATER 9:30 PM NATTY RED BAND 11:30 AM MOON MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS 2 PM THE BRIAN O’DELL BAND 3:30 PM

JAZZ STAGE Saturday

Friday

GROOVASAUR

GUARDIANS OF THE UNDERDOG 5 PM ASHLEIGH FLYNN AND THE RIVETERS 7 PM JAMES OTTO 9:15 PM

sunday

LIVE MUSIC

sunday

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

26

THE PATTY DAVIS BAND 1 PM

CJ NEARY BAND 3:15 PM HOT CLUB OF BEND 5:30 PM INNER LIMITS BAND 7:30 PM GATOR NATION 9 PM

LOCALS ONLY STAGE DIVE BAR THEOLOGY 11:30 AM LEADBETTER BAND 1:30 PM COSMIC EVOLUTION 3:30 PM


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT spotted bats at various locations throughout Central Oregon this summer. June 28, 7-9pm. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-5934394. amanda@sunrivernaturecenter.org. Free.

Become a Big Brother or Big Sister in Redmond Ongoing. Big Brothers Big Sisters

of Central Oregon - Redmond, 412 SW Eighth St., Redmond. Contact: 541-617-4788. balbert@ bbbsco.org.

Call for Volunteers Volunteers needed at

Second Chance Bird Rescue! Located past Cascade Lakes Distillery, call for hours and location. Contact: 916-956-2153.

Fences For Fido No experience is required.

Sign up on Facebook: FFF Central Oregon Region Volunteers. More info can be found at fencesforfido.org. Ongoing.

Happy Hour in the Garden No experience necessary, gloves and tools provided. Bring a cup and enjoy some beer or kombucha from our Happy Hour in the Garden Beverage Sponsors. This event is family friendly, and you can drop in anytime. Tuesdays. The Environmental Center, 16 NW Kansas Ave., Bend. Contact: denise@ envirocenter.org. No cover. Herd U Needed A Home Dog Rescue

Contact for details. Contact: volunteer@herduneededahome.com.

Make Your Mark at Bend Spay+Neuter! Ongoing. Bend Spay & Neuter Project, 910 SE Wilson, Suite A1, Bend. Contact: 541-617-1010. volunteer@bendsnip.org.

Mentors Needed. Heart of Oregon Corps,

1291 NE Fifth St., Bend. Contact: 541-526-1380. info@heartoforegon.org.

Oregon Long-Term Care Ombudsman Training Certified volunteer Ombudsmen

advocate for residents who live in long-term care facilities or adult foster homes. Get certified through these classes. Please plan to attend all five days to become certified. For more info call 800-522-2602 or go online to altco.org. Wed, June 5, 10am-3pm, Thu, June 6, 10am-3pm, Wed, June 19, 10am-3pm, Thu, June 20, 10am3pm and Wed, June 26, 10am-3pm. Multiple Locations, See website for details, Bend.

Training: Long-Term Care Ombudsman A five-day training to become a volun-

teer Certified Ombudsman. Ombudsman are advocates for your family, friends, and neighbors living in Nursing Homes, Memory Care, Assisted Living and Adult Foster homes. Become someone who can help be a problem solver and advocate for many who cannot speak for themselves. Wed, June 26, 10am-3pm. Central Oregon Community College, 2600 NW College Way, Bend. Contact: 503-378-6303. natascha.cronin@ oregon.gov. Free.

Volunteer with Salvation Army The

Salvation Army has a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for almost every age. We have an emergency food pantry, we visit residents of assisted living centers, and we make up gifts for veterans and homeless. Ongoing. Contact: 541-389-8888.

Volunteers Needed Help with daily horse care. Duties include; corral cleaning, grooming, walking horses. Flexible days and hours. No experience required. Call Kate Beardsley to set up an appointment. Ongoing. Mustangs to the Rescue, 21670 McGilvray Road, Bend. Contact: 541-350-2406.

GROUPS + MEETUPS

ACA and other Dysfunctional Families

A twelve step program where members share their experience, strength and hope about growing up in an alcoholic or other dysfunctional family. Wednesdays, 6-8pm and Fridays, 1011am. First Presbyterian Church, 230 NE Ninth St., Bend. Free.

Al-Anon Family Groups 12-step group for

friends and families of alcoholics. Check afginfo. org or call 541-728-3707 for times and locations.

Alcoholics Anonymous If you want to stop,

we can help. Call Alcoholics Anonymous. Hotline: 541-548-0440. Or visit coigaa.org.

Bend Chamber Toastmasters Develop

and grow your public speaking and leadership skills, whether you’re an executive, stay-at-home parent, college student or retiree. Wednesdays, Noon-1pm. The Environmental Center, 16 NW Kansas Ave., Bend.

Bend “GO” Club Learn the ancient, abstract strategy game of “Go” in a group setting. Call Mike for more info. Sundays, 1-4pm. Market of Choice, 115 NW Sisemore St., Bend. Contact: 541-385-9198. Bendharma - Consciousness Discussion Group Exploring pathways to

peace through the study of the energy that is consciousness. A relaxed group discussion facilitated by an experienced western mind-yogi (50+ yrs). All welcome to stop by, even if it’s just for a bear-hug. First Wednesday of every month, 5:30-7pm. Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend.

Bernie 2020 Debate Watch Party Please bring chairs and beverages to share or for yourself. Meet at 740 SE 9th St, Unit 12. June 27, 5pm. Bend, RSVP for address, Bend. Free.

Caregiver Support Group Support groups create a safe, confidential, supportive environPixabay

ment or community and a chance for participants to develop informal mutual support and social relationships. They also educate and inform participants about dementia and help participants develop methods and skills to solve problems. First Tuesday of every month, 12-1:30pm. Sisters City Hall, 520 E Cascade Ave., Sisters. Contact: 800-272-3900. Free.

Celebrate Recovery Celebrate Recovery is

a Christ-centered, 12-step recovery program for anyone struggling with hurt, pain or addiction of any kind. Mondays, 6:30pm. Faith Christian Center, 1049 NE 11th St., Bend. | Wednesdays, 7pm. Redmond Assembly of God, 1865 W. Antler Ave., Redmond. | Thursdays, 6:30pm. High Lakes Christian Church, 52620 Day Road, La Pine. | Thursdays, 6:30pm. Westside Church, 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend. | Fridays, 7pm. Redmond Christian Church, 536 SW 10th St., Redmond. Visit celebraterecovery.com for more info. Ongoing.

Central Oregon PubTalk EDCO’s Central Oregon PubTalk, held the fourth Thursday of the month, is a happy hour aimed at bringing together different facets of the business community in one place to network, share ideas and further local businesses. Fourth Thursday of every month, 5-7:30pm. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 NW Bond St., Bend. Contact: 541-388-3236. events@edcoinfo.com. $26-$36. Citizens Climate Lobby Monthly Meeting The Citizens Climate Lobby works to

empower citizens to connect with and influence members of Congress to implement climate solutions. First Tuesday of every month, 4-6pm. The Environmental Center, 16 NW Kansas Ave., Bend.

Community Landfill Tour Come join The Environmental Center and Rethink Waste Project staff in partnership with Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste for a behind-the-scenes tour of what happens to your trash after it leaves the curb. Meet at the Ponderosa Park parking lot near the intersection of SE 15h St and SE Virginia Rd to divide into cars July 2, 9am. Knott Landfill, 61050 SE 27th St., Bend. Free. Compassionate Communication / NVC Practice Groups Through practicing with

others, we can learn and grow using real-life experiences to become more compassionate with ourselves and others. Some NVC experience necessary. Tuesdays-Wednesdays, 6-7:30pm and Wednesdays, 4-5:30pm. Center for Compassionate Living, 803 SW Industrial Way, #200, Bend. Free.

A Course in Miracles This a course in mind training. The purpose is to see the through the eyes of love and release us from judgment. With practice, the course brings a sense of peace and well being, as well as remove obstacles to loves presence. Saturdays, 10am. St. Charles Bend South Clinic, 61250 SE Coombs Place, Bend. Contact: Lisa: 760-208-9097. tomlisah@hotmail. com. Free.

Democratic Debate Watch Party Come watch the first Democratic Debate! June 26, 6-8pm. Deschutes Brewery & Mountain Room, 901 SW Simpson Ave., Bend. Free.

Emotions Anonymous Wednesdays, 9:30am and Thursdays, 10:30am. First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St., Bend. French Conversation Table All are wel-

come! Third and First Monday of every month, 10:30am-12:30pm. Barnes and Noble, 2690 NE Highway 20, Bend.

Garage Night The Pine Shed is the perfect place to talk shop, and tell all of your buddies about your winter projects! Come on down for a pint and be ready to share what you’ve been working on! Wednesdays, 6-8pm. Spoken Moto, 310 SW Industrial Way, Bend.

lessons for both beginners and intermediate students for Japanese for all ages. Wednesdays, 5-6pm. Wabi Sabi, 830 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-633-7205. $10.

League of Women Voters of Deschutes County Luncheon A different speaker each month on issues important to our community. First Thursday of every month, 11am-1pm. Black Bear Diner, 1465 NE Third St., Bend.

Life after Birth Join a supportive community

of pregnant and postpartum mothers in a space where it is safe to come as you are. This group is facilitated by Dr. Wendy Hatcher, Psy.D, a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in pregnancy and postpartum-related issues. Tuesdays, 2-3pm. St. Charles Center for Women’s Health, 340 NW 5th Street, Suite 101, Redmond. Contact: 541-526-6635. tlclay@stcharleshealthcare.org. Free.

Marijuana Anonymous Meeting Thursdays, 7-8pm. Serenity Lane, 601 NW Harmon Blvd., Bend.

Mommy & Me Breastfeeding Support Group. Thursdays, 1-3pm. Through Dec. 19.

Central Oregon Locavore, 1841 NE Third St., Bend. Contact: 541-633-7388. info@centraloregonlocavore.org. Free.

Overeaters Anonymous Meeting

Mondays & Thursdays, Noon-1pm. Saturdays, 9:30am-11am. United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St., Bend. | Wednesdays, 4-5pm. Redmond Senior Center, 325 NW Dogwood Ave., Redmond. Ongoing. Contact: 541-3066844.

Pet Parade and Old Fashioned Festival with Bend Parks and Recreation District Start out your day’s festivities at 10am with

the Pet Parade through downtown Bend then follow up with the Old Fashioned July 4th Festival in Drake Park . July 4, 10am-4pm. Downtown Bend, Downtown Bend, Bend. Contact: 541-3897275. Free.

Resist! Rally Weekly resistance protest,

the theme of the week changes. Contact Vocal Seniority or Indivisible Bend for more info. Bring your signs, bring your attitude—and we’ll bring the bullhorn! Contact info@thevocalseniority. org for more info. Tuesdays, 11:30am-12:30pm. Peace Corner, Corner of NW Greenwood Avenue and NW Wall Street, Bend.

Socrates Cafe Group Exchange thought-

ful ideas and experiences while embracing the Socratic Method. Second and Fourth Thursday of every month, 6-8pm. Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend.

Spanish Club Spanish language study and

conversation group. All levels welcome. Call for more info. Thursdays, 3:30-5:30pm. Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-749-2010.

Oregon Communicators Toastmasters Meeting Attend in person or online.

https://zoom.us/j/246410212. Meet and greet at 6:15pm. Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm. La Pine Community Health Center - Meeting Room, 51600 Huntington Road, La Pine. Contact: 541408-7610. oregon.communicators.club@gmail. com. Free.

U.S. Cellular’s Customer Appreciation Celebration in Bend U.S. Cellular is kicking

off summer by hosting a Customer Appreciation Celebration at its Bend store. Everyone who visits the store during this time will receive a free beach towel*, and customers can access a mobile prize game on their smartphone. June 27-30, 10am-7pm. U.S. Cellular, 3197 N. Hwy 97, Bend. Free.

welcome. For info, call Sue. Mondays, 6-9pm. Round Table Clubhouse, 2940 N. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-610-3717. ossz55@yahoo. com.

Watch the Debate Watch the political debates on TV while eating some pizza! June 26, 6-8pm and June 27, 6-8pm. Abby’s Legendary Pizza, 1115 Northeast Third St., Bend. Free. | June 26, 6-8pm and June 27, 6-8pm. Bend Pizza Kitchen, 2755 NW Crossing Dr., Bend. Free.

Italian Conversation Group Conversational Italian group in a relaxed atmosphere. Saturdays, 9:45-11am. Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend.

Thursdays, 1-3pm. Mountain Laurel Lodge, 990 SW Yates Drive, Bend. Contact: Judy: 541728-0767.

Grassroots Cribbage Club Newcomers

Watch the political debates over pizza at Abby'sLegendary Pizza and Bend Pizza Kitchen.

Japanese Group Lesson We offer group

Women’s Cancer Support Group

27 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Brightside Thrift Store in Redmond

Ongoing, 10am-5pm. Brightside Animal Thrift Store, 838 NW Fifth St., Redmond. Contact: 541504-0101. thrift@brightsideanimals.org.

Volunteer Drivers Needed Volunteer drivers needed Mondays-Fridays to transport veterans to the Bend VA Clinic and Portland VA Hospital. Must have clean driving record and be able to pass VA-provided physical and screening. Contact: Paul: 541-647-2363.


Sunriver Style

Music & Market Great Music | Local Vendors

Another Universe: Harry Potter Trivia Bingo How much do you really know about the

world of Hogwarts? Prizes! Ages 6+ years. June 26, 6:30pm. Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-617-7097. Free.

Art Club Art Club is a unique after school program to develop one of the most valuable skills for life - creativity - for ages 5-11. Thursdays, 4-5:30pm. ARTdog Children’s Art Studio, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 130, Bend.

Builders Camp June 24-27, 9am-3pm. ARTdog Children’s Art Studio, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 130, Bend. Contact: 541625-0253. sarah@artdogbend.com. $150-250. Cosmic Crafts Make and take a DIY jetpack,

moon dough, and more! Ages 0-11 years. July 2, 10:30am. La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St., La Pine. Contact: 541-312-1090. Free.

Weekly concert series with boutique vendors and family-friendly music. www.sunriversharc.com/turftunes for more info and list of vendors

Sundays, June 23 - July 21 | 4pm-6pm • John Gray Amphitheater at SHARC

Code Red

JUNE 30

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

28

Presented by Your Sunriver Health Care Home, a La Pine Community Health Center Site

FAMILY & KIDS’ EVENTS

Creative Story Time Bring your little for this unique story time in which we’ll read a different book each week, followed by an art-making experience inspired by the story. Perfect for ages 1.5Y-5. Wednesdays, 10-10:45am. ARTdog Children’s Art Studio, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 130, Bend. Galaxy Slime Relax, get ooey gooey, and

make out-of-this-world slime. Ages 10-17 years. July 3, 1:30pm. La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St., La Pine. Contact: 541-312-1090. Free.

Interstellar Mixed-Media Workshop

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE SUNRIVER OWNERS ASSOCIATION AND MADE POSSIBLE BY THESE COMMUNITY PARTNERS:

Blast off with this space-themed mixed-media workshop. Ages 12-17 years. Online registration is required. June 29, 10:30am. Sisters Public Library, 110 N Cedar St., Sisters. Contact: 541-312-1070. Free. Blast off with this spacethemed mixed-media workshop. Ages 12-17 years. Online registration is required. July 1, 3-4:30pm. Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-617-7087. Free.

Kerbal Space Program Build a rocket and explore the galaxy with this flight simulator video game. Ages 10-17 years. Online registration is required. June 26, 3-4:30pm. Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-617-7087. Free.

Kinder Critter Camp Fridays, 9-11am. Through Aug. 30. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4394. info@sunrivernaturecenter.org. $25. LEGO Block Party Kids + 1 gazillion LEGOs = fun. All ages. Wed, June 26, 2:30pm and Wed, July 24, 2:30pm. East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road, Bend. Contact: 541330-3760. Free. Little Artist Playgroup Nurture your

Paddleboards • Mt Bikes • Kayaks

RENTALS $ 35 per day

Play on the Cascade Lakes, Ride in the Deschutes National Forest

Located on Century Drive at MP 7, we are the most convenient stop for your rental gear.Online reservations are available at 9am for pick up and returned at 6pm the same day.

Call us today at 541-693-9124 or visit seventhmountainriverco.com

little’s developing brain through rich sensory experiences and messy play during our drop-in class for ages 1.5Y-5. Tuesdays, 10:30-11:15am. ARTdog Children’s Art Studio, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 130, Bend.

Mom & Baby Yoga No experience necessary. Tuesdays, Noon-1pm. Tula Movement Arts, 2797 NW Clearwater Drive, Suite 100, Bend. $17/drop-in. Old Fashioned July 4th Celebration

Redmond’s Old Fashioned Fourth of July Celebration. Free, fun, family event so gather up your family and come spend the day with us for games, music and fun for all ages! July 4, 11am-4pm. Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond, Redmond. Contact: 541-548-7275. katie.hammer@raprd. org. Free.

Paws to Read Reluctant readers read with a dog. Ages 6-11 years. Online registration is required. Tue, June 18, 2pm, Wed, June 26, 11am, Wed, July 3, 11am, Wed, July 17, 11am and Thu, Aug. 1, 2pm. East Bend Public Library, 62080

Dean Swift Road, Bend. Contact: 541-330-3760. Free.

Rocket Science Ages 8-15. Thursdays,

10:30am-12:30pm. Through Aug. 29. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4394. info@sunrivernaturecenter.org. $25/child.

Space Camp: Aliens, UFOs, and Unusual Materials Greetings, Earth-

lings! We have come to invade your planet. Learn more about us with amusing play and scientific exploration. Ages 6-11 years. June 26, 10:30am. Sisters Public Library, 110 N Cedar St., Sisters. Contact: 541-312-1070. Free. |June 27, 10:30am. Sunriver Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver. Contact: 541-3121080. Free. | June 26, 1:30pm. Redmond Public Library, 827 SW Deschutes Ave., Redmond. Contact: 541-312-1061. Free. | June 27, 2:30pm. Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-617-7097. Free.

Space Rovers Test your skills on Earth by navigating an obstacle course with a remote-controlled rock crawler and then build and personalize your own solar rover to take home. Ages 8-15 years old. Wednesdays. Through Aug. 28. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4394. info@sunrivernaturecenter.org. $25/child. Sunriver 4th of July Festival Bring the whole family for a fun-filled day, including entertainment, games and food. July 4, 10:30am4pm. The Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Dr., Sunriver. Contact: events@alpine-entertainment.com. Toddler Move + Make Perfect for ages

1.5Y-5. *Please note you must register for this class ahead of time (no drop-ins). Thursdays, 9-9:45am. ARTdog Children’s Art Studio, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 130, Bend.

Tuesdays in Space at the Tower Theatre: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial Screen

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial as part of Summer Reading. July 2, 11am-1:30pm. Tower Theatre, 835 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-312-1032. lizg@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

Universe of Crafts Enjoy crafts and stories that are out of this world. All ages. Sat, June 29, 2pm and Sat, July 20, 2pm. Sisters Public Library, 110 N Cedar St., Sisters. Contact: 541312-1070. Free. Vacation Bible School 2019 Everyone age three through sixth grade is invited to be a part of Word of Victory’s 2019 “POWER UP” Vacation Bible School.Wed, June 26, 9amNoon-Thu, June 27, 9am-Noon and Fri, June 28, 9am-Noon. Word of Victory Church, 645 SE Salmon Ave, Redmond. Contact: 541-548-0464. wovictory@bendbroadband.com. Free. Waterston Desert Writing Prize Award Ceremony This literary award hon-

ors writing that illustrates artistic excellence, sensitivity to place and desert literacy. June 26, 6:30-8:30pm. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754. info@highdesertmuseum.org. Free.

Waterston Desert Writing Prize Workshops Get ready for the Waterston

Desert Writing Prize Award Ceremony by participating in one of three creative writing workshops led by poet and author Ellen Waterston, Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford and award winning fiction writer James Anderson. June 26, 4-5:30pm. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754. info@highdesertmuseum.org. Free.

Wildheart Nature School Summer Camps 2019 We cover everything from

primitive skills to nature art to mindfulness. For kids ages 5-12. Mondays-Fridays, 9am-3:30pm. Through Aug. 9. Skyliners Lodge, 16125 Skyliners Rd., Bend. Contact: 541-625-0273. info@ wildheartnatureschool.com. $217-$284.


C

CULTURE

Turning the Seasons

New Summer Solstice Celebration focuses on health, music and the arts By Isaac Biehl

B

Joshua Jacobs

29 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

ack in March, Joshua Jacobs (sometimes known as SinSay, when he DJs) began to put the puzzle pieces in place for a new gathering in Central Oregon. While the birth of the idea came from his brain, Jacobs makes sure to tell me that it was a total group effort of everyone involved. Located at the Powell Butte Community Center, the Summer Solstice Celebration will bring together artists, healers, musicians and more to help usher in the summer. “A few years back, which was around the time I was getting introduced to the Bend and Central Oregon dance and yoga community, there was an event called the Bend Urban Fest at the Old Stone Church. It was definitely along the same lines,” Jacobs recalls. “I always loved that idea. Just a few months back I started teaching yoga at the (Powell Butte) center and the space is just amazing. It doesn’t get used very much. I was like, ‘something should happen here!’” Jacobs was quickly able to find those interested in participating and being a part of the day-long event. A brief rundown of some of the activities include yoga sessions, food vendors, an artist’s bazaar, music, sound healing, live painting, a fire performance and more. “Bend is probably known as very wellness focused. You see a lot happening in Bend and Central Oregon in general, whether it’s focused on art, or music or wellness, but you don’t see a lot of lines being blurred there,” says Jacobs as he goes through the core themes of the gathering. “I think bringing all of

This print by local artist Joshua Jacobs lends itself to the celebration of the summer solstace.

“The pull of the sun and the energy that it provides — the atmosphere is so different in the summer because everyone wants to get up and be doing something.”

—JOSHUA JACOBS

that into one event can be hugely beneficial for the community, just in terms of awareness, even.” The event itself is alcohol free and donation based. Jacobs has partnered with a local nonprofit, Elephants Now, as the beneficiary. Operated by Phillip Price, Elephants Now is an organization focused on establishing safe conservation habitats for elephants. This is

ARTWATCH

Vital Art Degree

a partnership that Jacobs is very excited about. “It’s cool to see a local do something on such a national scale,” he says. For many, the summer solstice symbolizes a way to get more in tune with body and mind—while being able to enjoy the offerings of the season. For Jacobs, this celebration is no different for him. “For me, I’m very much a seasonal

Summer Solstice Celebration Sat., June 29. 10am-11:45pm Powell Butte Community Center 8404 SW Reif Rd., Powell Butte Donations accepted

Submitted

OSU-Cascades offers new bachelor’s program in arts, media and technology By Cari Brown

Following the trend of growth in Central Oregon’s arts and culture and related industries, Oregon State University-Cascades is offering a new “Arts, Media, and Technology,” degree program, exclusive to the campus in Bend. With degree-related courses being offered as early as summer term—that’s right now, folks—the program officially begins fall term and enrollment is already underway. The program offers “an integrated education combining cutting-edge technical skills and traditional studio arts both on campus and through community internships.” This is great news for a region that currently has more than 200 “Creative Jobs” posted on Indeed.com.

person, in terms of how I focus my energy,” Jacobs says of the solstice’s importance to him. “And when we transition into the summer, the pull of the sun and the energy that it provides – the atmosphere is so different in the summer because everyone wants to get up and be doing something. A lot of people want to be outside and with each other. That is very true for me as well. I love being a part of that.”

Students at OSU-Cascades learn how to incorporate their art with technology,

Unlike a traditional art degree, this new track offers diverse opportunities for students to deepen their studio practice through the utilization and understanding of creative technology. For example, an illustrator who

works in watercolor can learn how to take their drawings and animate them into a short film, or a painter can learn to create an app that allows users to collaborate on a painting with them. The aim is to expose the curious and creative student to the rigors of a traditional art education and studio practice, while teaching them to apply technology to art thinking, or to apply art thinking to technology. Either way, grads will be well equipped to enter the job or entrepreneurial markets with a well-rounded set of skills. Kiel Fletcher, the program’s lead, says, “With the new degree, students will [also] have the option to fulfill graduation requirements by completing internships.” WHAT?! Enrollees can intern in the community for the Bend Design Conference, for example, or at 1859 magazine and get credit toward a degree. As Fletcher put it, “Honestly, we’re stoked to have such an awesome program here.” OSU-Cascades Arts, Media and Technology degree program Fall admission deadline Sept. 1 541-322-3100 osucascades.edu/admissions


A S P O T L I G H T O N T H E P E O P L E O F C E N T R A L O R E G O N 

Forty Years of Service WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

30

Deschutes National Forest Supervisor John Allen is retiring. We sat down with him during his last week to talk fires, permits and more By Chris Miller

A

fter 40 years of serving the public through the National Forest Service, John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor since 2007, retired June 21. Allen said he started as a summer seasonal employee when he was in college at the University of California, Berkeley. After getting his degree in forest management, Allen said he worked for the Forest Service his entire career, nearly all of it in Oregon. He said he started in 1978 in the small town of Bly, in Klamath County. On his second-to-last day on the job, the Source Weekly sat down with Allen to ask about two hot topics for the Forest Service: Wildfires, and the new trail permitting system. Source Weekly: How have fire seasons changed over the years and what do you think will happen in the future? John Allen: The term I think that’s becoming more prevalent is we’re starting to call it a “fire year,” because some of our firefighters are gone to fires all over the country starting in the spring and gone well into November and December. They do a lot of pretty intensive training in the winter, so as an agency we’re starting to look at it as a fire year. But as far as the summer coming up, we’ve had a really wet spring here on the east side of the Cascades and

the grass is taller than normal, and when it does cure out, it will really depend on how much lightning we get, but certainly the small fuels and the fine fuels that dry out quick, they’ll be ready to burn here in the coming weeks. I think the Forest Service has done a pretty good job of breaking up the fuel landscape with active management here in the last 10 to 12 years. SW: What do you see happening with the Central Cascades Wilderness Strategies Project, aka the new trail permit system? JA: The next step is, we’ve issued the decision for the permit system, and 19 of the 79 trailheads are going to have limited day use permits, and you’ll be able to get your permits reserved online and we’ll have some same-day or day-before permits for spontaneous people who can’t plan, or they show up from Ohio and they don’t know we have a permit system. These are the busiest trailheads where we’ve had the most degradation in the wilderness. Not everybody agrees with this decision, but we’ve gotten pretty broad support for the Forest Service to do something about degradation in the wilderness—and I think we’re doing a good job of following our

S O U R C E

S P O

T

L

I G H T

Not everybody agrees with this decision, but we’ve gotten pretty broad support for the Forest Service to do something about degradation in the wilderness and I think we’re doing a good job of following our mandate from Congress. —JOHN ALLEN Chris Miller

mandate from Congress, where we’re mandated to maintain or improve wilderness character. We believe that’s what our wilderness decision will do. SW: What do you think the biggest challenge will be for the new permit system? JA: There’s no simple solution, no silver bullet. It’s a mixture of things, it’s user education, it’s having more presence out in the wilderness. The Deschutes National Forest is one of the largest wilderness ranger programs in the country. But we know how to meet our responsibilities and we’re going to have to ramp that up a little bit, and we’re going to do that in the coming years. Education is always our first choice before enforcement, and we’re going to do our best to get visitors and the Central Oregon community understanding our wilderness objective out there. SW: What can people do if they see bad behavior on the trails or in the wilderness?

JA: They can call any of our offices. We will have trailhead volunteers at many of the busy trailheads on weekends. A lot of the needs out there is when citizens make us aware of something. We can’t be everywhere. We need help and we’re not shy about it. At the end of our interview, Allen said he’s most pleased with how the Deschutes National Forest has engaged with the people and communities of Central Oregon during his time at the Forest Service. He said he would have liked to have done more prescribed burning during his tenure, but thinks the Forest Service is on the right path. Allen said he and his wife plan on taking some fishing trips and traveling abroad now that they’re both retired. But, he wanted to give one last shout out to the people of Central Oregon. “We can’t get done what we get done on our public lands without their support and understanding, and help,” Allen said. “So thank you, Central Oregon.”

Existentially Inspired Clothing

HOT SUMMER, HOTTER DEALS! Cool festival wear plus hard to find UTILITY BELTS!

Mention this ad to receive 10% Off your utility belt purchase the entire month of June!

200 NE Greenwood Suite 3 (541) 797-7035 Hours: Mon, Wed - Sat 11-6, Sun 12-5 closed Tuesdays www.zazenshop.com

SAVE 20%-50%

on your favorite loca l businesses

Purchase discount gift certificates online at

perks.bendsource.com


CH

CHOW

LITTLE BITES

Saving S’Mores

By Keely Damara

As fire bans happen earlier and earlier, these fire pits can let you stare into the flames (mostly) year-round

Courtesy: A&J’s Fish & Chips

31

I

t’s a primal urge: To stare into the flames under a blue-black bonnet, alive with tiny white stars. Evolutionary Anthropologist Daniel Fesser of the University of California-Los Angeles has an explanation about humans’ attraction to fire, saying in a 2012 article with Live Science that adults’ “fascination with fire is a direct consequence of not having mastered it as a child.” Fessler contended that modern humans may not be required to make fire to survive—but in us is still that urge to know how to wield it. Maybe that’s why many of us can be found staying up waaaay later than we should, sitting around a campfire, staring into those ever-changing licks of flame. That is, until the next fire ban. Last year’s fire that decimated Paradise, California, woke me up to the notion that indeed, it can happen here. A dear friend lost her home in that blaze, and Central Oregon seems to be only a slightly-wetter summer tinderbox than Northern California. When fire officials announced a (temporary) fire ban in parts of the state earlier this spring—months ahead of the normal late-summer bans—it seemed a portent of what’s to come, with our long, now-green grasses soon turning to yellow. That got me thinking—selfishly, frivolously—‘there go my S’Mores.’ During a fire ban, I’m guessing not a few of you have found yourselves attempting to make S’Mores over the open flame of your Coleman stove— but there is a better way: The portable, gas-powered fire pit. Each of the three portable pits I checked out offers that tantalizing flame we humans are so drawn to—and enough of it that you can cook a dog or a S’More over it. What’s more, local fire officials, for the most part, will let you use them, even during a fire ban. (There are still places you can’t use them, so keep reading.) Where to get your portable gas fire pit in Bend At the Bend Bi-Mart, I found the Flame One Portable Fireplace, powered, like the others, by propane. At $89.99 (plus the Bi-Mart lifetime family membership, at $5), it was the most affordable local option, and the store had plenty in stock. When I asked the staff how much gas this baby would suck up in a night, they said, “not much.” Since any of the options listed here require you to lug along a standard

Nicole Vulcan

Baja-inspired beer-battered fish tacos.

A Little Baha in Bend

Bring on the dogs and S'Mores with this self-contained propane-powered fire pit.

20-pound propane tank, suffice it to say you’ll have enough gas for a few hours of fire each night of a weekend. The Bend Sportsman’s Warehouse has two models. There’s the Bond Mfg Aurora Portable Gas Steel Fire Bowl, which sells for $109 and is advertised to run for 15 hours on a 20-gallon tank. Then there’s the Camco Little Red Campfire, retailing for $134.99, which comes with a handy top that goes over the device and makes it easy to tote around. All of the three pits adhere to one of Bend Fire’s informal recommendations for portable fire pits—which is to ensure that the heat source isn’t directly on the ground. The Little Red Campfire has a solid metal base that touches the ground, while the other two have a metal support ring for the base. Fire pit restrictions during burn bans Each portable gas fire pit comes with some pretty explicit instructions: Check with the local land managers to find out whether you can use these products during a fire ban. Inside the city of Bend, you can use a portable gas fire pit (nearly) anytime, so long as you follow the recommendations of the manufacturer, says Bend Deputy Fire Marshal Dan Derlacki. Those recommendations might include clearing the space of debris or giving a certain amount of space between the flames and flammable items, for example. Portable gas fire pits are “great because they’re not going to throw up embers,” Derlacki told me. Bend Fire

generally allows wood-burning fire pits year-round—but they’ll sometimes ban them during “bad fire years,” Derlacki said. As of this writing, the Deschutes National Forest and most nearby Bureau of Land Management lands are not under a fire ban—but when the fire bans come, you can still use portable gas fire pits on most lands. One exception: BLM-administered lands within the John Day and Deschutes Rivers, where there’s been a fire ban in place since June 1. On Forest Service lands, you can use your portable gas fire pit in both developed and dispersed camping areas, “As long as there is a 6-foot diameter area cleared of all flammable material to prevent the accidental spread of fire to the wildland,” according to Deschutes NF Assistant Fire Management Officer Jeff Bishop. Bishop added that if the fire danger increases, they may ban all propane devices. And while this information is up to date right now, let this be a lesson that it’s important to know which lands you’re recreating on, and who to contact to ask more questions before you light that fire. Helpful links: Bend Fire general burning restrictions: bendoregon.gov/burninginfo Deschutes National Forest: fs.usda. gov/alerts/deschutes/alerts-notices BLM Oregon/Washington: blm.gov/programs/public-safety-andfire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/ oregon-washington/fire-restrictions  

A new food cart in Central Oregon is offering up a little bit of Baha in Bend—filling the niche for fish and chips in the local food cart scene. James Gage, the “J” in A&J’s Fish & Chips, spent three years working for a fish and chips restaurant in Oceanside, California, before opening his own food truck in Bend with business partner Alan Teshima. While they don’t have a permanent home yet, the food truck made its debut at the Bite of Bend this month and has been making appearances at food cart lots and breweries in the area. They set up shop at Spoken Moto last weekend and Gage has been reaching out to local breweries to collaborate—using a featured brew for their beer-battered fish. In addition to fish and chips, the truck also serves up shrimp cocktails and ceviche—a good option for those looking for a low-carb meal. As for his Baja-inspired fish tacos—Gage guarantees they are the best tacos around. Until they find a permanent home, you can catch A&J’s Fish & Chips at Music on the Green in Redmond on June 26, Monkless Belgian Ales on Saturday, June 29 and Ale Apothecary on Sunday, June 30. To keep tabs on where they’ll be next, follow them on Instagram: @a_j_fishandchips

A&J’s Fish & Chips

Looking for permanent home Bend, OR Instagram.com/a_j_fishandchips

Bring on the Buns

For those who have never tried bao, it’s a delicious, fluffy bun, steamed and often served up with some sort of BBQ-style meat filling. It’s a popular street food in China— and now you can find it in Bend. Bao Down has been popping up at events around Central Oregon since the end of May, and can we just say—they make the perfect outdoor festival food. Bun lovers can choose from Korean BBQ short ribs, ginger garlic-glazed fried chicken, misoglazed pork belly or marinated tofu. They've been regularly serving up buns as Les Schwab concerts and will be at the Subaru Outdoor Games on July 26. Beginning in July, Bao Down can be found at the Podski in Old Bend. Follow them on Instagram or Facebook @baodownbend to find out where they’ll be next.

Bao Down

Mobile Bend, OR Instagram.com/baodownbend

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Nicole Vulcan


9 to 5... WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

32

FOOD & DRINK EVENTS

Great for work.

Not for watering. Things are sure to heat up at the Oregon BBQ Festival in Redmond.

#GreatWaterGreatLife waterwisetips.org

N o l a n d s c a p e w a t e r i n g b e t w e e n 9 a m a n d 5 p m.

FOOD EVENTS General Duffy’s Saturday Markets

Along with food trucks & beer taps, Saturday Market will include 21 exciting vendors with a variety of interesting and cool items. CBD products, vintage clothing & accessories, baked goods from Coho Coffee, Paparazzi Jewelry, home decor, scents and candles, art work and much more! Saturdays, 10am. Through Aug. 31. General Duffy’s Waterhole, 404 NW Forest Ave., Redmond. No cover.

Maragas Winery Independence Day Grill & Music Winery closes at 4pm. Music by

the Opal Springs boy. Grilled souvlaki, burgers, wine, beer, and soft drinks available for purchase. Family friendly event but no pets please. July 4, 11am-4pm. Maragas Winery, 15523 SW Hwy 97, Culver. Contact: 541-546-5464. info@ maragaswinery.co. Free.

BEER + DRINK Barley Brown’s Beer Tap Take Over We have a fun evening of great beer for you. Barley Brown’s from Baker City, OR, will be joining us with many of their beers that you don’t see very often. Raffle for swag and live music by Scott Fox & Friends. June 26, 6-8pm. River’s Place, 787 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend. Contact: riversplacebend@gmail.com. No cover. BreakThrough BBQ BreakThrough BBQ & Dream Team winner announcements! This is a potluck BBQ! Sign up at the gym for what dish you would like to bring (salad, side, desert). Families welcome too of course! June 29, 6pm. 237 NW 9th St, 237 Northwest 9th Street, Redmond. Free. Cruxapalooza Come celebrate 7 years of community and craft beer with us! You all are such a big part of what makes Crux so special and Cruxaplaooza is our way of saying thank you. We’ll have 30 beers on tap, live bands playing all day and activities to keep everyone entertained. June 29, 11am-10pm. Crux Fermentation Project, 50 SW Division St., Bend. Free. Guest Wineries to The Suttle Lodge

The Suttle Lodge welcomes Oregon and Wash-

ington wine producers to the lake each Wednesday to share their wines. Guest wineries include Abacela, Hundred Suns, Soter, Barnard Griffin, Cooper Mountain, Grochau and more. See website for details. Thursdays, 5-7pm. Through Aug. 29. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters. Contact: 541-638-7001. info@thesuttlelodge.com. Complimentary to adults over 21. Glasses and bottles available for purchase..

Local’s Night Come on down to Bevel Craft

Brewing for $4 beers and food specials from the food carts located out back at The Patio! Tuesdays, 3-9pm. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. Contact: 541-97-BEVEL. holla@bevelbeer.com. Free.

Oregon BBQ Festival The 3rd annual Or-

egon BBQ Festival presented by Nolan Town Center will feature 20 BBQ teams from across the Pacific Northwest competing for $5000 in cash and prizes! Join us and sample the best barbecue in the Northwest! Wild Ride brewing and Oregon Spirit Distillers will be on hand serving drinks. Logan’s Market will be serving up burgers, hot dogs and ice cream! June 29-30, 8am. American Legion Park, 850 W Rimrock Way, Redmond. $10 for public.

Palate Trip If you’ve ever wondered, “Where

can I sample craft beer and amazing wine in Bend, Oregon?” we’ve got the answer. Come on down to Newport Avenue Market and take your palate on a trip every Friday! Check our Friday morning timeline post each week to learn what brews and wines we’ll be tasting. Cheers! Fridays, 3:30-5:30pm. Newport Avenue Market, 1121 NW Newport Ave., Bend.

Pints and Pistons Head down to Porter Brewing for Pints & Pistons, a free cruise-in for cars and motorcycles. Kid-friendly with food and drinks! This is an ongoing event every Sunday over the summer. Sundays, 11am-4pm. Porter Brewing, 611 NE Jackpine Court, #2, Redmond. Contact: 541-504-7959. info@porterbrewingco. com. Free. Shade Tree Brew Tour Brewery Tour! The usual samples are included, of course :). Bottles, growlers and kegs are also for sale, cash or credit cards accepted. ID required too. June 28, 9:30am. Shade Tree Brewing, Deschutes River Woods; call for location, Bend. No cover.


CH

Vodka from Apples Back to Basics for NW FruitObsessed Brandy Distiller

1989 - 2019

Bend’s Premier Hunter Jumper Show July 17 - 21 and 24 - 28, 2019

g 30 Years Celebratin

33

By Lisa Sipe

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

CRAFT

Oregon High Desert Classics

Lisa Sipe

Artwork by Kimry Jelen

Reserve your tickets! A Night at the Classics Saturday Evenings July 20 & 27 This vodka made from apples is not sweet and can still get down and dirty.

Contact: kmorrell@jbarj.org www.oregonhighdesertclassics.org

A

fter studying abroad, Stephen McCarthy had a dream of making some of the products he tasted in Europe—like poire Williams (pear brandy)—in the U.S. He founded Clear Creek Distillery in 1985 and brought the brandy culture to the States. A craft distillery—maybe among the first, as we’ve seen craft spirits come of age—they bottle over 20 spirits, including the pear-in-the-bottle pear brandy. If you were wondering how this magic happens, the distillers tie a bottle to a budding pear in the branches of a tree until the pear is big enough to harvest, then fill the bottle with clear pear brandy. After years of making fruit brandies and liqueurs, Clear Creek Distillery decided to distill vodka after moving its operations from Portland to the orchards of Hood River, and its parent company, Hood River Distillers, bought them a new column still. “It was a while before we could come up with a product worthy of the Clear Creek name,” said National Marketing Manager Jeanine Racht. Sticking with an orchard-to-glass philosophy, their vodka starts with pressed apple cider from Ryan’s Juice (their cider is sold seasonally to consumers at New Seasons and Whole Foods). Clear Creek Distillery’s cider blend contains 14 different heirloom varietals of non-genetically modified organism apples from Hood River and the Yakima Valley in Washington. If making vodka from apples sounds different, it’s not. Vodka can be made with any plant matter high in starch or sugar. Most vodkas on the market today are made from corn, rye, wheat or sorghum. It’s also the norm for distilleries

to purchase neutral grain spirit, a highproof non-flavored alcohol typically produced from a mix of grains to make vodka. Racht says the vodka market is “saturated with subpar product.” She said Clear Creek Distillery vodka is “for people that care about what they put in their mouth.” According to Clear Creek, they sustainably source from local farmers because they want to put money back into their community. It’s important to note that although Clear Creek Distillery vodka is made from apples, it isn’t apple flavored. Racht said depending what you make the vodka with, the flavor comes across a bit. “The essence of a crushed apple blossom, it’s not sweet or Christmas spices, but it has a tartness,” Racht said. “Because it’s not fruity you can still make a dirty martini with it.” Since vodka made from apples isn’t common, I pressed Racht to explain the innovation coming from Clear Creek Distillery. “We’re not trying to change the world, we’re very proud that each product we make has an ancestor,” Racht said. “It’s tied to history and we’re lucky to use our valuable resources.” Those resources are the lush fruits coming from local orchards and the fresh water springs of Mount Hood.  Clear Creek Distillery 304 Oak St., Hood River 541-386-1588 clearcreekdistillery.com

STOCK UP ON ALL Y O U R 4 T H O F J U LY PA RT Y N E E D S !


FILM SHORTS By Jared Rasic ALADDIN: With Guy Ritchie in the director’s chair, here’s hoping he can add some of that “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels” magic to a remake already lacking the brilliance of Robin Williams. Will Smith might be a good choice for the genie, but the special effects look downright ridiculous. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, Redmond Cinema

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

34

ANNA: Luc Besson used to be a good filmmaker. After such stone classics as “The Fifth Element” and “The Professional”, it’s hard not to give him the benefit of the doubt. But after the dreadful, sexist and ignorant “Anna,” he has lost that privilege. Even with a couple very cool action sequences, this movie is a platter of hot garbage pretending to be dessert. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX.

Your Community SEXUAL HEALTH RESOURCE Ask to talk to one of our CERTIFIED ASSOCIATES ♥ Lingerie ♥ Sex Toys ♥ Party Supplies ♥ Costumes & Wigs ♥ Vaporizers ♥ Local Hand Blow Glass Pipes

Your One Stop Adult Fun Shop! ONLINE SHOPPING NOW AVAILABLE! visit www.prettypussycat.com 1341 NE 3rd Street, Bend 541-317-3566

AVENGERS: ENDGAME: After 11 years and

22 movies, the Marvel Cinematic Universe as we’ve come to know it reaches its end. With the amount of hype leveled toward this movie, it’s kind of astounding that the film not only sticks the landing but manages to be an emotional powerhouse for anyone invested in this story. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

BOOKSMART: The funniest and most heartwarming

film of 2019 so far follows a pair of studious high school graduates who decide to go apeshit and party like rock stars before heading off to college. Just a delightful movie from top to bottom. Sisters Movie House.

CHILD’S PLAY: This is a reboot of a franchise

that’s been going strong since 2017’s “Cult of Chucky,” so there’s less of a reason for its existence than your average horror remake. Amazingly, this new “Child’s Play” is a fun bit of horror and hopefully will keep going parallel to the Don Mancini’s shepherded original, still continuing franchise. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX.

DARK PHOENIX: Hey look, another adaptation of the “Dark Phoenix Saga,” a much beloved comic arc from the 1980s. I wonder if they’ll get it right this time? It can’t be worse than “X-Men: The Last Stand,” can it? Oh, sweet summer child. It can always get worse… especially in Hollywood. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX. FRAMING JOHN DELOREAN: A weird hybrid documentary/biopic about the guy who made that car from “Back to the Future” and his brushes with drugs, politics, money and all kinds of other super fun stuff. Such a bizarre ride. Tin Pan Theater GLORIA BELL: Julianne Moore gives one of her finest performances as a woman who finds love at a time where she was searching for anything but something serious. A surprising and heartfelt little movie. Odem Theater Pub GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS:

There’s a lot of really cool monster stuff in this new “Godzilla,” which is a direct sequel to 2014’s “Godzilla” and 2017’s “Kong: Skull Island,” but none of it adds up to a satisfying whole. Really, this movie only exists to set up next year’s “Godzilla vs. Kong” and, because I’m a man-child, I’m much more excited for that than I should be. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

HOTEL MUMBAI: An intense and nail-biting recreation of the terrorist attack against the Taj hotel in Mumbai. Odem Theater Pub JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 - Parabellum: Somehow, the “John Wick” franchise not only keeps getting more epic with its action and violence, but more intimate with Keanu Reeves’ portrayal of the damaged killer. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX LATE NIGHT: You know who’s great? Emma Thompson and Mindy Kaling—together in one movie about changing the diversity in the writ-

er’s room, with a supporting cast featuring John Lithgow, Amy Ryan and “Veep’s” Reid Scott. This might be a must-see. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, Sisters Movie House

MARY MAGDALENE: A film that portrays Mary

Magdalene as an almost-revolutionary and fiercely dedicated apostle. For those not interested in the story, the film is worth watching just to see the always underrated Rooney Mara as Mary and a deeply committed Joaquin Phoenix as Jesus. Sisters Movie House

MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL: If “Thor: Ragnarok” proved anything to us, it’s that the combination of Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson is a delightful one. Sadly, “MiB4” never really cashes in on their chemistry, instead content to coast on uninspired special effects and a very out of touch script. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, Sisters Movie House, Redmond Cinema, Odem Theater Pub SHAFT: Look, more Sam Jackson is always a good thing, but the last “Shaft” movie from 2000 has such iconic villain turns from Christian Bale and Jeffrey Wright that it’s hard to care too much about another trip to this well. But a script from Kenya Barris (the creator of “Blackish”) keeps me cautiously optimistic. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, TEEN SPIRIT: While the film tells a tale we’ve seen many times before, the central performance from Elle Fanning is astounding in this look at what makes a modern Cinderella story. Surprisingly delightful. Sisters Movie House

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM: A docu-

mentary following a couple with 200 acres right outside of Los Angeles as they try to create a sustainable farm. It’s a lovely story and manages to have some truly breathtaking nature cinematography—even though the couple managed to annoy me pretty much all the way through. Odem Odem Theater Pub, Tin Pan Theater

THE DEAD DON’T DIE: Jim Jarmusch is responsible for several near-perfect deconstructions of the Western, the vampire movie and samurai films, so obviously he would have to put his stamp on the zombie genre eventually. With a cast featuring Bill Murray, Tilda Swinton, Adam Driver, Tom Waits, Iggy Pop, Rza, Steve Buscemi and a dozen more, the real question is, why haven’t you seen this yet? Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2: The last one was surprisingly sweet and funny and this one looks like it brings more of the same sense of charm. Kevin Hart as a mildly psychotic bunny rabbit is about the most inspired casting possible, although with a voice cast also including Patton Oswalt, Hannibal Burress and Jenny Slate, the film knows how to play funny. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX THE TOMORROW MAN: John Lithgow and

Blythe Danner play two senior citizens with some dark and eccentric beliefs that mesh perfectly with each other. A surprisingly strange little movie that revels in the things that make us different. Sisters Movie House.

TOY STORY 4: If “Toy Story 3” was about the very

human fear of obsolescence, then “Toy Story 4” focuses on the idea of taking chances in life long past the point where we feel like we have nothing left to offer the world. These movies are dark and sad and weird. I hope Disney and Pixar keep making them— forever. See full review on p35. Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, Sisters Movie House, Redmond Cinema.

 STREAMING THIS WEEK DARK — SEASON TWO After a very long year waiting, Season Two of the strangest German show of all time has returned. The deeply cinematic and addictive show feels like a mashup of “Lost,” “Twin Peaks” and “Silence of the Lambs” if directed by someone on a ton of molly. Already renewed for a third and final season, this is the best show you’re not watching. courtesy IMDb

Now Streaming on Netflix


SC

or Toy? SCREEN Trash Toy Story 4 Embraces Existential Despair By Jared Rasic

Photo courtesy of Disney

35 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

L

ook, Pixar has always been pretty good about finding moments of genuine humanity within their movies about flying houses, sentient toys and cute robots, but they’re masters at unearthing the sadness at the core of the human condition. Animated movies about anthropomorphic toys shouldn’t be so gut wrenchingly honest and upsetting, but here we are. Each of the “Toy Story” movies has had a specific thematic motif that the filmmakers were interested in unearthing. The original focused on the cowboy Woody (voiced with breathtaking humanity by Tom Hanks) being afraid of being replaced by Buzz Lightyear, a new and flashier toy (Tim Allen). That feeling of watching the world pass you by is a universal one, and gave adults something to think about even as kids enjoyed the jokes and animation. “Toy Story 2” explored the ideas of what toys would actually be afraid of: not fulfilling their purpose of being played with by children. This beautifully mirrors the very human fear of not living up to our potential, and just existing without truly living. Then “Toy Story 3” got dark, exploring our fears of death through a meditation on loss and love. Just like J.K. Rowling did with her “Harry Potter” novels, the “Toy Story” franchise grew up with the kids it served, telling stories made to get children to ask their parents the big questions. Even though “Toy Story 3” seemed like the perfect ending to the story of these beloved toys, I can’t imagine the series without No. 4. The film has the darkness of the last entry, but tempers it

Three guesses which of these characters is voiced by Keanu Reeves.

with a powerful message that most live action films can’t even pull off, let alone a cartoon about children’s toys. There are so many layers to the ideas in “Toy Story 4” that audiences can basically take out of it whatever they feel like putting in. Whether it’s the bittersweet love story or the bleak look at mental illness and suicide. Or, a kid can watch it and just think it’s colorful and funny and ignore any of the thematic goo. The physical scale of the series shrinks, as most of “Toy Story 4” takes place in an antique store next to a carnival, but the emotional scale encompasses stuff like the acceptance of mortality

and whether people who are emotionally broken can accept being loved. There’s a spork whose only purpose is to throw himself in the trash and die, and a little toy girl who was a factory defect so has never been loved by a child. Buzz is starting to feel incapable of original thought while Woody still hasn’t gotten over Andy giving him to another child. None of these toys can move on, instead they’re stuck in a feedback loop of diminishing prospects, desperate for a future that gets more remote every day. All of this might sound extremely heavy for children, but most of the kids in the screening I saw were laughing all the

way through. It’s a fun movie filled with inventive action, photo-realistic animation and beautiful moments of friendship and love. All the dark stuff is aimed at the big kids who are wrestling with these questions already. There’s nothing too mature here that will destroy your kid…unless you’re uncomfortable with them asking why you’re crying.

Toy Story 4

A ¯

Dir. Josh Cooley Grade: AOld Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, Sisters Movie House, Redmond Cinema

FREE ADMISSION SAVE 20%-50%

on your favorite loca l businesses Purchase discount gift certificates online at perks.bendsource.com

SISTERS ROUND UP OF GEMS CREEKSIDE PARK JULY 4TH, 5TH & 6TH 504 SO. LOCUST ST. SISTERS, OREGON


CENTRAL OREGON’S

LARGEST Golf & Culinary Event

SUMMER SPECIALS

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

36

pronghorn resort

|

bend, oregon

August 9-10, 2019 DINNER TICKETS

$125 PP

All inclus ive

PARTYof theYEAR OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Experience cuisine from up to 15 of the best chefs, spirits, wine, beer from GoodLife and Deschutes and much more. In addition, we welcome renowned magician Joel Ward from Los Angeles to help us celebrate the 35th anniversary of Saxon’s Fine Jewelers. » » » » » » »

Lake Las Vegas Resort, Las Vegas, NV - Guest Chef The Porter Hotel - Portland, OR - Guest Chef Bonta Natural Artisan Gelato - Bend, OR Chi Chinese & Sushi Bar - Bend, OR Crossroads BBQ Pit & Pub - Bend, OR Deschutes Brewery - Bend, OR Foxtail Bakeshop - Bend, OR

» » » » » » »

GoodLife Brewing - Bend, OR La Magie Bakery Cafe - Bend, OR Level 2 - Bend, OR Life & Time - Bend, OR Pronghorn Resort - Bend, OR Rio Mexican Cuisine - Sisters, OR Tetherow Resort - Bend, OR & More.

www.GhostTreeInvitational.com 541-410-0361

541-383-3722 eastsidegardensinc.com

61780 SE 27th Bend

rs

e lf

Thank you Community Partners for supporting our Nonprofits

T O G E T H E R

W E

s

o er G & lf r o e Fo n-g lik A o N

SUBARUOFBEND.COM

C A N

Visit us at www.WhatIfWeCould.com or download the app at


O

OUTSIDE

Eyes in the Sky

Low-tech fire lookouts remain a key tool in finding fires before they spread By Caitlin Richmond

visitors, they’re scanning the horizon looking for “smokes,” while also listening to the dispatch radio, which broadcasts 16 other channels. Since they don’t often see actual flames from their position on the mountaintops, they’re primarily looking for the telltale smoke. When they see it, they follow a specific protocol. To pinpoint the fire, the first thing they do is use an Osborne Fire Finder— basically a giant compass, sometimes with a scope attached. They record the latitude and longitude, then fill out a smoke report sheet, which includes weather and how that affects fire behavior. Then they call into dispatch, explains Rachel Lindgren, who also works at the Lava Butte lookout tower. “We spot, plot and then give the report to dispatch,” Hodgson says. “They decide what action to take, and we act as incident command until someone gets to the scene, since we’re the eyes in the sky.” These steps—especially the first step of noticing the fire—are key to keeping fires small. Oftentimes, when lookouts see a fire, it’s still small—about the size of a campfire. By getting people to the scene of a small fire, the lookouts are saving time and money. Technology such as satellites can’t see the wispy plumes of smoke from a small fire—so by the time a fire would show up on a satellite it could be an acre large and spreading, Hodgson said. Many variables affect how quickly a fire spreads, but one of the biggest is wind speed. If a fire has moved up into the crowns of trees in a 30-mile-per-hour wind, that’s the same speed at which the

37 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

I

Courtesy Joey Hodgson

n a time when technology is taking over, the team managing the Deschutes National Forest still does some things the old-fashioned way. In addition to airplanes and helicopters, fire lookout towers are a critical part of finding fires early. “It’s all about early detection,” says Joey Hodgson, a Forest Service employee who’s been a lookout for 24 years. “We don’t have the time between when we see the fire and when we call it in that we did 10 years ago, and there is a lot more at risk these days than there was 20 years ago.” Fire detection these days is almost a competition between the lookouts, people patrolling from the air, commercial aircrafts and the public, Hodgson says. The outcome is the same whoever calls it in, but that competition provides an added incentive for lookouts to be attentive at all times. “It’s a low-stress and high-stress job,” he explains. “Sometimes nothing goes on for a while, but when there is a fire, you’re incident command and there is no room for a mistake. People’s livelihoods depend on you.” Hodgson says the job of a lookout is often romanticized, but it’s not for everyone. He works primarily at the Lava Butte lookout tower, one that receives a lot of visitors due to its proximity to Bend and the Lava Lands Visitor Center. Other lookout towers, however, receive very few visitors. Some people like the solitary nature of the job, but others, like Hodgson, appreciate the company. When Hodgson and the other lookouts aren’t answering questions from

The Round Mountain fire lookout.

fire will grow, according to Hodgson. That was one of the reasons why the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire in the Columbia River Gorge spread so rapidly—the blustery Gorge acted like a wind funnel. Despite the pressure and constant vigilance required for the job, Hodgson loves it. He appreciates the expansive views and enjoys working in part of a system that he considers an important part of Oregon’s history. “People think of something like the Oregon Trail as a big part of Oregon culture, but I think these places are just as special,” he says. “The forest means so many different things to different

Get your life back in focus. With the most advanced surgical techniques for cataract and LASIK surgery, Dr. Ida Alul and Dr. Patricia Buehler will help you say goodbye to your glasses or contacts — and hello to the beauty around you. infocus-eyecare.com / 541-318-8388 Patricia Buehler, MD . Ida Alul, MD . Meryl Sundy, MD . Winter Lewis, OD . Elizabeth Potvin, OD . Emily Karben, OD

people, so it needs to be preserved for different generations.” Most of the lookout towers were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s and haven’t changed much since. They’re part of the National Historic Register, and Hodgson hopes they, along with other historic Forest Service buildings, will continue to be used far into the future. For those interested in visiting a fire lookout tower, Hodgson suggests the tower at Lava Butte, because it’s the closest tower to Bend and has an interpreter stationed at the top to give people information.  


BEND’S LOCAL INDEPENDENT OUTDOOR RETAILER

OUTDOOR RESEARCH PATAGONIA PETZL RAB PRANA MERRELL SMARTWOOL THERMAREST METOLIUS SALEWA SCARPA SEA TO SUMMIT OBOZ MOUNTAIN HARDWEAR HYDRO FLASK ZEAL MONTRAIL ARC’TERYX FIVETEN GARMONT KEEN LA SPORTIVA MAMMUT DARN TOUGH OSPREY CHACO SMITH

FOR THE WATER, FOR THE TRAIL, & EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN! WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

38 Bend’s #1 Climbing Shop & Outdoor Retailer

OUTSIDE EVENTS ATHLETIC EVENTS “Follow Your Ablis” Scavenger Hunt

We are giving away 4 free bikes throughout the month of June! Clues for the scavenger hunt will be posted on Instagram @abliscbd starting Monday, June 3rd. Happy Hunting! Mondays. Through July 1. Crater Lake Spirits Downtown Tasting Room, 1024 Northwest Bond Street, Bend. Free.

Bend Area Running Community (BARF) Mondays, 5:30pm. AVID Cider Co., 900

SE Wilson St., Bend. Contact: bendarearunningfraternity@gmail.com. Free.

Bend Babes Brew & Running Crew

All paces welcome! Thursdays, 5:30pm. City of Bend, contact for more info, . Contact: b3runningcrew@gmail.com.

Challenge of Champions Challenge

834 NW Colorado Ave, Bend 541-388-0688 www.mountainsupplybend.com

Monday - Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 10am-5pm

of Champions Bull Riding comes to La Pine! Gates open at 4pm.Senior Discount $10. Children 6 and under are free. July 4, 6:30-11pm. La Pine Rodeo Grounds, Third & Walker Street, La Pine. $14.

Chicks in Bowls Ladies’ Night Wednes-

Central Oregon’s One Stop Cannabis Super Store

days, 7-9pm. Bearings Skateboard Academy, 615 SE Glenwood Drive, Bend. $10.

CORK Thursday Run Join us for a run from

3-5 miles. Stay afterward for a drink and food. All ability levels welcome along with friendly on leash dogs. Thursdays, 6-7:30pm. Spoken Moto, 310 SW Industrial Way, Bend. Free.

Crux Fermentation 5k Fun Run Partici-

pants walk, jog, or run approximately 3.1 miles, then drink beer! Everyone receives a craft brew, and collectors pint glass or seasonal swag item. June 29, 11am. Crux Fermentation Project, 50 SW Division St., Bend. $0-$40.

LARGEST SELECTION OF CANNABIS

CONCENTRATES, EDIBLES, GLASS AND ACCESSORIES AT THE LOWEST PRICES. REPRESENTING THE BEST GROWERS, PROCESSORS AND ARTISTS IN THE STATE.

NOW OFFERING FLOWER AS LOW AS $2.75 PER GRAM — OUT THE DOOR INCLUDING TAX —

Hours: M-S 8:30am-10pm Sunday 8:30am-9pm

2205 NE Division Street 541-550-7325

Dodgeball Night Thursday night hangout starts at 6pm. Dinner is available for purchase at $5 per person or $20 per family. (Proceeds go to Honduras) This is an all age / family event and there will be activities for everyone. No dogs or alcohol. June 27, 6pm. Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Rd, Bend. Free. Pacific Crest Endurance Sport Festival Go online to find more info on each event, pricing and daily schedules: https://whyracingevents.com/pacific-crest-endurance/ June 28-30. Sunriver, various locations, Sunriver.

Redmond Running Group Run Find the Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook for weekly run details. Saturdays, 8am. City of Redmond, Redmond, Or., Redmond. Contact: rundanorun1985@gmail.com.

Rise and Run Tuesdays, 5am. FootZone, 842 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: colton.gale@gmail. com. Free.

Saturday Coffee Run Saturdays, 9am. FootZone, 842 NW Wall St., Bend. Contact: michelle@footzonebend.com. Free.

BAR & GRILL

EVERYBODY’S BAR

Happy Hour Everyday 3-6pm 642 NW Franklin , Downtown Bend @JCs_Bar_Bend jcsbend.com

Walk Up Pilot Butte Tuesdays, 8-9am. Pilot Butte State Park, Pilot Butte State Park, Bend. Contact: 503-446-0803. jess@jessbfit.com.

OUTDOOR EVENTS Basic Skills Paddleboarding on the Deschutes River 10am-Noon-Sundays,

9-11am, Sundays, 9-11am and Sundays, 10amNoon Through Sept. 29. Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 SW Industrial Way Suite 6, Bend. Contact: 541-317-9407. topher@tumalocreek. com. $55.

BMX Practice and Racing Weekly

Monday open practice 5:30-7:30pm $5. Weds. Practice 5:30-6:30pm Racing 6:45pm $8. Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30pm. Through Oct. 30. High Desert BMX, 21690 Neff Rd., Bend. Contact: nickhighdesertbmx@gmail.com. $5 for Practice, $8 for Racing.

Brace & Roll (3 hour) Kayaking Clinic Thursdays, 6-8pm. Through Sept. 12. Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 SW Industrial Way Suite 6, Bend. Contact: 541-317-9407. topher@ tumalocreek.com. $35.

Climb til Sunset Reservation and some

experience required. Wednesdays, 3:30-8pm. Through July 24. Smith Rock State Park - Welcome Center, 10087 NE Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne. Contact: 541-318-7170. info@ goclimbing.com. $85 person, $75- 2 sessions, $65 - 3 sessions.

Electric Bike Test Rides Call ahead to

reserve a bike 541-410-7408. Wednesdays, 9:3010:30am. Through Sept. 30. Bend Electric Bikes, 223 NW Hill St., Bend. Contact: 541-410-7408. info@bendelectricbikes.com. Free.

Intro to Rock Climbing Learn the basics of outside rock climbing and belaying at Smith Rock State Park with Chockstone Climbing Guides. Sat, June 15, 8am-Noon and Sat, June 29, 8am-Noon. Smith Rock State Park - Welcome Center, 10087 NE Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne. Contact: info@goclimbing.com. $85. Lake Billy Chinook Sunset Kayaking Tour Fri, June 28, 6-11pm, Fri, July

12, 6-11pm, Fri, July 26, 6-11pm, Fri, Aug. 9, 6-11pm and Fri, Aug. 23, 6-11pm. Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 SW Industrial Way Suite 6, Bend. Contact: 541-317-9407. topher@tumalocreek.com. $95.

Learn to Play the Game of Petanque with Gary Bigham his social game is ideal for Sunriver’s warm summer days! June 26, 10am. Fort Rock Park, 57515 East Cascade Road, Sunriver.

Raptors of the Desert Sky May 25-Sept. 2, 11:30am. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. $3/members, $5/non-members. Scout Camp Trail Wildflower Hike June

29, 8am. Scout Camp Trailhead, SW Scout Camp Trail Road, Terrebonne.

South Canyon Deschutes River Trail (Bend) Hike June 27, 10am. Various Locations - Bend, Bend, Bend. Free, RSVP online.

Steelhead Falls Wildflower Hike. Meet at the Steelhead Falls Trailhead parking lot at 9am. July 2, 8am. Steelhead Falls Trailhead, River Road, Terrebonne.

Steens Mountain Camping Trip Join Wanderlust Tours’ professional naturalist guides on a camping tour of Oregon’s remote Steens Mountain & Alvord Desert! This will be an epic journey 3-day, 2-night camping experience with interpretive trips into the beautiful landscape, and delicious meals from Wild Oregon Foods. Runs July 1-3, & July 5-7. Mon, July 1, 8am-5pm and Fri, July 5, 8am-5pm. Wanderlust Tours, 61535 S Hwy 97, Bend. Contact: 541-389-8359. info@wanderlusttours.com. $1,100/per person. SUP Sundowner on the Deschutes River Mondays, 6-8pm. Through Aug. 26.

Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 SW Industrial Way Suite 6, Bend. Contact: 541-317-9407. Topher@tumalocreek.com. $25.

Ten Best Hikes Near Sunriver, Where to Go and What to Bring with Dan Hilburn July 3, 4pm. Sunriver Library, Venture

Lane, Sunriver.

Weed Warriors Work Party, Indian Ford Meadow Preserve Weed Warriors

is a volunteer group that meets three times a month to remove invasive weeds like mullein, spotted knapweed, teasel, and Canada thistle from the Land Trust protected lands. July 2, 9am.


N A T U R A L

O

W O R L D

No, Really, We Do Need Bugs Insects are vital to life as we know it By Jim Anderson Victor Berthelesdorf)

A once-in-a-lifetime photo from a good friend over in the Valley: A crab spider taking advantage of a wasp visiting a flower for pollen, while another tiny arthropod hides in a petal.

forms of life on Earth. Insects and their partners are nearly irreplaceable to the reproduction of most flowering plants — including many fruits, vegetables,

extinct over the next few decades. This is not only here in North America, but in Eastern Europe as well. We cannot allow that to happen! I

Before you grab up the chemical spray to remove some kind of plant or creepy-crawly that annoys you, stop and think how long that stuff will be in the soil and what will happen to our insect life in the long run—especially when it reaches the water table. and nuts, in addition to insects and their allies, which are food for birds, fish, and other animals. They filter water and keep our rivers and streams pristine, and they clean up waste from plants and animals. Insects are indisputably the most important creatures on Earth, but they and the other invertebrates are in trouble. One recent review published by the science of entomology estimated that, if losses continue at current rates, over 40% of the world’s insect species may go

Big Day Coming Up? We can help! 15% off of your first colonic! Call us at 541-979-9900

www.HydroBend.com

know this sounds like Hollywood stuff, but it’s an indisputable scientific fact: If you like to eat potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes and other veggies, you must save the insects that pollinate them. There’s no time to wait. We need to act now. Large, connected natural lands such as national forests, Bureau of Land Management lands and freshwater systems act as reservoirs for insects—but they’re not enough. We must also address conservation in farmlands and urban areas. Please, before you grab up the chemical

spray to remove some kind of plant or creepy-crawly that annoys you, stop and think how long that stuff will be in the soil and what will happen to our insect life in the long run — especially when it reaches the water table. Approximately 40% of global land use is devoted to agriculture and 55% of people live in towns and cities. Roadsides, parks and gardens are providing important habitat for insects and other invertebrates. The fiasco involving the Oregon Department of Transportation and the death of hundreds of trees along Hwy. 20 outside Sisters is an environmental warning of what can happen when chemicals are applied to the land without understanding the circumstance of such actions. Herbicides can be deadly if applied without caution. Just the loss of the insects that depend on the plants destroyed by herbicides can cause irreversible harm for life on earth. Please, Good People, listen to the promptings of the man who studied the earth and its life systems his entire life, Aldo Leopold. His “Land Ethic” brings to life the fact that humans have a responsibility to be aware and understand all life around us. Local libraries stock Leopold’s book, “A Sand County Almanac”— please read it and act responsibly to ensure a sense of balance in our Earth. In that light, please be kind to our world of invertebrates. Even with all the years we’ve been living with them, we still have a long way to go in understanding their role in the welfare of man and the Earth. If you go to the Xerces Society  website (xerces.org) a science-based nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitats, you will be starting down the trail of Aldo Leopold’s work and understanding your role in helping the Earth survive man’s errors. 

39 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

T

he links between insects and a healthy environment are so vital to life as we know it, they should be taught in kindergarten so that everyone learns the facts at an early age. You can thank an insect pollinator for one out of every three mouthfuls of food you eat— which is what makes spraying chemicals to kill insects in an apple orchard so deadly. Without insects to pollinate fruit crops you don’t get healthy fruit to eat. Sure, those black flies, the biters in the “No-see-‘em” group, can drive you nuts while you’re fly fishing, but your grilled salmon dinner would have been impossible without them and the other aquatic invertebrates that young fish eat. Nearly all of our native songbirds raise their young on insects, even quail and other seed-eaters. The swallows that nest in those clever little wooden boxes we put up to help them keep their numbers up are completely dependent on insects to stay alive—many of which we spray deadly chemicals to kill, such as mosquitoes. Unless you’ve seen the films regarding the food of grizzly bears, this is going to be tough to believe, but without tiny cutworm moths to eat, bears wouldn’t make it. It’s the fat in the insects’ tissues that keeps the bears alive as they sleep though the winter. In Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks, grizzly bears consume up to 40,000 cutworm moths a day. However, the elements driving climate change have been raising the temperature of the air surrounding the mountains to the point where the plants that keep the moths going have died in the lower elevations. Without those moths it will eventually be, “So long, grizzly bears,” along with the various interrelated food chains within their ecosystem. This is a scientific fact: With well over 1 million known species, insects and other invertebrates eclipse all other


REAL ESTATE SPACIOUS HOME NEAR RIVER TRAIL MODERN NWX HOME 3044 NW River Trail Pl. 2200 NW Newport Hills Dr.

ADVERTISE IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION ADVERTISE@BENDSOURCE.COM

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

40 Spacious home located steps away from the Deschutes river trail. Great room floor plan w/ entertainer’s kitchen & main level office. Master suite, 2 addt’l beds & large bonus/4th bed upstairs. Low maint. yard w/ covered patio. Live the Central Oregon dream in this $639,000 immaculate home.

Beautiful home boasts open floor plan w/ 4beds, 3 baths + bonus room & 3 car garage w/master & guest room on the main level. Lovely outdoor living space off the great room plus a fully fenced, low maintenance back yard. $998,000

1.10 ACRE LOT IN THE PARKS 61430 Cultus Lake Ct

PREMIUM WESTSIDE LOCATION 915 NW Saginaw Ave

Rare 1.10 acre lot at The Parks at Broken Top on Bend’s westside. Gentle slope perfect for your dream home in a highly desirable neighborhood. Enjoy parks, community pool & central location to westside $465,000 amenities.

Terry Skjersaa

Principal Broker, CRS

Jason Boone

Principal Broker, CRIS

Sunny & bright located in a great location across from Hillside Park, close to Newport corridor & downtown Bend. 4bed/2.5ba + loft, 2 car garage & south facing deck overlooking landscaped yard.

$635,000

Mollie Hogan

Principal Broker, CRS

SINGLE LEVEL IN THE BRIDGES 61022 Ambassador Dr.

Single level Pahlisch home in The Bridges features great room & chef’s kitchen, 3bd, 3ba, office & 3-car garage. Covered backyard deck, paver patio, garden & bocce ball court. Community pool, club house, gym, $599,900 indoor basketball & trails.

TUMALO SMALL ACREAGE 1840 Tumalo Reservoir Rd.

Stunning Cascade Mountain views on 7.4 acres w/4.5 acres of irrigation. Spacious 2728 SQFT split-level home with all 4 beds on the ground level. Several outbuildings, including large barn w/ 3 stalls & extra cover on both sides provides endless opportunities for animals, hobbies, RVs & storage. $689,999

Cole Billings Broker

Skjersaa Group | Duke Warner Realty 1033 NW Newport Ave. Bend, OR 97703

541.383.1426

www.SkjersaaGroup.com

n ow S h ow i n g

by

Powell Butte

Colleen Dillingham

8915 SW Pokegama Dr. • Panoramic mountain views • Contemporary Neal Huston designed home • 5 BR, 2.5 Bath Master on Main • Beautiful woods used in the home • Wonderful ambience & good feng shui • 4.6 Acre lush landscaping, greenhouse • 30 min to Costco 15 min to RDM airport • Feel like you’re on vacation every day.

Offered at $769,000

Bend

Offered at $975,000

1491 NW Promontory Dr. • 4080 sq ft. 3 BR , 3.5 Bath • Main floor living. Beautiful SE views from expansive deck • Enjoy outdoor living, the sunrise and SE views from expansive decks! • 4 car garage and shop. 1.05 Acre – very quiet and beautiful setting • Home office or bonus room with outside entrance • Home is move-in-ready • So many amenities – 3 Fireplaces, radiant floor heat and more

Colleen Dillingham 541-788-9991

colleendillingham@gmail.com

61653 27th St, Bend • $349,500 PRICE REDUCTION

OPEN SAT 10-12

Craftsman-style, single level 4 bd 2 ba home, features open floor plan and vaulted ceilings. Over-sized fenced lot with views of Mt. Bachelor from the back patio. RV parking. Master suite includes large walk-in closet and bathroom with waterproof LVT flooring, high-end fixtures and dual sinks. ADA accessibility. Great location near schools, shopping and medical facilities. Priced to sell. Great home or investment property.

21141 Reed Market Rd, Bend • $385,000

OPEN SAT 1-3

Recently updated 3 bed 2 bath home on oversized city lot. Brand new roof and recently hooked up to city sewer. Brand new appliances and hot water heater. Centrally located with new deck and fenced yard.

55311 Zagt Lane, Bend • $539,995 Located on secluded 4.77 acres just south of Sunriver. 2302 sq ft home with 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bathrooms. W/newer updated addition that includes updated bathrooms kitchen and master bedroom. Several out buildings including: garage, green house, and RV carport. 20 mins to Bend, 5 minutes to the Big Deschutes River

61378 Geary Drive, Bend • $344,995 Energy Star and Earth Advantage Certified 3 bd 2 ba craftsman-style home located on landscaped lot in SE Bend. Quiet street minutes away from shopping. Spacious livingroom, kitchen with pantry and island. Over-sized master bedroom with vaulted ceilings. Extra room for office or bonus room. Forced air/AC upstairs. Mitsubishi ductless heat/AC downstairs. Covered front porch and back deck.

Tony Levison Broker 541.977.1852

alevison@me.com

Jamie Garza Broker 541.788.0860

CENTRAL OREGON

JamieGarza@windermere.com

550 NW FRANKLIN AVENUE, SUITE 108, BEND

695 SW Mill View Way Suite 100 • Bend • www.Alevison.withwre.com


REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

REAL ESTATE

Coming Soon 354 SE LEE LANE $344,900 on 2 privacy fenced RM lots 1038 sf with basement, NGFA SS appliances, carport. Mary Gemba 541.771.8947 Deschutes Realty 541.330.1700

41

DUAL MASTER, IDEAL FAMILY HOME 4 BEDROOM/3.5 BATHS | 2,230 SQFT $411,000

COMING SOON

Misty Rupe, Broker 503-991-3233 Misty.Rupe@myluckyhouse.com

STRATFORD COURT CONDO/TOWNHOME $249,900

2 bedroom/2 baths | 1,000 sqft. Light and bright open oor plan. All appliances included. Large master with double closets and a linen closet. Front window looks out on beautiful common space and condo backs onto Kiwanis Park. Contact Misty or Bonnie for appointment to view. Bonnie Varner, Principal Broker 541-788-3485 Bonnie.Varner@myluckyhouse.com

Misty Rupe, Broker 503-991-3233 Misty.Rupe@myluckyhouse.com

A Larger Toolbox Gives Me More Ways To Say “YES!� Tracia Larimer MORTGAGE BROKER

NMLS# 1507306

Azara Mortgage, LLC

NMLS#1577943

(541) 241-8344

�ristin

J9'1Jnter

Real Estate Broker/ Licensed in Oregon

christinhunter@windermere.com 541.306.0479 christinhunter.com

<.ďż˝ Windermere REAL ESTATE

Otis Craig

695 SW Mill View Way, Suite 100 Bend, OR 97702

Broker, CRS

 Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x201A;Â&#x201A; Â&#x2122; Â&#x161;Â&#x203A;Â&#x153;Â&#x17E; Â&#x;Â&#x201A; Â&#x2122; Â&#x161;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2014;Â&#x153;Â&#x201D; 

 Â&#x2026; Â&#x2026;  Â&#x17D;     Â?  Â&#x2DC;

FIND YOUR PLACE IN BEND

www.otiscraig.com

541.771.4824 otis@otiscraig.com

 Get Noticed in our Real Estate Section contact

advertise@bendsource.com

  Â&#x2019;Â&#x2019;  Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D; Â&#x2022;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013; Â&#x2014;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2014;

           Â? Â?  Â?Â?  ­ Â?Â&#x20AC;Â&#x201A;Â&#x20AC; Â&#x192;Â&#x201A;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;

Â&#x2030;Â?Â&#x160;Â&#x201A;Â&#x192;Â&#x160;Â?Â&#x201A;Â Â&#x192;Â&#x201A;  Â&#x2039;

Â?Â?Â&#x152;    Â&#x20AC;Â?­ Â&#x20AC;| Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;.Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2026;

VOLUME 23â&#x20AC;&#x201A;ISSUE 26â&#x20AC;&#x201A;/â&#x20AC;&#x201A;JUNE 27, 2019â&#x20AC;&#x201A; /â&#x20AC;&#x201A; THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Bonnie Varner, Principal Broker 541-788-3485 Bonnie.Varner@myluckyhouse.com

ADVERTISE IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION ADVERTISE@BENDSOURCE.COM

Located near neighborhood parks, close to schools & shopping. Two master bedrooms and family rm/loft area. Tile counters, hardwood floors, built-ins & gas fireplace. Patio & attached garage.


2019

REAL ESTATE

TAKE ME HOME

By Christin J Hunter Licensed broker, Windermere Central Oregon

Frequently Asked Questions in Real Estate Answering the inquiries real estate clients ask

42 WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

W

SATURDAY . AUGUST 10 FULL MARATHON · HALF MARATHON · 6.5 MILE HALF AS

RUN CENTRAL OREGON’S ONLY FULL TRAIL MARATHON

hether buying or selling a home, questions surrounding the process abound. As is a common statement in the vast majority of my columns, the purchase or sale of a property is one the largest investments one will make in their lifetime. As such, there are bound to be a lot of questions. The sales process is exciting, scary and can be strange at times—and I can guarantee never a dull or vanilla process. My colleagues and I field questions daily, and I want to stress: There are no questions not worth asking! As the old adage goes, “The only dumb question, is the question that is not asked.” Are we in another housing bubble? This is a question my colleagues and I get daily. While none of us have a crystal ball, no doubt we wish we do, because who doesn’t wish they were able to predict that their investment was foolproof? No one can answer the question of the future. That said, I can tell you what’s different from the myriad of factors that led to the real estate crash of late 2008 and subsequent years. As a result of the real estate crash we’ve come to know as the “Great Recession,” lending guidelines have changed dramatically. Gone are the days of stated income loans. No longer are the days where a buyer doesn’t have to unequivocally prove with written documentation that they are able to afford the monthly mortgage based on their debt-to-income ratio. Lending guidelines are far stricter than they were some 11 years ago, and these new guidelines, while not fail-safe, do help protect and insulate the real estate market from a rash of encumbered inventory flooding the market, thereby

limiting the chances of another “bubble.” Long story short, so long as the current guidelines stay intact, we will not see another “bubble.” Prices will fluctuate, of course, but to assume that there will be another “2008-2010” market is almost akin to betting that the University of Oregon’s football team will not go to a bowl game in the next five years. Personal Property vs. Fixtures: This is a common question and can also be confusing. A fixture, defined by Merriam-Webster, is property other than real property consisting of things temporary or removable. The most common examples of this in real estate are refrigerators and washer/dryers. These examples are considered to be by Oregon law, personal property. They are not affixed to walls or countertops and are removable/temporary. One of the easiest ways to look at personal property versus a fixture is: can it be unplugged and removed without removing anything that attaches it to the structure? If you’re not sure, ask, and ask again. Your real estate professional is able to answer these questions for you. The last thing anyone wants is to assume on what is included, only to find out that the refrigerator is not a permanent fixture on moving day with a cooler full of perishables. In future issues, I’ll be answering FAQs I receive from clients and would love to hear your questions. Please feel free to contact me with questions you would like for me to address in this column series. Please email me at christinhunter@windermere.com with things you’d like to know about real estate and I’ll be happy to address them in future columns.

HOME PRICE ROUND-UP

Photos and listing info from Central Oregon Multiple Listing Service

<< LOW

3350 NE Collier Court, Bend, OR 97703 4 beds, 2 baths, 1,790 square feet, 0.14 Acres lot Built in 1999 $364,000 Listed by: Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate

MID>>

REGISTER AT HAULINASPEN.COM

1515 NW Kingston Avenue, Bend, OR 97703 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 2,533 square feet, 0.14 acres lot Built in 1996 $819,000 Listed by Alpine Real Estate

<< HIGH

19367 Alianna Loop (Lot 6), Bend, OR 97702 5 beds, 5.5 baths, 4,071 square feet, 0.2 acres lot Built in 2019 $1,499,990 Listed by Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty


SCIENCE ADVICE GODDESS Baptism by Liar

Believing...Again

Well, on the upside, he isn’t afraid to express his feelings. On the downside, if you’re like many women, you prefer your relationships long-form — more Nicholas Sparks’ “The Notebook” than 3M’s “The Post-it Note.” You aren’t the only one on these calls who buys into everything the guy says he has in store for you (and no, I’m not suggesting there’s an FBI agent listening in from a “cable company” van). While this guy is on the phone with you, chances are he believes what he’s telling you — which is to say, deception has a brother, and it’s self-deception. Evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers defines self-deception as “the active misrepresentation of reality to the conscious mind.” As for how the self can end up being “both the deceiver and the deceived,” Trivers and fellow evolutionary researcher William von Hippel explain that our mind seems to have “information-processing biases” that “favor welcome over unwelcome information” in a way that reflects our goals. (Think rose-colored horse blinders.) Trivers and von Hippel note that believing our own hooey helps us sell it to other people: If you aren’t conscious that you’re lying, you won’t be burdened by the mental costs of maintaining “two separate representations of reality” or show physical signs of nervousness at possibly getting caught, such as a higher-pitched voice. Understanding all of this, you should probably go easy on yourself for being a bit of a slow learner on the “fool me twice” thing. If this guy was also putting one over on himself in these phone conversations, that probably made it much more believable to you. Mark him as emotionally toxic and come up with a plan in case he calls again. Options include blocking his number, not picking up, or

Done Juan I went on three or four dates with this dude, and he said it wasn’t really working for him and stopped calling. I’m kind of confused about what went wrong or what put him off. My friends tell me to leave it alone. Doesn’t he owe me more of an explanation for why he isn’t interested anymore, considering we went on multiple dates? — Baffled You are owed: 1. The correct change. 2. Amy Alkon The news that a guy you’ve been dating is no longer interested. Period. It is not his job to tell you that you are, say, bad in bed or have all the table manners of a coyote on recent roadkill. Still, it’s understandable that you’re pining for an explanation. Research by psychologist Daniel Kahneman suggests that being in a state of uncertainty—not knowing what’s what—makes us very uncomfortable. It makes sense that we evolved to feel this way, as going through the world in a state of ignorance would not exactly increase our chances of survival, mating, and passing on our genes: “Oh, what a pretty berry! Here’s hoping it won’t cause violent convulsions and death!” However, there is a way to alleviate the mental itchiness from not knowing, even in cases where there’s no way to know what really happened. You could say that we believe what we think — and especially what we repeatedly think. Studies by memory researcher Elizabeth Loftus find that every time we recall a story (or even something we’re told might have happened to us) it encodes it more deeply in our minds, often to the point where it starts to seem like it actually happened. In line with this, come up with a story for why the guy bailed—ideally one that’s easy on your ego—and tell it to yourself repeatedly. For example, imagine him saying, “I just remembered that I’m emotionally unavailable” or, if that seems a little boring, “Your slight nose whistle is actually endearing, but it seems to have a thing for Dave Matthews covers, and I just can’t stand that band.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Acquire a new personal symbol that thrills your mind and mobilizes your soul. AUGUST: Reconfigure the way you deal with money. Get smarter about your finances. SEPTEMBER: It’s time to expedite your learning. But streetwise education is more useful than formal education. Study the Book of Life. OCTOBER: Ask for more help than you normally do. Aggressively build your support. NOVEMBER: Creativity is your superpower. Reinvent any part of your life that needs a bolt of imaginative ingenuity. DECEMBER: Love and care for what you imagine to be your flaws and liabilities. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Transform something that’s semi-ugly into something that’s useful and winsome. AUGUST: Go to the top of the world and seek a big vision of who you must become. SEPTEMBER: Your instinct for worthy and constructive adventures is impeccable. Trust it. OCTOBER: Be alert for a new teacher with a capacity to teach you precisely what you need to learn. NOVEMBER: Your mind might not guide you perfectly, but your body and soul will. DECEMBER: Fresh hungers and budding fascinations should alert you to the fact that deep in the genius part of your soul, your master plan is changing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: I’d love to see you phase out wishy-washy wishes that keep you distracted from your burning, churning desires. AUGUST: A story that began years ago begins again. Be proactive about changing the themes you’d rather not repeat. SEPTEMBER: Get seriously and daringly creative about living in a more expansive world. OCTOBER: Acquire a new tool or skill that will enable you to carry out your mission more effectively. NOVEMBER: Unanticipated plot twists can help heal old dilemmas about intimacy. DECEMBER: Come up with savvy plans to eliminate bad stress and welcome good stress.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Say this every morning: “The less I have to prove and the fewer people I have to impress, the smarter I’ll be.” AUGUST: Escape an unnecessary limitation. Break an obsolete rule. Override a faded tradition. SEPTEMBER: What kind of “badness” might give your goodness more power? OCTOBER: You’re stronger and freer than you thought you were. Call on your untapped power. NOVEMBER: Narrowing your focus and paring down your options will serve you beautifully. DECEMBER: Replace what’s fake with the Real Thing. S CORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Stretch yourself. Freelance, moonlight, diversify, and expand. AUGUST: Having power over other people is less important than having power over yourself. Manage your passions like a wizard! SEPTEMBER: Ask the big question. And be ready to act expeditiously when you get the big answer. OCTOBER: I think you can arrange for the surge to arrive in manageable installments. Seriously. NOVEMBER: Dare to break barren customs and habits that are obstructing small miracles and cathartic breakthroughs. DECEMBER: Don’t wait around hoping to be given what you need. Instead, go after it. Create it yourself, if necessary.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Can you infuse dark places with your intense light without dimming your intense light? Yes! AUGUST: It’s time for an archetypal Sagittarian jaunt, quest, or pilgrimage. SEPTEMBER: The world around you needs your practical idealism. Be a role model who catalyzes good changes. OCTOBER: Seek out new allies and connections that can help you with your future goals. NOVEMBER: Be open to new and unexpected ideas so as to get

the emotional healing you long for. DECEMBER: Shed old, worn-out self-images. Reinvent yourself. Get to know your depths better.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: You have an enhanced capacity to feel at peace with your body, to not wish it were different from what it naturally is. AUGUST: You can finally solve a riddle you’ve been trying to solve for a long time. SEPTEMBER: Make your imagination work and play twice as hard. Crack open seemingly closed possibilities. OCTOBER: Move up at least one rung on the ladder of success. NOVEMBER: Make yourself more receptive to blessings and help that you have overlooked or ignored. DECEMBER: You’ll learn most from what you leave behind—so leave behind as much as possible. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: I’ll cry one tear for you, then I’ll cheer. AUGUST: Plant seeds in places that hadn’t previously been on your radar. SEPTEMBER: You may seem to take a wrong turn, but it’ll take you where you need to go. OCTOBER: Open your mind and heart as wide as you can. Be receptive to the unexpected. NOVEMBER: I bet you’ll gain a new power, higher rank, or greater privilege. DECEMBER: Send out feelers to new arrivals who may be potential helpers. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Your creative powers are at a peak. Use them with flair. AUGUST: Wean yourself from pretend feelings and artificial motivations and inauthentic communications. SEPTEMBER: If you want to have greater impact and more influence, you can. Make it happen! OCTOBER: Love is weird but good. Trust the odd journey it takes you on. NOVEMBER: If you cultivate an appreciation for paradox, your paradoxical goals will succeed. DECEMBER: Set firm deadlines. Have fun disciplining yourself.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Discipline your inner flame. Use your radiance constructively. Your theme is controlled fire. AUGUST: Release yourself from dwelling on what’s amiss or off-kilter. Find the inspiration to focus on what’s right and good. SEPTEMBER: Pay your dues with joy and gratitude. Work hard in service to your beautiful dreams. OCTOBER: You can undo your attractions to “gratifications” that aren’t really very gratifying. NOVEMBER: Your allies can become even better allies. Ask them for more. DECEMBER: Be alert for unrecognized value and hidden resources. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: If you choose to play one of life’s trickier games, you must get trickier yourself. AUGUST: Shedding irrelevant theories and unlearning old approaches will pave the way for creative breakthroughs. SEPTEMBER: Begin working on a new product or project that will last a long time. OCTOBER: Maybe you don’t need that emotional crutch as much as you thought. NOVEMBER: Explore the intense, perplexing, interesting feelings until you’re cleansed and healed. DECEMBER: Join forces with a new ally and/or deepen an existing alliance. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: It’s time to take fuller advantage of a resource you’ve been neglecting or underestimating. AUGUST: For a limited time only, two plus two equals five. Capitalize on that fact by temporarily becoming a two-plus-two-equals-five type of person. SEPTEMBER: It’s time and you’re ready to discover new keys to fostering interesting intimacy and robust collaboration. OCTOBER: The boundaries are shifting on the map of the heart. That will ultimately be a good thing. NOVEMBER: If you do what you fear, you’ll gain unprecedented power over the fear. DECEMBER: What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Refine and deepen your relationship to it.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave. Suite 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (advicegoddess.com).

© 2019, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Homework: What were the circumstances in   which you were most vigorously alive? FreeWillAstrology.com.

43 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

I was talking with this guy whom I’ve known for over six years who lives a plane ride away. It was late at night on a weekend, and he was saying all this mushy sexy stuff and how he wanted to fly me out to his city, blah, blah, blah. Afterward, he never called or texted again. It’s been weeks now. He’s done this before — come on really hot and heavy and then disappeared. And he doesn’t drink or do drugs, so that isn’t an explanation. Why do men do this? — Feeling Dumb For

figuring out how to control the conversation if he veers off into Sweetnothingsville. On a positive note, it does seem he’s accidentally telling the truth in one area: You do seem to be the woman of his dreams — as you always vanish from his consciousness as soon as he wakes up.

ASTROLOGY  By Rob Brezsny


WELLNESS

* Relationships * Grief * Trauma * Transitions

I strongly believe in each person’s ability to discover their full health potential.

419-3947

Steven Foster-Wexler, LAc 541.330.8283

Acupuncture / Herbs / Massage / Qigong / Addictions

628 NW York Dr., Suite 104

www.bendacupuncture.com

Blue Heron Hypnotherapy Remove blocks to your success and free yourself from limiting habits through hypnosis.

Call for free consultation Cynthia Crossman, CH Ph: 541-233-8695 • www.blueheronhypnosis.me

ADVERTISE@BENDSOURCE.COM

Green Earth Medicine Clinic

OMMP Licensing &

Medical Cannabis Consultations Trust our trained and highly experienced physicians to provide a professional and high quality OMMP licensing experience and provide medical cannabis consultationst to help guide your medical use of cannabis for best results.

Office: 503-272-8781

www.greenearthmedicine.com

COME SEE US AT OUR NEW LOCATION! • HEAL PAIN OR PLANTER FASCIITIS • FLAT FEET OR FALLEN ARCHES • BALL OF FOOT PAIN OR MORTON’S NEUROMA • ACHILLES TENDONITIS • BUNIONS • BACK, HIP & KNEE PAIN

362 NE Dekalb Ave. Bend, OR 97701 541.647.1108 CycleSoles.com

Scott Peterson, C. Ped, CO ABC Certified Pedorthist/Orthotist

COMPOST : GARBAGE OR GARDEN

KEEP COMPOST

COLORFUL Rethink about it!

Are you getting enough browns (dry) and greens (moist) in your compost? Learn more about the best mix for optimum decomposition on our website, just in time for Fall!

RethinkWasteProject.org

Feng Shui in Bend Offering Balance & Soul-utions

Gentle, Effective Health Care

D’Arcy Swanson, MC NCC ADVERTISE IN OUR WELLNESS SECTION

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

44

Couples & Individuals

In Feng Shui using color is a wonderful way to balance all five elements. Tip: Experiment with different colors and notice how you feel. Let your feelings be your guide! Dixie Boggs

Western School of Feng Shui

(541) 389-1226

dixie.fengshuibend@aol.com

LASER TEETH WHITENING

INSTANT RESULTS! $99 Special! ($200 value)

By appointment only. Offer expires 6/30/19

856 NW Bond St #3 Call 541.480.4516

azurasalonspabend.com

Salon & Laser Spa

Call for an appointment & get your teeth 6-10 shades whiter in just 60 minutes!

Ladybug Ladybug Hemp CBD

Hemp CBD

OUR CBD FORMULAS ARE IN BIOPHOTONIC VIOLET GLASS THAT STOPS CBD FROM DEGRADING

IF YOUR CBD IS IN PLASTIC, CLEAR GLASS, AMBER GLASS OR BLUE GLASS YOU ARE LOOSING 4% OF CBD EVERY 10 DAYS. (SCIENCE JOURNAL 2017) JUST ONE OF MANY REASONS TO BUY LADYBUG’S TRUSTED FORMULAS.

1 COUPON $10 OFF PER PERSON Expires 7/7/19 Cannot be combined with other discounts. Must present coupon at time of purchase.

Hours NE Greenwood Ave (541) 389-2228 727 MWTFS 10am-5:30pm Next to Planet Fitness Sunday 12-4pm ladybughemp.com by product of Sher-Ray, inc.


HEALTH & WELLNESS EVENTS Barre Class Please bring a water bottle

Breathe - a weekly contemplative prayer gathering We read scripture, a poem or a short essay to focus our hearts, then enter a time of silent prayer. It’s a powerful way to quiet the mind and connect with our Creator. Tuesdays, 11:30am-Noon Through Aug. 27. Bend Church United Methodist, 680 NW Bond St, Bend. Contact: 541-382-1672. julie.bendchurch@gmail.com. Free.

Breathwork with Gong Sound Healing Breathwork is a purely experiential thing that’s different for everybody and different every time you do it, so it’s impossible to describe but one thing is guaranteed and that is that you will feel completely different than how you felt when you came in. It’s undeniable. June 28, 7pm. Boys & Girls Clubs of Bend, 500 Northwest Wall Street, Bend. $25.

Community Healing Flow A gentle flow class by donation, which go to a local charity each month. Fridays, 4-5:15pm. Bend Community Healing Center, 155 SW Century Drive, Suite 133, Bend. By donation.

Essential Tibetan Buddhism An informal talk offering a general introduction to Tibetan or Vajrayana Buddhism, led by Natural Mind Dharma Center director Michael Stevens. First Monday of every month, 7-9pm. Natural Mind Dharma Center, 345 SW Century Drive, Suite 2, Bend. Contact: info@naturalminddharma.org. Free. Free Presentation: Food Intolerance Testing for Adults and Children Dr. Stephanie Auerbach, ND, offers a free presentation on Food Intolerance Testing. So many adults/children have undiagnosable symptoms that could, in fact, be as simple as a need to avoid a particular allergen. Learn about your options in test diagnostics and why this is a life-changing decision. June 27, 6-7pm. Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 NW Louisiana Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-330-0334. Free.

Free Presentation: Food Intolerance Testing for Children/Adults Join Dr. Stephanie Auerbach, ND, for a free presentation on Food Intolerance Testing for children and adults. So many people, often children, are having undiagnosed symptoms that could, in fact, be as simple as a need to avoid a particular allergen. Learn about your options for test diagnostics. June 27, 6-7pm. Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 NW Louisiana Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-330-0334. info@hawthorncenter.com. Free.

Gyrokinesis The Gyrokinesis Method is a movement method that addresses the entire body. This class will benefit all levels of fitness and is a great modality to help improve range of motion, coordination, flexibility and mobilization of the joints to make every day movements easier! BYO mat. Thursdays, 9:30-10:45am. The Blissful Heart ~ Crystal Sanctuary, 45 NW Greeley Ave., Bend. Contact: 760-271-3272. angela@blissful-heart.com. $15/class, first class is free.

Living Funeral Ceremony The Living Funeral Ceremony is an intensely personal and transformative experience intended to spur serious reflection about mortality and life priorities. The event offers opportunity to face mortality directly, write one’s final words and experience a death visualization meditation. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required at: https://form.jotform.com/91416324469157 June 29, 6-9pm. Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 NW Louisiana Ave., Bend. Contact: 208-571-0042. cheryl@deathdoulahandinhand. com. $45-$75.

45

AUGUST 23rd & 24th

Qigong Plus Qigong is a movement medi-

THEATERBEND.COM

tation that enhances one’s own ability to heal, maintains health and opens new pathways to being, using breathing, sound, movements, concentration, massage, meditation. Sunday class by appointment only until Spring. Signed for hearing impaired. Contact Dawn Song, text or email only. Sundays, 12:30-1:30pm and Wednesdays, 1:30-3pm. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, 61980 Skyline Ranch Road, Bend. Contact: 541-207-7266. dawnsong03@gmail.com. Donations Accepted.

at DRAKE PARK BEND, OREGON

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION

Renewing The Aging Brain Complex disorders like memory impairment, Alzheimers and dementia often result from a multitude of factors including; inflammation, blood sugar imbalances, toxins, hormone imbalance, decreased oxygen to the brain, and not enough activation or stimulation to the brain. June 27, 6pm. Hanes Chiropractic Wellness Center & The Center For Functional Medicine, 446 Northwest 3rd Street, Prineville. Free.

DIRECTED AND CHOREOGRAPHED BY MICHELLE MEJASKI

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY

BOOK BY

JERRY HERMAN HARVEY FIERSTEIN

Restorative and Gentle/Slow flow YOGA Monday Evening Restorative in the tradition of Judith Lasiter Tuesday Morning Slow Flow in the tradition of Kripalu Yoga Compassionately taught by Suzanne E-RYT Kripalu School of Yoga and Health. www. BendCommunityHealing.com Mondays, 5:306:45pm and Tuesdays, 9:30-10:45am. Bend Community Healing Center, 155 SW Century Drive, Suite 133, Bend. Contact: 240-498-1471. info@bendcommunityhealing.com. First class/ free, 5pack intro/$40.

BASED ON THE PLAY

BY JEAN POIRET

Mark your calendar!

July 26th - 28th Childr Festiven’s al

N i g h ts G low

Tai Chi Taiji classes with Dr. Rob Neilson at Hawthorn are in the Yang style of Taiji. The movements practiced are appropriate for people of all ages, and stages of physical fitness. Tuesdays, 8-9am. Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 NW Louisiana Ave., Bend. Contact: robsneilson@gmail.com. Free. Tai Chi For Health Instructor Maureen Benet. Certified by Dr. Paul Lam. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 8:15-9:15am. OREGON TAI CHI, 1350 SE Reed Mkt Rd Ste 102, Bend. Contact: 541-389-5015. First class free. Vin/Yin Yoga Mondays-Thursdays, 3pm. First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St., Bend. Contact: 541-420-1587. By donation.

Yoga An hour of yoga with Shawn Anzaldo. BYO yoga mat. Thursdays, Noon-1pm. Princess Athletic, 945 NW Wall St., Suite 150, Bend. Free.

Zen Discussion & Meditation A weekly lay-led Dharma discussion and meditation (zazen). Open to all. Does not meet 12/24 or or 1/31. For more info, contact Tom. Mondays, 6-8:30pm. St. Helen’s Hall - Trinity Episcopal, 231 NW Idaho St., Bend. Contact: 541-3826651. Free.

Lau

PRESENTED BY

n ch

es

SEE MORE DETAILS AT:

BALLOONSOVERBEND.COM

CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BENDTICKET.COM

VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

& yoga mat. Barre Above® fuses the best of Pilates, yoga, aerobics, and elements of the strengthening exercises dancers do. Thursdays, 8:30-9:30am. Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 NW Newport Ave, Bend. Contact: 541-410-2826. info@synchronicitywellnesscenter.com. First class free, $14 drop in, $45 for 5 class pass.


smokesignals@bendsource.com

SMOKE SIGNALS

Oregon is Ready to Get the Nation High WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 27, 2019 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

46

Some progress at the state and federal level; locally, however, another denial By Jeremy Dickman

O

regon’s weed industry has many enemies. From the Drug Enforcement Agency, to the U.S. Justice Department, to local-government hostiles who perpetuate reefer-madness myths, to an endless parade of complicated regulations and taxes; it’s a scary world out there for pot proprietors. But the biggest enemy may be a result of the sticky icky itself: Oversupply. Market analysts believe Oregon cannabis supply outpaces demand by double, meaning there is a surplus of 2.3 million pounds of marijuana from last year’s harvest alone. Unfortunately, there is very little to be done—within the bounds of the law—to cure that problem. Marijuana’s status as a Schedule 1 narcotic makes it verboten to smuggle the plant across state lines, even if the destination is California, Washington or Nevada—all states bordering Oregon that have passed laws legalizing recreational marijuana. Luckily, a progressive legislature in Salem is making sure Oregon will be poised to take advantage of nationwide demand, should the federal government come to its senses and legalize cannabis on the federal level. Earlier this month, the Oregon House passed SB 582, which creates a legal framework for marijuana licensees in Oregon to export marijuana to proprietors in other states where the plant is legal to possess, process and sell. Gov. Kate Brown, always a vocal proponent of Oregon’s marijuana industry, is poised to sign it into law, perhaps before you read these words. The nuts and bolts of the law are, so far, pretty simple. The legislation authorizes the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to enact regulations to track and trace the export or import of marijuana upon a change in either federal law, or federal Department of Justice policy. Even a memorandum from the Justice Department “allowing or tolerating the interstate transfer of marijuana items between authorized marijuana-related businesses” would trigger the legislation. That said, even the Cole Memorandum—the Obama-era DOJ memo that told the feds to stand down in the face of state law concerning marijuana businesses—expressly forbade the interstate transfer of marijuana items. Accordingly, don’t expect anything short of a new U.S. president and an official Drug Enforcement Administration blessing to make Oregon the nation’s Idaho potatoes of weed. Marijuana scores its biggest congressional win ever On June 20, Congress approved a rider within an appropriations bill for

the 2020 fiscal year budget that would prohibit the federal government from interfering with the marijuana industry in states where recreational sale is legal. A bipartisan majority voted 267-165 to prevent the Department of Justice from enforcing parts of the Controlled Substances Act against Oregon, Washington, California, Colorado and the other states and federal territories where adult-use legislation has been passed. This passage was probably seen as inevitable. A similar bill in 2015 came up just nine votes short, and in the four years hence, the number of states passing adult-use laws has doubled. This means far more congressional representatives have constituents who stand to benefit from less federal enforcement. It’s a clear sign that, yes, state “laboratories of democracy” can, indeed, wag the federal dog and inch us closer to the end of prohibition. Still, the rider may face doom in a Senate dominated by Republicans. (While 41 GOP members supported it, most House Republicans voted against the rider.) More marijuana legislation is snaking its way through Washington, D.C., including a spending bill that would protect banks from enforcement by the feds if they work with cannabis companies, and bills giving veterans more access to cannabis medicine/counseling through the Veterans Administration. Tumalo dispensary blocked … for now In a public hearing June 19, the Deschutes County Commissioners ratified a denial of a marijuana retail application proposed for Tumalo, with Commissioner Phil Henderson phoning into the meeting specifically to cast his voice-vote to adopt the denial. Commissioner Tony DeBone was clear in his opposition. “I said my piece a few times,” DeBone said. “I do not approve the way this document was written.” Acting Chairperson Patti Adair voted with Henderson, as usual. The denial centrally located itself to the problem of an easement dispute between the dispensary applicant and a neighbor—a disagreement they believed was headed for civil litigation. But the truth is that land-use officials don’t typically opine on how they feel potential civil litigation would be resolved with respect to a conditional use … unless morally objectionable devil’s lettuce is weighing heavily on their conscience. The fact that Henderson telephoned in for this vote—and no others—speaks volumes.


THE REC ROOM Crossword

“Boss Words”

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

Pearl’s Puzzle

Difficulty Level

★★

We’re Local!

© Pearl Stark mathpuzzlesgames.com/quodoku

Fill in every row, column, and 3x3 box with each of the letters exactly once.

H I K E R

S O U P

The highlighted letters read left to right and top to bottom will complete the quote:

“I'm a marvelous ___er — every time I leave a man, I _____ his ____."” — Zsa Zsa Gabor

ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S PUZZLES

ACROSS 1. Screaming at the top of one’s lungs 6. “Drop what you’re doing” letters 10. Recent grads who might be future CEOs 14. Milton who was banned from “SNL” 15. Maker of the Z4 and G7 phones 16. “A-Hunting We Will Go” composer Thomas 17. House coverings made of stone 19. Skater’s jump 20. Prods on 21. One likely to have shot down a US drone last week 23. Polished off 24. Brawny rivals 28. Sporty Spice 30. Pakistani president of the 1980s 31. Bibliography information 32. Scheduled to arrive 35. Gospel singer Campbell 37. Ten gallon hat wearer 38. Does some cardio, say 42. Philadelphia Union org. 43. Envelope for Gmail, e.g. 44. The “S” in “DOS,”: Abbr. 45. What a captcha proves you are not 47. With it 49. Silicate used in capacitors 53. It’s half on staff 57. Kip : UK :: ___ : USA 58. Cool-headedness 59. Delta figure? 61. Ice chunk 62. Trick or treat container? 65. Beginning drawing class 66. Grabbed 67. Black Panther Bobby 68. League: Abbr. 69. Confessional fodder 70. “___ to us”

DOWN 1. FBI operation that inspired “American Hustle” 2. Pertain (to) 3. Big name in cold sore relief 4. Countertenor 5. Lively dances 6. Israeli author of “Elsewhere, Perhaps” 7. “... you were saying?” 8. Anti-arson org. 9. Set forth 10. Where to spend kwacha 11. She’s just not fair 12. Greater or Lesser isles 13. Speaks, loosely 18. Red button on a smartphone camera 22. It’ll have you going round in circles 25. Hollywood blockbuster that had the working title “Planet Ice” 26. Booty 27. Booty 29. Cracked copy of Photoshop 6.0 holder, maybe 33. QB nicknamed “The Golden Arm” 34. Window-closing key 36. Rejections 38. They’re played for laughs during credits 39. Openings in computers 40. Salmon fish 41. Belief 42. Bride’s title 46. (0, 0) on a graph 48. Ab strengthening exercise 50. Having some drinks, say 51. King of pop 52. Tops 54. Egg containers 55. One for Merkel 56. New and exciting 60. Unoccupied 61. Bleat it 63. Ornamental fish 64. Tiny charge carrier

“A vacation is having nothing to do and all day to do it."” — Robert Orben

47 VOLUME 23 ISSUE 26 / JUNE 27, 2019  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

©2017 Brendan Emmett Quigley (www.brendanemmettquigley.com)

Questions, comments or suggestions for our local puzzle guru? Email Pearl Stark at pearl@bendsource.com


Get in the Sunriver state of mind.

800-354-1632 | SunriverResort.com |

PLAY PXG FOR A DAY

CELEBRATE FREEDOM IN STYLE

DESCHUTES COUNTY RESIDENT SPECIAL

4TH OF JULY

Complimentary PXG rental set with paid full greens fee. Greens fees starting at $50 (includes golf cart). Offer based on availability through June 30.

5K Fun Run | Bike Decorating | Bike Parade Live Music and more! Festivities starting at 8:15am.

FLOAT THE SCENIC DESCHUTES RIVER

COMPLIMENTARY TREATMENT WITH STAY

$35 DESCHUTES COUNTY RESIDENT SPECIAL

$99 SPA-CATION GETAWAY FOR TWO

Enjoy a scenic 6-mile float from Sunriver Marina. Your choice of canoe, kayak or SUP for $35/watercraft. Includes parking, shuttle, paddles and life jackets.

Book a room at Sunriver Resort starting at $99 per person and get a free 50 minute massage, facial or manicure-pedicure (a $278 value) at Sage Springs Club & Spa!

Profile for The Source Weekly

Source Weekly  

June 27, 2019 issue

Source Weekly  

June 27, 2019 issue

Advertisement