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INDEPENDENT FREE

CULT U R A L

J O U R N A L I S M

July 2018 Scotland Issue 154

WE LOOK AT THE THREATS FACING TWO OF SCOTLAND'S MOST IMPORTANT LIVE VENUES

Music BODEGA Phantastic Ferniture Sneaky Pete's is 10 Love Letters Chuchoter EXCLUSIVE Edinburgh Book Festival's Unbound programme Film Ethan Hawke Kevin Macdonald Female voices in film criticism

DON'T STOP THE MUSIC

Clubs Ribeka Afrodeutsche Theatre Tetra-Decathlon Books Olivia Laing Comedy Siân Davies Fringe Dog Art 2018 degree shows

MUSIC | FILM | CLUBS | THEATRE | ART | BOOKS | COMEDY | TRAVEL | FOOD & DRINK | INTERSECTIONS | LISTINGS


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Photo: Roosa Päivänsalo

P.54 Tetra-Decathlon

July 2018

Issue 154, July 2018 © Radge Media Ltd. Get in touch: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, 1.9 1st Floor Tower, Techcube, Summerhall, 1 Summerhall Pl, Edinburgh, EH9 1PL The Skinny is Scotland's largest independent entertainment & listings magazine, and offers a wide range of advertising packages and affordable ways to promote your business. Get in touch to find out more.

E: sales@theskinny.co.uk All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher.

Printed by Mortons Print Limited, Horncastle ABC verified Jan – Dec 2017: 25,825

printed on 100% recycled paper

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Contents

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Art Editor Books Editor Clubs Editor Comedy Editor Events Editor Film & DVD Editor Food Editor Intersections Editor Music Editor Theatre Editor Travel Editor

Rosamund West Adam Benmakhlouf Heather McDaid Michael Lawson Ben Venables Nadia Younes Jamie Dunn Peter Simpson Kate Pasola Tallah Brash Amy Taylor Paul Mitchell

Production Production Manager Designer

Sarah Donley Fiona Hunter

Sales Sales Manager Sales Executives

Sandy Park George Sully Keith Allan David Hammond

Online Digital Editor Acting Digital Editor Online Journalist Web Developer

Peter Simpson Nimita Bhatt Jamie Dunn Stuart Spencer

Bookkeeping & Accounts Publisher

Rebecca Sweeney Sophie Kyle

THE SKINNY

Photo: Mihaela Bodlovic

P.28 Chef 's Table at Wilderness Festival

P.21 Whitney

Credit: JustineTrickett

P. 11 Car Seat Headrest


Contents Chat & Opinion: Welcome! Here’s an 06  intro to this month’s mag, a precis of what’s to be found on the website, our Shot of the Month and the triumphant return of The Skinny on Tour. Heads Up: A day-by-day guide to the 08  month ahead. All killer, no filler. FEATURES the Save Leith Walk campaign keeps 10 As up the fight, we chat to grassroots venue Leith Depot about this month’s week-long celebration of live music.

11

F ollowing the O2 ABC fire, a look back on the history and memories of the venue, and a hopeful glance towards its possible future.

12

Ethan Hawke discusses his role as a priest facing an existential crisis in First Reformed, the new film from Taxi Driver scribe Paul Schrader.

14 New York post-punks BODEGA tackle the mundanity of modern life on Endless Scroll; we get the lowdown from Ben Hozie and Nikki Belfiglio.

27 Food & Drink: A look at the world of

non-alcoholic craft drinks; a selection of music festivals with dead good food at them; a selection of foodie events for your perusal.

38 Intersections: Cataloguing the high

street’s failures at 'socially conscious' clothing, and a look at media representations of Borderline Personality Disorder.

UNBOUND Book Festival’s late-night 29 Edinburgh strand is back! Roland Gulliver explains

the concept, Ross Sutherland & Damian Barr talk literary podcasts, Dracula battles Frankenstein’s Monster, and Sabrina Mahfouz heads Out-Spoken Press’ spoken word line-up. Plus the exclusive reveal of this year’s full Unbound programme.

REVIEW

41 Music: All-round good time emporium

Sneaky Pete’s celebrates its 10th birthday; meet the Love Letters zine and feminist pop duo Chuchoter; plus our take on the month’s albums and the gigs to catch this month.

Julia Jacklin takes a sideways step from 15 her confessional folk sound with the ga-

46 Clubs: Ribeka on juggling day jobs,

16 Olivia Laing on new novel Crudo, com-

50 Books: A look at July’s new releases, and

rage-pop of Phantastic Ferniture – we talk to Jacklin and bandmate Elizabeth Hughes. bining the heady/terrifying events of summer 2017 with the prose of punk novelist Kathy Acker.

round up the best of this year’s 18 We Degree Shows from Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, Gray’s School of Art and Duncan of Jordanstone.

20 We need more female voices in film criticism. ‘Nuff said really.

21

 evin Macdonald on digging into the K past of a pop icon for his latest musical biopic, Whitney.

Get ready for the 25th anniversary of the 22 Rock Trust Sleep Out with stories from past participants; Siân Davies introduces her showcase of working-class comedians making a crowdfunded run at the Fringe.

With a month until its return, a look at 24 the mental health strain the Edinburgh Fringe puts on its participants.

side-hustles and her growing role as one of Glasgow’s best club DJs, a chat to Afrodeutsche ahead of her slot at Skye Live and our clubbing highlights for July. a guide to the month’s poetry and spoken word events.

51 Art: Reviews of current exhibitions

at GoMA and DCA, and our pick of the month ahead.

52 Film & TV: Pin Cushion, Terminal and

Incredibles 2 all arrive on the big screen in July. At home, pick from Highland thriller Calibre or Karate Kid update Cobra Kai.

54 Theatre: Lauren Hendry on making theatre out of the 14-event Tetra-Decathalon, plus our theatre picks.

55 Comedy: Fringe Dog stumbles upon the truth behind comedy reviews (spoiler: sad critics give bad scores)

57 Listings: What’s on in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee.

63 Our Local Heroes column returns to the

topic of collaboration with some notable team-ups from across Scottish art and design.

LIFESTYLE

25 Travel: An intrepid explorer heads up a

Japanese hill, thinks he’s heard a bear, comes back down again in pant-wetting terror.

July 2018

Contents

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W

elcome to the July issue, also known as my last issue until 2019. I’m off on maternity leave as of today, leaving the magazine in the very capable hands of our Digital Editor Peter Simpson who will presumably spend the rest of the year turning The Skinny into a hip-hop / food monthly. I’m looking forward to seeing what happens with it – I’ve never had the privilege of reading a copy of The Skinny that I’ve had nothing to do with so I’ll be eagerly awaiting the autumn issues, providing of course my brain is still functioning sufficiently to read what with all the sleep deprivation and crying I’ve been told to look forward to. In the issue at hand, it cannot have escaped your notice that many of Scotland’s favourite venues are under threat of closure. In Edinburgh, the threat often derives from greedy property developers coupled with stringent council restrictions that shut down any sort of loud-ish noises / joy (apart from in the Festival of course, when anything goes as long as you give us your money thanks). See the abrupt curtailment of Summerhall’s Rip It Up festival just last month for a classic example. Right now, the Leith Depot is under notice for a multi-million pound property development but the locals aren’t giving up without a fight. We take a closer look at the Save Leith Walk campaign, and the artists who’re fighting back to preserve a place for live music in the heart of the community. Alongside this, we celebrate Glasgow’s ABC, damaged by a threat of a different kind. It’s a special venue, long a core part of the city’s leisure life. I remember going to see Robin Hood Prince of Thieves there with my grandma, long before it became the music venue with the giant disco ball we all know and love. Hopefully this loss, at least, is temporary. Elsewhere in Music, we meet Ben Hozie and Nikki Belfiglio of Brooklyn post-punk five-piece BODEGA to hear about their debut album, Endless Scroll. Julia Jacklin introduces her new band Phantastic Ferniture, formed in a whisky-fuelled haze in a Sydney pizza place; we celebrate Sneaky Pete’s 10th birthday by posing ten questions to

COVER ARTIST Joe Rampley is a freelance graphic artist & illustrator based in South West London, UK.

The Skinny on Tour

the owner; we meet the co-editor of Glasgow zine Love Letters; and Edinburgh duo Chuchoter drop by to talk feminism and safe spaces. In Film, about to enter its annual recovery phase after all the excitement of Edinburgh Film Festival, we meet Ethan Hawke who’s keen to tell us why he likes to keep things eclectic, careerwise. Kevin Macdonald introduces Whitney, his much-anticipated documentary about the tragic megastar. We also look at the lack of female voices within film criticism, and discuss what this means on an industry and publication level. We are not innocent of gender imbalance in this area, but we’re working to improve it. Art is also in recovery, after spending a couple of months running around degree shows across the country attempting to take in the overwhelming wealth of creative talent Scotland produces each year. We’ve distilled our reviews of each of the country’s main art schools down for the print publication – head to the website for the full length versions, and keep an eye on future editions for our Showcase top picks from each institution. The Rock Trust is celebrating its 25th birthday, and looking for former Sleep Out participants to share their stories for a special exhibition. We meet a few of those they’ve already found on p22. In Books, we meet Olivia Laing to share the fascinating process behind her eagerly-awaited first novel Crudo. The magazine closes with this month’s design focus, as our correspondent examines some of the collaborative ventures which have developed already in 2018. As is traditonal in July, we also have the special privilege of being the first to release the programme for Unbound, Edinburgh International Book Festival’s late night series of free events held in their newly-expanded Spiegeltent from 12-27 August. Turn to the centre pages for our pull-out-and-keep guide featuring full event listings, an in-depth focus on a few of their many highlights and some particularly vibrant illustrations. I’m away now – see you next year. [Rosamund West]

Yes, it’s the return of everyone’s favourite geography-based observation game: The Skinny On Tour! To restart things, here’s a snap of our Run the Jewels cover next to some lovely old Northern European architecture and frankly excessive tram lines and bike lanes. All looks very flat, too. Can you identify the location in which The Skinny is On Tour? Send your guesses in to competitions@theskinny.co.uk – one lucky entrant will receive a copy of The Changeling by Victor LaValle courtesy of the globe-trotters at Canongate Books. Send your shots of The Skinny in various exotic locations to news@theskinny.co.uk

By Jock Mooney

Editorial

Shot of the Month

Camila Cabello, O2 Academy, Glasgow, 5 Jun, by Alexandros Costa

A recent graduate, he studied at Blackpool & The Fylde College, gaining a Foundation Diploma in Art & Design (Fine Art), and Liverpool School of Art, gaining a BA Hons Degree in Graphic Design & Illustration. Rampley specialises in minimalist illustration, with a strong link to place and structure. He takes inspiration from what he sees around him, and is captivated by structure and form, colour and shadow.

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Chat

THE SKINNY


Competitions

Online Only

Win tickets to the Festival 2018 Opening Party We’ve a pair of tickets to give away for The Great Big Opening Party on 1 August with The Ayoub Sisters, C Duncan, Sacred Paws and The Elephant Sessions plus fireworks and guest appearances. To be in with a chance of winning, simply head over to theskinny.co.uk/competitions and answer this question: Glasgow is a UNESCO City of what? a) Music b) Design c) Literature Competition closes midnight Fri 20 Jul. Winners will be notified via email within one working days of closing and required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. Our Ts&Cs can be found at theskinny.co.uk/about/terms

EH-FM

Highland thriller Calibre Ahead of winning the Michael Powell award at this year’s Edinburgh Film Festival, we sat down with Edinburgh-based director Matt Palmer to discuss his nail-biting thriller Calibre. “I was sitting on the sofa one night with my eyes closed, almost half asleep, and I just saw this image in my mind. From there, I very carefully built the film around that image”

Sacred Paws

Win tickets to theatre-circus spectacular Cirque Berserk!

Photo: Derek Robertson

Read the full interview at theskinny.co.uk/film

Introducing EH-FM We talk to the minds behind Edinburgh’s latest radio station EH-FM, which aims to bring together the strands of the city’s creativity on the airwaves. "We want EH-FM to become an inclusive platform for creativity in the city. It seemed with the likes of Sub City in Glasgow and NTS in London, there was a gap in Edinburgh for a focal point for the music and arts scene. We are hoping EH-FM can fill that gap!"

Photo: Chris Scott and Hidden Door

The biggest sporting event in Scotland since the Commonwealth Games is happening in August, but it’s not just about the sport – Festival 2018 is a fun-filled cultural programme running alongside 11 days of sporting activities. Glasgow, a UNESCO City of Music, will be bursting at the seams with festivities for the whole family! Head along and take part at George Square, Merchant City and GO LIVE! on Glasgow Green. There is a fantastic array of events including live music, street performances, outdoor spectaculars, comedy, film, dance, family activities, market stalls, sport come-and-try sessions and delicious food and drink! Discover more at glasgow2018.com/festival

Creepy horror The Secret of Marrowbone The Orphanage writer Sergio G. Sánchez goes behind the camera for this creepy, old-school horror about a family haunted by their past. We spoke to Sánchez and his star, George MacKay, when they visited Edinburgh for the film's UK premiere. Read the full interview at theskinny.co.uk/film

Cult animation with Monkey Dust We look back at wildly inventive animated sketch series Monkey Dust, one of the genre's most overlooked gems. Read the full retrospective at theskinny.co.uk/comedy

Glasgow mumblecore Super November Romantic comedy meets Orwellian dystopia in the Josie Long scripted Super November. Ahead of its screening at monthly indie film night Blueprint, we speak to Super November’s director, Douglas King. Read the full interview at theskinny.co.uk/film

Read the full interview at theskinny.co.uk/music

To be in with a chance of winning tickets to see this spectacular show, all you have to do is head over to theskinny.co.uk/competitions and answer this question: What is the name of the hair-raising, legendary motorcycle act in Cirque Berserk!? a) Sphere of Terror b) Globe of Death c) Circle of Doom

Find more at theskinny.co.uk

August Issue out 31 Jul

Competition closes midnight Sun 29 Jul. Winners will be notified via email within one working days of closing and required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. Our Ts&Cs can be found at theskinny.co.uk/about/terms

Rabiya Choudhry, installation view from DCA Thomson, 2016

Photo: Ruth Clark

Britain’s biggest theatre-circus spectacular makes its eagerly anticipated Fringe debut! Showcasing the finest in traditional circus thrills and skills, Cirque Berserk! celebrates the 250th anniversary of the invention of circus by bringing this treasured form of live entertainment bang up-to-date in a jaw-dropping spectacular created especially for the theatre. Combining contemporary cirque-style artistry with adrenaline-fuelled stunt action, this astoundingly talented international troupe includes over 30 acrobats, aerialists, dancers, drummers and daredevil stuntmen. The show also features the world’s most hair-raising circus act, the legendary motorcycle globe of death.

August means festivals, and that means a bumper issue of The Skinny packed with coverage from across the Edinburgh Festivals. Comedy gets existential and charts comic life from conception to death, Theatre explains theatrical terminology and looks at accessibility on the Fringe, Art dives headlong into the Edinburgh Art Festival programme, with an extended interview with Edinburgh painter Rabiya Choudhry. Music looks at Edinburgh International Festival’s Light on the Shore line-up, plus a whole load more. Cirque Berserk

July 2018

Chat

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Tacos and beer on a Wednesday night? Yes, please. Head along to one of two sessions at taco aficionado Bodega’s still reasonably new spot at Tollcross tonight, for the Naranjito Launch Party tonight. You’ll be able to sample Brooklyn Brewery’s new Naranjito Orange Pale Ale and enjoy some delicious food from Bodega’s kitchen – what more could you possibly want? Bodega TollX, Edinburgh, 6pm, £20 Bodega

Mon 9 Jul

Tue 10 Jul

Touring pop-up event, FriendsFest stops in Glasgow, celebrating the TV show that brought us such unforgettable quotes as ‘PIVOT!’, ‘OH. MY. GOD.’ and, of course, ‘How you doin’?’ Relive the 90s classic by stepping inside Monica’s apartment and sipping on coffee in Central Perk, with a new set addition this year of Ross’s apartment. Maybe he’ll be making FAJITAS! Victoria Park, Glasgow, 11am, £27.50

Threatened with possible closure earlier this year, Leith Depot is just one of the venues being supported by the Save Leith Walk campaign, petitioning to prevent its demolition. In support of the group, the Depot are hosting Love Live Music Week, a week-long run of gigs with bands including The Spook School and Pictish Trail set to perform. Leith Depot, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £tbc

Tacita Dean is having a pretty good year, with a trio of solo exhibitions at London’s Royal Academy of Arts, National Portrait Gallery and National Gallery – Landscape, Portrait and Still Life. The Fruitmarket’s celebration of Dean’s work, Woman with a Red Hat takes performance as its theme, in the context of the Edinburgh International Festival. The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, until 30 Sep

Friends

The Spook School

Sat 14 Jul

Looking for a music and arts festival you can take the kids to? Well, familyfriendly festival Doune the Rabbit Hole allows you to do just that. This year’s music line-up includes live performances from the likes of Akala, Temples and The Orielles, as well as DJ sets from Sofay, Sarra Wild and more. Cardross Estate, Port of Monteith, 13-15 Jul, £15-95

With Edinburgh’s Pride celebrations taking place last month, it’s left to Glasgow to pick things up where they left off. Out west they’ve got much bigger things planned, as Glasgow Pride takes over Kelvingrove Park for two days of celebrations, with performances by the likes of Melanie C, Courtney Act and, the one and only, Steps. Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow, 12pm, £5-45

Akala

Photo: Paul Husband

Fri 13 Jul

Credit: Sarah Donley

Sun 8 Jul

Tacita Dean, Event for a Stage Location

Glasgow Pride

Fri 20 Jul

Sat 21 Jul

Were you a Donkey Kong devotee, Sonic the Hedgehog superfan or House of the Dead head (that last one didn’t really work did it)? No matter where your allegiances lie, make sure to pay a visit to the History of Video Games, which returns to Edinburgh this month, with all of the above and about 97 more. FTW n00bz. Ocean Terminal, Edinburgh, until 22 Jul

Ah those trusty folks at The Pitt, consistently bringing us delicious street food down in Leith every weekend, and now helping to jazz up your work lunches too. Setting up shop at Edinburgh Business Park, today is your last chance to treat yourself to a decadent lunch from their Off the Tracks Thursdays spot – for now anyway. Edinburgh Business Park, Edinburgh, 11.30am, free

German duo Smallpeople return to Telfort’s Good Place, having last visited nearly two years ago to the day. Julius Steinhoff and Just von Ahlefeld, aka Dionne, run the Smallville record store and label in Hamburg, as well as the sub label Fuck Reality, and make lovely house music to warm your ears. Smallpeople, small club; good place, good times *thumbs up*. Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, 11pm, £5

Aberdeen’s street art scene is thriving, with Nuart Festival taking place in the city just a few months ago and now with the return of six°north’s annual Street Jam. Scottish artists, including Katie Guthrie, Ugly People and Jenny Hood, will be painting live, while you enjoy a selection of beers from a special tap list and chow down on food provided by Foodstory. six°north, Aberdeen, 2pm, free

Off the Tracks Thursdays

Wed 25 Jul Everything you know about 90s fashion trends – from PVC coats to crucifix necklaces – they all came from The Craft. Burnt Church Film Club are screening the cult film tonight, and actress Rachel True, who played Rochelle, will also be participating in a Q&A. One thing you’ll learn is that witchcraft is really fucking chic. Flying Duck, Glasgow, 7pm, £5-7

The Craft

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Chat

Smallpeople

Thu 26 Jul

Fri 27 Jul

The goth goodness continues, as RuPaul’s Drag Race season 4 winner Sharon Needles brings her Celebrity Morgue show to Scotland – in Dundee tonight and La Belle Angele, Edinburgh the night before. Needles will perform a eulogy of songs from some of her favourite celebrities and make all your goth/ punk rock dreams come true. Church, Dundee, 7pm, £20-45

Pretty much the whole month at King Tut’s is taken up by their King Tut's Summer Nights, which sees a rotating cast of local upstarts take to the legendary stage every night for just over two weeks. Tonight, LUCIA, Walt Disco and Velveteen Riot will all perform, while The Ninth Wave will DJ in between the acts. King Tut's, Glasgow, 8.30pm, £8.80

Sharon Needles

Photo: Producer Entertainment Group

History of Video Games

Photo: Katja Hänninen

Thu 19 Jul

Photo: George Wilson

Wed 18 Jul

Photo: Zan Wimberley

Pride & Prejudice* (*Sort Of)

Credit: Susie Purvis

One month ‘til Fringe alert! You probably want to have a fairly quiet July to prepare for the madness that is August but if not, here are some things we think you should see/do...

Tron Theatre Company and Blood of the Young join forces for this irreverent, all-female adaptation of the Jane Austen classic, Pride & Prejudice. Written by Isobel McArthur and directed by Paul Brotherston, Pride & Prejudice* (*Sort Of) follows five women who all have a story to tell, as they fight over men, money and microphones. Tron Theatre, Glasgow, 7.45pm, £10-15

Street Jam

Walt Disco

THE SKINNY

Photo: Neelam Khan Vela

Compiled by: Nadia Younes

Wed 4 Jul

Credit: Mihaela Bodlovic

Heads Up

Tue 3 Jul


A revived version of their previous work together – CRACK SQUAD OF SITU – Crystalline Chrysalis Crisis is a collaborative project by artist and musician Fritz Welch and producer Holly Knox Yeoman. Located in Summerhall’s Machine Shop, the work responds to the space’s architectural and interior features through wall drawings, videos and sound works. Summerhall, Edinburgh, until 13 Jul

It’s a clubber’s paradise in Glasgow tonight, as good ol’ reliable Subbie bring together Hunee & Sassy J for one big dance. Swiss DJ Sassy J recently warmed up the crowd at Belfast’s AVA Festival before Hunee’s headline set, so the pair are accustomed to sharing the same stage, only this time it’s a much smaller one. It’s gonna get sweaty. Sub Club, Glasgow, 11pm, £15

Part of the Hypermarket series at SWG3, Glasgowbased contemporary art gallery Patricia Fleming Projects bring us an Art Car Boot Sale, where 100 contemporary artists, including Helen de Main, Jim Lambie and Ciara Phillips, will be flogging their works. As is tradition with just about every event these days, there will also be street food, cocktail bars and DJs, because why not? SWG3, Glasgow, 11am, £3

Hunee

Crystalline Chrysalis Crisis

Thu 12 Jul

Since launching with issue #1 in February, independent zine dedicated to femme/non-binary people in music Love Letters is now launching a website, and naturally they’re having a party to celebrate. The stellar line-up includes local supergroup Hairband, Freakwave, 4mina (aka Katie Lynch of ST.MARTiiNS) and LALOLA, as well as DJs Moon Bather and ChipSlut. Nice 'n' Sleazy, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £5

Broadcast Summer Breakdowns returns, offering free entry shows every Thursday for the whole month of July and proving that free doesn’t have to mean shit. Tonight, you can catch a trio of up-and-coming Scottish acts from all across the country, in the form of Dunfermline pop rockers Dancing on Tables, Edinburgh grunge fourpiece CRYSTAL and Glasgow indie lot Gallus. Broadcast, Glasgow, 7pm, free

Photo: Alice Smith

Wed 11 Jul

Hairband

Soulwax

Sun 15 Jul The Dewaele brothers take a break from being 2manydjs and return to their preceding Soulwax moniker. Having released their first album in over a decade last year, the Belgian group clearly caught a bit of a creative bug, returning just over a year later with new album Essential and a series of shows in support. SWG3, Glasgow, 7pm, £24.50

Art Car Boot Sale

CRYSTAL

Mon 16 Jul

Tue 17 Jul

Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival celebrates its 40th year, continuing to showcase acts working in every realm of both genres. Also celebrating an anniversary – but for them their tenth – is Italian group Rumba de Bodas, who return to the festival’s Spiegeltent following a string of sold out shows last year. Prepare for lots of dancing. George Square Spiegeltent, Edinburgh, 6pm, £13

Brian Griffin has shot album covers, single sleeves, posters and press for everyone from Iggy Pop to Kate Bush and is recognised as one of the most influential British photographers of the 70s and 80s. First issued as a book last year, POP showcases Griffin’s music photography, including over 160 record covers from more than 100 bands and musicians. Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, until 16 Sep

Rumba de Bodas

Mon 23 Jul

Tue 24 Jul

To mark the film’s 50th anniversary, The Beatles' Yellow Submarine has been restored, with screenings in cinemas across the UK this month. The animated film is just one of the band’s big screen ventures and received widespread critical acclaim upon its initial release. Sing it with us, 'We all live in a yellow submarine / Yellow submarine / Yellow submarine.' DCA, Dundee, 6pm, £7-9

Back on our TV screens with his new weekly review show, Frankie Boyle’s New World Order, and now testing out new stand-up material, Frankie Boyle will be performing workin-progress shows at The Stand throughout the month. It’s safe to say you can probably expect a mix of belly laughs and shouldI-really-be-laughing-atthis laughs. The Stand, Glasgow, 5.30pm, £12-15

You may have heard of this guy called William Shakespeare. He’s kind of famous, having written plays including Romeo & Juliet and Macbeth. Yeah, that guy. Bard in the Botanics celebrates Shakespeare’s work with a series of productions in Glasgow’s Botanic Gardens in summer and on Tuesdays, tickets are only £12 for each show so basically, just go. Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Glasgow, 8pm, £12

The Beatles Yellow Submarine

Frankie Boyle

Photo: Frankie Boyle

Sun 22 Jul

Kate Bush

Bard in the Botanics

Mon 30 Jul

Clearly feeling a bit nostalgic, Jupiter Artland are launching their new exhibition, Of Landscape Immersion, with a sleepover in the venue’s grounds, and they’ve commissioned Acid Prawn’s Sian Dorrer and Supernormal’s Matilda Strang to create the programme. Jupiter Campout: ROMANTICRASH! will include live music, sound, art, talks and performances from a selection of artists and musicians. Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh, 1pm, £0-40

The weirdest named festival in all of the land, MugStock Festival (presumably a play on the infamous 60s hippie fest Woodstock) returns for its fourth year. The festival of 'music and merriment' will, this year, see performances from bands including Colonel Mustard & The Dijon 5, Kid Canaveral and, the incredibly named, Busker Rhymes. Mugdock Country Park, Milngavnie, 27-30 Jul, £15-85

Do you want to live forever? Do you want to learn how to fly, high? Yep, it’s the all-singing, all-dancing 80s classic, Fame. Keith Jack, Mica Paris and Jorgie Porter star in the 30th anniversary tour of Fame the Musical, following the lives of students at New York’s High School For The Performing Arts. The King’s Theatre, Glasgow 7.30pm, £16.90-56.90

July 2018



Kid Canaveral

Photo: Stephanie Gibson

Sun 29 Jul

Photo: Harrison Reid

Sat 28 Jul

Apostille

Photo: James A. Grant

Sat 7 Jul

Photo: Brian Griffin

Fri 6 Jul

Fame

Chat

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Photo: Tommy Ga Ken Wan

Thu 5 Jul


Sunshine On Leith A multi-million pound development on Edinburgh’s immortal Leith Walk spells disaster for the area’s only local music venue. But promoters and local campaigners aren’t giving up without a party

T

here’s something depressingly ironic about the gentrification of Leith Walk, the iconic strip that connects the port of Leith with Edinburgh’s city centre. Renowned local author Irvine Welsh depicted the process vividly in his 2002 book Porno, which sees his Trainspotting characters respond in various ways to the visible middle class encroachment of the place they grew up in. In real life, it’s Leith’s rich cultural heritage and artistic identity as expressed by the likes of Welsh which makes it so attractive to incoming developers – at least in part. With property prices soaring and long-time residents being ‘priced out,’ it’d be easy to point the finger at some of the cultural ventures that have contributed to Leith’s growing reputation as one of the ‘hippest’ spots to hang out in the country. But many community-led enterprises and artistic hubs have also come under threat – in March, it was revealed that Leith Depot, the only dedicated live music venue in the area, was earmarked to be demolished to make way for student housing and a hotel development. For many locals, enough was enough. The Save Leith Walk campaign was set up in March to oppose the Drum Property firm’s plans to demolish the old red sandstone buildings on the walk, including Leith Depot. The campaigners believe it’s a last stand by a community that is “often ignored” in favour of big time investors building “elite multi-million pound corporate developments.” Leith Depot promoter Ryan Drever, who moved from Glasgow to work at the venue after it opened, believes the campaign has tapped into a sentiment held by the Edinburgh music scene as a whole. He says: “The development represents a wider problem. I know Glasgow is affected by gentrification too, but I think the city celebrates its music scene a little more. It seems weird to me that you’d take an existing popular place and put an unpopular thing in its place. It’s just hard to see how their plans would benefit the community in any way. We felt that was important with Leith Depot – you need to respect these old buildings and make them useful for local people.

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If you want to establish a pub, fine, but why not do what’s needed? “If you’re going to take away local businesses people care about, it affects the wider culture of Edinburgh. It’s not just about us – it’s about Leith Walk and the community. People might not see the cultural significance, but if a community does then you should be paying attention to that if you’re developing. We don’t run the Save Leith Walk campaign but we’re a part of it and support it.” Leith Depot is more than just a trendy restaurant and bar – although it’s not short on veggie options or craft ales. It’s the only space on Leith Walk dedicated to showcasing live music every night, whether it be up-and-coming local acts or small-to-mid-sized touring bands. The owners don’t charge artists or promoters looking to hire out and, crucially, have opened it up for anyone in the local community to use if needed. Having supported the local campaign more widely, running fundraisers, hosting stalls and selling bespoke ‘Save Leith Walk’ merchandise, the venue are now set to host an entire week of live music in mid-July under the banner of Love Live Music Week to raise awareness about the venue itself. Final line-ups are to be announced soon, but those already billed to perform include folk singer Chrissy Barnacle, Meursault frontman Neil Pennycook, Phillip Taylor of Glasgow rockers PAWS, pop collective The Spook School and Johnny Lynch aka Pictish Trail. For Drever, using music to protest was a no-brainer. He says: “Right now, the best thing we can do is be louder and more fun than ever. If what we’re trying to say at a basic level is ‘this place is a fun place to go and hang out and we don’t want it to go’ then we want to throw a party and show that. By organising a whole week, we can make a real event out of it and send a message. “Neil Pennycook was key on this – he knew when all the information about applications being lodged were to be made public and all the key details. Soon, a lot of musicians who were pals of

ours were asking how they could help. We were already planning to do a big fundraiser for St Columba’s Hospice – an all day-festival on 14 July with local bands – so we’re using the whole week to raise awareness about gentrification. Some of the money will go to the campaign and some to charities and causes like Drake Music.” It’s easy to sneer at the Leith Depot case – plucky punk promoters taking on a corporate property giant makes for a great David vs Goliath narrative in isolation. But many artists involved in the campaign genuinely consider the struggle to be symptomatic of a wider conflict between guardians of Scotland’s culture and heritage and the forces of capital seeking to exploit areas using the pretence of regeneration.

“If what we’re trying to say at a basic level is ‘this place is a fun place to go and hang out and we don’t want it to go’ then we want to throw a party and show that” Ryan Drever

Mercury Prize winning trio Young Fathers, who have recorded all their albums in Leith, called the campaign a “flag in the ground” because “all the stuff that makes an area desirable – the mix, the artistic community, the grit, the energy, they all disappear when gentrification happens.” Their call comes in the wake of the clos-

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Interview: Jonathan Rimmer Illustration: Joe Rampley

ure of Edinburgh venues such as Studio 24, Electric Circus Picturehouse and Silk, due to similar developments. However, not all hope is lost. In 2015, Morvern Cunningham initiated the Leith Creative project, which maps all the instances of artistic works and hubs in the area. She estimates that more than 1000 artists and creative businesses operate in Leith, with a far greater number working from home. The research, which now encompasses a huge community engagement programme, suggests there’s still plenty of scope for the community themselves to lead developments going forward. Cunningham says: “The challenge for Leith now is to retain its identity and integrity in the face of rising house prices and increased development in the area. Increased development, in an already densely populated area, is seen as having a negative impact onto already overloaded services and local businesses who are perceived to be under threat. “In terms of the wishes of local people in relation to development, across the board, Leithers are calling for social housing as opposed to more student flats being built in the area. There is a huge strength of feeling with regards to the Stead’s Place proposed developments that will affect local community assets such as Leith Depot and Sikh Sanjog/Punjabi Junction, but these are endemic of a wider issue relating to disempowerment and local people feeling a lack of agency and control over the planning decisions that are made in their communities. “The work that Leith Creative has done to date and campaigns such as Save Leith Walk reflect the huge pride and passion that Leith as a community encapsulates. Its heart is fit to bursting. I have great faith and trust in Leith’s ability to persevere and embrace its challenges. There are great changes ahead, but I am hugely hopeful for Leith’s bright future. Sunshine on Leith...” Love Live Music Week takes place at Leith Depot, Edinburgh, 9-15 Jul leithdepot.com facebook.com/saveleithwalk

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Damage Control After a fire from the neighbouring Glasgow School of Art caused extensive damage to the O2 ABC, we speak to those associated with the venue and look at what makes it so special

Interview: Tony Inglis Photos: Roosa Päivänsalo

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t’s May, and it’s uncharacteristically hot and humid for this to really be Glasgow in spring. But that doesn’t matter: we’re inside a ballroom that has become as familiar to us as our own living room and it’s hot in here anyway, surrounded by hundreds of other people. Car Seat Headrest are on stage playing Talking Heads’ Crosseyed and Painless, and my friends and I are too dazed with excitement to realise that this wasn’t what we expected them to open with. When the band move into prog-pop opus Bodys, from their album Twin Fantasy, we lose our minds. The whole crowd is throbbing. Like the best shows, it’s hard to think of anywhere else you’d rather be. That was the ABC, that inconspicuous ever-present venue on Sauchiehall Street. Just over a month later, it was up in flames. It has become a distressingly familiar tale. That moment of panic when you wake up at some ungodly hour and, as has become routine, turn to your smartphone to scroll through an increasingly desperate set of breaking news tweets. On this particular morning, they tell us the Glasgow School of Art is on fire, again. Four years into a multi-million pound restoration, the unthinkable has happened for a second time, not just to an institution of learning, a landmark, a beautifully constructed building, a place that consistently spits out talented creators like a machine, but also a representation of Glasgow’s imaginative and emotional spirit. It was a few hours until those having a quiet weekend in realised that the toll on this occasion was much worse, with the damage spreading to neighbouring structures, including the O2sponsored ABC venue. Former Delgados member and Chemikal Underground co-founder, Emma Pollock was already in bed when she discovered what had happened. “I was almost asleep when my husband told me about the fire,” she says. “It must have been about 2am. It felt quite unreal, but I couldn’t sleep and went downstairs to try to find out more on the news.” Soon though, the chatter around the Art School overwhelmed the plight of the ABC, and what it had endured threatened to fly under the radar. But as a multitude of artists and writers have scrambled around to declare, the loss of the ABC does not have less of an impact on the cultural ecosystem of Glasgow. It may not be a feat of architectural wonder in the same vein as Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s masterpiece, but it is certainly more than just a place that hosts club nights and concerts. It’s an arbiter of formative experiences, an influence on tastes and attitudes, and a focal point for Glasgow’s vibrant and unrivaled live music scene. There isn’t an outpouring of grief for the loss of just any venue. In a city filled with so many unique spots to see bands, the ABC really stood out. On a purely practical level, it was easy to get to, getting in and out was simple enough (if we disregard cloakroom queues), you could stand anywhere and have the ideal view. And it sounded great. It occupied its own spot in Glasgow’s family of venues. “Many touring and local acts can’t quite fill a Barrowlands or Academy-sized venue, and it is a world-class, high-spec space that is slightly smaller in capacity,” says BBC Radio Scotland, and sometimes 6 Music DJ Vic Galloway. “It means you can see a major act performing in high-class surroundings with a relatively intimate audience. I actually don’t like venues being much

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Car Seat Headrest live at O2 ABC, 18 May

bigger; you lose the edge and intimacy. The ABC had both, but also the production values to put on a really pro gig.” Looking back at that Car Seat Headrest show, the generational importance this brick and mortar holds was never more apparent than that night: young teens with parents, adolescents in high school, students, those in their mid-to-late twenties still finding their way in the world, middle-aged music lovers there for the umpteenth time. And before them, people still came, those who stood in the same spot when it was a cinema, a theatre and even a circus. I recently went along to Slowdive’s show at the ABC on my own, one of my most dearly held bands. The room was full but I might as well have been the only person there. Rachel Goswell and Neil Halstead’s delicate twinned voices; the soaring, otherworldly noise of the guitars; everything seemed to lock in place and amount to perfection. It may have been happenstance that the ABC figures into this memory, or perhaps uniquely faultless shows like this were its forte? Fire has ravaged that place now, but nothing can burn down the memories of allowing your favourite band’s music to envelope you in a room, with countless strangers experiencing the same. And for the nights that it wasn’t hosting renowned bands and artists of all genres, it was the home of long-running club nights catering to all types of people. “The ABC was such a special place to me,” says Christopher Moody, a DJturned-promoter who played there every Friday for three years at the club’s Propaganda night. “I felt as though everyone who entered that space instantly felt at ease, almost like they were home

and were just there to let their hair down and have a super fun night out with no holding back.” Even having gone through so many seminal moments during shows at the ABC, sometimes what stands out is simply slipping on the toilet steps as you run to catch the next great song. Getting drunk and dancing to Mr Brightside seems embarrassingly sad now, but those times are crystallised in the minds of many and are looked back upon fondly. Also overlooked has been the ABC’s importance to the city as a venue accessible to all. Tight basements and steep staircases in many Glasgow venues pose challenges to creating inclusive spaces where people of all needs can enjoy the transcendent experience of gig-going like anyone else and with everyone else. The ABC was a place that strived towards that goal. “We were greatly saddened at the news of the damage sustained by the O2 ABC, who we have worked with for the past six years,” says Gideon Feldman of Attitude is Everything, an organisation which works with venues to make live music accessible to people with disabilities. “They had a commitment to accessibility for deaf and disabled audiences, and it represents around 30 per cent of the city’s physically accessible live music capacity at that scale of venue, so its loss significantly impacts the options available.” The mood from many going forward seems bleak. But it wouldn’t be the first time a popular music venue has come back from the brink after sustaining seemingly irreparable damage. Edinburgh’s Liquid Room was in a similar position when it sustained fire damage nearly ten years

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Car Seat Headrest live at O2 ABC, 18 May

ago, and has since reopened. Its managing director John ‘Mick’ McWilliams has sympathy for what ABC’s owners, staff and regular attendees are going through. “My heart goes out to them, it’s a real shame. From what I’ve seen, it looks totally devastated,” he says. “It’s going to be a long, long journey for the people behind the venue. We’ve been through it for many years now and, to be honest, it’s been one struggle after another. So, it will be a fight – a fight with insurers, a fight to keep the attention of the people who go there.” While many mourn its loss, hopefully temporarily, people behind the scenes are working together to rearrange shows, plan ahead and support the cultural scene it was at the centre of, but the true scale of the damage may not be apparent for many weeks. “There’s no point in any of us not being honest about how shit this situation is,” says the Scottish Music Industry Association’s Robert Kilpatrick, “but Glasgow’s a music city, and it always will be. It’s embedded within us, and is such an intrinsic and special part of our identity.” McWilliams offers a similar glimmer of optimism: “The music scene is better now than it ever has been, and [the] ABC was such a big part of that. The hope is that what will stand in its place in the end will likely be even better than what was there. There is a silver lining, if they can see it through the smoke.” O2 ABC Glasgow are working as quickly as possible to move or reschedule forthcoming events to alternative venues in the city with minimum disruption. Please visit academymusicgroup.com/o2abcglasgow for up-to-date information

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Keeping the Faith Since starring in sci-fi comedy Explorers as a teen, Ethan Hawke has been ubiquitous on our screens. Three decades later he gives perhaps his finest performance yet as a priest going through an existential crisis in Paul Schrader’s First Reformed

Interview: Kelli Weston

First Reformed

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eteran filmmaker Paul Schrader, still best known as the writer of Taxi Driver, but whose own storied directing career includes fantastic but underappreciated titles like Blue Collar, American Gigolo, Light Sleeper and madcap crime picture Dog Eat Dog, is a true Hollywood survivor. His latest drama, First Reformed, is a stark, austere unraveling of faith and extremism with a centrepiece performance from Ethan Hawke as Ernst Toller, the haunted, ailing, whisky-guzzling pastor of First Reformed church. Toller is still grieving the loss of his son, who died in combat and whom Toller encouraged to enlist in the military. Chronicling his thoughts in his own personal book of revelations (while quoting the actual Book of Revelations) in a journal he plans to keep for a year, Toller spends the film wrestling with his convictions and the bureaucracy that keeps his church, with a congregation of barely ten, afloat. If that premise sounds at all familiar, the film quickly whisks its viewers down one surprising path after another until the audience arrives at what will surely go down as one of cinema’s most memorable climaxes. Hawke could not have achieved the longevity he has without consistently delivering weighty performances in roles that have each demanded something different from him. His turn here in First Reformed is nothing short of fascinating; a skilled, masterful performance that all at once requires deep passion and immense restraint. We recently sat down with Hawke to discuss how he prepared for the role and working with Schrader.

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This film is so much more about questions rather than answers. How do you begin to prepare for a character or construct a character that’s full of so much uncertainty and doubt? Ethan Hawke: With a character like this, your life prepares you or you’re never gonna get prepared. In a lot of ways, I felt when I read the script I felt really ready for this part. I was really happy that he sent the script to me because I don’t always feel this way but I felt that I was the right person for this job. One of the opening things in the script talks about the books on Reverend Toller’s desk and they were all books that were really important to me. And I knew like, oh wait, I know this character. I know this guy. In particular, the books of Thomas Merton, which my mother gave me when I was 16. So my life prepared me for this part. What type of film role grants you more freedom as an actor? You bring a real authenticity and sincerity to romantic dramas and romantic comedies, but you also do a lot more serious roles like this. Do you prefer one over the other or do they simply demand different things of you? Well, you know, I really like doing different things. I find it really exciting to put yourself in a position where you’re not sure how it’s gonna go. And so, you know, that’s why I directed a documentary, or I wrote a graphic novel, or I directed a play, or act in Shakespeare then do a horror movie. I like to put myself in situations where I’m not sure what to do. Because it helps it stay fresh for me and helps me maintain my curiosity and my joy. I think

if all I did was play brutal, self-lacerating characters like Reverend Toller, I think I would get really tired. But I think if all I did was light comedy I’d get really bored as well. There’s something I really enjoy over the period of my career, dancing around inside a lot of different kinds of art. And I think that’s what really brings me pleasure. The perfect scenario for me in a lot of ways is the Before trilogy because they’re both light and serious. I enjoy that tone where it’s both things at the same time.

“It's really exciting to put yourself in a position where you’re not sure how it’s gonna go” Ethan Hawke

Can you talk a little bit about how you prepared for First Reformed’s final sequence and what physical and emotional challenges that presented for you while filming? Well, Paul Schrader has a great expression he would say when I would ask him about the end of the movie. He’d say: “A great film starts as you’re walking out of the theater.” And that the importance of the ending is kind of to ring a bell and to

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have that bell vibrate in the audience for as long as possible depending on how well you ring the bell. So a good movie all works up to that final moment. So we put a tremendous amount of thought into it. For me, the whole movie is on this razor’s edge of hope and despair and how those two sides of the same coin interact with each other. I don’t know what to say about it without giving it away, the ending, but one of the joys of working on the movie was working with somebody who so clearly had something they wanted to say and express, and that ending is a big part of what he’s trying to express with the movie. You know, the last thing I’ll say about it is that it really poses the question, an unanswerable question, and I really like that. So many movies try to dictate to you what you’re supposed to say or what you’re supposed to think, and Paul – [doing] what a lot of great writers do – is giving voice to a question that is on the tip of all our tongues. Paul Schrader doesn’t strike us as the most playful guy in the world. Do you have something fun or light to share about working with him? The lightest thing I have to say about Paul Schrader is that the answer to that question is a resounding NO [laughs]. I’ll tell you one thing, the other day we were backstage – we were doing a Q&A for the movie – and Paul has a detached retina that’s hurting him a lot. And the funniest thing he said was, “Well, the good Lord gave me one more good movie and took back his eye!” First Reformed is released by Picturehouse on 13 Jul

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Rock ’n’ Scroll Ben Hozie and Nikki Belfiglio of Brooklyn post-punk five-piece BODEGA tell us about their debut album, Endless Scroll Interview: Nadia Younes

his is new BODEGA song,’ begins Brooklyn five-piece BODEGA’s debut album Endless Scroll. The statement is made by a robotic female voice, which reappears throughout the album in soundbite-style interludes. A robotic male voice also features at one point, reinterpreting lyrics from a Smiths song: ‘I use my computer for everything / Heaven knows I’m miserable now.’ Endless Scroll explores the effects of technology on the modern world through the lens of someone witnessing and living through it, and through a series of sharp, clever and witty observations. The same robotic female voice makes another appearance at the beginning of the music video for single Can’t Knock the Hustle, stating ‘I scroll down the endless scroll / Endlessly scrolling / Endlessly scrolling / Like / Scroll / Like / Click,’ perfectly summing up our relationship with social media. “I think the dichotomy between human and inhuman is important with this band,” says guitarist and vocalist Ben Hozie. “That dichotomy is a big theme of this record and of this band, playing sort of machine music but by people.” Born from the ashes of Hozie and vocalist Nikki Belfiglio’s former band Bodega Bay, this new incarnation features a completely new line-up, bar its co-founders, completed by drummer Montana Simone, guitarist Madison VeldingVandam and bassist Heather Elle. “Ben and I got together one day and talked about all the things that weren’t going right within our personal lives, and within the band that we were in, and sat down and made a venn diagram of everything that we wanted for the future, for ourselves and for the music, and just transitioned over from that to BODEGA,” says Belfiglio. Incorporating traditional punk sounds with more modern electronica alongside biting lyricism, Endless Scroll provides social commentary on the world today and covers everything from the impact of technology to female masturbation. In a post on the band’s Tumblr page (yes, those still exist), Belfiglio explains the track Gyrate: “When I was a little girl I used to masturbate in public (once at a JC Penny perfume counter), not knowing that was wrong. My parents, not wishing to shame me told me I shouldn’t ‘gyrate’ in front of other people. My song uses the language of Top 40 pop to celebrate self-sustainability and female pleasure.” Bookmarks, on the other hand, is an explicit culmination of the album’s main themes, highlighting the mundanity and repetitiveness of daily life. ‘All day at work / Stare at computer / Come back from work / Stare at computer,’ sing Hozie and Belfiglio in a call and response style. “I think the way technology is changing the world is both the biggest moral and ethical issue of our time,” says Hozie. “I think my songwriting has always been kind of about how people are programmed in the bigger philosophical sense, so the metaphor stands quite nicely with technology… you can see it changing the way people think, changing the way people interact with the world, and it’s just ubiquitous. “One of our goals I think is just to deprogramme things,” continues Hozie. “Hopefully, certain things we say or certain gestures we make screw up the algorithm a little bit.” Jack In Titanic is, unsurprisingly, the band’s taking apart of the character of Jack Dawson from the 1997 film Titanic, featuring some Venus In Furs-esque

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BODEGA

slide guitar. ‘And no one is as open but still firm in beliefs quite like me / Except Jack in Titanic / And I’ll tell you that no one shows devotion when they’re down on their knees quite like me / Except maybe Jack in Titanic,’ sings Hozie, breaking down what he describes as “learned male behavior from the movies and LPs.”

“I think the way technology is changing the world is both the biggest moral and ethical issue of our time” Ben Hozie

Recorded and produced by Austin Brown of Parquet Courts on the same Tascam 388 8-track tape his band recorded their second album Light Up Gold on – “one of my favourite recent rock records,” says Hozie – it was also mixed and mastered by the same person as that album, frequent Parquet Courts collaborator Jonathan Schenke. “It wasn’t us trying to sound like that record, it was just kind of having a spiritual, physical connection with that record, having the tapes go through literally the same gears,” says Hozie. Outside of the band, Hozie and Belfiglio also

have their own film production company, Pretorius Pictures, where they’ve each released their own short films – some of which feature other members of BODEGA – and Belfiglio has directed several of the band’s music videos. “It’s just something that I feel is a moral imperative that I do... to be shown, I think it has to be through your own voice and your own vision,” says Belfiglio. “We have tried to use other directors and things before but no one quite understands the exact way of what we’re trying to do, so having a hands-on approach is very much a BODEGA aesthetic.” The band’s interest in technology naturally extends to their music videos too. The video for lead single How Did This Happen? was filmed using VR technology, simulating a show at Brooklyn venue ALPHAVILLE. When viewing the video, you’re able to watch the performance from the band’s perspective as well as the crowd’s, dragging the screen round to whichever angle you wish to witness it from. “Documentary’s a big theme on our record, about us wanting to just show the concrete details of our life, and we were spending probably three or four nights a week at ALPHAVILLE... so we thought we should just literally document it,” says Hozie. “We wanted to kind of show in a jokey matter how non-exciting rock shows are… We’re just pointing out the difference between the mythology and what a rock show actually looks like,” he continues. Belfiglio adds: “Most people don’t even realise it’s an actual conceptualised music video. They really think it’s just a show we played in Brooklyn that we taped.” The video allows you to see the audience how a band sees them from the

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Photo: Mert Gafuroglu

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stage, showing all the different kinds of people that go to gigs: those on their phones, those standing with their arms crossed, those chatting to their friends and so on. “That’s the role music is taking more and more… That’s what streaming services do – it’s music to put on while you study, music to put on while you have sex, music to put on while you’re trying to sleep; music is more and more just becoming utilitarian,” says Hozie. “It’s actually something that we actively try to cut against,” adds Belfiglio. “We have these light boxes that we put in front of the stage and project out to the audience, so we put them on the same stage as we are [and] they feel just as exposed in some senses.” Looking outward as well as inward, on Endless Scroll BODEGA detail modern life in an acute and very funny fashion, ultimately fulfilling their mantra: ‘the best critique is self-critique.’ They openly welcome questions and comments from their fanbase, so much in fact that they even have suggestion boxes at their shows, where you can ask them questions or give the band feedback, and they encourage fans to get in touch with them on their online platforms. “One thing that me and Nikki talked about when we were first starting this band was we wanted to make songs that were critical of ourselves,” says Hozie. “We want to take that same critical lens and apply it to ourselves but I would like to extend that to our hypothetical audience as well... we’re not making music just to please ourselves; that’s half of it, but the other half is we do want to have a communication with people.” Endless Scroll is released on 6 Jul via What’s Your Rupture? bodeganyc.tumblr.com/

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Fernal Phantasy After two years of bringing her brooding brand of indie-folk to audiences around the world, Julia Jacklin is putting old friends and good fun first with Phantastic Ferniture

Interview: Joe Goggins

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but that’s the beauty of a record. I mean, that’s why it’s called a record. It’s a record of an event, a moment in time. There’s something very cool about respecting the choices your past self made, and just letting it be.” That feels like a good summation of the band’s ethos. The key to Phantastic Ferniture, it seems, is steering clear of overthinking any given decision, whether it’s over the record, the shows or, in Jacklin’s case, the lyrics. “I wrote all of them, and I didn’t spend too much time on any of them, in keeping with how everything has operated with this group so far. There’s a handful of songs that I’ve taken out of personal experiences – Gap Year, Bad Timing and Uncomfortable Teenager – but the rest are less considered. I’m just riding on a feeling!” Hughes’ personal favourite line, for what it’s worth, is ‘Mama y Papa Bear said never play with fire.’ “That’s proverb worthy!” she exclaims.

“I never thought I’d have this much trouble spelling ‘furniture’ correctly, but it’s a real headfuck for me. It’s like walking up an escalator when the stairs have stopped moving”

Phantastic Ferniture

“I love shows like that, in dark venues where you can basically just be in the crowd while you’re up there,” Hughes adds. “The stage was really low to the ground and it was pretty packed, and the audience were so close to us. Sometimes Julia would walk out into them while she was singing, or walk onstage halfway through the first song. I think we just felt really connected with the people who’d come to see us. There was less of a definition of us as performers and the crowd as spectators – it was just one big party.” Already, the duo found themselves surpassing the expectations they’d had for the project, which had been slim to none. As Hughes puts it, “there were multiple reasons for that, including the fact that I didn’t think we’d get away with the name for very long.” Fantastic Furniture is a nationwide chain in Australia – no prizes for guessing what they specialise in. “I never thought

I’d get to the point where I’d have this much trouble spelling ‘furniture’ correctly, but it’s a real headfuck for me these days. It’s like walking up an escalator when the stairs have stopped moving.” Still, as the solo commitments began to pile up, the process of putting together a Phantastic Ferniture LP looked more and more as if it was going to represent a logistical nightmare. In the end, it was pieced together, bit by bit, whenever they had some spare time, mostly at a host of studios across Sydney, as well as in Brennan’s living room. Jacklin, meanwhile, cut half of the vocals at The Sitting Room in New Zealand, the same place she made Don’t Let the Kids Win. “It took a while to finish,” Hughes explains. “Just finding days when we were all in Sydney at the same time, and all available, was pretty hard. It’s weird listening back to guitars that I tracked a long time ago. I’d do things pretty differently now,

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Photo: Cate Harman

hen you’re hustling to get heard in the corner of bars, it can make you forget why you might be pushing in the first place. This band felt like some kind of soap cutting through the grease; it was just giving me a moment to remember why I was working so hard for music. Bringing back the joy, really.” Julia Jacklin’s debut solo record, Don’t Let the Kids Win, was one of the breakout successes of 2016 and introduced her to an audience that reached well beyond her native Australia, but it didn’t come easy; she’d spent years prior holding down a day job and playing to whoever would listen by night, around her adopted hometown of Sydney. When you consider that she was dealing in deeply personal folk music, too, you could see the recipe for disillusionment coming a mile off. The challenge of scraping together enough money to decamp to New Zealand to record her album, the inherent difficulties for any Australian artist in cracking the western market, and the emotional toll of spilling out her soul night in, night out were always factors that were going to need to be offset by something a touch lighter. That’s something that bandmate Elizabeth Hughes can relate to: her own solo music is similarly confessional and her one previous joint venture with Jacklin – her best friend, who penned Don’t Let the Kids Win cut Elizabeth for her – again involved forays into introspective territory. Phantastic Ferniture, a group that began as little more than an in-joke, would go on to provide the pair with an ideal tonic for the stresses of their individual careers; their self-titled full-length, released this month, is an irresistibly fun collection of garage-pop stompers, all breezy guitars and loose lyricism. The group came together at Frankie’s Pizza in Sydney in 2014, with Ryan K Brennan and Tom Stephens now rounding out the current line-up. Jacklin’s quickfire recollection of their formation is “too much whisky, birthday celebrations, group huddle, vague plans.” They all deliberately picked up instruments that they weren’t well-versed in, which instantly lowered the stakes for them – “we had no fear of failure after that,” Hughes says. To set themselves a deadline for writing some indie pop songs, they booked what they billed as their first and last gig – their original bass player was about to move to Melbourne. “By the time it swung around,” Hughes recalls, “we had two originals, one cover, and a poster made on Microsoft Paint. The audience was comprised of a few friends, Julia’s mum, and a hitchhiker. All in all, just your average band back story.” As time went by, Jacklin and Hughes began to notice not just how valuable Phantastic Ferniture’s off-the-cuff pop fun was to them personally, but also that a committed local following was burgeoning. “There was a show at the Sly Fox in Enmore,” says Jacklin. “They used to have these live nights that were so great; cheap beer, three bands, and a dancefloor at the end. I just remember playing there and people were singing along to songs that we hadn’t even recorded yet – that just felt so special. It made me see the power in live music, and really appreciate people who make the effort see a local band perform over and over.”

Elizabeth Hughes Phantastic Ferniture will tour the album through Australia this year, although the future for the band beyond that remains unclear. It seems inevitable that it will once again take a backseat to Jacklin and Hughes’ solo work at some point, with both having already finished new albums; Jacklin will also spend September on the road in the US with First Aid Kit. Regardless, though, you suspect that Phantastic Ferniture will remain a crucial part of their creative outlook, offering them some emotional sanctuary and – above all – a chance to simply enjoy themselves. “When I think back to everything it’s counteracted so far – working jobs, going to uni, playing folk music,” says Hughes, “I realise how valuable it’s been. It’s our opportunity to not take life so seriously, and we’ve relished every minute of it.” Phantastic Ferniture is released on 27 Jul via Transgressive phantasticferniture.com

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The Rawness of Reality Olivia Laing introduces her first novel Crudo, a blend of punk prose and the all-too-real events of seven turbulent summer weeks in 2017 Interview: Katie Goh

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rump, Brexit, Grenfell, and the constant and seemingly imminent threat of nuclear war all sit at the forefront of Crudo, Olivia Laing’s debut novel and summer 2017 time capsule. As Kathy, the protagonist of Crudo, reflects, “2017, fire and fascism, she’d never forget it.” Though known as one of Britain’s most exciting non-fiction writers – most famous for The Lonely City – Laing’s fiction debut is as experimentally deviant and thrilling as those to come before. A year on from when she began writing this fictional foray, we speak to Laing about being creative in today’s political climate, the role Kathy Acker plays in the novel, and the art of giving a shit. “I wasn’t actually planning on publishing Crudo,” Laing tells The Skinny over a crackling phone line. “I was really writing it for myself.” The book materialised when Laing was working on her next non-fiction book last summer. “I was trying to write a non-fiction book about bodies, which I’m still trying to write, and finding it incredibly difficult. Post-Trump and Brexit, it felt like the world kept changing every four seconds.” At the same time, Laing was reading Chris Kraus’ biography of the American punk writer Kathy Acker. “There was a really fascinating thing in it: as a young writer, Kathy would go into libraries and she’d pick up biographies and copy them out but she’d change them into the first person. Suddenly it would become a different, more exciting book. I read that and thought maybe I’ll start writing down everything that’s happening but I’ll do it from the perspective of Kathy Acker, just to see what happens. And suddenly it was like I’d found a form where I could record that summer. I found this way where I could get it all down and handle the turbulence – it’s sunny, it’s tragic, it’s frustrating, it’s horrifying. It let me do that in a way I couldn’t with non-fiction.”

“Art rising up as this force to be reckoned with, as something that provides not just consolation but the possibility of change – now that feels really exciting” Olivia Laing

Written in ‘real time’, Laing started and finished the novel over the seven weeks in which its events take place. “My rules were that I had to write at least once every day and I couldn’t go back to edit anything.” Her book is named after the Italian word for ‘raw’ because it is just that – while it has had some polishing, it’s effectively what she wrote day in and day out. As much as it is a work of fiction, it’s also a reflection on current events as they happened.

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Olivia Laing

The novel also picks up the beginning tremors of political fallouts we’re dealing with a year on. “There’s a bit in it where I talk about something in Spain which may or may not be anything,” she reflects. “Later on that turned into a major constitutional crisis but at the time it looked like it was just a little tremor. I wanted to record the big things as well as the small and I wanted to capture it as it was shifting and changing.” For a time as turbulent as summer 2017, Kathy Acker is the perfect guide. Any time Crudo’s Kathy writes something down, she’s writing something from a real Kathy Acker book. Laing discovered almost perfect parallels between what was happening today and what Acker was writing about in the late 20th century. “Her writing is incredibly relevant and prescient. She saw the rise of the far right, she saw the terrorism and violence we’re facing now, she saw the battle for abortion. We’ve re-inhabited a universe that’s very similar to hers. Her writing really speaks to right now in a way that ten years ago I don’t think it did.” In the book, Kathy writes that her novels are “populated with the pre-packaged and readymade”, and the novel itself could be described similarly. The news, the internet, and Acker’s own writing turn Crudo into a collage of voices. “I’m lifting all sorts of stuff from the news and all sorts of stuff from Twitter,” explains Laing. “I was trying to create a magpie novel. It was so fun to pick up a massive stack of Kathy Acker novels and open them, sometimes completely at random, and so often the words would speak back. I would watch Grenfell footage on TV and then I would find a Kathy Acker quote that spoke to that. That

project of collage was really exciting to me. It’s like drawing the past back out and bringing it into the present.” Acker’s novels are a ripe field for magpie-ing. An infamous plagiariser, Acker gleefully stole voices from everywhere, particularly other writers from the literary canon – in Great Expectations (1982), she rewrote parts of Dickens’ classic. As a magpie herself, Acker was the perfect pair of eyes for Laing to write about today’s world. “She’s someone who’s so fearless and aggressive as an artist – she steals things, she takes what she wants, she says what she wants, so it was really fun for me to play around with what this fantasy version of a 21st century Kathy Acker might do or think.” In Crudo there are two narratives running parallel to one another: newly married Kathy is grappling with commitment as she also grapples with the ever-shifting world around her personal life. As the news cycle keeps spinning, she describes feeling like a “beached somnolent whale”, incapable of thought and action, a feeling familiar to anyone attempting to keep up to date with current events. “It felt hellish,” Laing says. “That endlessness of the news cycle where you’re constantly getting new news but you never get the chance to make sense of yesterday’s news and the day before’s news. It just keeps coming like a wave breaking over you.” For her, art and writing are the antidotes for breaking that wave. “Art is incredibly powerful as a force for change. It’s a space to reflect, a space to think about different possibilities, and different ways of organising the world and our emotional lives.” “It’s why the novel’s called Crudo,” Laing continues. “It’s all about rawness and that’s why

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there’s a crab on the cover. This idea that everyone is so armoured against each other and the ways we can soften up – that’s Kathy’s thing throughout the book. How do I learn to soften? How do I learn to take in other people? There’s a political argument in being less selfish. You have an obligation to kindness or to generosity. Kathy is an incredibly selfish character who has to learn how to be less selfish, and that feels like a personal thing, but at the same time that’s what’s happening in the world. All these forces of selfishness and the horrific consequences that they have, for example when somebody like Trump gets into power – it’s the same dynamic but writ large.” Art is rising up to this task of radical empathy. In music, artists like Childish Gambino, Kendrick Lamar and Beyoncé are writing music in and for the here and now, and in literature, there’s a move towards the same. “There was this point, maybe a decade ago, when everything was so ironic and whimsical and distanced from reality,” recalls Laing. “Now there’s a huge amount of writers who are both trying to engage with the times that we’re in but also doing things that experiment with form, like Ali Smith and Deborah Levy. Exciting writers who are totally not complacent about what art is, and who are trying to reinvent art for this moment. That feels to me like an incredible time to live in. I mean, I’d rather not have Trump and Brexit, but art rising up as this force to be reckoned with, as something that provides not just consolation but the possibility of change – now that feels really exciting.” Crudo is out now via Picador panmacmillan.com/authors/olivia-laing/crudo

THE SKINNY


July 2018

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Graduates with Distinction The Skinny’s crack team of Art reporters were gainfully employed throughout the past month with the four degree shows that come with high anticipation and excitement every year. As always, our expectations were surpassed by the work on show Words: Adam Benmakhlouf, Donald Butler and Rosie Priest

Dundee

The political, the whimsical, the joyous and the brilliantly bizarre can all be found within the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design (DJCAD) degree show this year. Tucked in a hidden corner, an orientation pointer comes from Camassia Bruce, it feels as if we’re intruding on someone’s studies – a chair sitting at a desk, empty, with incredible cartographic drawings littering the space, luscious map-like drawings, vaguely geographic in their nature but compelling to explore. The concepts of places and spaces seem to reverberate throughout the degree show, no more so than in the work of David McLeish. Working across performance, installation and karaoke, he explores the hilarity behind becoming a tourist destination, specifically in his hometown of Dundee. Stepping through the bright blue glittery curtain into his shop, the only thing missing is Cilla Black (or whoever her Dundee counterpart would be – Lorraine Kelly?) on stage. The gaudy and garish continues on within the work of Jade Kerr. We are simultaneously completely repelled by and drawn in to her familiar sculptures: brightly coloured stress-toy objects are a joyful and interesting exploration of the familiar and an artist’s ability to create estrangement through materials. While brightly coloured, there is nothing gaudy about Ciara Neufeldt’s ceramics. A wheel stands empty in the corner, as Neufeldt will be showcasing throwing techniques throughout the degree show, but serves to remind the viewer of the relationship between the beautifully crafted objects on display and the artist’s body. An altogether different ceramicist is Elizabeth Ann Day, who shows stacked and identical white matt plates and figurines, pitched as ‘instant collectibles’, a hilarious statement about such innocuous items. The Skinny also comes across the work of Daniel Twist, who has made a space with a ‘finite amount of material,’ where one can have tea and make decisions, and feel some relief from contemporary experiences of unlimited data. Another outstanding artist whose work traverses across mediums and ideas is James Fallan. Bells and a large banner are there to be rung and written on with the audience’s truth as Fallan creates a space for open political expression. Another politically charged artist, Ewa Piotrowska presents an altogether less joyous exploration compared to that of Fallan. Responding to draconian abortion laws in Poland, Piotrowska’s space combines to disquieting effect, surgical and religious-architectural allusions, a sharp reminder of the causes and conditions of unregulated abortions in countries where this right is not recognised. Nina Stanger similarly pulls and repulses with her work. Too large to be that of a human figure, a huge blue sculpture made (and stinking) of plastic is sitting and welcoming like a familiar friend, Stanger’s work sits between a bizarrely sexual and uncomfortable place. A far more welcoming sculptural intervention comes from Bethan Radcliffe, who utilises

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Ewa Piotrowska, DJCAD

familiar shapes within her playful, fluid, yet immoveable curved metal structures and accompanying drawings. Similarly FK McLoone utilises the familiarity of curves encountered in contemporary shopping centre escalators to celebrate the sleek, bright ‘and unremarkably modern’ constructions, while Sobia Ashraf takes us back to a far more organic and soothing place, with her work exploring the cultural identity of being British Pakistani. Finally, there needs to be a shout out to the incredible painters of DJCAD, artists such as Ryan Gill and Michael J. Doherty creating hyper real canvases that are lustrous and rich in their creation, while Kristina Pelehacs utilises the medium to cast a whimsical light on the realm of memes. Altogether this exhibition is an uplifting and empowering encounter into the work being created further up the east coast. [Rosie Priest]

Edinburgh

While undergraduate degree shows often feel impossible to see in their entirety, this year’s Edinburgh College of Art showcase feels somehow both overflowing and manageable. One student collective this year excitingly challenged the degree show format. Calling themselves Just Guts, they create a tree house-like construction, filled with uncredited paintings, movement workshops, sculpture and publications. Thinking of domesticity, but literally

stripping back this reference to something sparser and bare, there’s the large sculptures by Jasmine Brown-Rasé. A cross-section reproduction of the room where the artist lived in London is filled with undulating and cracked terracotta in reference to Mauritian landscapes, next to bookshelves of year-marked books coated in sugar are intended as a poetic reference to Jamaica, as a further layering of geographical contexts. At some point during the opening night, Ayshia Taskin’s performance begins. Giving out live machine-made corn snacks, Taskin combines a gesture of generosity with the instruments of industrial food production. More subtle is the performance from Amelia Tan. The everyday movements of her amateur performance troupe are mostly subtle, though sometimes coming into relief when they slip out of context – see one man miming a hand-drier underneath an abstract painting. Intriguing performances comes too from Rachel Lee. She scrapes sonorously on a mortar and pestle, or drums quietly on the lid of a Starbucks cup, walking barefoot across rough blue office chairs. Wearing fitness garb and set around exercise machinery, the melancholy atmosphere is set poignantly within imageries of monetised health and wellness services. There’s low-key confrontation in the work of Taylor Shaw, who has left dozens of half pint glasses in a tight row on the floor, frequently

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Leo Wight, GSA

kicked across the room by mortified viewers. Similarly, there’s a quiet shock in Robert Cooper’s space, as he presents the dead forms of a fox and rabbit that died of natural causes, locked in a chest freezer. For many students, they’ve already got their eyes on what they’re planning next and Sarah Brown’s carefully constructed painted cardboard kitchen presents her ambition and skill as a set designer. There’s also a penchant for handmade replicas of mass produced items in the work of Kirsty Paterson, who makes replicas of tinned food and includes narratives from working in a supermarket: a saggy break room, looking too hot, made entirely of cardboard, including its fan which shoogles the table it sits on back and forth. One of the most effective and economic gestures in the show are the posters of Zoë Zo, Zoë Guthrie and Zoë Tumika. Rather than taking up the floorspace or any formal room in the degree show, the artist has chosen to paste a group of posters on the wall. One reads: ‘I can picture myself somewhere like this.’ Enough posters to be visible and in bright enough colours to catch our attention, this work is otherwise reduced beyond the minimum of the bulk that’s expected of degree show presentation. It’s a stunning betrayal and refusal of the degree show, which Zoë Zo, Zoë Guthrie and Zoë Tumika deploys to protest the experience of being at art school and not being able to circulate with the comfort of white, straight and

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middle class privileges that dominate all aspects of the art school experience. It’s a necessary and timely interruption of the degree show event and gestures to the creativity, struggle and courage of the students who apply, receive a place and even graduate without ever being let into the institution. ‘I can see myself somewhere like this,’ the poster reads. [Adam Benmakhlouf]

Glasgow

Now in its fourth year in the Tontine, the Glasgow School of Art degree show experience is no longer feeling like the mysterious labyrinth it felt back in 2015 in its first iteration here. In one intensively laid out room, Fenella Gabrysch’s video work melds its soundtrack with Danny Pagarani’s. In Gabrysch’s work, there are references to the immigrant experience interlaced with images of hands passing water to one another and the subtle gestures of conversation. In a similarly oblique narrative style, Pagarini’s work uses disturbing images of a body in a printed fabric sack in a filling bath. Each present an affecting and mysterious body of work. Upstairs, there’s a different kind of audio collaboration. A pared-down presentation by Hamshya Rajkumar centres on an old style double tape-deck hi-fi that plays emotive and rich soundscapes is the main presentation, alongside a stack of blank tape and invitation to bootleg. Representing talented draughting, there are Beth Kitchen’s quiet and beautifully rendered drawing. Kitchen’s work juxtaposes the handmade mark with mechanical routine in large format detailed pencil works. More surprising juxtaposition in the work of Phyllis McGowan, whose ironic ceramic weapons and helmets combine material vulnerability with the forms of strength. Throughout the same room, Rachel Woodside’s karaoke set-up plays hits of the 80s and 90s as a revolving curtain shows then masks the checkered table and floor that make up her performance. The playlist syncs up (perhaps?) with Josie Lee’s work, in which Smooth Radio plays softly over the video of her perfectly constructed office space, as a leak gradually floods the room, speaking to the slow threats of bureaucracy and corporate irresponsibility. More radio in Harriet Gould’s full car

dashboard used to play a track in which Gould describes the moment that a driving instructor responds with disturbingly recognisable racist humour when faced with his white-passing student’s mixed-race identity. There’s a deployment here of the readymade as a symbol of familiar and rife racism. Often degree shows come with a high level of artistic vulnerability and openness. Georgia Grinter shares intimate letters with a relative alongside hazily sentimental drawings of everyday scenes; in a similar painterly reduction of detail, Leo Wight’s black and white grain self-portraits of his back speak to a cool alienation from body and the self.

“Through a smirk the artist tells of how one collector confidently relayed his experience of meeting faux artist Joseph Kerr in the past” Nearby, there’s an installation by Hayley Jane Dawson of different sculptures and a huge rug of pink fleece that refer and respond to the idea of peeing in the great outdoors as a person with a vagina. More generally, there’s a sense of tools, workarounds and creativity that resists the great outdoors as a space reserved for cisgendered males. Pink soft sculpture again, from Kieran Muir whose drawings and pink, purple and brown knits represent gore, but with a surprising dash of warm humour. Two artists decided to punch a wall between their spaces, as Scott Hopper’s unruly space leaks out onto Dylan Meade’s more orderly presentation of acrylic on cling film paintings.

This unique technique brings moments of intimacy, bodiliness and unruly liquidity. Throughout the run, in a small room, there’s a video of an audience wearing a motley of period styles laughing, intrigued or pishawing, as Aphra Pilkington’s video critically considers performativity, the theatre and the power of the engaging orator. And perhaps this is a clue to the function in 2018 of going to see 139 distinctive solo shows on one hot afternoon, to think reflectively and consider one’s own position as audience, taste-response and assumptions, and feel them reflected back and twisted around by a pleasurable barrage of talent. [Adam Benmakhlouf]

Aberdeen

Generous exhibition spaces at this year’s Gray’s School of Art degree show allow for a collection of confident solo presentations from the 2018 graduating cohort. A kaleidoscopic smattering of boldly coloured spaces of blue, pink and yellow cluster a multitude of students working in sculpture this year, punctuated with quietly poetic works in photography and video. Works have been grouped together in two specific disciplines this year, with the Contemporary Art Practice class taking main control of the ground floor. Karolina Bachanek’s multi-media installation can be heard before it is seen, a soundtrack of darkly hypnotic electronic music filtering out into the hallway, inspired by Catholic imagery and mythology – quite literally a product, an album and printed t-shirts are available to purchase, part of Bachanek’s music project/pseudonym Zloto. Elsbeth Morrison presents the darkest work in the show, literally and figuratively. In her film Confronting the Corporeal, ethereal bodies floating down rivers shot in black and white create tranquil moments of resonance, effectively transitioning to the more macabre shots of states of decay. On a more light-hearted note, Phoebe Banks and Sandy Scott both use humour as a means of critiquing the arts environment they now find themselves thrust upon. Banks has created a family of polystyrene white forms on wheels she invites viewers to play with, and a video of her in decidedly humdrum moments with the sculptures. It’s a simple but effective

Hayley Jane Dawson, GSA

July 2018

comedy on an artist’s relationship to their work. Nearby, Scott has curated an archive of material from a lesser-known Scottish land artist Joseph Kerr including printed ephemera, an original sketchbook and various tools retrieved from his studio. After inspecting a stone dyke expertly formed in fibreglass, asking the artist of its relevance reveals the whole show is in fact a fictive narrative. Through a smirk the artist tells of how one collector confidently relayed his experience of meeting faux artist Joseph Kerr in the past. Abby Quick is one of the only students to present work in photography this year. Each of her three series shares a familiar approach to presenting geographies in intimate detail, often punctuated by shots of bare male chests or limbs in shallow focus lending a sleepy sensuality to the scapes placed around them. It is an expertly deployed moment of stillness. Upstairs there is a group of painters confidently displaying a formalist approach to their chosen medium that is a real high point. Alluding to sensory qualities far beyond the pictorial, Hannah Stirling combines colourful thick swirls and forms of paint atop muted flat monochromes. Marcus Murison transfers digital drawing into the painted realm with moments of abandon and verve, shifting between focused blocks of pastel greens, pinks and blues depicting effects from Photoshop. Ceramic twists of ropes and glazed amorphous chunks rest peacefully on the canvases of Hannah Gibson’s fluid paintings, seas of pale peach and muted green that spill beautifully into each other. Rope twists and bundles of marks similarly occupy these pictorial renderings of things seemingly coming undone in fits of contained energy. There are many riotous moments throughout this year’s show, with reflective floors and rooms illuminated in neon reds and blues. Text on seemingly melting plastic that speak of the artist’s anxiety of existing in a digital age resonate, yet it is the confidently subtle presentations that stand out, and make the journey to the outer edge of Aberdeen worth it. [Donald Butler] All degree shows have ended, see individual university and student websites for further information

Karolina Bachanek, Gray's

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Situation Critical A recent American study confirmed what we all knew: film criticism is dominated by white men. It’s well beyond time the playing field was levelled

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n a not so shocking turn of events, last month the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism published a study showing that film criticism is dominated by (surprise!) white men. The research found that 82% of reviews for top-grossing films in 2017 were written by white people and 77.8% of reviews were written by men. That’s a ratio of 3.5 men to every female film critic. Even female-centric films, like Wonder Woman and Girls Trip, are being largely reviewed by men – the study found that women wrote only 30% of the reviews of the 36 biggest female-centric films in 2017. For films with underrepresented leads (for example, Moonlight or Hidden Figures), the statistics are even worse, with critics from underrepresented backgrounds writing only 20% of those reviews. The study proves what many people of colour and women within the industry have been saying for years: criticism – particularly film criticism – is very male and very pale. While on-screen representation has been increasingly scrutinised (and improving at a snail’s pace), the imbalance of who gets to write about what’s happening on screen has largely been ignored by the industry until now. When the recently released Ocean’s 8 was poorly received by critics, the cast pointed to gender biases as the cause. To an extent, they had a point. In the UK, most of the film’s reviews in mainstream publications – The Telegraph, The Guardian, The Times, Little White Lies, Empire, The Independent and here at The Skinny too – were by men. Of the most well-read publications in the UK, Violet Lucca, for Sight & Sound, and Simran Hans, for The Observer, were the only women afforded the chance to opine on the film. While Lucca and Hans’ reviews were no less negative than the men’s – and it’s a sexist mistake to think a female critic will give a female-centric film an easy ride – a two to nine ratio speaks volumes about who is given a platform to express their opinions. Despite the general public’s frequent bemoaning of critics, they play an essential role within the film industry. These are the people who can make or break a filmmaker’s career and

the people we entrust to tell us whether it’s worth forking out a tenner to see Deadpool 2 (FYI: it’s not). For indie filmmakers, positive reviews can be a lifeline, encouraging distributors to pick up their films. But more importantly perhaps, criticism plays an integral role within our wider culture, historicising film by creating a canon. If white men are the dominant voices in criticism, then they are the gatekeepers of the industry and the tastemakers of film history. As Hannah Woodhead, who works for independent film magazine Little White Lies, told us: “Film criticism should reflect society – [the critic’s] job is to talk about why films are relevant, why films are made, why films are important. For decades white men have held the work of men who look like them in high esteem […] as historically film has been the reserve of straight, white, middle-class men, they have favoured art that speaks to their experience and viewpoint.” Simran Hans is a rare example of a young woman of colour writing about film for a broadsheet newspaper. The Observer has four main critics: two men, two women – again, a rare example of a mainstream publication with a 50/50 gender balance. Speaking about why film criticism has a diversity problem, Hans says that one of the issues is that “the economy of film criticism is shrinking. With fewer paid jobs in the field than ever, there’s no real historical precedent for authoritative voices that don’t belong to straight white cis men of a certain age and background.” In other words: the lack of paid work within film criticism means fewer editors are willing to take a chance on new writers. As a result, an abundance of new platforms for film criticism have appeared in the last few years, particularly feminist publications such as Another Gaze, Seventh Row, cléo and Much Ado About Cinema, for whom many emerging female critics are choosing to write, as well as alternatives to print, such as podcasts. Freelance film critic Rhianna Dhillon regularly reviews for BBC Radio, and says broadcasting is potentially easier to break into than print criticism. “With a rise in freelancers, there’s more of a turnover, producers come and go, along with their personal pref-

Words: Katie Goh

erences and there are more opportunities for myriad people to review on the same programme,” she says. “For print, it seems as though the same men are still writing at the same publications as they always have. Men at the top have jobs for life and are more unwilling to evoke a change.”

“If white men are the dominant voices in criticism, then they are the gatekeepers of the industry and the tastemakers of film history” Looking through any British newspaper or mainstream magazine, Dhillon’s point becomes clear. Due to shrinking budgets, there often isn’t room for more than one or two critics, who also tend to be men. For example, The Scotsman’s Alistair Harkness is the sole voice in the paper’s film section and Robbie Collin and Tim Robey review the majority of films for The Telegraph. As a result, broadsheets’ review sections often become homogeneous and stale, composed of one or two viewpoints. In May, only one review out of 45 was written by a woman in The Telegraph. At The Skinny, we don’t get off the hook either. So far in 2018 (not including this current issue), three print issues out of six have had no women reviewers for the film section. Only two women – myself included – have reviewed for The Skinny’s film section this year in comparison to 16 men. Diversity in film criticism isn’t about quota

filling or tokenism. Commissioning female critics to only review female-centric films or Asian critics to only review Asian films is just as harmful as an all-white and male film section. Hans told me that earlier in her career, she was often asked to review films tagged to race or gender – something I’ve also experienced as a bi-racial female critic. While my background occasionally informs how and what I write about (for example, I suspect it was the reason behind why I was asked to write this), you need more than lived experience to be a good critic. As Hans explains, diversity in film criticism means “less of a consensus [which] means sharper criticism. If all critics are the same, then criticism – a work of record about the films – ends up being a closed loop of confirmation biases, meaning only a certain type of movie becomes canonised. While it’s neither fair nor accurate to make the assumption that ‘diverse’ critics are always operating from a totally different paradigm, hopefully having a plurality of voices opens up that canon a bit more.” While we need to show caution while addressing gendered and racial differences of critics which can easily fall into essentialism – not all women or people of colour have the same experiences or opinions and gendering film criticism into male and female ‘takes’ is problematic in itself – it’s the industry’s elephant in the room that needs to finally be confronted. So, how do we diversify film criticism? The most obvious first step is for editors and publications to actively seek out and commission new talent and new perspectives. However, that’s only a drop in the ocean. Accessibility is often at the root of emerging critics being dissuaded to pursue a career in criticism – whether that’s financial concerns or physically being unable to access cinemas and press screenings. As Woodhead commented, “it’s no good being offered a place at the table if you can’t get to the table to begin with.” Speaking at the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards last month, American actor Brie Larson passionately spoke about the need for diversity within criticism and announced that Sundance and Toronto film festivals plan to support underrepresented critics from next year. Closer to home, this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival ran an expenses paid Student Critics Competition to give emerging writers a stepping stone into the industry (for which Hans was a mentor). Established journalists within the field have a responsibility to support the next generation of critics coming up behind them. While there are several female-led mentorship schemes, such as The Second Source, more established male critics need to be encouraged to share their wealth of knowledge. Despite pretences of objectivity, there’s a wonderfully subjective component to film criticism – something that should be embraced rather than ignored – and at the end of the day there are zero cons to diversifying the profession. As Woodhead says, “representation is about affording everyone the same opportunities to see and write about films, and that will likely start to change the discourse around cinema and the sort of filmmakers and films we hold in high regard.” The call to diversify film criticism isn’t about doing away with white male critics or about tokenism, it’s about levelling the playing field to ensure we don’t watch films through a single lens. Ocean’s 8 is currently on general release

Ocean's 8

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The Skinny’s film section is actively trying to diversify its pool of writers, and would encourage all emerging female film writers interested in contributing towards our magazine to contact our Film editor, jamie@theskinny.co.uk

THE SKINNY


Home Truths Kevin Macdonald’s latest film is a heartfelt documentary about the troubled life of iconic singer Whitney Houston. The Scottish director explains his compassionate but honest approach to telling the singer’s story

Interview: Iana Murray

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here’s this friend of mine who’s a school teacher,” Whitney director Kevin Macdonald recalls. “In the staff common room, whenever the younger members of staff who are in their early 20s put music on, they would put on Whitney Houston. That made me think: maybe people still do listen to her.” The 50-yearold Glaswegian filmmaker seems almost surprised that – despite the controversy that permeated the end of her life – Whitney Houston’s music is timeless. From the way Kevin Macdonald talks about making the documentary Whitney – the singer is so legendary no surname is needed – the film sounds like no easy task. It unfolds like an investigation, peeling back the layers to uncover how a life that appeared as glamorous as hers could end so tragically. “I didn’t start thinking it was going to be like that,” he says. “That’s what it became. There was a sense of being foiled by people not wanting to tell you the truth. It makes you feel more determined to find out what happened to her.” Prior to beginning our interview in a bustling hotel bar, Macdonald laments being asked the same questions over and over again. He’s relaxed but fidgety (he drops a spoon multiple times) and clearly has his answers loaded. It’s all part of the job. Macdonald is a prolific director with over 20 years of work under his belt. He began making documentaries (including the Oscar-winning One Day in September), eventually switching to features like The Last King of Scotland. He is not new to music documentaries either; with films about Mick Jagger and Bob Marley, Macdonald has proven himself a certified pro in examining elusive icons. His years of experience in fact and fiction has informed Whitney greatly. “When I started off making documentaries 20 years ago, I was really into this idea of making cinematic documentaries that almost felt like feature films, with a three-act structure and big music tracks and sound effects – then I went away and started doing drama. And now that I’ve come back to documentaries, I didn’t want to do that level of manipulation with the material. I wanted to let the material speak for itself, and have the bagginess of reality, rather than feeling like it needs to be serving this artificial narrative structure.” When you strip it down, however, Whitney is a traditional story of a rise and fall. “It’s the simplest story ever,” he says. “It’s a three-page story with 20 pages of footnotes.” Intercutting between home footage, TV appearances and interviews with family, friends and employees, the film pieces together the singer’s life to discover what led to the drug abuse that eventually killed her. What is particularly intriguing about these interviews with the Houston family is that – even six years after her death – they are still reluctant to talk about her, or even be completely honest. “First of all, you’re never going to get the truth out of anyone because, what is the complete truth?” says Macdonald. “I definitely had the feeling that so many people were unwilling to go there because they felt that they were protecting her, which was sort of ridiculous, because what are you protecting? But secondly, more importantly, they are protecting themselves because they feel guilty. They feel like they somehow could’ve done more. I think a lot of

July 2018

people felt guilty – very few people were honest enough to say that. And actually, I think I’ve never known a bunch of interviewees more in denial.” One key person Macdonald attempted to interview was Houston’s mother Cissy Houston, but the formal interview setting paired with her forgetfulness made the footage unusable. It wasn’t until he took her to New Hope Baptist Church – the church where her daughter would perform in as a child – that she began to open up to him. “Suddenly, she came alive and seemed much younger and more engaged,” he says. “It was as though being in that environment that was so familiar and meant so much to her made her remember.” The film not only examines what events in her childhood and career affected her, but also suggests that Houston was a product of her environment. Montages of Houston’s performances make references to the Newark Riots and the Gulf War. Macdonald realised that racism was integral to shaping who the singer was, and montages afforded him the chance to acknowledge that without dwelling on it. “The best version of the film would be The Life and Times of Whitney Houston and it would be four hours long on Netflix,” says Macdonald. “But at the same time, you have to balance telling a good story with trying to be educational. Those two things are often in conflict. You have to try to keep it entertaining in the broadest sense, and educate people on the complexities of the story.” He was interested in examining how Houston succeeded as a black artist in the white-dominated music industry. “She’s an integral part of 80s culture, but she’s also a part of this consumerist

culture that says ‘She’s as American as a McDonald’s or a skateboard or Wrigley’s spearmint gum.’ All of those things are white – and she’s a part of that.”

“It’s the simplest story ever. It’s a three-page story with 20 pages of footnotes” Kevin Macdonald

Unlike Nick Broomfield’s 2017 film Whitney: Can I Be Me, Whitney is the only documentary about Houston that has been authorised by her family’s estate – but there is something that Macdonald wants to clarify. “People think that anything that is authorised means that they have control. [Whitney Houston’s family] didn’t have any control over the editorial content of the film, and I wouldn’t have made it if they had. There was no point in making a puff piece.” Was he ever worried about how they would respond? “Very,” he promptly answers. He mentions that Cissy Houston and cousin Dionne Warwick only saw the film a few weeks ago. “They weren’t best pleased but they haven’t tried to stop me,” he says.

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The film uncovers many secrets that few people – especially one of the most famous families in show business – would want out in the open. There’s the affair Whitney’s mother had with the preacher of her church, which Macdonald suggests tormented her psychologically by destroying the two things she relied on most: family and the church. There’s also the drug addiction that not only afflicted Houston, but her brothers as well, and cost half-brother Gary a place in the NBA. The most notable discovery is that Houston was sexually abused as a child by cousin Dee Dee Warwick. Knowing this information prior, the film feels like it is leading up to this reveal, which comes later in the runtime. “That is sort of the reality of how it was made,” admits Macdonald. “That did come to me very late in the last few weeks of the edit. It made me revise a lot of opinions on what happened earlier and why Whitney behaved in certain ways.” Even though he didn’t know Houston personally, Macdonald speaks about the woman with great affection and admiration. By immersing himself in her life, he understands how fame validated her difficult childhood. There’s a certain poeticism to the film, in that it begins and ends with the one place she felt at home: her church. “I think Whitney just wanted to belong, and so this whole idea of home is so important to her,” he says. “The people who bullied her when she was young because she was different or too white, they’re queueing in the streets, they’re in the church, applauding her. She belongs.” Whitney had its UK premiere at Edinburgh International Film Festival and is released 6 Jul by Altitude

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Rock On For a quarter of a century, Rock Trust have shone a light on the difficulties faced by those threatened by homelessness. Past participants in their Sleep Outs talk us through the experience ahead of this year’s event

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wenty-five years ago, a small group of people voluntarily swapped their comfortable beds to spend a restless night outside Edinburgh’s St Andrew’s and St George’s West Church. Since then, Rock Trust’s Sleep Out has grown into a major annual event. Over 2000 participants have helped raise over £500,000 towards services for local teenagers and young adults enduring, or who are threatened by, homelessness. Those who do not have a warm home or bed to take for granted. From its earliest years, Sleep Out gave a tiny glimpse of circumstances that would otherwise be unimaginable to its participants. Alex Smith took part in one of the first Sleep Outs, back in 1995, and recalls it as one of the most memorable experiences from her time at university: “It was a meaningful way for our group of friends to get some perspective on our own lives and a better appreciation of the difficulties faced by those forced on to the streets. We did have fun despite the cold, and most importantly we raised awareness and funds to help ensure other young people didn’t end up sleeping rough.” Smith recently got back in touch with Rock Trust and is now on the board of trustees. Former board member Simon Jaquet, Chair of Edinburgh Youth Work Consortium, would agree with Smith. “Very few people have slept out on the streets in Scotland willingly. For those taking part in a Sleep Out it can be very instructive, giving a small sense of the conditions so

many people are forced to experience.” It’s this measure of empathy and insight Omar Shabana, of the Edinburgh University Islamic Society, took from last year’s Sleep Out: “I was still wide awake when the first droplets of rain started falling on us at 5am. I huddled up deep inside my sleeping bag. I could hear the gentle droplets, it was the same noise you hear on your window on a rainy night. I thought I was completely safe, only to wake up and find that half my body was drenched and the cardboard beneath me was disintegrating.” Sabana adds: “I couldn’t believe how much I missed my bed. I couldn’t believe how deeply I slept that morning when I got home. It’s hard to believe that some people don’t have beds to go back to, that by being in that position for so long they could become part of the background, ignored. I don’t know how anyone copes with that. There are so many things that I discovered that night. It was an eye opening experience.” Sleep Out has become a cornerstone of Rock Trust’s work. The original night in 1993 raised enough funds to secure a flat and the charity can now count over 40 places of accommodation. It supports over 400 people, in many ways, every year across Edinburgh and the Lothians. The charity gives advice, education and practical support to those in need. Support includes drop-in groups and help with new skills – from writing CVs to skills in the arts, including filmmaking and music.

Interview: Ben Venables

Rock Trust Sleep Out 2017

This year not only marks a special quartercentury anniversary for Sleep Out, but sees it move to St Andrew Square. For the last few years the event has taken place at Festival Square, and they have held a parallel event exclusively for young people aged 12-18 at the original location on George Street, which continues this year. For Rock Trust’s CEO Kate Polson, Sleep Out is “not about replicating the misery and hardships faced by people sleeping rough. It is just one night in the year.” But, it can act as a spark for ongoing social change; raising awareness,

funds and in offering a rewarding experience for its participants: “They wake up in the morning after trying to sleep on cardboard in the cold drizzle, and on the way back to their home and a hot shower, they think deeply about the reality of the experience they’ve just had a glimpse of.” The 2018 Rock Trust Sleep Out takes place on 26 Oct. If you’re interested in participating, check rocktrust.org/ sleep-out for details rocktrust.org

Working Comedians Showcasing a host of exciting new acts, comedian Siân Davies is taking her crowdfunded show Best in Class to this year’s Fringe

hampioning working-class comics, Best in Class is giving nine acts the chance to perform at the Fringe with no costs to themselves. The aim is to showcase talented workingclass comedians chronically underrepresented, both in Edinburgh and the arts in general. As Siân Davies puts it, Best in Class is an antidote to the current system. “I wanted to do something to make a change. I think a lot of people are talking

about how there’s not any working class representation and how difficult it is for working people to perform at the Fringe because of the rising costs... I had a bad experience myself, whereby I was dropped from an audition because I didn’t have the money to go and do it and I thought ‘this isn’t right’.” Indeed, Davies decided to take positive action and help other acts facing similar

Siân Davies

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Photo: Andy Hollingworth

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Interview: James McColl

obstacles. “It was made clear to me that it wasn’t the done thing, and I just thought well, why not? We’ve been really successful in fundraising because people believe in the comedians we’ve selected and people want us to do well.” Davies is using Kickstarter to raise money for Best in Class, a stand against the overwhelming disproportionately middle class takeover of the Fringe and the cultural pricing-out of working-class performers. With fundraising shows in London, Manchester and Liverpool helping the effort, these showcases also direct attention to the online crowd fund. “It’s all crowdfunded and it’s profit sharing as well. Everyone is going to get a share of any profit we make at the end of it. No one has to pay to be a part of it. I’ve put in the money myself… and we’ve been crowdfunding to make that back.” Ultimately, the hope is that the financial drain of costly Fringe accommodation, travel, venue hire and time away from work will not deter working-class acts from the biggest arts festival in the world, which is also a major talent scouting event for the industry. Over a hundred acts applied for these limited slots, a testament to the need of such a showcase and to the Fringe’s lack of class diversity and accessibility. “I probably could have staffed the show just from people that I know from the circuit but I didn’t want to do that. I wanted to get people from

COMEDY

different areas, people from different cities, people that represent different viewpoints. That’s the whole point; we’re all working class but my experience of being working class is not going to be the same as the next person’s experience of being working class.” Recently published figures from a sociological study on social mobility in the cultural industries show that on average, less than 20% of people working in the creative sector (taken from a range of different industries) identify as working class. “It’s easy to discriminate against working-class people because we don’t fit into a tick box,” says Davies. “There’s different things contributing to it and if I’m honest, I can’t even define it. People ask me to define it and I think well, it is really difficult to… that’s why no one in the industry says ‘let’s get these working-class comedians in’, because people start asking questions.” She adds: “If you look at any kind of struggles for any sort of equality or recognition, unfortunately it always does come from the bottom up… it’s about making the people at the top take notice.” Best in Class runs daily at the Free Festival venue Laughing Horse @ Harry’s Southside, 12pm, 2-26 Aug. It includes Vince Atta, Lindsey Santoro, Tom Mayhew, Cheekykita, Drew Taylor, Jamie Hutchinson, Nena Edwards, Kathryn Mather and is compered by Siân Davies You can support the Best in Class project via Kickstarter

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Fringe Concerns The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the biggest arts festival in the world, but with the financial, physical and emotional costs running high, is the biggest hit at the Fringe to its participants’ mental health?

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t’s an understatement to say that the stakes are high at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Now in its 71st year, the festival has grown from a literal fringe group of companies performing as protest against the established Edinburgh International Festival, to the biggest arts festival on the globe. However, while it’s undoubtedly an expensive festival for performers (in terms of accommodation, venue hire, travel), what price are performers paying with their mental health at the festival? How does performing at the Fringe affect mental health? “I didn’t realise how mentally and physically tiring it would be,” explains Jo Caulfield of her first Fringe 15 years ago. “I thought I would just be doing a one-hour show every night but there’s so many other things to take care of: interviews, meetings, running from venue to venue, continually drying my clothes, continually drying my hair(!), worrying if there would be an audience, organising flyers... the list goes on and on. There’s so many things that can stop you thinking about your actual show.” For Catherine Wilson, a poet, the stress of working 12-to-16hour days combined with worries about ticket sales and flyering had a severe impact on her mental health. She explains: “I dealt with a whole host of problems: from panic attacks, depression, severe anxiety and sleep deprivation to the point of sleep hallucinations. “I would wake up in the morning in different clothes, having got up and dressed myself in the night, or would be convinced someone had broken in my house. It was a really stressful time and I completely burnt myself out.” For Gemma-Marie Everest, who came to the Fringe two years in a row as an actor, the pressure to perform as well as market the show led to her leaving early: “Because the festival is so full-on, and your director or producer wants you to be flyering and promoting when not in the show, it is so hard to have time to be able to seek help if you need it. I ended up being sent home/ fired by my director because she deemed ‘[my] mental health a problem’ because I was trying to carry on whilst highly anxious and stressed and run-down.” The stress of the festival is nothing new according to Gavin Robertson, a producer and performer who has attended the Fringe since 1987. “The demands on you mentally – if you’re a producer, performer, press contact etc – make for a very intense month,” he explains, “and the feeling of relentless pressure was notable even then.”

personal this support wasn’t there, mostly because everyone has to push really hard to get through the Fringe. The more exhausted everyone becomes the less we care for others and in turn ourselves. It is a self-perpetuating culture and in some ways that is what is most dangerous about it all.”

“The demands on you mentally – if you’re a producer, performer, press contact – make for a very intense month” Gavin Robertson

For other participants, such as Deborah Brennan who is returning to the Fringe with new show The Hummingbird Effect, the support was simply not available, or they didn’t know where to turn to when they were having a mental health crisis. She says: “I’m aware that there are lectures on mental health available to Fringe participants as part of the Events series but I personally haven’t attended these. I’m not aware of any mental-health specific support at any of the venues I’ve performed with.”

“Due to a friend insisting, I called NHS Direct during the year I did my debut hour,” begins Harriet Dyer, who is bringing her show Soo’s a Prick to the Gilded Balloon for one night only. “There wasn’t really a lot they could do though (there doesn’t tend to be when you’re away from where you’re registered with a doctor), they said I seemed extremely self-aware and logical which told them that I probably wasn’t going to kill myself.” What support is available after the Fringe? While August is undoubtedly a pressure cooker of expectations, stress and exhaustion, what happens afterwards? “The one month of the festival and the one after was the best of times/the worst of times,” begins FK Alexander, who performed at the Fringe for the first time in 2016 with the criticallyacclaimed show, (I Could Go on Singing) Over the Rainbow. “No one talked about after-care. No one talked about what to do when you went home if you become a ‘hit’. I went home to nothing. I was kinda devastated. I had done something that night after night I felt ‘I am not sure I can do this’ but I did. People said the most stunning things to me, came up to me in the street, so you can’t leave the bubble, and a bomb could go off and you’d not notice. You can only communicate with others in the same bubble as there is only THE FRINGE that has become reality and that reality is fake and also your entire life. it was ABSOLUTELY fucking intense.” For some, the loss of everything that makes up the Edinburgh Fringe bubble, from performing to partying, protects you from the reality of day-to-day life.

Interview: Amy Taylor Illustration: Susie Purvis

“The biggest issue my first year was not during the festival itself,” explains Nicola Foxfield, an actor who has performed at the Fringe twice. “That felt like one big party, but the moment when I arrived back and realised that I had become so wrapped up in the show and my duties with flyering etc that I hadn’t planned beyond the fringe. I had no plans and no money. Edinburgh is a bubble and it’s easy to forget that life carries on outside including rent that needs to be paid.” How can performers help themselves? While the experience of performing at the Fringe is unpredictable, there are ways that performers can help themselves; keep a clear head, and most importantly, take a break. For Dave Bibby of Lead Pencil, the key is controlling what is within your reach, such as not paying attention to what other people are doing, which is just a distraction: “If you control the controllables, your effort is directed to realistic problem solving and away from the distraction of things you’ll never be able to change.” Andrew Blair, a poet who runs the Poetry As Fuck podcast, says: “My advice would be that you are definitely going to feel overwhelmed, burned out and stressed, so make sure you have some coping mechanisms in place beforehand. “On your days off do not do anything remotely involving the festival. Get out of town, go see some other parts of Scotland. Go have a swim in Portobello or something. Just don’t do the Festival.” Read an extended version of this article at theskinny.co.uk/ theatre

What support is available during the Fringe? With many performers agreeing on the stresses of the Fringe, what support is available during the festival? For the dancer and theatre maker Emma Jayne Park, the support she receives is dependent on the content of her show.  “Luckily, as I am performing sensitive autobiographical work, this year the venue are already being extremely supportive in terms of my mental health and have begun to discuss strategies of acting like a buffer between me and the audience if needed,” she explains.  “When the work didn’t appear to be so

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LI FE ST Y LE

The Invisible Bears of Ome One intrepid explorer ventures into ‘the wilderness’ on the outskirts of Tokyo and has a close encounter with ‘a bear’

‘B

eware the bears’ – Tokyo Metropolitan Council This might sound odd to you. It sounded odd to me too that, on the outskirts of Tokyo’s metropolis, I was being told to be vigilant of bears. Not just bears in fact, but snakes and wilds boars, which unfortunately turned my delightful stroll in the country into a scene from The Revenant. OK, it wasn’t exactly The Revenant, for one thing I don’t look like Leonardo DiCaprio (yet). For another, I’m wasn’t savaged by a bear, I didn’t witness my son’s murder and Tom Hardy was nowhere near… OK, you get the idea. What I’m trying to say is I found myself on the outskirts of Tokyo and, apparently, there are bears. Tokyo is a humongous metropolis which basically engulfs the Kanto prefecture. To put that into context, if Edinburgh was the size of Tokyo, Glasgow would be a suburb (albeit a very outspoken one). Spanning from the Pacific Ocean to the forested mountains of the east, it’s an incredibly large mosaic of once independent cities and villages that have merged together over the years to form a concrete sprawl. Yet, on the edge of this sprawl was me, looking at a sign that said ‘Pooh’ wasn’t just here for honey – and he might maul my face off. I suppose the whole thing was my fault. I should’ve known better, or checked, or listened to what supposed ‘experts’ said about the place. The key word here was outskirts. I was on the outskirts of Tokyo, not a central tower block – but to me, when I heard “Tokyo for hillbillies,” I still thought Tokyo.

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Ome (the location) isn’t exactly a party town. It’s completely out the way, famous for absolutely nothing and the only reason I was there was that I fancied a walk. Depending on where you look, Ome is beautiful. If you look in, you see just another city centre. It’s not a slum, but it’s hardly easy on the eye. Looking outwards though, you’ll see mountains and thick forests blooming with dark green cedar trees. When I arrived I had no plan, I just pointed at a hill and decided to climb. It was cherry blossom season and pink blooms littered the surrounding area. I walked through the town, which has old, derelict wooden houses next to giant tower blocks. For some reason, there’s also a park which has a railway museum right next to it. After a short while, I entered the woods. If you were to ask someone Japanese whether this was ‘wild’ they’d would probably say “No.” I would also say no. On this route, you’re only 500 metres roughly away from the town. However, you’ll still find yourself in a completely dense forest, cut off from everything city – which, believe me, I was grateful for. Living in Tokyo, I’d missed fresh air, the smell of trees and the random sounds of a (hopefully) distant chainsaw. As I trekked, however, I noticed something. Across from me was a hut. Specifically, a hut with a map. I had already come across a concrete dome and a Buddhist shrine, but the map (for whatever reason) excited me. It provided a chance to follow the trail and see the ‘crown of Ome’. “Gee whiz!” I said, punching the air, “an actual crown!” It wasn’t an actual crown. Instead it was a

view of the local eyesore, a snow peaked mountain that was supposedly very big and very impressive. I was disappointed, but the picture looked nice and I was enjoying the stroll. So, off I went. As the hours ticked by, I soon began to notice how dark it’d become. Suspiciously, the further I walked, the shadier the trees became. Soon, I was surrounded by thick undergrowth, looming trees and a sense of forboding usually reserved for my job. Checking the map, I noticed that I was still nowhere near this famous mountain and instead was wondering in an increasingly darkening forest. As I turned the corner, my heart stopped. “Oh my god! Bears? BEARS!” To clarify, this wasn’t an actual bear. It was a sign. Not a sign from God, but a sign warning me that ‘”Bear” something something kill you’. OK, I’ll level with you, I couldn’t read the rest of the sign, it was in Japanese. Having grown up in Edinburgh, bears were never really on my radar. Charity fundraisers? Sure, I hate having to walk across the street just to avoid them, but bears (the animal)? Not a threat. The truth is I didn’t know how to react. I especially didn’t know how to react when there was a sign for snakes and wild pigs as well, so, even though I was shaken, I decided to go on, reckoning that it couldn’t be far anyway. Yet, as I moved further forwards, the forest seemed to come alive. Trees began rustling and there was movement in the undergrowth. Suddenly I heard a growl, a rumble, a hoot. Crows circled overhead spelling out bear in the sky. As I turned, a large shadow moved

TRAVEL

Words: Thomas Gisborne Illustration: SIlvia Chiclana

behind a tree and before I could see what it was, I’d done a U-turn and legged it, screaming as I went (but in a decisively manly way). As I turned down the darkened path, I turned to see what was behind me. Shadowy shapes followed me with the patter of paws and rustling leaves. I sprinted all the way until I landed back into town, where, breathing deeply, I burst into a department store to get a new pair of pants.

“Suddenly I heard a growl, a rumble, a hoot. Crows circled overhead spelling out ‘bear’ in the sky” I don’t know what it was. In hindsight, it was probably my mind. But who knows, if I hadn’t taken the fearful, but extremely wise decision to flee, I may not be here today to tell the tale. So, if there is a moral to this tale, it’s that the author of Paddington is a malevolent sociopath who doesn’t understand the nature of these violent, feral animals and frankly, I’m never going hiking again. theskinny.co.uk/travel

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Let’s Get Fizzical

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ummer means three things – standing ankle-deep in mud watching bands, idly dreaming of the beach as gale force winds blow your hat off, and cracking into some cold ones with the squad while trying not to get hit by flying frisbees and footballs. But while craft beer has become a staple of our collective can-cracking for a number of years, a new contender has entered the fray, with a host of craft soft drinks making waves in Scotland’s bars and cafes. Actually, we should say “re-entered the fray,” as on craft soda’s first pass through these parts a few years ago we were slightly sniffy about the concept; apologies to all concerned, we simply weren’t ready. Yet according to Gregor Leckie of Rapscallion Soda, The Skinny are far from the only people to need convincing. “The first year was brutal,” Leckie tells us by email. “People didn’t get it. I think there’s a lot of mistrust around soft drinks and what’s in them, and rightly so. That’s exactly why we do what we do. Breaking through that barrier was tough and we still have much, much further to go.” Leckie’s foray into boutique soft drinks began at the Laneways pop-up in Glasgow’s Gordon Lane a few years back, with his drinks programme for the pop-up’s bar focussing on fresh seasonal ingredients. While it all went well, the soft drinks would inevitably wind up the biggest hit of the lot, which sparked the notion of jumping into the bubbles full-time. The impetus for Kelsey Moore of Clever Kombucha, the Glasgow-based ‘buch bottlers whose wares can be found in venues across Scotland, was slightly different – simply not being able to find the thing you want anywhere else.  “I am Canadian and kombucha is huge in Canada,” Moore tells us. “You can find it everywhere and you are spoiled for choice. One summer after spending some time back on the west coast we were missing our daily kombucha.

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It was an effort to find any kombucha in Glasgow and the ones we did find paled in comparison to what we were used to drinking. The lack of kombucha available on the market sparked the desire for us.” That gap in the market, paired with Moore’s discovery of an untapped market in the form of a relatively large group of kombucha heads working away on their own stuff, has led to Clever proving a success from the off. “The reception that we have had from the beginning has been really positive. For kombucha to be a bit of the unknown, everyone seems to be really open to the idea of it.” Soft drinks seem to sit at the crossroads of a number of different areas of food – they can be both utilitarian and fancy, you can have them at any time of day (providing you can handle the attendant sugar rush), and their ingredients list tends not to rule too many people out of drinking them. Hand a bottle of gin to your tweenage sibling or cousin and their parent will probably try to take you down; do the same with a can of juice and you’ll probably get away with it. Of course, that’s not to say these drinks are easy to make, especially when they rely on a big bacterial blob monster for their lifeforce.  As Moore says: “There always seems to be some sort of a challenge. Just because we are producing kombucha on a large scale doesn’t mean that we don’t run into bumps along the way. There are a lot of factors you need to take into consideration when scaling up production and it is never easy. Balance and patience should also not be underestimated.” Patience has also proven important for Rapscallion; reaction has proven positive once getting past the aforementioned suspicion, but Leckie tells us that, as in soft drink adverts, sometimes a mere sip was enough to get people on board. “Once we actually got punters and proprietors to taste our soda their mindset

Rapscallion Soda

changed,” he says. “I still fucking love seeing people’s faces when they can smell, taste and pick out all the ingredients in our juice. Now we have our product in cans, the feedback has been overwhelming. The first 18 months was all just swinging and missing!”

“I think there’s a lot of mistrust around soft drinks and what’s in them... that’s exactly why we do what we do” Gregor Leckie, Rapscallion Soda

And that’s one of the great things about non-alcoholic drinks from our layman’s don’thave-to-actually-make-it perspective – the freedom for producers to experiment. While spirits are steeped in recipe, tradition and entirely justifiable red tape, and the beer lot are concerned with correctly categorising everything, these kinds of drinks are free to just taste nice. Clever’s range of drinks includes kombucha blends with watermelon & mint and peach & lavender, and Leckie’s goal with Rapscallion is to push beyond the usual options you might find on a supermarket shelf. The current options including a rhubarb, grapefruit and szechuan pepper drink appropriately titled ‘Mr Pink’, and a cranachan-inspired blend of star anise, raspber-

FOOD AND DRINK

ry and toasted oats. “We don’t have a rule book and we want to break up the boring selection in fridges,” says Leckie. “It seems daft to me that everyone drinks tonic water, but the last time I checked the UK doesn’t have a malaria epidemic. It also pisses me off that lemonade has barely even seen a lemon in its life. “Every ingredient in our juice must be there for a reason. If we hit on bitter, sweet, sour and spice then we know carbonation will supercharge the flavour and provide balance. We don’t throw in ingredients willy-nilly, but often start with a base fruit and ask: when is it in season, does it smell good, taste good and look good, then what would it pair with? It’s then my job to extract the best flavour I can.” Clever and Rapscallion sit at different ends of the alcohol-free craft drinks chart, but they’re reflective of Scotland’s continued embrace of all things small-batch and well-made (they’re also clear admirers of each other’s work, with both Moore and Leckie flagging up the other in our conversations). Clever is stocked in 60 locations across Scotland, while Rapscallion’s brand new canned range will be popping up in locations far and wide alongside their on-tap presence in Saint Luke’s and The Rum Shack and regular spot at the Platform street food market at the Arches on Argyle Street.  For Leckie, the success of craft drinks of all stripes “proves that people care more about what they put in their body, where it comes from, who made it, and why they do it.” It worked with beer, spirits and coffee, so get ready for a summer of afternoons slurping on delicious booze-free craft goodness. If nothing else, your frisbee-dodging abilities should see a swift uptick. facebook.com/rapscallionSODA cleverkombucha.co.uk

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Photo: @vlexjames

Rapscallion Soda

Interview: Peter Simpson

Photo: @vlexjames

We get a heads-up on the world of craft soft drinks from the minds behind Rapscallion Soda and Clever Kombucha


Food News Pop-up dining, pressing buttons and popping (beer) bottles all await in this month's food and drink events round-up

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Michelin Star chefs at Festival No. 6 The Portmeirion-based festival packs an appropriately wild selection of food to go with its bonkers post-modern setting and extremely ‘6 Music-friendly’ line-up. But it’s the festival’s Dinner at Clough’s pop-up restaurant that we want to highlight, in which Michelin Star chefs Aiden Byrne and Gareth Ward cook up inventive three-course meals in a venue inspired by the Italian Riviera. It’s a long old way from the Slam Tent, that’s for sure… Portmeirion, North Wales, 6-9 Sep, festivalnumber6.com theskinny.co.uk/festivals

theskinny.co.uk/food

Photo: Andrew Whitton

Chef 's Table at Wilderness Festival

e kick off July with three of our favourite things – beer, citrus fruit, and Mexican food. They all come together in the launch event for Brooklyn Brewery’s new Naranjito Orange Pale Ale at the delightful Bodega in Edinburgh. You’ll try a quartet of Brooklyn’s beers, including the aforementioned orangey one, while Bodega will throw in some delightful nibbles to run alongside. 4 Jul, 6-8pm or 8.30-10.30pm; Bodega TollX, 36 Leven St, Edinburgh; £20, tickets via Eventbrite If you’re more of a gin and push-button fan, then Brockman’s Gin have just the event for you – Press For Gin. “It’s simple,” they say somewhat facetiously. “Press a button, gin appears.” Ah, now we get it... no actually that doesn’t really explain things at all does it? As far as we can make out, this is an evening of gin cocktails, canapes, experiential performance, and some kind of button. How big will this button be? Will we all have to share a button, or do we get one each? Only one way to find out, we suppose. 4-6 Jul, 7pm; Summerhall, 1 Summerhall Pl, Edinburgh; £20, tickets via Skiddle Through in Glasgow, there are still a couple of chances to check out Ka Pao’s takeover of SWG3’s new Acid Bar space. Ka Pao is the brainchild of former Ox and Finch chef Sandy Browning, and the menu for this residency promises to be an up-to-ten course feast of sharing dishes inspired by his recent travels around southeast Asia. 5 & 7 Jul, 7pm; 100 Eastvale Pl, Glasgow; £30, tickets via Eventbrite Making its triumphant return this month is the West End Beer Festival, with the Glasgow hopfest back for its fourth iteration. 15 independent bars run by breweries from across Scotland and beyond – featuring some of our local faves including Pilot, Up Front and Drygate – with the festival also getting its very own official beer for the first time. If you’re in the market for a new favourite beer this summer, here’s where to have a look. 6 Jul, 6pm-midnight, 7 Jul, 12-5pm & 6pm-midnight; Cafe Source Too, 32 Hughenden Road, Glasgow; £8, tickets via Eventbrite If you ever wanted proof that veganism is ‘having a moment’ as the kids say, look no further than the fact that Scotland Vegan Festival is being hosted in the colossal surroundings of Hampden Park. Inside, you’ll find 100 stalls dedicated to vegan wares and chat, as well as a string of workshops, talks and vegan food vendors. Looking for the vegan equivalent of literally anything? Chances are that if it exists, you’ll find it here. 14 Jul, 10.30am-4.30pm; Hampden Park, Glasgow; £3 on the door And finally, some lovely times courtesy of a Pasta PopUp at Edinburgh cake shop Lovecrumbs. Rather than the usual niceness of a slice of cake and flat white in the midst of some nice reclaimed furniture, here’s the chance to smash into some charcuterie and big bowls of pasta while sitting in said furniture. Homemade scran in really nice surroundings, one week out from the end of a very long month? This is a fantastic idea we wholeheartedly endorse. 22 & 23 Jul, 7pm; Lovecrumbs, 155 West Port, Edinburgh; £35, tickets via Eventbrite

Brooklyn Brewery

Festival Food Festival food continues to get cheffier by the month, but you won’t hear us complaining. Here are six of the most outlandish and exciting food options at UK music festivals this summer Words: Peter Simpson Platform at TRNSMT TRNSMT festival has bulked up for its second year, spreading out across two weekends and adding all manner of festive hoopla. Among said hoopla is a pop-up residency from Platform, the market at the Argyle Street Arches that brings together many of Glasgow’s best street food venues then fires them back out in one concentrated burst. Expect some top notch scran in pleasingly practical formats from the likes of Shrimpwreck and Platform’s in-house coffee roasters Thomson’s. Glasgow Green, 6 & 8 Jul, trnsmtfest.com Taste the World at WOMAD The long-running world music fest has something for every taste, but their Taste the World stage is a hugely intriguing departure from many of the other festivals on this list. The stage features artists and musicians from across the festival programme discussing their favourite foods, cooking dishes for audiences to share and opening up the kind of festival dialogue you want, rather than the usual repeated questions about where the toilets are. Malmesbury, Wiltshire, 26-29 Jul, womad.co.uk Chef ’s Table at Wilderness Festival Let’s be frank, personal space can be a bit hard to come by at a festival. So when someone dangles the carrot of an extremely exclusive

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Chef ’s Table experience that we could hypothetically chill at before drinking a hipflask of rum and dancing to some aggressive French techno, you’d better believe we’re on board. Away from the tiny restaurant, Wilderness also features mini-restaurant The Counter (which basically seems like the same idea as before, but a bit bigger), banqueting (for those of you who ‘like’ ‘people’), and a range of bars including a Ketel One spot that’s essentially dedicated to Bloody Marys. Cornbury Park, Oxfordshire, 2-5 Aug, wildernessfestival.com Tribal Banquets at Lost Village The Lincolnshire festival sports a headline set from Four Tet and an undercard including Helena Hauff and Daniel Avery, but you can’t eat any of those things. However, the festival’s Tribal Banquets make up for it – big long tables out in the woods, and experimental menus from a host of top-tier chefs. If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, there’s the Eating House pop-up bringing a batch of London restaurants to the country for a weekend, and if you don’t fancy that, there are Dishoom and Patty & Bun pop-ups for fans of tasty curry and wildly decadent burgers respectively. Norton Disney, Lincolnshire, 23-26 Aug, lostvillagefestival.com The Pitt at Electric Fields The vibe is always lovely, the line-ups are always

impressive, and the ground is pleasingly flat. But the food at Electric Fields is what we’re talking about here, and it’s genuinely a strong selling point. Edinburgh street food greats The Pitt will once again bring an array of the country’s best vendors together for a jaunt south, with last year’s line-up including the excellent Mac Shack, and The Buffalo Truck, who we would (evidently) follow across the country to get their crunchy, tasty fried chicken. We did so in 2017, then they sold out of chicken halfway through the festival and one of them accidentally hit The Skinny with an inflatable ball at 2am. That’s a festival memory right there. Drumlanrig Castle, Dumfries and Galloway, 30 Aug-1 Sep, electricfieldsfestival.com

FOOD AND DRINK

THE SKINNY


UNBOUND 12-27 AUG 2018

Late nights at the Edinburgh International Book Festival

July 2018

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Welcome to Unbound 2018 To get a flavour of this year’s programme we pose ten questions to Unbound mastermind Roland Gulliver

For those who have never been to an Unbound event, could you give an overview? For 16 nights, Unbound takes place in the Book Festival’s Spiegeltent in Charlotte Square Gardens. It’s free, it’s informal and it’s fun. It begins around 9pm, finishes around 11.30pm, and each night is different. Authors, performers, musicians and artists come together on stage to share stories, celebrate books and relax at the end of a festival day. It brings together authors who have been appearing at the Festival, some of Scotland’s most interesting live literature and a selection of international friends and partners. Unbound has become a staple of the Edinburgh International Book Festival line-up. Why do you think it’s gained such an esteemed reputation? What is it about the Unbound atmosphere that’s different? I feel very honoured that Unbound has gained such a respected reputation over the years. The atmosphere is created partly by the venue – the Spiegeltent at night has such a great vibe which really appeals to both audiences and authors – in particular, musicians love to come back and perform here. And this year, we will have a new bigger and better Spiegeltent! Very exciting. I feel like we have built a kind of community with Unbound. I hope there’s a sense of ownership beyond the festival – it gives authors and artists the chance to do something different, a place to take risks if they want, to have fun. It’s a night time venue where people come and relax, enjoy a drink but are respectful and attentive of who is on stage. Audiences discover new artists and authors – Billy Letford performed before he was published, Be Charlotte performed before heading to headline Scottish music festivals... It’s where you get to see some legends up close

– Nile Rodgers and Neil Gaiman being two classics from the past! The work challenges, guarantees something different – it might not suit everyone every night – but always offers a quality night out inspired by books and stories. How do you approach programming the Unbound bill? Creating the Unbound programme is a deliciously organic process. It quietly simmers away in the background while we make the ‘main’ programme then comes to the boil in May and June before serving up the event listings in July, to be feasted upon in August. Overdone cooking analogies aside, the programme responds to authors and themes in the main Festival and looks to give the themes a special Unbound twist; it comes from conversations with friends and partners both in Scotland and overseas, some new, some longstanding Unbound partnerships; it comes from people pitching ideas to me and from me pitching ideas to partners. Overall, I aim to create a programme that is engaging, unexpected, diverse and entertaining Could you tell us about some programme highlights for 2018? I am terrible at picking highlights – I can never have a favourite Unbound child! We will celebrate our partnership with the Edinburgh Comic Art Fair with Andrew Rae hosting a night of music, performance and live drawing inspired by his Moonhead and the Music Machine; this will definitely make the most of our new look Spiegeltent. I am really excited about the international elements of this year’s programme, with partners

in Rio’s FLUPP Festival and Barcelona City of Literature bringing some brilliant ideas to the festival. Brazilian artists will be re-interpreting poetry through body language which simply just has to be seen; poets and musicians from Barcelona are giving voice to their changing times; and the bringing together of Irish musicians and poets with Scotland’s own Aidan O’Rourke and Brighde Chaimbeul will make for a special Friday night. Our long-standing Babble On weekend knocks it out of the park with some of Britain’s best with Outspoken Press on one night then Mik Artistik’s Ego Trip on the next. Again, championing the energy, poetry and politics of spoken word. The programme features a broad range of performers, from new starts to celebrating Macmillan’s 175th birthday. How core is it to Edinburgh to showcase and celebrate talent at all stages in their career? It is so important for Unbound to present a range of voices and artists, especially those from the local scene. So it is great that INTERROBANG‽ are joining Unbound this year. I’m intrigued to see what their Edinburgh Bible will bring. Also, it is about challenging people’s preconceptions of established authors and this year we bring in Marcus Sedgwick and Gill Arbuthnott, normally seen surrounded by teens and small people in the children’s programme. There’s a mix of formats – spoken word, podcasts, gigs – is it a conscious effort for you to try new ideas and break the mould of what events at a book festival can be? Yes, definitely. We set up Unbound to offer something different to our audiences, to challenge the distorted stereotypes of what a book festival event is. It is also a space for us to experiment with different kinds of event performances and content to see how our audience respond. It is important for us to have a space to take creative risks. Over the years, Ross Sutherland has done some brilliant Unbound events and this year will be presenting his award-winning podcast, Imaginary Advice, an event that mixes storytelling, soundscapes, exploring how the spoken word and music respond in a live performance. There’s a strong musical contingent, from the Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers to Anthony Joseph’s night on Calypso Stars – can you tell us more about the musical programme? The Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers exemplify why music is so integral to the Unbound programme – not just because it brings a different kind of energy and entertainment but because the relationship between writers, musicians and performers is intermingled with many artists working across creative genres depending on their project. Acclaimed musician and novelist, James Yorkston, who is hosting our closing night, brings together elements of his spoken word music night Tae Sup Wi a Fifer and his international music collaboration, Yorkston Thorne Khan. Anthony Joseph is another great example, he is a poet and musician who has written a fictional biography of Lord Kitchener, a calypso icon; a tale that encapsulates the Windrush Scandal.

Roland Gulliver

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Amidst the fun of the programme, it also tackles serious issues – including freedom of expression in Catalonia, ideas of privacy – why

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do you feel it’s important for festivals, and literature in general, to explore issues head on? It is massively, massively important to explore these kinds of issues in the Book Festival. Books themselves offer places to explore intellectual, emotional ideas, they are where we can find understanding, where we find the complexity and nuance in these increasingly simplified, polarised times. We aren’t arrogant enough to think we can provide all the answers but hope we can offer a space where we can safely ask the questions.

“We set up Unbound to offer something different to our audiences, to challenge the distorted stereotypes of what a book festival event is” The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas will bring four presenters to argue on four disparate challenging subjects and explore how we use our freedom of expression. Although Unbound is about entertainment, enjoying a drink and the atmosphere, it is also about engaging in ideas and events happening in Scotland and beyond. But that doesn’t make it an either/or thing, some of the most celebratory nights have come from the most serious of subjects. What do you hope people take away from attending Unbound events? I hope people leave Unbound feeling refreshed, invigorated, inspired. Maybe they discovered a new writer, found a favourite they missed earlier in the festival, maybe they laughed a lot, maybe they realised book festivals are different places than they expected, maybe they should come back tomorrow night even if it’s another school night… If you could sum up Unbound nights in three words, what would they be? I can never do short, simple answers… UNexpected    BOoks in            UNDeniably Enticing Formats

Editors: Heather McDaid, Rosamund West & Peter Simpson Designer: Fiona Hunter Production Manager & Picture Editor: Sarah Donley Illustrator: Jasmine Floyd

THE SKINNY


In Pod We Trust We look at the ever-expanding and endlessly exciting world of podcasts with two of Scotland’s most celebrated podcasters, Ross Sutherland and Damian Barr

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ver the last decade, the world of podcasts has swollen from an obscurity on the cultural outskirts, to a vast and varied realm that extends across every conceivable theme and topic. Along the way, it has engulfed huge swathes of the general population, enticing many of the world’s biggest celebrities, and creating hundreds of millions of pounds worth of advertising revenue. A term that once sounded techy and niche, ‘podcast’ is now a part of most people’s everyday vocabulary. Appearing at this year’s Unbound to talk a little about this tidal shift are two of Scotland’s most celebrated podcasters, Ross Sutherland and Damian Barr. Rather than pushing it as something shiny and new, both Sutherland and Barr are keen to point out how podcasting can tap into something essential and timeless. To better illustrate this, Barr points to his own route into podcasting. “My interest began as a child, long before the internet, listening to Story Teller – the Marshall Cavendish magazine where each fortnight you got a new tape. I’ve always enjoyed listening to stories and having them read to me, listening over a long form. I think people have always enjoyed that and podcasts are just a new platform to satisfy a very old urge. The urge to listen.” Sutherland agrees, adding: “Making audio stories has been going on for about a century, so there’s nothing new really. Podcasting is just allowing amateurs like me a chance to experiment with the medium and find an audience.” In opening it up to whoever wants to try their hand at it, podcasting has flourished into one of the most diverse artistic landscapes in existence. A cursory glance at the difference between Barr and Sutherland’s demonstrates this pretty clearly: beyond their success and their Scottish accents, the two really are worlds apart. London’s Savoy Hotel has been playing host to great writers for over a century, a place where the likes of Zola, Twain, Maugham and Wilde would each spend time locked in discussion of

July 2018

life and letters. With his Literary Salon, Damian Barr brings this tradition into the digital age, letting the world listen in to conversations with literary heavyweights like Bret Easton Ellis and David Mitchell, as well as newcomers airing their talents for the first time.

"Podcasts are just a new platform to satisfy a very old urge – the urge to listen” Damian Barr

This is in tandem with the most popular image of a ‘podcast’: experts and enthusiasts holding an in-depth conversation about their shared passions. Ross Sutherland’s Imaginary Advice is off at podcasting’s other pole, opting instead for a highly experimental mixture of intimate storytelling and hypnotic soundscapes. Barr’s sounds like a cosy afternoon conversation with a good friend, Sutherland’s more like a chemically altered epiphany-exchange taking place at three in the morning in the smoking area of a club. The great thing is that, in the world of podcasting, there is room for both. This multiplicity is a key part of the appeal for both hosts, as Barr explains: “There is a podcast for literally everything. I think that’s great.” In this conversation alone, podcasts ranging from Australian True Crime to Brightonbased Twin Peaks fandoms pop into the conversation. “And I think the fact that anybody can make one is also great,” he continues. “I’m quite confident that if I’ve got a totally byzantine, niche interest I can go find a podcast about it. In

about two minutes.” Talking about the ways in which podcasting has changed since he first began, Sutherland is similarly enthused, citing “about a million more podcasts!” as the biggest change the medium has undergone since he first got involved. If nothing else, he credits this explosion with the fact that “I probably don’t have to explain what a podcast is as much as I did four years ago.” Just as streaming services allow us to choose what we watch and when, podcasts give us that kind of control over our listening. Steve Jobs referred to it as TiVo for radio while Barr goes with “radio on demand” and it seems likely that this flexibility is a large part of the reason so many are now working podcasts into their lives. Sutherland explains: “Often podcasts are used in vulnerable moments – lying in bed, walking to work, waiting for trains. This is what I use them for, at least. I like the idea of art slipping into these gaps in our lives.” Radio was designed for a time in which working hours and leisure time were more standardised, but “people now use their time in a different way,” Barr suggests. “People’s work landscapes have changed, their lives are much more fragmented, so I think that ‘consume on demand’ model now works much better,” he adds. The “gaps” in our lives are now much more widely spread, chopped up into little pockets of time we want to fill with something valuable. Sutherland talks about them as a way “to make doing the dishes 30% less shit”, while Barr mentions how many people he sees listening to them while waiting on trains. The point is the same: whatever size the gap is and whatever point in your day you can find it, there’s a podcast there to fit it. Much like streaming services, this convenience and ease of access has helped turn podcasting into a massive industry. Apple has been integral to the medium’s rise, while Disney Marvel has further expanded its media empire into the podcasting peninsula with Wolverine: The Long Night. In spite of this, the general culture

UNBOUND

Interview: Ross McIndoe

remains predominantly punk, thanks to its democratising DIY potential. “Podcasts are, to my mind, a bit less monetised than YouTube,” Barr argues. “There’s not so much ‘Look, I’m using this concealer’ or ‘I’m wearing this Nike thing’. YouTube and Instagram are a bit more paid-for, podcasts seem to me to still have a wee bit more integrity.” As the medium moves forward and becomes more mainstream, Barr hopes that it is able to maintain this lo-fi, accessible quality. “I hope it doesn’t become commercialised in the way YouTube has. I’d like it remain a bit of a Wild West.” However, with the sheer mass of small podcasts now in existence, there is the risk of it becoming a jungle in which the little guys cannibalise one another while those with the artificial advantage of a big ad budget are left to thrive. As a remedy for this, Sutherland suggests strength in numbers. “I’d be interested to see more podcast ‘networks’ spring up in the UK. Little podcasts can be stronger if they connect up.” There’s a famous line which has floated around for many years, attributed to various different writers, that goes something like this: “Everyone is born with a book inside them and, in most cases, that is exactly where it should stay.” As a final piece of wisdom, Barr offers an updated take on that anonymous adage: “I think we’re getting to a point where lots of people feel like they should have a podcast just for the sake of it. If there isn’t something you really want to talk about, if you have to really look for the idea, maybe you shouldn’t. There are people who just shouldn’t have a podcast.” Fortunately, neither Barr nor Sutherland are those people. Damian Barr's Literary Salon, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Mon 13 Aug, 9pm, free Imaginary Advice Live, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Tue 14 Aug, 9pm, free

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The Danger Zone The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas brings academics and the public together to discuss everything from privacy and surveillance to health and education. We talk to Dr Sarah Anderson about the benefits (and pitfalls) of conversation

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oise complaints aren’t always a bad thing. If one disgruntled George Street resident hadn’t been such a party pooper, The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas might not exist. When a space opened up for ‘quiet’ shows like acoustic music or spoken word, comedian Susan Morrison jumped on it, with a new idea for a show exploring controversial research topics performed by the academics researching them. With help from arts production company Fair Pley and the Beltane Public Engagement Network, the stage was set for danger. “Universities are not always great in how they engage with the wider world, especially when engaging with non-specialists,” says Dr Sarah Anderson from the University of Edinburgh. “There can be a real power imbalance when you have a researcher from one of Scotland’s top universities who is a world-expert on something speaking to someone who feels like an average member of society. However, universities are publicly-funded institutions and everyone has a right to benefit from the knowledge they generate.” The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas levels this playing field by introducing audience interaction and a compere – Morrison – to each show, so members of the public can feel free to ask any questions that come to mind. Added to this, the researchers involved are fully aware of the fact that, on some occasions, their purely academic

knowledge can also be a limitation. “Audience members often bring a fresh perspective and spot questions and holes in arguments that researchers haven’t spotted before. So the interaction can actually make research better.” While the university staff called up to CODI are engaging and intelligent, it hardly needs to be stated that they’re not entertainment professionals. This is where the compere steps in, playing an integral part in forging the link between researcher and audience member. “They work with the researcher to make sure the shows are entertaining, since they’re being sold as entertainment. They’re also there to help keep the audience discussions on topic and to manage the more vocal members of the crowd who might otherwise monopolise a discussion.” It’s not unusual, Anderson admits, for the audience to completely take over proceedings from time to time. A show on capitalism saw the researcher speak for just seven minutes before questions and debate began. Some of her favourite shows, though, have been where the ‘danger’ in The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas is not immediately obvious. “Rachel Hosker turned what could have been quite a dry topic – archival research – into a discussion of Trump and the manipulation of collective memory. Amy Burge’s show on writing romance fiction, where she got heckled by her

Interview: Kirstyn Smith

The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas

own dad, was also considerably livelier than I anticipated! And our shows on data, privacy and your online footprint always leave me thinking (and a bit unsettled).” While dangerous is, literally, the show’s middle name, there’s also the threat of topics that get too controversial. One particular event, ‘Let Extremists Speak’, meant a lot of risk assessment had to be done beforehand, and the organisers were prepared to withdraw the show at any time, keeping a close eye on online discussions. Although as Anderson points out, when you’re at the Edinburgh Fringe “you can guarantee that someone out there is being far more dangerous than you”.

As for the Edinburgh International Book Festival, the line-up includes Edinburgh Napier’s Richard Kyle, arguing that obesity has bankrupted the NHS, University of Edinburgh’s Smita Kheria, making the case for copyright, and EDINA’s Nicola Osborne, taking a look at online privacy in the wake of GDPR. Each researcher has 30 minutes to present their topic and speak with the audience, and, if you like what you see, consider these events a taster menu for the full shows that will be taking place during the Fringe. The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Tue 21 Aug, 9pm, free

Babbling On Unbound’s spoken word strand returns this year with a showcase of the Out-Spoken imprint and poetry night. We talk to founder Anthony Anaxagorou and poet Sabrina Mahfouz about the unique night in store this August

Sabrina Mahfouz

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ut-Spoken shows what poetry can be – multidisciplinary, inclusive, radical. “The goal was to curate and distil an event which encompassed both poetry and live music,” begins founder Anthony Anaxagorou, “where the age-old elitism and myopia that often trails both art forms is disregarded, leaving artists free to experiment and enthral audiences.” Anaxagorou brings Out-Spoken to the

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famed Spiegeltent with Babble On, alongside a compelling line-up of those whose work he has published: Joelle Taylor, Sabrina Mahfouz, Fran Lock, Raymond Antrobus and Bridget Minamore. “The discourse surrounding underrepresentation had reached its zenith with official statistics highlighting the lack of inclusivity and representation within the industry,” he explains. “I had friends who had

written great books or pamphlets but were being rejected from major presses due to their poetry failing to meet the narrow proclivities of an editor, so Out-Spoken Press was set up to tackle the ongoing issue.” One such collection was How You Might Know Me by Sabrina Mahfouz, a book of characterbased poems from four women working in London’s sex industry, inspired by her own time working in strip clubs, and by years of writing workshops with sex workers. With ‘freedom’ running as a thread throughout the Festival, where does Mahfouz feel her work fits within this? “My work is usually documenting a world and people within it who don’t often have the freedom to platform their stories in a way that centres them, whether due to taboos of society, barriers of gender, race, class or all sorts of other reasons,” she explains. “Artists should use what freedom they have just like anybody else – explore things truthfully and mindfully, researching well before representing outside of your own experience and always open doors (literally and metaphorically!) for others when you can.” On what to expect from the event, Mahfouz quips “accents, anger and some attempts at humour,” while Anaxagorou adds, “There will be moments of high energy, anger, confusion, confession and profound reflection. Audiences can expect to gain insight into worlds that previously they may have been unaware of. These are poets who are responding to life in a way that is wholly unique and compelling.”

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Interview: Heather McDaid

Out-Spoken isn’t the only event under the Babble On umbrella – Luke Wright, awardwinning poet and Babble On co-programmer, brings Mik Artistik’s Ego Trip to Charlotte Square Gardens. “Babble On is about bringing spoken word into the main festival programme,” Wright says. “We are in our fifth year now and our weekend of events gets bigger and better each year. This is going to be the maddest night of the whole festival. There is no one quite like Mik Artistik – his songs are both hilarious and moving; beautiful, sad and brilliant. At least half of his sets are ad-libbed, the band play on as Mik takes us by the hand and guides us through the surreal landscape of his mind. We’ll have a job getting him off, but the audience will be begging for more. “For years I’ve found Mik and the band playing dark corners of music festivals with impromptu crowds of people around him shouting the lyrics to his songs. We’ve wanted him at the Book Festival for years, and this year it is happening. I’ll be Mik’s support. I’ll dig out my best Saturday night poetry and warm you all up.” Rather than conforming to festival themes, Wright suggests performers at their events simply roam free. When they leave the Spiegeltent after these events, he has one simple hope: “People will sit on buses or in cars, maybe with a bottle of wine at the top of Calton Hill, lines of poetry pinging around their brains: entertained, challenged, changed.“ Babble On presents: Out-Spoken Press, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Fri 17 Aug, 9pm, free

THE SKINNY


Monsters Ink Two of the most iconic figures in all of literature – Frankenstein’s monster and Dracula – go head-to-head at Unbound; we talk all things Gothic with their respective backers, Dr Sam George and Marcus Sedgwick

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rankenstein. Dracula. They’re inarguably two titans of literature, cult figures who have outlived their creators Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker respectively. Published at either end of the 19th century, the duo are gothic icons, and now, in the shadows of Charlotte Square Gardens, Edinburgh International Book Festival plays host to the Gothic debate to end all debates, and you’re invited.

other stories, familiar images and narrative structures, intertextual allusions, etc. It has a great degree of self-consciousness about its nature and I like that. It is also very liminal – the concept of the threshold appeals to me, intermediate forms; what lies between the known and unknown.” As for Sedgwick, he thinks it’s something “that some people would have down under that dreadful phrase of the ‘guilty pleasure’, which is a notion I disparage anyway. What does that mean apart from some kind of snobbish hierarchy of what we find acceptable?

Dracula vs. Frankenstein: The debate Both Dr Sam George and Marcus Sedgwick had the opportunity to lay the groundwork for their debate by talking up their side or putting down the other.

“I think the Gothic really appeals to people because it’s the perfect combination of the two most present matters in life – sex and death”

Dr Sam George – Team Frankenstein “My defence of Frankenstein would be very simple. I would argue it is the greater novel for the following reasons: remarkably, it is the work of a teenager, since it was begun when Mary was only 18; it is a novel written by a teenager, read by teenagers as part of the A-level syllabus. Dracula is unsympathetic since he is denied a voice in the novel, whereas the monster is eloquent and questioning, inspiring our sympathy. He is for many the first sympathetic monster – a very big claim! “The science has been overplayed – in my opinion it is a novel about education and parenting (or the lack of); as such it could not be more profound or poignant. It allows for the idea that monsters are made and not created. In doing so it explores the premise that we are born innocent and corrupted by society (naturally good, not innately sinful). “The monster can be read in many ways. One of the most interesting is to see him as an allegory for the female condition. I would argue that Shelley saw him as such – he is doubly like woman i.e. judged by his appearance and denied an education. He undergoes the kind of haphazard or self-styled education that the majority of women endured at the time. “Frankenstein’s monster speaks to teenagers and female readers in a way that Dracula doesn’t.” Marcus Sedgwick – Team Dracula “There’s no question Frankenstein is an absolutely iconic novel, that’s why we’ve chosen it as one of these two books, but it’s less successful narratively. It’s replete with clumsy coincidences. There’s just so many overly convenient chance meetings and encounters of various kinds throughout the book. Narratively I find it therefore less enjoyable to a modern reader. “I know Sam’s going to argue the opposite! I think Dracula stands up better from a non-academic point of view, as the more enjoyable novel. “There are other things about Frankenstein that worry me. I find there’s dubious snobbishness in the book and I’d argue [it] verges on becoming racist. There certainly is xenophobia in it that’s distasteful. “Structurally I find it a little bizarre – it’s like a Russian nested doll of a novel and you’ve got four stories sitting inside each other. There’s a thing in writing called the rule of three – we see it in fairytales, that things work in threes. Three works very neatly psychologically, and four feels like it gets too complicated. I feel it would work if that middle story were the central core nugget

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Interview: Heather McDaid

Marcus Sedgwick

we get to, but that central story is thematically irrelevant to the rest of the book. So, there’s a few things you could start with!” The Gothic at large Sedgwick came to work with George many years ago, following her launch of the world’s first MA in Vampire Literature. Working through the classics, including Dracula, to the present day and Twilight, the course included Sedgwick’s My Swordhand is Singing; George invited him to come and talk about the book, and they’ve worked together since. As for what draws them to the Gothic, for George is was through folklore and fairytale. “I grew up in Cumbria where there is a tradition of storytelling and superstition,” she explains. “One

of my earliest memories is going to the village associated with the Croglin vampire, a little known British myth which predates Stoker! “When I first started lecturing I was given the courses students seemed to dread – the eighteenth-century novel, early Renaissance literature, and so on. One day when they were struggling to engage with an epic poem, I asked them what they read for pleasure and two of the brightest said vampire fiction. I thought, ‘Me too… I could do something with this.” The rest is legendary. “You could say I embraced my dark side, my inner goth, and the rest is history! “Gothic as a genre is profoundly concerned with the past, narrative interruptions of the past into the present. It is also dependent on traces of

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“The Gothic has always, always, always suffered from this notion that it’s inferior in some way. The adjective gothic originated – whether it was architecture or literature – because it was deemed to be decadent and weak and corrupt. That stigma stuck with Gothic fiction and I’m not sure it’s entirely gone away now. It was there throughout the 20th century, and certainly at the time of its birth it got called that because it seemed to be inferior in some way. “For example, Edgar Allan Poe: he never really within his lifetime was given credit – he’s studied in schools and universities now, but in his lifetime, his work was disparaged. You look at the work of later writers [like] H.P. Lovecraft, it’s the same thing. It takes a very long time for the Gothic to be rehabilitated, and to be taken seriously, and yet throughout all this time, I think it really appeals to people because it’s the perfect combination of the two most present matters in life, namely sex and death. Those two things are almost always neatly combined and not far beneath the surface within Gothic.” As parting words, Sedgwick has some high hopes for the event. “We’re really looking for people to get involved and bring their opinions as well. I hope that people will maybe see these two books in a way they haven’t seen them before. I hope they’ll have some fun. We’re hoping that Sam and I will kick off the first half and then we’ll open up and have a fairly rambunctious debate about the merits and otherwise of these two books.” The groundwork has been laid. For one night only, Frankenstein takes on Dracula and you are invited to pick a side and fight your case. Will the fight be won? Can it ever be? There’s only one way to find out. Night of the Literary Living Dead! Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Sun 26 Aug, 9pm, free

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Shoot for the Moon

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ife's a peach when you have a moon for a head. So says Andrew Rae with his graphic novel Moonhead and the Music Machine. Joey's head can wander into galactic reveries, escape the dullness of earth, and then in one snap he's back to the reality of being a teenage boy – it's much crueler here. Moonhead and the Music Machine is a psychedelic, bizarre, but ultimately fun coming-of-age story - the school talent show comes around, and so he embarks on his mission to create the musical machine to rule them all, the best there's ever been. Striking, fun, musical and creative – what better way to celebrate the mystique of Moonhead than a jolly gang of illustrators and musicians coming together for some tunes and live drawing? Featuring Aussies Electric Fields and more, it's a night that promises to shoot for the moon.

Andrew Rae and the Music Machines, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Sun 12 Aug, 9pm, free

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Praise the Lord Poet, musician and writer Anthony Joseph presents his unconventional biography of Trinidadian calypso legend Lord Kitchener at Unbound. Joshua talks us through the importance of Kitch to Trinidadians past and present Interview: Kirstyn Smith

Twin Cities For one night in the Spiegeltent, Edinburgh hands the stage to a fellow UNESCO City of Literature – Barcelona Interview: Laura Waddell

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fter our own referendum, Scotland has taken quite an interest in the constitutional debate in Spain. It is fair to wonder if poetry there reflects the political upheaval. “It has been a period which has shaken up Catalan society, and poetry, being a human expression as it is, has echoed it,” says Maria Cabrera. Cabrera – who often performs alongside the band El Pèsol Feréstec, which translates as ‘the savage pea’ – is part of the Barcelona line-up for this year’s Unbound. As well as being an awardwinning Catalan poet, she teaches linguistics and is currently translating English poet Emily Berry into Catalan. “There have been at least two poetic anthologies which have included expressions of 1 October 2017 (the day of the Catalan referendum),” she tells us. Catalan poetry “is a minority practice in a minorised culture” says Marina Espasa, coordinator of the Ciutat de la Literatura, and a writer herself. She has put together this line-up of some of Barcelona’s best poets. It’s tempting to draw easy parallels between the constitutional debates of Catalonia and Scotland, and poets working in minority languages in both cultures, but the poetry itself, of course, cannot be generalised. It digs deeper. What kind of concerns do poets have in Barcelona? “Themes and concerns are very diverse,” says Cabrera. “Each generation shares themes and stylistic approaches with contemporaneous generations in other cultures. In younger generations there are, for example, clearly identifiable signs of postmodernity: intertextuality, genre hybridisation, classical metric forms combined with social and modern themes.” And how does it go down? “In Barcelona, poetry receives attention and institutional help, and in Catalonia there is quite a big amount of poetry prizes. In Spain, except for one or two exceptions, there is a great lack of awareness of Catalan-written poetry.” One of the line-up, Enric Casasses, is a poet who has gained a cult following in Catalonia.

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Around Casasses’ figure, as seen in his performances on YouTube, are rapt audiences listening intently to his direct delivery. His work has been published by big publishers and underground presses alike and is described by Espasa as “questioning the position of a language-made self in the world.” If Edinburgh’s event is anything to go by, Barcelona’s poetry scene looks vibrant, and Espasa describes it as powerful. Why is that? “Considering the dimensions of the Catalanspeaking community, the poetry which is written in this language is, thematically, formally and generationally, very diverse. And because there is a strong poetry reading circuit, poets are more used to speaking up than other writers, and have freer spirits.” Also on the line-up is poet Mireia Calafell. She’s co-director of the Barcelona Poetry Festival, and in 2015, she was awarded the Lletra d’Or for the best book published in Catalan for Tantes Mudes. It was subsequently published in Spanish. Like Calebra, her poetry evokes personal freedoms. It “deals with the constraints which grind us down in human relationships and our relationships with our own body,” says Espasa. It all sounds like a good fit for this year’s festival theme of Freedom. Espasa agrees: “The invited poets explore, from different perspectives, the idea of freedom, individual as well as collective.” And there’s another factor, she says: “The fact that poetry has such a small audience gives it more freedom, in the sense that it is not submitted to market pressure. The majority of the poets don’t make a living writing and reciting their poems, which means that they only write when they feel the intimate and urgent need to do so, and then they can treat any theme they want to.”

n a carnival Monday afternoon in Queen’s Park Savannah, Port of Spain, Trinidad, Aldwin Roberts – better known by his stage name Lord Kitchener or simply Lord Kitch – was standing alone watching a steel band. This was the first and only time Anthony Joseph met his musical idol. “The city was hot with carnival: bands passing, loud music, and suddenly in the middle of the field, there was Kitch,” says Joseph. “I couldn’t miss the opportunity to at least say hello. I mean, he was a legend.” Although he’d seen him perform many times and caught glimpses of him around town from a distance, he hadn’t ever encountered Kitch alone and accessible. “We spoke for about 15 minutes, mainly about calypso. He was explaining the difference between major and minor modes, about lyrics, about the calypsos he liked and didn’t like that year, about double entendre. It was amazing.” The importance of this serendipitous meeting cannot be understated. Like most Trinidadians, Joseph grew up listening to Kitchener: he and his music were deeply woven into Joseph’s identity. He also sees parallels between Kitchener’s story and his own, both having left Trinidad in their mid-20s to pursue a music career in the UK. After Kitchener’s death in 2000, Joseph felt as though a family member had died. “It also felt like the end of an era, as if the generation that included Kitch and my grandparents, who were born in the early 20th century into the height of the colonial project, were making room for the new. These were people who were still touched by colonialism, who looked to the ‘mother country’ while still being quite nationalistic as Trinidadians.” Another thing Joseph noticed was that after 60 years of making such important music, not much was known about Kitchener at all. There were no biographies and even fewer books to consult. So Joseph decided to write one. He took an unconventional approach to his own writing,

partly because of his belief that a mainstream bio isn’t the most accurate way to represent someone’s life, but also because he found so little information about Kitch that it became necessary to take on a storyteller role, to re-imagine the narratives behind the anecdotes he was collecting. “No one lives a detached, singular existence,” says Joseph. “I was interested in levelling the narrative field, to have the people that knew him also reveal themselves. In a way that’s a political choice, to focus on the community rather than the individual. I was interested in testimony, in how people saw Kitchener and how we all created his mythology.” While Joseph is a musician and writer, he primarily sees himself as a poet, and any other work he produces is informed by his poetry, in a mutual meta exchange of ideas. “Sometimes poems or prose become ‘songs’, sometimes the poem remains intact, sometimes music enforces change,” he says. “It’s a symbiotic process. I’m a Trinidadian, and the way I grew up speaking, the particular swing of Creole we have, is pure music. I never move too far from that.” It’s this experimentation, this playing with established forms and coaxing something new to the surface that audiences can expect from Joseph’s Unbound show. “I like odd juxtapositions, so the key for me is in finding a new space or as-yet-undiscovered moment in the telling of a historical narrative. I’ll be joined in Edinburgh by three improvising musicians who are able to move back and forth between calypso, poetry and free jazz.” Looking at Kitch through these lenses gives Joseph a chance to lay bare his wisdom and knowledge of the legend onto a brand new audience, and to dictate through poetry and music the secrets he learned on that hot Monday afternoon in Trinidad. Calypso King of the Windrush Generation, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Sun 19 Aug, 9pm, free

Set Thought and Voice Free, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, Sat 25 Aug, 9pm, free Anthony Joseph

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Barcelona

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What’s On A night-by-night guide to this year’s Unbound programme. Events kick off at 9pm in the Book Festival Spiegeltent, Charlotte Square Gardens, although you may want to get down early to make sure you get a seat. Each and every event is, of course, free

Sun 19 Aug

Calypso King of the Windrush Generation

Sun 12 Aug

Andrew Rae and the Music Machines Horrendous hormones, awkward bodies, and homework: you might remember how bloody awful being a teenager is, and you didn’t even have a moon for a head. Award-winning graphic novelist Andrew Rae’s Moonhead and the Music Machine is a psychedelic, gorgeously illustrated coming-of-age-and-beating-the-bullies story centred on one unusual boy and his gift for making music. Andrew brings a gang of illustrators and musicians for a night of performance and live drawing, with tunes from Electric Fields from Adelaide.

Mon 13 Aug

Damian Barr’s Literary Salon Damian Barr’s Literary Salon is a global sensation which has sold out everywhere from London to New York to Moscow, and finally it arrives in Edinburgh. North Lanarkshire-born Barr – author of Maggie & Me, a memoir of growing up and coming out in Thatcher’s Britain – is one of the most connected people in the arts, and his Salon has welcomed the likes of Caitlin Moran and Bret Easton Ellis in the past. Join him for a stylish night of songs and stories with plenty of garrulous guests.

Tue 14 Aug

Imaginary Advice Live Formally daring and hugely inventive in its approach, Ross Sutherland’s award-winning podcast Imaginary Advice is a colourful sketchpad of new storytelling ideas. Joined tonight by Submarine and The Adulterants author Joe Dunthorne and with live music from the brilliant Jonnie Common, this is the perfect introduction to one of the medium’s most startling successes, and an unmissable celebration for fans of the show. Check out the podcast in advance for a flavour of what to expect.

Wed 15 Aug

Africa Unbound A celebration of contemporary voices from across the nations of Africa, journeying beyond stereotypes to interrogate history, politics, the imperial past, ancestors, and the future. Discover dazzling talents from

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the continent in a night of readings and performances from Zimbabwe’s Novuyo Tshuma, Uganda’s Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi and S J Naudé from South Africa, plus Nigerian poet Donna Ogunnaike and Ghanaian percussionist Gameli Tordzro.

Thu 16 Aug

MacMillan 175: Crafting Curious Minds In 1843, two sons of Scottish crofters set up MacMillan Publishers to share learning and capture imaginations. 175 years later their company still produces the bestsellers and groundbreakers that shape our literary lives, from The Gruffalo to Kate Tempest. Tonight we celebrate their history and look to the future. Enjoy readings, performances and music from guests including Cooking on a Bootstrap founder and food poverty activist Jack Monroe, and Sharlene Teo, winner of the inaugural Deborah Rogers Writer’s Award for debut novel Ponti.

Fri 17 Aug

In 1948 calypso music icon Lord Kitchener arrived in the UK on the Windrush. He was at the forefront of multicultural Britain in the 50s, popularising calypso music and representing a growing Caribbean community facing a hostile environment even then. Poet and musician Anthony Joseph has captured Kitchener’s story and music in Kitch, a mix of fiction, biography and memoir, and tonight Joseph and his band celebrate the man and the Caribbean influences that still thrive in this sceptred isle.

Mon 20 Aug

INTERROBANG‽ present The Edinburgh Bible Officially Britain’s Best Spoken Word Show (according to the 2017 Saboteur Awards), Edinburgh’s own INTERROBANG‽ lights up Unbound with a sumptuous night of performance. Join host Ricky Monahan Brown and discover The Edinburgh Bible, a mysterious text that reinvents biblical stories and relocates them in Scottish settings. An award-winning writing cast including Mark Bolsover, Beth Cochrane, Emily Dodd, Jen McGregor and musician Aurora Engine stage a fun and thought-provoking show designed for people of all faiths and none.

Babble On presents: Out-Spoken Press

Tue 21 Aug

After a hugely successful national tour in 2017, acclaimed independent publishing house Out-Spoken Press presents an exclusive spoken word showcase at the Book Festival. Champions of inclusive, radical and multidisciplinary poetry, Out-Spoken can be trusted to deliver a cracking show tackling a wide array of topical themes by some of the most enthralling poet-performers around: Joelle Taylor, Sabrina Mahfouz, Fran Lock, Raymond Antrobus, Bridget Minamore and Anthony Anaxagorou.

The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas allows some brilliant researchers to let their most challenging ideas loose on the public. Is obesity crushing the NHS? Can too much education be bad for us? Should we celebrate the death of privacy? Comedian Susan Morrison hosts this boundary-pushing, potentially world-altering evening of debate and frenzied discussion, which has become a Fringe staple over the past five years.

Sat 18 Aug

Babble On’s Ego Trip Mik Artistik’s Ego Trip are one of the most unpredictable and exciting acts on the circuit. Mik’s lyrical dexterity and the musical range of the band combine to make people laugh, cry, and flail around. BBC 6 Music’s Gideon Coe regularly plays their tunes and John Cooper Clarke called them ‘sensational’. A whirl of music hall, poetry, funk and punk, Ego Trip are the ideal tonic in troubled times. Special guest Luke Wright delivers bighearted, quick-witted new work too.

The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas

Thu 23 Aug

Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers Last year this criminally good covers act rocked the Book Festival with their bone-chilling talents before setting off on a nationwide tour, and we’re delighted to have them back for their hard-earned encore. A cavalcade of crime writing’s best — Val McDermid, Chris Brookmyre, Mark Billingham, Stuart Neville, Luca Veste and Doug Johnstone — blow back in to town with a refined set and a growing cult following. Lucky we’ve got a bigger Spiegeltent, or it would be murder on the dance floor…

Fri 24 Aug

Soul Clap its Hands and Sing with Poetry Ireland Irish and Scottish poets and musicians have always cast a particular spell on each other, as tonight’s trio of creative collaborators prove. Bilingual poet Doireann Ní Ghríofa presents a series of new poems, in a live performance with a sonic landscape by composer Linda Buckley. They are joined two of Scotland's finest traditional musicians, Brighde Chaimbeul and Aidan O’Rourke, weaving in and out of each others’ work to spin a tapestry of Celtic music and lyric.

Sat 25 Aug

Set Thought and Voice Free Barcelona has always been home to poets, those born there and those who have been drawn to live there. It has been sung about, praised and vilified, for its beauty and its darkness. Barcelona City of Literature offers a view of the poetry that has emerged from its historical stones and from some of today’s preoccupations: freedom of expression and lust for life. Poet Mireia Calafell presents her

delicate yet sharp, combative words. While Maria Cabrera and Enric Casasses perform live alongside the band El Pèsol Feréstec who put music to some of the best poetry written in Catalan over the past centuries through to the contemporary.

Sun 26 Aug

Night of the Literary Living Dead! Darkness descends, and with it come monsters. The creature of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein first awoke 200 years ago, and 80 years later Bram Stoker’s Dracula emerged from the crypt – but which is better? Novelist Marcus Sedgwick and gothic expert Dr Sam George square off in a battle of the beasts. Then travel to the village of Losthope with Gill Arbuthnott and Doug MacDonald for a grizzly live game experience filled with weird experiments, serums and surprises. Could you be the bloodthirsty Count stalking the Spiegeltent?

Mon 27 Aug (7pm Til Late) Tae Sup wi’ a Fifer

In May the Book Festival travelled to Fife, and now the Kingdom comes to Charlotte Square Gardens for our final night spectacular, which kicks off at the earlier time of 7pm. Acclaimed singer-songwriter and novelist James Yorkston brings his award-winning folk club to the capital, featuring music from the legendary Sheena Wellington, a special appearance from Richard Dawson and poetry readings from Jamaica’s Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison and Jeet Thayil, poet and novelist, author of Narcopolis and The Book of Chocolate Saints. Finish the Festival in style with the songs and sounds of international supergroup Yorkston Thorne Khan.

Wed 22 Aug

Body Slam: Kiss of Tongues Coming all the way from Rio, Body Slam is a new kind of poetic performance: a composition of languages both spoken and signed, English and Portuguese. In the poets’ performances sometimes the languages are different, each happening in its own grammar; at other times, they intersect. Grupo Corposinalizante, a Rio-based art group led by Joana Mussi and Cibele Lucena, invent forms of communication, performances and poetic interventions that give visibility to deaf culture.

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Wearing Thin As big brands cash in on millennial tastes with gender-neutral, plus size and so-called ‘modest’ ranges, one writer takes stock of their shortfalls

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t the last New York Fashion Week, less than 2% of models were trans or non-binary. People of colour only made up 37.3% of the models walking at shows and only 27 out of the 2289 model appearances were made by plus size models. While a handful of brands and labels – New York’s Gypsy Sport, for example – are committed to casting models of diverse ethnic backgrounds, gender identities, body types and ages, most catwalk casting leaves a lot to be desired. This might not seem all that important for the average shopper nipping out to Topshop for a quick browse, especially when a failure to recognise and celebrate diversity has long been an issue in the fashion industry. But the absence of diversity from catwalks plays into a wider, more systemic problem in fashion: that designers are still creating clothes to flatter and suit the lifestyles of a very narrow portion of the population. This kind of thoughtlessness on the part of high fashion brands not only reinforces singleminded beauty standards, but justifies a situation in which large swathes of the population are overlooked and ignored by retailers. That’s not to say the fashion industry isn’t moving forward. One focus group at a time, many brands are beginning to realise the lucrative effects of catering to a more diverse customer base. While most women’s high street stores only stock styles up to a size 16, the ‘plus-size’ market (which caters for sizes 16/18 upwards) was worth around £6.6bn in 2017. As a result of this success, other brands are taking heed, and dipping their toes in other markets deemed to be outside of the mainstream. But their approach thus far has often left a lot to be desired, serving up tokenistic, half-hearted ranges which fail to deliver for their targeted customers. Take the high street’s attempts to tap into the ‘modest fashion’ market. For those unaware, ‘modest fashion’ is a style of dressing favoured by a wide spectrum of individuals who are more inclined towards covering certain areas of their body. What it actually comprises is pretty subjective and anyone can be a modest dresser, but modest fashion is often marketed toward culturally Muslim women. It is this demographic which has been targeted by high street stores. H&M, for example, released modest line LTD to coincide with this year’s Ramadan. While the company’s head of design, Pernilla Wohlfahrt, claimed that the move was taken with the aim of making the brand more “diverse and inclusive” and “offer[ing] something for everyone”, many Muslim women were vocally disappointed by the fruits of this labour. Modest fashion blogger Dina Tokio (aka Dina Torkia), who has amassed more than 1.4 million followers on Instagram, publicly called out the LTD line in a YouTube video with more than 600,000 views. “We are not asking brands to sell us what our cultures around the world have already invented,” she explains. “We are looking for whatever’s on the high street to be more inclusive for everyone — just add a few more layers and a bit more length.” Similar critiques surfaced in a video by YouTuber Kaur Beauty, who stated; “I don’t think we want a westernised abaya or a westernised

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Words: Megan Wallace Illustration: Jacky Sheridan

salwar kameez… we want more options.” What’s more, the collection was not only placed at a considerably higher price point than most H&M pieces, but it featured garments posing the same issue to modest dressers as most high street collections — for example, dresses that are too sheer to not be worn without a petticoat. How have H&M managed to disappoint their modestdressing customers quite so spectacularly? Torkia’s opinion is that the collection’s failings are down to a lack of engagement with the modest-dressing community, coupled with complacency: “It seems to me like they’re not actually working with modest dressers… But why would they? They know the pieces are going to be hot.” And Torkia may well be right. At the time of filming her video, many pieces within the collection had already sold out. It seems as if high street stores are just not willing to make the effort to listen to the actual modest dressers out there, knowing that modest collections are so overdue and in demand that they can get away with a sub-par selection.

“We are not asking brands to sell us what our cultures around the world have already invented” Dina Tokio

It’s a similar story with the shift towards ‘gender neutral’ fashion as retailers scramble to appeal to the emerging Gen Z market, whose ambivalent attitudes towards the gender binary pose issues for the strict menswear/womenswear divide in fashion. While gender-neutral or unisex collections would, in an ideal world, serve the queer, trans and non-binary communities by providing clothes that go beyond ‘male’ or ‘female’ and towards more fluid definitions of gender, retailers have fallen down again and again. A stunning example of this came in 2016, with Zara’s Ungendered line; it was literally eight pieces of loungewear and plain T-shirts. Not exactly groundbreaking and certainly not what gender non-conforming can’t already buy from literally anywhere. Even as the years go by, big brands are slow to catch up to where gender neutral fashion needs to be. Last year, H&M’s unisex denim collection, despite featuring a solitary and much-discussed dress, was just another disheartening selection of ‘basics’. More recently, Abercrombie’s gender neutral childrenswear line disappointed the queer community by falling back on exclusively masculine-coded items and no dresses, skirts, or other pieces of clothing considered ‘feminine’.

The steps retailers are making towards making their collections more inclusive should be applauded. But we should remain critical of the types of changes retailers are introducing and indeed the motives lurking behind these decisions. In order to truly improve representation at shows and in stores, there needs to be more POC and LGBTQ+ individuals working at every stage; not just models, but designers, buyers, marketers, CEOs and fashion writers and photographers. Brands must do the groundwork

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before they cash in on the profits and social prestige involved in selling to minority fashion markets. Those who have the privilege of having their needs catered to by the mainstream should listen to those who have been traditionally overlooked and help hold brands accountable when they fail to deliver. The problem of exclusion in the fashion industry is a difficult weed to kill, but one thing’s for sure: it won’t be fixed by a limited edition capsule collection.

THE SKINNY


Crossing Borders From Girl, Interrupted to Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, pop culture has long wrestled with the topic of Borderline Personality Disorder – but could we be doing better?

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’m either psychotic or neurotic. Neurotic: bad for me. Psychotic: bad for you.” This bone-cutting summary of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) from comedian Tommy Tiernan both captures its essence and reduces it to the most base of explanations. His routine about the subject, seen in his 2014 Stray Sod show, expands his feelings a little. In a nutshell: “I’m not good on my own or with people.” As a comedian living with BPD, his job is to laugh at the issue, to remove the harsh initialism from its spiky casing and coax out enough humour to soften its rusty edges. It’s a frightening and lonely thing, made worse by stigma and misinterpretation. In terms of widely-discussed mental health issues, BPD hasn’t really been one we’ve heard much about. While it’s one thing for someone actually living with the condition to reduce it to simplistic terms – psychotic or neurotic – when it comes to the general public’s understanding, there aren’t many readily accessible sources out there to help them understand it. For many, it’s a baffling concoction of syndromes which, as with most mental illnesses, differs wildly from person to person. Few have attempted to illustrate BPD explicitly for what it is – no euphemisms, no bullshit – in the mainstream, as opposed to the portrayal of better known mental illnesses, like how BoJack Horseman deals with depression, or the illustrations of anxiety and panic attacks in This Is Us. Despite this, BPD is flirting pretty heavily with the general public at the moment, thanks to news about Pete Davidson, a stand-up comedian and cast member on Saturday Night Live with BPD, and his alleged engagement to Ariana Grande after dating for a matter of months. Eyebrows raised, news, gossip and fan sites are pseudo-confused, but are mainly using these events as an excuse to assign it the same fate as other mental illnesses – OCD, depression, bipolar disorder: the phrase “that’s so BPD” has been born.

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It’s true that impulsive acts, particularly when it comes to relationships – romantic or otherwise – could be considered a blend of some of the nine diagnostic criteria. But the act of reducing BPD to a character trait is both unhelpful and unhealthy. It’s already seen as a punchline and a trope; to trivialise or cartoonise it is dangerous. In TV, film, music and books, portrayals of characters with BPD are few and far between. Girl, Interrupted, the 1999 film starring Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder is based on American author Susanna Kaysen’s memoirs of being hospitalised, and is one notable example of BPD on film.

“Can the reality of living with BPD ever square away with its filmic or literary image?” It’s not the mainstream’s responsibility to ensure that every mental illness is coddled into user-friendly, audience-attracting, money-grabbing media. One TV show, however, has firmly grasped this nettle: The CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Perhaps it’s because many have found a relatable protagonist in Rachel Bloom’s confused and often self-aware character, Rebecca Bunch, or perhaps it’s because the team had two seasons under their belt – allowing audiences to connect, empathise with and fall for characters – before slipping in the reality behind what makes the eponymous ex-girlfriend ‘crazy’, but the response has been, generally, favourable. In the musical

comedy series, Bunch confesses something to her therapist that has shades of what Tiernan spoke about in his ‘either/or’ routine: “My whole life I’ve only known how to be really good or really bad, but being human is living in that kind of in-between space.” Maggy Van Eijk, author of How Not to Fall Apart, a book that uses the author’s hard-earned lessons to give advice on how to live safely with mental ill health, cites Crazy Ex-Girlfriend as a useful representation. “It was great for me, especially her diagnosis episode,” she says. “It really depicted the mixed feeling of not wanting to be stigmatised, but also finally wanting some semblance of a label, so you can start to piece together what’s going to help you moving forward.” As Crazy Ex-Girlfriend demonstrates, it can be difficult to get a BPD corroboration from a doctor or psychiatrist; in my case it took more than a decade and included mis- and re-diagnoses of depression, anxiety, OCD, and disordered eating before the word ‘borderline’ was ever uttered. I’m one of many who feels ‘textbook’, but it’s understandable that psychiatrists are wary to pinpoint it as the be-all and end-all. “I am aware that a lot of people feel diagnostic labels can be stigmatising,” says Dr Ed Burns, Consultant Psychiatrist at The Priory in London. “However, I have seen a lot of patients who do not find the terms ‘borderline’ and ‘emotionally unstable’ stigmatising and instead have expressed relief that they have a way to describe or categorise their symptoms. This often comes with the realisation that they are not alone in suffering and that once ‘named’, there may be ways to help manage their condition.” When we reconsider the recent eyeballing of Pete Davidson for his quick engagement to Grande, it’s laudable that he is vocal and seemingly unashamed to discuss his experiences. Chris Young, author of Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon, believes that it’s important to have content makers look harder at how they

INTERSECTIONS

Words: Kirstyn Smith Illustration: Xenia Latii

render Borderline Personality Disorder in their work. “I can’t think of any well-thought-out depictions of other men with BPD in the media,” he says. “This reflects the stigma and prejudice around the diagnosis. If we can enable the producers of content across the media to look at BPD in a realistic way – not in a sensationalist or othering way – then things will gradually change.” Stripping away screens, editing and viewer pleasing, the reality remains that diagnosing and being diagnosed can be a muffled and inconsistent experience. Almost every diagnosis of BPD contains parallels with other mental illnesses; in fact it is often considered an umbrella, sheltering many others under its malleable canopy. This inevitably makes it difficult to portray it in a way that will please everyone; can the reality of living with BPD ever square away with its filmic or literary image? It’s hard enough to get a doctor to tell you that you have it, let alone to find someone who can piece together its myriad quirks in order to present it in a way that will be comprehensible for passers-by. While it’s obviously important to bring the subject to light, it’s just as imperative that content producers don’t fall into the trap of having a character be defined by their BPD and nothing else. This is difficult; the complexity of the condition can be overwhelming and it’s easy to see how those with no lived experience can find it hard to separate the person from the diagnosis. In my experience, however, people living with BPD are fascinating, funny and incisive with lots to say – and not just about their diagnosis. This is why it’s so important to see BPD represented in the likes of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and Girl, Interrupted, as well as having spokespeople like Pete Davidson around to bring three dimensionality to the condition. Visible depictions of illnesses are crucial, but above all else, the people – intricate, nuanced, authentic – behind these must also be revealed.

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Weird Fun As the beating heart of Edinburgh’s Cowgate, Sneaky Pete’s, gears up for its tenth birthday we speak to owner and manager Nick Stewart about his beloved shoebox in the capital’s Old Town

Interview: Tallah Brash

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The Skinny: Have you ever experienced a gig at Sneaky’s that has changed your idea of what a gig can be? Nick Stewart: “We’ve had a few! Montonix playing in nothing but Speedos and boxer’s boots, beginning their set by sweatily crowdsurfing on top of their drums for the first five minutes, then taking the whole gig to the street; Bob Log III doing the same on an inflatable dingy while wearing full Top Gun flight suit and helmet; James Vincent McMorrow standing stock still, staring ahead and singing in beautiful falsetto to a pin-drop quiet crowd for an hour – it seemed like some amazing performance art but I’ve heard he was pretty tipsy and trying to hide it; Happy Meals (now known as Free Love) mixing right into the crowd through a club time live set, with Suzy singing in French while up on a dancer’s shoulders; Billy McCarthy from Augustines being so funny and rambling in-between songs that he kind of forgot to play them and the show went on an extra hour; The Juan MacLean’s full live band 30-minute version of Happy House with at least ten minutes of theremin solo – you don’t get that every day; Yak merrily trashing their gear as the crowd were leaving, that was really bonkers, I don’t think many of the audience even noticed!” Can you recall a night where everything went wrong but the night was still incredible? “There are so many things that can go wrong! One night we had the fire alarm go off three times when the club was full to capacity. Each time the whole crowd had to leave and each time every single person came back in to start dancing again. It was like watching that video of the Slam Tent filling up in two minutes, but on a loop.” What band had you never heard of/listened to before seeing them in Sneaky’s that totally blew you away? “Honeyblood’s debut show here was like that. I knew Stina had been working on some songs, but when they played what was only their second ever gig, they played more or less the whole debut album in that short set, and everyone knew straight away that a band had arrived. Ed from FatCat Records was in the crowd and that led to a record deal pretty much straight away.” What was the gig/band/club/DJ you booked in to Sneaky’s that got you most excited? “It’s impossible to pick one show, but I had an incredible experience recently. Dale Barclay’s bands And Yet It Moves and The Amazing

July 2018

Photo: Nick Stewart

neaky Pete’s is the final destination for many an Edinburgh clubber on a night out in the capital. For ten years now, bands and DJs alike have cut their teeth in the space that Young Fathers’ co-producer Tim London recently described to us as a “black rectangle of possibilities,” and for most people it really is exactly that. Sneaky Pete’s, with its maximum capacity of only 100, offers the opportunity to experiment with music, to meet new collaborators, colleagues, friends, future lovers – all with the simple goal of creating a fucking great party atmosphere at its core; it truly is a very special place. To celebrate each of its ten years we posed ten nostalgia-inducing questions to owner and manager Nick Stewart, aka The Mayor of Sneakytown, to really make him dig deep into his Sneaky’s memory palace, from gigs that blew him away to nights where everything went wrong.

Snakeheads had both played here before and been brilliant, but I had a feeling his new project with Laura St. Jude would be something special, and I was texting friends to come down last month for what I thought would be one of the shows of the year. There’s been nowhere to hear the new recordings so I really was hosting the gig without a solid idea of what would happen. “Well, as it turned out, Dale’s new band featuring members of Sweaty Palms is actually one of the best live bands I have ever seen. I mean it! EVER! Dale’s the greatest frontman of his generation – the band make sometimes brooding, sometimes howling grooves that burst apart brutally, and it’s all held together with some of the best songwriting I’ve heard in ages. It was like early Birthday Party with better tunes, but instead of the feeling you get with Nick Cave that he’s a precocious kid that invented a character to be, with Dale what you get is his innate raw blazing soul and energy coming through, the absolute genuine article. You know it when you see it. “I’ve also got to mention that I was so so excited to have Simonotron revive the Edinburgh version of Hot Mess here. I am incredibly proud to have a queer rave here where the music is on point and the crowd are just the best. Since that first party last year, which totally surpassed expectations and then some, we’ve kept Hot Mess on as a regular night.” Bands like Young Fathers started out playing shows at Sneaky’s – what other artists have played Sneaky’s in their infancy that might come as a surprise? “I could go through a long list here but I’ll give you one fun one. Future Islands played here in

2011 to about ten people, gave that tiny show as much heart then as they do playing huge stages now, and totally deserved to become the stars they now are. If you thought they seemed weird on Letterman you shoulda seen them here. They are in fact the only band to have ever crashed on my sofa and floor rather than get a cheap hotel or hostel. Perhaps I should be offering that service more often, seems like it might shake a little magic dust on things!” Have there been any artists you’ve really had to work hard to book due to their size compared with the size of the venue? “Weirdly, we haven’t really had to work all that hard to get well known acts to play here. Especially for DJs, there’s a fair amount of rubbish gigs around that pay well, where the crowd is there but not ‘really there’ inside the music, but at my place DJs find that the crowds really engage. “Sneaks is tiny, so there’s never going to be mega money here, but by keeping the atmosphere right we’ve created a space that artists actually want to come and play. At one stage last year we were getting a LOT of requests for big name DJs to play for us, and I had to start turning them down. I realised that the reason that well known DJs wanted to play here was to get an authentic experience from a brilliant in-the-know crowd, and you don’t get that at a club that hosts everyone from the circuit. So long as we keep things weird and fun, then a premier league of artists will keep wanting to play.” Did you ever have what you thought was a totally outrageous idea for the venue that you thought you’d never pull off in a million years?

Music

“I think the idea of the venue working at all in such a tiny space is the most outrageous idea really. I think about it every night, how it’s so strange that it works... but it does!” What’s the best last song of the night you remember hearing in Sneaky’s? “Everyone who’s been to Wasabi Disco knows the answer to this. For ten years Kris Wasabi has played Everywhere by Fleetwood Mac as the last tune, and the anticipation of that singalong moment at the end of the night is always justified in the beautiful release when it happens.” What’s your most beloved and memorable moment at Sneaky’s over the past ten years and why? “I think some of our early moments matter the most to me. Seeing our original bar manager Shane Greenfield being held aloft crowd-surfing at his leaving do was very special: I realised that what we do is quite meaningful to the people who come here and when they get a chance to express how they feel, they really go for it.” And finally, what’s your secret to the successful running of Sneaky’s and what are your hopes and dreams for its future? “Keep it weird and keep it fun. Sneaks is a social club for people that love music and we really do love and take care of our family. I guess my ambitions don’t go much further than that either: keep it weird and fun for as long as possible!” Sneaky Pete’s has been throwing parties now for ten years – keep an eye on their website and socials for regular updates on future events sneakypetes.co.uk

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Essay It Ain’t So Ahead of Love Letters’ Glasgow website launch party, we speak to co-editor Lola Stephen about the zine’s beginnings, gender equality in the music industry and Debbie Harry

re you sick of seeing guy-bands overpopulate playlists and festivals in equal measure? Are you filled with gratitude towards the femme and non-binary musicians who made it, against all odds, to carry you through hard times? If the answer to either of these questions is “yes” then Love Letters is the zine for you. Launched earlier this year in Perth, Australia, Love Letters provides a space to celebrate female and non-binary musicians, share killer music recommendations and have long-overdue conversations about diversity in the music industry. After the first issue dropped in February, Love Letters is returning in digital form through a new website where fans and contributors can continue to ask the important questions between print editions. Ahead of the website’s Glasgow launch party on 11 July, we catch up with Lola Stephen – one half of an editorial dream team also including photographer Pamela Boland.

“It’s so important for people to have role models in music. When they see someone like themselves onstage, it gives them the motivation to make music themselves” Lola Stephen

When she fell upon troubled times, Stephen turned to music and this is what inspired Love Letters. “I came up with the concept just over a year ago when I was going through a break-up and just felt a bit shit,” she tells us. “I made a playlist of all these strong female artists like The Runaways and Patti Smith – these songs made me

feel so much better about myself, especially when I was feeling vulnerable and my heart was a wee bit broken. I thought it would be cool to do a zine thanking these women for that, and that’s where the idea came about: writing love letters to femme and non-binary musicians for how they’ve impacted our lives.” When Stephen met her co-editor at a party, things quickly fell into place: “It was an idea floating about while I was living in Australia and then I met Pam at a party. She liked the idea and came on board, then we made the first issue together.” The result is a 72-page printed zine which combines the bright colours and imagery of original fanzines with a feminist riot grrrl sensibility. Both editors were among the writers who contributed their own love letters; Boland’s was directed to Patti Smith, while Stephen wrote two, one devoted to Angel Olsen and the other to Debbie Harry. “I listened to Angel Olsen’s album My Woman on repeat. I admired her vulnerability and it inspired me to do the same in my own music.” Stephen continues enthusiastically: “And Debbie Harry’s the coolest person I could ever think of. From such a young age, I’ve always been in awe of her. She has such a strong presence and she doesn’t take shit from anyone. Especially when she was starting out in New York, it was such a boy’s scene but it didn’t bother her. She just did her thing and made no apologies for it.” With both editors immersed in Perth’s vibrant creative scene whilst writing these letters and making the zine, it was inevitable that “the first issue really focussed on Australian artists, and a lot of the femme and non-binary local musicians [in Perth].” However, this focus has shifted, particularly as Stephen – originally from Dundee – has relocated to Scotland: “I moved back here in March and wanted to bring Love Letters with me; to work with people here and launch the zine over on the Western Hemisphere.” As the editors broaden the zine’s geographical focus they hope to extend the important conversations taking place in the Australian music industry to new audiences. “Over in Australia there’s such a big conversation about the music industry as a whole – like with #MeToo in the film industry,” Stephen explains. “In Perth, everyone’s really switched on in terms of making line-ups more inclusive... It’s so important for people to have role models in music. When they

Edwin Organ @ Broadcast, Glasgow, 5 Jul We recently caught Edwin Organ performing as part of Wide Days’ evening showcases back at Edinburgh’s Teviot House in April and we absolutely loved what we heard. His cover of LCD Soundsystem’s I Can Change for a BBC Introducing session last year totally knocked us sideways as well, so be sure to head along to this show at Broadcast tonight, as part of the venue’s Broadcast Summer Breakdown series throughout July. Snack Villain and Egopatterns also play tonight. Lovely stuff.

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Photo: Alex Cameron

Edwin Organ

Lunir

Lunir @ The Safari Lounge, Edinburgh, 7 Jul The Cologne-based soul, R’n’B and pop duo, originally from Edinburgh, are back for a couple of weeks thanks to their recent appearance at Kelburn Garden Party. Making the most of their time here, the duo who describe their sound as “kaleidoscopic future-soul” are bringing their loops and beats, along with the simply stunning vocal of Becky Sikasa, to the intimate surrounds of The Safari Lounge tonight. Support comes from Edinburgh-based nu-soul band The Onethreeone.

Photo: Marina Mche

Do Not Miss

Love letter to Courtney Barnett

see someone like themselves onstage, it gives them the motivation to make music themselves.” Stephen’s goal of making line-ups more diverse begins at a grassroots level, in local music scenes, and is something which she has actively participated in when curating the music for the Love Letters website launch in Glasgow. “One of our favourite Scottish bands is Hairband, so they’re playing it, and then we have Freakwave. 4mina, who is my really close friend Katie, is also playing; she’s in ST.MARTiiNS as well, but this is her first solo show.” As well as advocating for more diverse line-ups, Love Letters strives for gender equality in the music industry at an even more fundamental level. Edited by two women, and with contributions open to everyone, the zine seeks to combat the bias in music journalism itself: whether it be the erasure of non-binary musicians or the sexist narratives established around female musicians. Coming from a journalism background, and as a practising musician herself, Stephen is keenly aware about the urgency of

Tiree Music Festival @ Tiree, Inner Hebrides, 13-15 Jul It’s the middle of July, you’re sick of being stuck on the mainland, but you don’t want to miss out on your usual weekend of fun musical antics. Well, look no further than Tiree Music Festival on the Isle of, well, obviously, Tiree. Travelling to the most westerly island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland will not only offer you the chance to take in some of the most beautiful scenery Scotland has to offer, but once there you can enjoy its glorious beaches as well as lots of excellent music. Be Charlotte, The Hoosiers, Elephant Sessions, Skerryvore and Skippnish are just some of the acts playing this year’s shindig.

MUSIC

Be Charlotte

Credit: Marney Anderson

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Interview: Megan Wallace

making music journalism more inclusive and less prejudiced. “I identify as female so I could never speak on behalf of a non-binary person,” she explains, “but I just think it’s so important to give people who identify in this way a platform. Especially as there are so many people who identify as non-binary but in the mainstream it’s not really spoken about.” What, then, can journalists do to clean up their act and contribute to making the music industry fairer and more equal? Stephen’s answer comes loud and clear: “Music journalists just need to be more respectful with their approach, and do their research. If you’re a journalist you need to be educating yourself constantly, rather than falling back on lazy questions. When you’re there to talk to someone about their music, you’re just there to talk about the music, nothing superficial.” Love Letters' Website Launch Party takes place at Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Glasgow, 11 Jul loveletterszine.com

Godflesh

Godflesh @ Summerhall, Edinburgh, 20 Jul When Godflesh played at Barcelona’s Primavera Sound in 2012, one of the food trucks at the festival were serving a ‘Godflesh’ burger, and we couldn’t think of anything more fitting. Tonight, while there are unlikely to be any food items at Summerhall named after Birmingham’s industrial metallers, meaty basslines, riffs and electronics will be on offer in abundance, of that we can assure you. Support will come from Edinburgh doom metal band Of Spire & Throne. Tickets? Check. Earplugs? Check. You’re ready.

THE SKINNY


Lightning Conductors

Pictish Trail

Lost Map 5th Birthday @ Mono, Glasgow, 20 Jul ‘Happy birthday to you / Happy birthday to you / Happy Birthday dear Eigg-based label Lost Map Records / Happy birthday to you!’ Tonight, Lost Map are celebrating five glorious years of putting out lots of lovely releases, from postcard singles to cassettes and vinyl to download codes on jumpers. Label chief Johnny Lynch, aka Pictish Trail, heads up tonight’s bill with Londoners Firestations also in tow. Oh, and on 27 July they’ve a second birthday party, just like the Queen, this time at The Rum Shack with Kid Canaveral and Randolph’s Leap. Streamers at the ready!

July 2018

interesting approach to writing songs, one that is reflected in the delicately balanced musicality yet raw immediacy and edginess of Chuchoter’s sound. “Owen works on the track, I don’t actually know what he does,” Smith laughs. “Generally, I’ll sit and try and write something for a small ensemble, like a jazz ensemble,” McAllister explains. “Basically just bounce all the music about and try and make it work as an electronic track. It kind of starts with an actual band in mind and eventually finds its way into being nasty, electronic [music]. I’ll work on that for two weeks and then send it over to Emily and she won’t look at it for about a month. And then honestly, just writes [the lyrics] in ten minutes.” It’s Smith’s perfectionism and commitment to writing something in less than half an hour that keeps their songs feeling punk-level raw, despite

Flying Moon Music and Arts Festival @ The Flying Duck, Glasgow, 21 Jul Flying Moon Music and Arts is a brand new allday music, arts and crafts festival for Glasgow organised by Moonstruck On Clydeside, indiefolk band Flying Penguins and venue host for the day, The Flying Duck. Kicking off at 4pm and running through until midnight, Flying Moon will feature a number of craft stalls from the likes of Rebel Radical DIY, Cymbal Things and BASICBITCH Stitching, with live performances from CRYSTAL, Annie Booth, Zoë Bestel, Megan Airlie, Iona Fyfe and more.

Annie Booth

gigs safe spaces “even if it means making cishet men a little uncomfortable for half an hour,” and are thrilled to be bringing their ethos and sound to this year's Electric Fields Festival. “We’re so, so fucking excited!” Smith gushes “The line-up is great! Young Fathers, Lady Leshurr... and just having a different platform, we’ve never had a platform like that. It should be a whole new set of people that we wouldn’t normally get the opportunity to play for.”

being expertly crafted. Songs like Back Again are like angry synthwave diamonds forced out of the pressure to record something good quickly. “It was nuts,” says McAllister, “Emily was just recording on her phone and I thought ‘Fuck, this is the best thing I’ve ever heard you write!’ It was lightning hot, absolutely furious. We’re really angry and loud now,” he laughs. Chuchoter’s lyrics are full of “lightning hot” feminist wrath, such as the EP’s single Pieces, their self-proclaimed “most vicious song” which was written as a direct reaction to sexual harassment. “We describe ourselves as angry, feminist pop,” explains Smith. “There’s just so much bullshit that I personally have had to contend with, and it’s good to have an outlet for that, to say ‘Fuck you!’ “I think it’s important as well that people hear that kind of music because there’s a lot of songs that perpetuate women as naturally submissive, and a lot of romanticisation around the idea of being pursued and desired. I think it’s important that people know that, OK, if that’s what you’re into then fine, but if it doesn’t feel good then you can absolutely say ‘Fuck off!’” Smith continues, “Pieces is full of that, it’s like ‘Don’t fucking touch me! I’ve had enough.’ When you’re performing it on stage, you can really let go of all that pent up aggression. And it’s fun to do too!” It’s this echoing of the #MeToo movement that gives Chuchoter’s music its timeliness, a movement that the band are committed to and one they embrace the complexities of. “There’s a whole cultural shift that’s happening and sexual assault is not OK,” says Smith. “Owning that within your own peer group, and extending that into the content you consume. Some people don’t have the option to separate the art from the artist, it’s so detrimental to a survivor’s state of mind to see other people acting like that’s OK. We’re more about standing in solidarity with survivors than trying to tell anybody off, but it works both ways. That little bit of support we can provide by saying, ‘I believe you.’” McAllister describes what this means in practical terms in the music industry: “As soon as we see something, we shut it down. We cut ties. We’ve turned down gigs, we’ve turned down a lot of work. We’re not going to actively encourage rape culture and predatory behaviour.” “It can be like a fucking safari!” adds Smith. Chuchoter are adamant about making their

The Little Kicks

The Little Kicks @ King Tut’s, Glasgow, 26 Jul Now in its seventh year, King Tut’s Suh-uh-mmer (dramatic pause) Niiiii-hiiiiights are back for 2018, with 15 nights lined up celebrating a plethora of up-and-coming Scottish artists within the walls of the world-renowned King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut. Their Summer Nights series runs from 1228 July; tonight be sure to check out Aberdeen electro-pop four-piece The Little Kicks who will be ably supported by singer-songwriter Zoe Graham and Glasgow bands The Vignettes and First Tiger, with EmuBands on DJ duty.

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“There’s just so much bullshit that I personally have had to contend with, and it’s good to have an outlet for that, to say ‘Fuck you!’” Emily Smith

It’s a passion of the band’s to carve out a space for queer and non-binary folk in the local Scottish music scene and this is something they want to take to the festival circuit, which usually falls very short in terms of gender representation among acts. “I feel like Electric Fields have made such an effort this year to be inclusive and have less ‘boybands’,” McAllister enthuses. “I think that will attract more people who are interested in us. They’re trying to accomodate people who will be more responsive to our kind of stuff. It’ll be like ‘Oh cool, we’re all here for the same thing!’” Pieces is released on 27 Jul via Spinnup Chuchoter play a free show at Cult Espresso, Edinburgh, 2 Aug facebook.com/chuchotermusic/

Missy Mcanulty @ Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, 30 Jul Missy Mcanulty was introduced to us recently at this year’s Wide Days A&R You Brave Enough? panel where she submitted one of her tracks to be critiqued by a panel of judges in front of a room full of strangers. Nerve-wracking stuff indeed. But on this occasion it paid off, with the Edinburgh-based pop singer-songwriter receiving a number of approving nods – Mcanulty’s tunes are pop through and through and seriously radio ready; catch her tonight as she celebrates the launch of her latest single, Home.

Missy Mcanulty

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Photo: Alishia Love

ast year, The Skinny caught Chuchoter supporting Kllo at Sneaky Pete’s and were instantly hooked on their sprawling synths and emotive vocals. The Edinburgh-based duo, made up of lyricist-singer Emily Smith and composerproducer Owen McAllister release their new EP Pieces on 27 July, a short, explosive record of danceable and uncanny beats (think riot grrrl filtered through Sleigh Bells and Jamie xx) which will no doubt make a big impression on festival goers at this year’s Electric Fields. “We had a lot of fun making it!” McAllister tells us. “We’re enjoying playing it, we’ve worked it into the live set a lot more now so we’re really getting to know the songs better. A lot of them we only wrote quite recently.” “And quite quickly as well!” Smith enthuses. The two music graduates have a really

Photo: Brian Sweeney

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Interview: Rachel Bowles

Photo: Colin Macdonald

Chuchoter

Photo: Chuchoter

Ahead of releasing their new EP Pieces, we speak to Edinburgh duo Chuchoter about their writing process, feminism and making their gigs safe spaces


Album of the Month Dirty Projectors Lamp Lit Prose [Domino, 13 Jul]

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avid Longstreth returns with a selection of du jour indie favourites less than eighteen months after last year’s essentially solo, selftitled effort. Where that album was a somewhat lachrymose reflection that considered, and was in response to Longstreth’s break-up with former bandmate Amber Coffman, Lamp Lit Prose is terrifically upbeat for the most part, with hopeful lyrics and bold, brassy arrangements. Opening track, Right Now features Syd (of The Internet) and contains pitch-shifted vocals, blaring horns and some gently plucked Spanish guitar in the first minute alone, and only gets better from there. Along with the subsequent two songs, Break-Thru and That’s a Lifestyle, this is one of the strongest opening stretches you’re likely to hear this year. First single Break-Thru doubles down on Longstreth’s idiosyncracies with references as varied as Kanye, Archimedes and Fauvism, but gives a sense of real, honest joy throughout (‘She is an epiphany / Her electricity opens my days...’). That’s a Lifestyle is less

Deafheaven

Ordinary Corrupt Human Love [Anti-, 13 Jul]

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Though it wasn’t George Clarke and Kerry McCoy’s first record, most people’s introduction to Deafheaven came with Sunbather, a record that reshaped a genre but begged the question, how do you follow up a record that had become an almost-instant classic? Follow-up New Bermuda bulked up and added some tough edges but didn’t quite rewrite the rules. Thankfully, Ordinary Corrupt Human Love has no such issues. Though Clarke’s vocals are still fractured and torn with grief, this is a supremely confident record with flashes of melody set against pinwheeling drums and explosive, brutal riffs. You Without End sounds like Slowdive playing in an underground cavern, summoning an almost psychedelic quality, while lead single Honeycomb is a thunderous, elaborately constructed monster expertly blending classic rock with raw coursing muscle power. Dark thoughts have never been far from Deafheaven but they understand the catharsis of purging, riffs swelling and bursting outwards on tracks like the merciless Glint. If you’ve ever wanted to scream at the sky this is the record for you. Needless to say, it’s one of the best produced records of the year. On album closer Worthless Animal, drums batter out a martial tattoo as claustrophobic riffs hang like shrouds around Clarke’s howling vocals. It’s bleak and bruised but builds to a beatific higher plane. As always, Deafheaven are anything but ordinary. [Max Sefton] Listen to: Honeycomb, Canary Yellow

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ambiguous in its take-down of elitism and materialism, using a Dylan-esque series of rhetorical questions, but still sounds fantastic. Elsewhere, Empress Of provides a solid backing on Zombie Conqueror (a song that jumps from delicate acoustic guitar to Jack White-ish skronk and back again), Rostam and Robin Pecknold bring a beautiful harmony to You’re the One and Amber Mark amps up the unabashed poptimism of I Feel Energy. But the real star of the show is Longstreth, who gels marvellously with both the guests and the new Dirty Projectors line-up (of whom Nat Baldwin is the only previous member). While this album could be characterised as a return to ‘normality’ for Dirty Projectors, such a label has no bearing on a group this relentlessly imaginative; a creative rebirth would be more accurate. [Lewis Wade] Listen to: Right Now, Break-Thru, That’s a Lifestyle

Dirty Projectors

Chuchoter

The Internet

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Pieces EP [Spinnup, 27 Jul]

Hive Mind [Columbia, 20 Jul]

Named after the Spanish word for whisper, Edinburgh-based duo Chuchoter are anything but quiet, and their new EP Pieces proves just that. Launching straight in with dark, warped synths and distorted, echoing vocals on EP opener Back Again, the track builds up to a massive dancefloor-ready chorus, following the declaration from vocalist Emily Smith, ‘I refuse to be contained.’ Smith and producer Owen McAllister’s explorative electro-pop is played out to full effect on Pieces, and contained they certainly are not. Smith’s lyrics and vocal tones cover a breadth of emotion, flitting between the soft and vulnerable (‘You tell me to stay / So I go nowhere,’ she sings on This Time Round) to the fierce and brutal (‘I’ll tear you apart’ she threatens on Pieces), while the weight of McAllister’s production allows her to do so seamlessly. Gorilla sees all these elements perfectly entwined, with its emotive lyrics and glowing production making for the stuff of pop brilliance. Chuchoter’s brand of pop music feels as big as it is gritty, and these are songs that could just as much be heard on Top 40 radio as they could played out in sweaty, underground clubs. Building on the sound of their debut EP Credo, Chuchoter have reached far greater heights with Pieces, and will undoubtedly continue to do so in the future. [Nadia Younes] Listen to: Back Again, Gorilla

There’s a palpable sense of ‘getting the gang back together’ on Hive Mind – which is crazy considering it’s only been three years since The Internet’s last album. Maybe it’s because, after the release of the excellent Ego Death in 2015, all five members quietly made names for themselves as solo artists. On Hive Mind, the positive impact of their time apart is quickly apparent. Opener Come Together is mature and quietly devastating in spite of its perky rhythm, an emblem of solidarity in the face of senseless violence. There’s little else here in the way

BODEGA

Endless Scroll [What’s Your Rupture?, 6 Jul]

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Like, scroll, like, click. From the album title alone, you’d be right in thinking BODEGA’s Endless Scroll is a bit of a millennial spin. And much like its youthful protagonists, attention span is brief thrashing through the entirety of their debut in just over 30 minutes. Our digital dependence is mock-narrated between songs, dishing out pop culture references (The Smiths’ Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now gets a few nods) and budding Oxford Dictionary entries (see: endless scroll). Name Escape features an ironic existential monologue from frontman Ben Hozie asking ‘have

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of political statements though, to the album’s benefit. Taking cues from Prince’s end of the world party 1999, dancing through the chaos is the clear through-line of Hive Mind. Squelching guitars and kinetic basslines are in ample supply and, like with Ego Death, romance is the album’s lifeblood. The spirit of The Purple One is also felt in the confident sensuality of lead singer Syd. ‘I can turn you on / With my dirty mind,’ she winks to a coy lover on Come Over while bandmate Christopher Smith lays down a severe drumbeat that slams against her caramel-smooth vocals. Nobody said we couldn’t have a good time while the world goes to shit. [Alexander Smail] Listen to: Come Over, La Di Da, It Gets Better (With Time) you heard the latest single from so and so,’ and their situationist post-punk artfully captures the monotony of modern life best in the rinse-andrepeat riff-fuelled Bookmarks: ‘All day at work, stare at computer / Come home from work, stare at computer...’ You get the idea. Can’t Knock the Hustle deals with consumerism in our artificially sweetened, augmented reality world – ‘Selling gluten-free water with sugar / Nine dollars for a smoothie’ – while standout Gyrate is The Roger Sisters on speed, with rollicking basslines and running rap spats. Named after their city’s equivalent of a corner shop, it’s fitting BODEGA’s debut has all the essentials covered; wry wit, shrewd observations and a vision of art rock’s finest punk party. Like, listen, like, like. [Cheri Amour] Listen to: Name Escape, Gyrate, Bookmarks

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Photo: Jason Frank Rothenberg

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Phantastic Ferniture [Transgressive, 27 Jul]

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Australian singer-songwriter Julia Jacklin has described her new project with bandmates Elizabeth Hughes and Ryan K Brennan as a way of getting away from her “sad music with a guitar” style. Admittedly, that sad music with a guitar has hit an incredibly connective chord with her fans and, let’s not forget, a lot of the best music being made right now can be described, rather inanely, as such. Not that Jacklin thinks in a demeaning way of her own music. After a stint playing sombrely to crowds across the world since 2016’s Don’t Let the Kids Win, no one can deny her the desire to let loose and have some fun. Luckily, Phantastic Ferniture is more than just a disposable side project to let off some steam. It may lack the richness and depth of her

Gorillaz

The Now Now [Parlophone / Warner Bros., Out Now]

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Melancholy and undecided lyrics about loneliness, isolation and difficult choices float over summery synths, hazy harmonies and George Benson’s unmistakably upbeat guitar. This is The Now Now. One of them, at least. Damon Albarn’s been on a streak. Blur’s The

solo work, but that is replaced with absolutely towering riffs and Jurassic grooves. The trio really reach for the titanic; the DIY aesthetic of the genre often relies on scrappiness, but they manage to hit the right note whilst scaling things up. Take It Off and I Need It sound massive. Jacklin’s voice is a welcome ingredient in the blender of a style whose most notable influencers are male. But the provocation to mix things up doesn’t come in the form of savage lyrical play or political statements. Jacklin’s basic refrain of ‘Fuckin ‘n’ rollin just feels right’ is cussy and brattish enough to make a point all on its own. Sleater-Kinney’s send up of, but also tribute to, classic rock The Woods is a touchstone here. Closer, Mumma y Pappa is a microcosm of the project in full: jammy, childish, not a little ridiculous and a perfectly executed homage to the excess and extravagance of rock’n’roll. Jacklin sets out to have fun, and she has it in spades. [Tony Inglis] Listen to: Uncomfortable Teenager, Take It Off, Mummy y Pappa Magic Whip (2015), Gorillaz’s Humanz (2017) and soon a follow up to The Good, The Bad & The Queen’s eponymous/anonymous 2007 debut – not a dud among them. He’s been busy making great art with talented collaborators and friends but the predominant themes on The Now Now are those identified in the opening track: states of being bereft, purposeless and ready for difficult change. Richly layered rhythmic grooves carry through much of the rest of the record, ably produced this time around by James Ford and Remi Kabaka. It’s far from the carnival of featured

Ty Segall & White Fence

Okzharp & Manthe Ribane

LUCIANBLOMKAMP

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Joy [Drag City, 20 Jul]

Ty Segall and Tim Presley have been here before with 2012’s Hair, and sadly followup Joy falls short. Songs are broken up by brief and throwaway interstitials and intros, just as melodies, riffs and jams start to make sense, at times providing an experience close to channel-hopping through a lot of very similar sounding transistor radio stations. Despite this, when the pair hit their sweet spot, Joy is not without (cough) its joys. For anyone who’s been obsessed with every Segall album since Goodbye Bread, Joy will feel like most of his work, breezy and fun, but also slight. If the two friends took the time to craft something more elegant and thought-out, they could deliver a classic. [Tony Inglis] Listen to: Body Behavior, Good Boy, My Friend

July 2018

Closer Apart [Hyperdub, 6 Jul]

On their first full-length for the experimental dance label Hyperdub, the Cape Townbased duo of producer Okzharp and singer/dancer Manthe Ribane dial down the tempo losing some of the violent, rhythmic excitement associated with the duo’s earlier releases. By aligning themselves with a heavily processed pop aesthetic, Ribane ends up with the bite torn out of her authoritative voice, and save for a few moments of brilliance that could certainly service an EP (such as Okzharp’s jump to hyperspeed on Never Thought, Ribane’s evocative flow on Tide and Why U In My Way or the suite of Theletsa and Dun, which best illustrates the pair’s afrocentric, globalist sound), Okzharp offers dry production that carry the vocals and little more. [Ross Devlin] Listen to: Never Thought, Theletsa, Dun

Sick of What I Don’t Understand (Part 2) [Good Manners, 6 Jul]

Phantastic Ferniture

guests that was 2017’s 26-track Humanz though; The Now Now, at 11 tracks and with only three comparatively unobtrusive features (Snoop Dogg and Jamie Principle appear on Hollywood) is tighter conceptually but looser as a listening experience. Gorillaz have always trafficked in “alternative realities”; now the mainstream is catching up. Their occasional danceable and house party hits have, historically, taken off because of excellent art-pop conception and production coupled with a calculated understanding of the music-listening masses’ deepest needs, but the band’s appeal

Lotic

Power [Tri Angle Records, 13 Jul]

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‘I’ve got what I want / But I want what they’ve got,’ LUCIANBLOMKAMP sings on Sick of What I Don’t Understand (Part 2) opener Endless, the frustrations around ambition and incompleteness hammered home at first by a galloping breakbeat and looping piano, before switching gears to a heavier house beat for a closing halfminute salvo. It’s a heart-rateraising lead single. It’s a shame, then, that the ambient feedback squeal at the end of I Lose Myself completely punctures any atmosphere generated by Part 2’s – and in fact, what will be the overall three-part LP’s – midpoint. This is a minor fault in an otherwise captivating collection of tunes. [George Sully] Listen to: Endless, Doing This For You

The issues surrounding who has and who can wield power have become entrenched in society and it’s a theme that Berlin-based producer Lotic has been navigating for two years. Unsurprisingly, on Power the concept manifests itself throughout. Power sometimes addresses its theme explicitly, as on Hunted, where Lotic’s repeated whispers tackle how white, cis gazes can fall on black, non-cis people. But it’s an album that also implicitly addresses these issues through deft and layered instrumentals, often straddling the line between the harsh and muscular, the soft and twinkling. Through it all, Power maintains a deep sense of nuance, sounds constantly morphing and remaining grippingly vital, still with great emotional intensity around every corner. [Eugenie Johnson] Listen to: Heart

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Photo: Cate Harman

Phantastic Ferniture

has always been strongest with those who wish for, well, alternatives that art, entertainment, news and relationships don’t offer. The Now Now celebrates the interpenetration of alternate realities and our mundane. It’s a reminder that realities, real or otherwise, are shared. Or, as Albarn intones in the opener, ‘I need you in the picture / That’s why I’m calling you.’ That’s an invitation even George Benson on a bad day couldn’t turn down. [Aidan Ryan] Listen to: Humility, Hollywood, Souk Eye, One Percent

Smokescreens

Used To Yesterday [Slumberland Records, 13 Jul]

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Smokescreens don’t stick to just one formula on their second LP. Instead, there are disparate influences at play: from the static power-pop of the title track to the soporific, Velvet Underground-esque Fool Me, Smokescreens are brazenly open about what informs them – using it as a tool to create a hybrid of sounds they love, rather than hiding behind any pretense. Used To Yesterday isn’t particularly unique, but Smokescreens’ melodic impulse shines brightly. Here, the LA-based four-piece have achieved the deceivingly difficult task of creating simple, perfectly wrought pop songs with substance. A faultless addition to Slumberland Records, this is indie pop as it should be: melodic, lyrically astute, bittersweet and catchy as hell. [Hayley Scott] Listen to: Jolly Jane, The Lost Song

Ross From Friends Family Portrait [Brainfeeder, 27 Jul]

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Across its 12 tracks, Ross From Friends’ Family Portrait blends together complex, layered production, filled with skittering beats and jackhammer pulses that sometimes float along with shimmering melodies. The title track provides a sweet interlude, while Back Into Space emerges from its noisy cacophony of samples to evolve into a cosmic voyage. Parallel Sequence, meanwhile, harnesses warped organic elements alongside its mechanical foundations to create something intriguing and immersive. A couple of the more traditionally structured techno tracks can feel a little too cold and laboured, feeling longer than their actual run-time. Despite this, when it pushes boundaries further into avant-garde territory, Family Portrait can be an immersive exploration of dance music. [Eugenie Johnson] Listen to: Parallel Sequence

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Balancing Act Ahead of her set at Stereo this month, we find out how Ribeka juggles a day job and A&R side project with her rising status as one of Glasgow’s most exciting club DJs

lot of shows like this tend to ignore the evolution of dance music, almost as if music stopped after 1987 and everything’s been the same since – totally disregarding this huge cultural revolution that completely changed the habits of a lot of people.” Becky Marshall is discussing the inclusion of dance music in Rip It Up, the soon-to-be released three-part BBC documentary on the history of Scottish pop music, tying in with the National Museum of Scotland's exhibition of the same name. “So I’m pushing the idea of dance music being covered as part of the programme. It’s kind of the most popular form of music in Scotland in many ways.” Through her role as a freelance assistant producer, she has spent the past six months bringing the series to life: “Setting up all the shoots, doing all the archive research – basically doing all the work to facilitate what the director wants the programme to be”. A fatigue-inducing task no doubt, but one that has presented Marshall with an opportunity to bring her deep-seated musical passions to the fore. As Ribeka, Marshall communicates these passions in DJ form, steadily carving a reputation as one of Glasgow’s finest purveyors of cold synths and industrial electronics, while also chipping in with semi-regular A&R work for pioneering industrial imprint Mute Records. “Right now it feels like there’s a nice marriage between the different sections of my life – at least in terms of content,” she explains. “But I guess the trade-off with that is just having the time to fit everything in. That’s the eternal struggle.” Growing up in a musical family with a big emphasis on post-punk, it didn’t take long for Marshall to tap into her appetite for music from the sonic fringes. “I remember my parents throwing a party and my dad clearing the room by playing Anthrax by Gang Of Four,” she laughs. “But from an early age I thought ‘yeah this is for me’. I was always the weird, miserable kid sitting up the back of the bus listening to Goth tunes.” After years of avid record collecting and hogging the aux cable playing songs on YouTube at after-parties, Marshall finally took the step of investing in a set of decks in 2014 – applying for a show on Subcity Radio shortly after. “I began teaching myself how to mix, and can safely say I was fucking terrible at it,” she laughs. “The first gig I played was a Subcity party at Nice ‘n’ Sleazy – it was very much a case of learning on the job – and from there a few other people started asking me to play.” While continuing to develop her technical skills, it was the art of persuasion that led to her most significant musical breakthrough to date. Along with friends Iona Fortune and Katie Shambles, Marshall was successful in bullying Optimo’s JD Twitch (aka Keith McIvor) into starting So Low, a club night dedicated to the darker recesses of synth, wave and industrial music. “Keith reluctantly agreed to do this one-off night and straight away it was a massive hit,” she recalls. “The crowd was a really amazing mix of young and old and it made for such a

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glorious dancefloor experience.” So Low acquired almost instantaneous cult status, and Twitch agreed to continue with the night on the proviso that Marshall, Fortune and Shambles made it their own. The trio’s widespanning leftfield tastes began drawing attention from further afield, and when Mute Records’ visionary label head Daniel Miller enquired about the possibility of employing regional scouts for the label, Twitch wasted no time in steering him Marshall’s way.

“I remember my parents throwing a party and my dad clearing the room by playing Anthrax by Gang Of Four”

music scene, and Marshall enthuses about its successes. “Lisa’s running club nights, while another girl Idman that we taught just did a mix for 12th Isle that’s ended up in the Resident Advisor top mixes of the month – it’s amazing to see how far they’ve all come. “People that like a year ago maybe wouldn’t have considered getting behind a set of decks and now they’re putting together such interesting things. I think it’s been a really positive thing for Glasgow.” Yet despite this positive impact, Marshall is quick to stress that the city’s scene still has a number of issues needing ironed out – none more so than the unwillingness to give female DJs headline slots. “My frustration is that I think there are a lot of women who deserve to be playing headline slots but are still predominantly playing warmup sets instead,” she laments. “For instance, Sofay’s one of the best warmup DJs I’ve ever seen and part of the reason for that is because she was held back so much – which is so wrong. She’s worked so hard for eight years and has all this experience behind her

(from going through such a long period of being a warmup DJ.) “I think the frustration for me now is wanting to make sure that those people who’ve worked really hard are getting the opportunities to play the bigger room slots, because that’s a whole other skill to learn, and if you don’t offer women the opportunity to play peak time slots then they never develop that skill.” But for Marshall, the clear signs of progress have been encouraging – both with Grassroots and on a personal level. When probed on whether she sees her music industry work surpassing that of her current day job, she offers a pragmatic response. “I think so,” she says cautiously. “I’ve tried to cut my hours with the BBC so that I’m only in four days a week, but it’s all pretty up in the air at the moment.” “My life’s one big balancing act, but I feel very fortunate to have had so many amazing opportunities, and I’m just enjoying the opportunity to do stuff in music.” Moonlight 003: Metrist, Ribeka & Sofay, Stereo, 14 July

Becky Marshall

“They offered me a full-time A&R job in London, which was a crazy situation to be in because I’m a complete Mute geek,” she jokes. “My 21st birthday gift was Mute audio documents – like the entire back catalogue of Mute with all the rarities and B-sides – and Daniel Miller is one of my all-time heroes. So sitting there having lunch with him and being offered a job was a bit overwhelming.” Despite this, Marshall made the painstaking decision to turn down the full-time offer, instead opting for a more relaxed arrangement that allowed her to stay in Glasgow. “The timing just wasn’t right for me to move to London, so we decided that the best thing for both parties was if I became a kind of freelance consultant for them.” Marshall was tasked with talent scouting for Liberation Technologies, the electronic-oriented wing of the imprint, that’s previously released music from the likes of Lukid, Mark Fell and Powell. “The only reason that Lib Tech exists is because Daniel’s still so passionate about releasing new music. It’s not a financial part of the business, it’s purely a thing that exists because he feels that he has a responsibility to continue uncovering new music.” Fast-forward to 2018 and Marshall is yet to commission a release, but is quick to assure us that she’s sitting on a tonne of exciting new music. The next gig in the diary is a particularly special one: not only will she be joined in the booth by close friend and regular back-to-back partner Sofay, but the night itself has been organised by a graduate of Grassroots Glasgow – an initiative that both DJs have been heavily involved in. Through a combination of DJ workshops and panel talks, the project aims to encourage greater female representation in Glasgow’s

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Photo: Sophie Reilly

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Interview: Michael Lawson

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July 2018

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Taking Control Manchester-based Afrodeutsche is blurring the lines between cinematic composition, critical club beats and improvised live performance. We catch up with her ahead of her performance at Skye Live

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enrietta Smith-Rolla is a multidisciplinary artist in the truest sense of the term. A composer, pianist, producer, live performer and NTS radio host, there doesn’t seem to be much in the realm of music and sound that she’d struggle to turn her hand to. As Afrodeutsche, she DJs and produces music heavily influenced by seminal Detroit electro acts such as Drexciya and Underground Resistance – even deriving her name from the latter’s 1998 track Afrogermanic. But with a background in classical music and cinematic composition, it’s clear that the way she approaches electronic music differs greatly from that of the average DJ or producer. “My DJing is kind of like this hybrid of vinyl and Ableton, and that’s partly down to me being a massive control freak,” she laughs. “There can be a track that I like that’s got a clap in it but I want to hear the clap more so I’ll add more claps in – I set up drums and stuff so I can play along to tracks.” This combination of improvisation and preparation is prevalent on Smith-Rolla’s debut LP, Break Before Make, recently released on longstanding Manchester experimental imprint Skam. It’s an album characterised by dark electro hardware jams, but interspersed among the club-focused tracks are a handful of fleeting, emotional soundscapes, that clearly draw on Smith-Rolla’s compositional background.

“I think composing and making electronic music are really similar,” she argues. “Like one time when I did a live show someone said to me after, ‘oh I didn’t realise you played songs’. In my head they’re all songs rather than just club tools or whatever. I come from different angles when I’m making music: some stuff ’s really emotional and that I guess is the stuff that’s more composed, and there’s the other thing when I just want to dance.” Afrodeutsche is also a vehicle for exploring Smith-Rolla’s Ghanaian, German and Russian heritage, while simultaneously satisfying her desire for all things German. “There’s always seemed to be this innate connection between myself and Germany,” she explains. “I’ve been obsessed with the country all my life and used to visit regularly as a teenager – which in hindsight could of looked a bit strange for some black kid living in Devon!” In fact, when we catch up on a balmy Wednesday afternoon, Smith-Rolla has just returned from an eventful week in Berlin. She enthuses about making her Berghain debut during the trip, and hearing her music played through the club’s fabled sound system, but talks even more excitedly about her new residency at Monom, a boundary-pushing 4D sound space in the city. “It’s got a capacity of around 300, then there’s a raised floor with 20 subs in it and

multiple pillars around the room with four monitors in each,” she explains enthusiastically. “And what you do is you basically create a shape of sound in the space – so you can create a cube of sound, like 1 metre squared or 40 metres squared or whatever, and move that shape around the space – and it’s just totally thrown my understanding of composition. It’s surreal because my compositions are now based around shapes of sound rather than elements of sound.”

“I think composing and making electronic music are really similar... in my head they’re all songs rather than just club tools” Afrodeutsche

Smith-Rolla is set to perform at the fourth edition of Skye Live in September, after being

Interview: Michael Lawson

invited along as part of a stage curated by Éclair Fifi. The pair first met when Fifi was a resident at Manchester club night Hoya:Hoya almost a decade ago, but have only recently got back in touch. “It’s funny; I’ve known Claire for years and we’d always got on and spoke to each other and stuff, but never really spent that much time together because she lived in London. It was only recently that we were back in communication again to discuss music and then she got in touch about the festival, so I guess it’s happened pretty organically.” Afrodeutsche’s multifaceted musical ability means she can effortlessly adapt her sound to fit the occasion, so how will she react to performing at an idyllic outdoor location on a remote Scottish island? “Well as I mentioned I’m a massive control freak. Like I totally am!” she admits through laughs. “So I’ll set up as many parameters as I can to make sure that I’ve got a lot of choice when the time comes. “When Claire invited me to play she described it as ‘the most beautiful festival ever’, so I want to be able to relax and take in the occasion.” Afrodeutsche plays Skye Live, Isle of Skye, 21 Sep skyelive.co.uk

Clubbing Highlights Summer is firmly upon us and July’s club highlights are set up nicely to usher in the warmer climes. This month includes crate-digger extraordinaires, dub and reggae flavours and a flurry of birthday celebrations

DABJ: Machine Woman @ The Berkeley Suite, Glasgow, 6 Jul Russian-born, Berlin-based Machine Woman claims to have made 1000 tracks in six months, while also finding time to tear up Berghain on a regular basis, so expect a similar effect when this tour de force is unleashed on the Berkeley basement. Residents on the night – Dixon Avenue Basement Jams – aren’t too shabby either. Hunee & Sassy J @ Sub Club, Glasgow, 6 Jul Two of the world’s most in-demand diggers come together for a night of dancefloor democratisation in one of Europe’s most revered clubs. Unidentifiable bangers and big smiles all round. Not one to miss. Jamaica Special: Marshmello & Sarra Wild @ The Rum Shack, Glasgow, 6 Jul Marshmello (not that one) can boast the title of first DJ to broadcast on NTS Radio, and like many hosts affiliated with the Gillett Square institution, the Londoner has used the station as a springboard to bigger things. She joins OH141’s Sarra Wild for The Rum Shack’s first ‘Jamaica Special’ of the summer. Palidrone x Hilltown Disco: Sync 24 @ The Mash House, Edinburgh, 6 Jul Phil Bolland aka Sync 24 has been at the forefront of electro’s supposed resurgence of late, with his Cultivated Electronics imprint respon-

July 2018

sible for some of the genre’s most crucial output of recent years. Edinburgh club night Palidrone and Dundee collective Hilltown Disco have joined forces to bring him to The Mash House. 5 Years of Groovement: Radioactive Man @ Ice Factory, Perth, 7 Jul Groovement has been instrumental in putting Perth on the clubbing map, bringing the likes of Serge, Or:la and Domenic Cappello to the Fair City over the past few years. For its fifth birthday, Radioactive Man has been sworn in to mark the occasion with a night of uncompromising, breakneck electro. Nightrave 5th Birthday Special: Nightwave + Special Guests TBA @ La Cheetah Club, Glasgow, 13 Jul Genre-traversing club night Nightrave turns five on Friday the 13th, with the party’s namesake Nightwave promising to bring “a mystery selection of close DJ pals” along for the ride. She’s keeping her cards close to her chest at this stage, but expect party vibes as soon as the doors open - especially when the first 50 go free. Moonlight 003: Metrist, Ribeka & Sofay @ Stereo, Glasgow, 14 Jul Bristol’s bass-inflicted techno sound, championed by the likes of Batu, Bruce and Hodge, is currently enjoying a moment in the sun. Joseph Higgins, aka Metrist, is another purveyor of this

Words: Michael Lawson Illustration: Will Ballance

forward-facing, genre-blurring style, releasing music on Timedance and Hotline among others. He plays Stereo on 14 July, joined by local favourites Ribeka and Sofay and Moonlight resident Lisa Lööf. TEESH with Jamie Tiller @ Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, 14 Jul Boundary-pushing record label Music From Memory often comes across as an exercise in musical history, such is the depth of crate-digging from those involved. The imprint has shone a light on Brazilian new age; European ‘deviant pop’ and obscure Japanese ambient among a wealth of uncategorisable oddities. Jamie Tiller, who co-runs MFM with Tako Reyenga and Abel Nagengast, graces the Sneaky Pete’s DJ booth as part of the club’s tenth birthday celebrations. Telfort’s Good Place: Smallpeople @ Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, 20 Jul “Sneaky’s literally is a good place, so it’s perfect.” Sam Telfort didn’t waste too much time or effort when choosing a name for his semi-regular Sneaky Pete’s endeavour. Instead, he’s maintained a policy of bringing close friends into the booth with him for nights with limited fanfare but killer tune selection. This time around its Smallpeople, who run Hamburg record store Smallville Records, joining him for the second Good Place of 2018. theskinny.co.uk/clubs

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Suicide Club

By Rachel Heng

rrrrr What is particularly chilling about Suicide Club is that the dystopian world it’s set in – one obsessed with looks and youth – is not an entirely implausible vision of the future. We don’t have SmartBlood™, DiamondSkin™ or Repairants™, but we do have diet, beauty and pseudo-wellness industries which hardly have our best interests at heart.

In her debut novel, Rachel Heng takes this to its wildest extreme, creating a society where health, ageing and mental wellbeing are all government mandated. Work nine to five, sleep eight hours a night, enjoy your oxygen shots, don’t listen to jazz, or you’ll become a sub-100. The goal, inevitably, is immortality whether you like it or not. What happens in a world where dying is discouraged? One where every digression you make is noted on your record and, if you are deemed in any way less than perfect, you could be put on the Observation List? Beyond exploring the ways our physical health and beauty are monitored, Suicide Club also analyses how society views poor mental health, grief and how and why we mourn the living and the dead. “At least he’s alive,” one character remarks about a painter who is too much of a lost cause even for WeCovery, living in a detention centre and forced to take all his nutrition intravenously. But at what cost? asks Heng. Through criss-crossing stories about love and loss, suffused in some wonderful and heartbreaking prose, she takes the reader on a journey to truly understand the question: who wants to live forever? [Kirstyn Smith] Sceptre, 10 July, £12.99 hodder.co.uk/books

Rhyme Watch Scotland’s spoken word scene gears up for the Fringe with a series of talks, events and slams, while Stewed Rhubarb celebrate their return and a host of new publications hit the shelves

Convenience Store Woman By Sayaka Murata

uly is here, and the poets of Edinburgh have heard a cry on the wind. It whispers to them, it repeats the same four words over and over: “The Fringe Is Coming! The Fringe Is Coming!” Enter Poetry As Fuck, the creators of the Wikipedia Slam and the Ambassador’s Reception. They’re back with The Slaminals of Farthing Wood; a slam much the same as any other, but losers will experience a child-traumatising death. Fingers crossed this remains metaphorical, but come along to the Scottish Poetry Library (SPL) on 27 July, 7pm, to find out. In a significantly less violent setting, Alison Lang will be welcomed by the Federation of Writers to the café bar in the Traverse Theatre, 10 July, 8pm. It will be a night of readings in Gaelic, accompanied by English translations, mainly fiction, but let’s cross our fingers for some of Alison’s poetry. Open mic slots will follow the performance and poet Marcas Mac an Tuairneir is to host the evening. Hotchpotch Dundee will take place in the Mayfly on 16 July (7-10pm, free). Hotchpotch is taking a slightly different format this month, with readers now encouraged to read for five minutes, rather than the usual ten. This way more voices will be heard – so make sure to time your set in advance if possible. Hotchpotch is a place of no criticism and no judgment, with anyone welcome along with any creative piece. Dunsyre in South Lanarkshire is home to Ian Hamilton Finlay’s finest work: Little Sparta. The poetry garden boasts over 270 artworks to discover, and is only open from June to September, Thursday to Sunday (afternoons). Little Sparta is almost impossible to reach from public transport, however there is minibus transport from central Edinburgh, available on certain Saturdays throughout the summer. littlespartasaturdays.brownpapertickets.com Between Mountain and Sea, Poems from Assynt is

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Every day, Keiko welcomes shoppers to the convenience store she works in with a well practised bow and greeting of irasshaimase! (welcome). It is in these moments she finds a true sense of contentment. “When morning comes, once again I’m a convenience store worker, a cog in society. This is the only way I can be a normal person.” After the school days where she struggled to fit in with her peers, to the bemusement of all around, the routine and order of her job is deeply satisfying. Each morning, workers group in the back room before opening up shop, practising greetings. Daily specials are announced over the tannoy, and new products offered with varying success – mango-chocolate buns, anyone? Keiko's life is arranged to the rhythms of the store, and at night, before she closes her eyes, she dwells on the sounds and sensations of the day as she falls asleep. Only when others interfere do things go awry, as their misguided attempts at improving Keiko’s welfare after years of shelf stacking only reveal their own rigid adherence to the one-size-fits-all norms of society. A bestseller in Japan, Convenience Store Woman is an offbeat, tongue-in-cheek read, filled with the minuscule joys of everyday life, and a tale of finding one’s own path to happiness. [Laura Waddell] Portobello Books, 5 Jul, £12.99 portobellobooks.com/convenience-store-woman

In Kim Sherwood’s debut novel we find that rare thing – a work which could easily be a third or fourth novel, so fluidly and gorgeously does it read. Testament tells dual stories about two blood relatives which intertwine across separate timelines; the self-named Silk, an eminent artist who survives the Holocaust and keeps silent to preserve sanity and, later, his granddaughter Eva, discovering everything he kept hidden following his passing and agonising over the responsibility she now holds over how the world will remember him. Through her journey, both physical and mental, to find answers to all her questions and come to a decision, we as readers are invited to explore the many elements that come together to form memories and impressions of people; we consider the many different angles from which survivors view things in order to cope (or otherwise). The regular switching between the plotlines brings a definite sense of movement, and in laying the information in a non-chronological form ensures the last crucial detail falling into place at the very end for maximum effect. Sherwood’s characters are finely nuanced, and her poetic prose is every bit as exquisite and harrowing as the events, people, relationships and objects it illustrates. A stunning, extremely sensitive take on one of the most difficult topics in human history. [Clare Mulley] Quercus, 12 Jul, £14.99 quercusbooks.co.uk/books/

Words: Beth Cochrane

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Testament Kim Sherwood

The Tyranny of Lost Things By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

Notes on a Nervous Planet By Matt Haig

the first collection of Norman MacCaig’s poems that is based on work written in or about his beloved Assynt. Edited by Roderick Watson, the included poems have been chosen by the poet’s son, Ewen MacCaig. This is a collection that rejoices in MacCaig’s keen eye and ability to see things anew. Jim Monaghan is launching a new pamphlet, Cumnock & other places, with Glasgow’s Speculative Books. This much-anticipated work is being launched on 5 July in St Louis Café Bar on Dumbarton Road (9-11pm, free). Expect to hear from support poets Iona Lee, Sam Small, Victoria McNulty and Colin Poole. Stewed Rhubarb will be celebrating its relaunch this month, with a sparkling line-up set to hit the SPL on 24 July, 7-9pm. Scottish poetic favourites Harry Josephine Giles, Jenny Lindsay and Rachel McCrum will be joined by musician Kirsty Law to celebrate the newly bright future of the independent publisher. The SPL will also play host to Teuchter Company’s Umbrella Man, the preview of the company’s upcoming Fringe show. The tragicomedy takes place on 31 July, 7pm, and features a sandwich artist exploring the popular conspiracy theory: the flat earth model. In Falkirk, [Untitled] will be hosting Truth or Lies 2018 at Behind the Wall (12 July, 7-10pm). Although mainly comprising of fiction from six short story writers, one performer, Carol McKay, has had her poetry and fiction widely published and won the Robert Louis Stevenson Fellowship in 2010. Tickets sit at £5 for this event, but every penny earned goes straight back to the performers. It’s incredibly encouraging to see event organisers paying writers (at all stages in their career) for their work – let’s hope it’s a continuing trend.

Harmony returns to the north London house her bohemian parents once lived in, driven to understand her 80s childhood growing up in a commune there. Cosslett’s journalistic background reveals itself in the neatly flowing sentences of her debut novel. She ekes out vulnerabilities of the taciturn Northerner and flighty rich girl flatmates with realistic dialogue and an occasional sharp pinpoint of societal insight, describing old money “…as if they inhabited a series of closed-off rooms, all joined so that those that walked within them never had to feel the cold of the outside air, never had to make conversation at the bus stop.” At points probably most interesting to the self-declared eccentric Harmony herself than to the reader, her personal nostalgia of childhood habits veers more towards self-indulgence than introspection, until the slow burn of secrets from Harmony’s past which so obsess her provides a solid hook. In a series of flashbacks and intriguing correspondence with a troubled neighbour who once lived in her parents’ commune, it becomes clear the bohemian utopia was not all it promised. The Tyranny of Lost Things is, at its best, a nostalgia-popping look at the place past countercultural lifestyles holds in contemporary consciousness, an intergenerational exploration, and a warning against romanticising the past. [Laura Waddell]

The world is a nervous system. We are connected, more so than we ever have been, unable to truly disconnect. The planet is growing quickly, or disappearing quickly, whichever way you look at it. There’s no sign of slowing in any direction. And so we worry. Politics, body image, social media followers, life, news – it’s all there, flashing before us on our TV screens, or carried around in our pockets. Notes on a Nervous Planet posits that there is potential for calm, offering a retreat from the bustling world around us. Haig identifies how fear sells and worry is currency to reap, while acknowledging the difficulty in truly being able to switch off. He remains hopeful, however, that people can find their own ways to disconnect from the stresses the world imparts on them and live in the present. It’s a nice idea, growing from Haig’s hugely impactful Reasons to Stay Alive, and fills the pages with stories and tips interspersed with instagrammable pull-quotes. Robots are at odds with people often, and he negotiates the minefield of being human and trying to overcome anxiety in a world that is heavily populated, but makes you feel alone. Haig navigates a world that can be dark and stressful in search of the light that lifts the weight of the world off our shoulders; whether or not that’s possible, it’s nice to believe it is. [Heather McDaid]

theskinny.co.uk/books

Sandstone, out now, £8.99

Canongate, 5 Jul, £12.99

sandstonepress.com/books/the-tyranny-of-lost-things

canongate.co.uk/books/2470-notes-on-a-nervous-planet

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THE SKINNY


Where Art Now? While Glasgow reels from the devastating fire at the GSA and the surrounding buildings, Edinburgh gears up for Edinburgh Art Festival

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he Summer Festival at Hospitalfield is well underway, playing host to several exciting events, programmes and workshops as well as providing us all with another excuse to travel to their beautiful space and check out their latest sculptural commission by Mary Redmond. The festival is open until 7 July, with works on display well into the autumn. Galleries across Edinburgh are filling their spaces in preparation for their partner exhibitions with Edinburgh Art Festival in August: the Fruitmarket Gallery are kicking off proceedings on 7 July with an exhibition by the formidable force of Tacita Dean. She’s described as ‘one of Britain’s most respected and successful international artists’ but, more importantly, Dean is one of Britain’s most exciting artists – expect to be mesmerised by films, installations, drawings and photogravures which will bring into focus Dean’s understanding of the possibilities and complications of performance. As Glasgow and the whole arts community in Scotland takes a deep breath after the devast-

ation of the GSA and surrounding buildings, the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) are having to press pause on their exhibition programmes temporarily. However, many of the upcoming talks and events have been moved to other venues kind enough to house them – be sure to check their website regularly to find out more. Tramway are shaking things up this summer, with their Children’s Exhibition. The exhibition will see a transformation of the exhibition space to a friendly, inviting and alluring haven in which we will all be encouraged to touch, explore and enjoy the materials on show. The exhibition aims to introduce children to materials commonly used in contemporary art, through tactile experience, digital interaction, and movable shapes and forms. Running from 7 July until late August, this exhibition is set to bring out the playfulness of even the most serious of art audiences. Programme Announcements Last month Edinburgh Art Festival announced their incredible line-up of pop-up events and

Words: Rosie Priest

Deadline: 6 July Canada’s Spark Box Studio have an exciting Artist Residency Program – they are currently looking for artists working in print, photography, paint and illustration to apply. The Residency Program affords artists the space and time to support the advancement of their careers and to strengthen their practice in Picton, Ontario. Deadline: 31 August Hospitalfield are on the look out for applications for their intriguing Meander Residency – a new commission in response to the walking routes and walking groups in Angus. The purpose of this residency is to geographically connect the disparate walking groups, picturing the spread of activity in Angus. Artists looking to apply are invited to respond to walking from a number of different perspectives – for example, considering walking in the context of geopolitics, health, the body, rurality, place or culture. Deadline: 9 July

exhibitions, which will spread across every corner of the capital to bring a cacophony of visual art to the city. There are simply too many things to shout about, but as usual the Platform exhibition will be giving early career artists an opportunity to exhibit alongside some of the ‘big guns’ in the art world: Annie Crabtree, Isobel Lutz-Smith and Rae-Yen Song are just some of the exciting artists to watch out for this summer, 26 July-26 August. Awards, Funding and Call for Entries Wasps Studios are inviting proposals from all Glasgow-based artists to apply for a really exciting opportunity to take part in their Anna Löbner Glasgow / Düsseldorf Exchange – the successful artist will spend September and October in Düsseldorf, Germany with a monthly allowance, material fees and a place to stay. This is a fantastic opportunity to become culturally immersed in another country, while having the time and space to explore your own practice.

theskinny.co.uk/art

Eve Fowler

Inner City

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Gallery of Modern Art

Repetition invites us to contemplate the direct presence of words, their meaning, intentions and intensity. In the case of Miss Furr and Miss Skeene, written by renowned Modernist poet Gertrude Stein in 1922, the word ‘gay’ is used 136 times, insistently claiming it to simultaneously connote happiness, joy and – radically – samesex desire. Eve Fowler’s DCA show comes from the artist’s long engagement with Stein’s writings and it opens with a black-and-white 16mm film – with it which it as it if it is to be – showing a collective portrait of Fowler’s friends at work in their studios with voiceover by eight writers and artists reading from Stein’s 1910 text Many Many Women. Creative activity is repeatedly examined and reimagined through these words. The darkened space opens up to the main gallery of text works by Fowler, celebrating this power of language in painting, print, neon, vinyl and collage. The works are visually arresting, laid in bold typefaces and playful colours across the space, brightened by natural daylight. Patriarchal poetry emblazoned in bright yellow and red text demands a re-negotiated relationship to the structure of poetry and language. Nearby, this provocative and silent exchange with text continues: ‘i want to tell about fire’ reads over a soft pastel pink backdrop. Language here is a site of imagery and meaning, remaining open to new interpretations in new contexts. The typography is reminiscent of the deadpan brightness of the Colby poster design agency that served some of the best-known American artists of the 60s and 70s. Gertrude Stein’s words multiply in meaning through Fowler’s works. Words can empower and unsettle, and this call to reclaim language’s subversive agency and capacity to question status is especially urgent amongst increasingly disturbing political contexts – Brexit negotiations, Trump in the US and last month’s presidential re-election in Turkey. [Alaya Ang]

Eve Fowler, install view

Michael C McMillen’s impressively detailed model of an imagined LA slum provides the first literal nod to the urban context that brings together the four exhibiting artists of Inner City. Alberta Whittle’s sculptures, prints and video work draw attention to the multiple places of belonging and legacies of colonialism that make up the expansive network of home, the city, family, migration and displacement. In one part of the video A Study in Vocal Intonation, Whittle rings a cow bell singing Amazing Grace loudly into the main space of GoMA. Set into a different and unrecognisable key, its strangeness is also felt in the inversion of the image of the video. Giving a sense of the high stakes of the speaking voice, Whittle says, “my tongue lives in exile... my body remembers the journey across the Atlantic in the swollen belly of a ship whose name has long been forgotten.” Also considering some of the hidden narratives of the city, Mitch Miller’s dialectograms combine floorplans, sketches and drawn portraits on large pieces of paper. These are built from the mapping of differently politicised, communal or public spaces and drawing in the narratives of those who reside or work there. There’s a virtue in his deft conflation of buildings and community, architecture and anecdote. Finally, Breda Beban’s film touches on the ambivalent listlessness and reward of wandering the city. From initial shots of a domestic interior, momentum builds with the rhythm of the tinny rustling of the string quartet soundtrack, and curiously unpeopled shots of the city in movement. The purposeless but paced and lyrical wandering gaze subtly lists beautiful instances of gridded paving stones or a stream of shiny water, ending ambiguously with the text: ‘She said/ it seems/ that our time/ like/ any other time like any other time is illegal.’ [Adam Benmakhlouf] Inner City, GoMA, until 11 Nov, free

Inner City, install view

Eve Fowler, Dundee Contemporary Arts, until 26 Aug, free

July 2018

Photo: Ruth Clark

DCA

ART

Review

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In Cinemas Whitney

Director: Kevin Macdonald Starring: Ellen White, Whitney Houston, Mary Jones, Kenneth 'Babyface' Edmonds, LA Reid, Michael Houston, Gary GarlandHouston Released: 6 Jul Certificate: 15

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A Prayer Before Dawn

First Reformed

Director: Paul Schrader Starring: Ethan Hawke, Amanda Seyfried, Philip Ettinger, Victoria Hill, Cedric the Entertainer Released: 13 Jul Certificate: 15

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The protagonist in Paul Schrader’s First Reformed is the kind of character we’ve seen before. A priest in a small Dutch Reformed Church in upstate New York, Reverend Ernst Toller (an extraordinary Ethan Hawke) is a man consumed with doubt and guilt, and falling ever deeper into despair. It’s hard not to think of Bresson’s Diary of a Country Priest or Bergman’s Winter Light as we watch Toller agonise over his spiritual crisis, particularly as Schrader has drawn so heavily from those films both thematically and stylistically. Four decades after he wrote the book Transcendental Style in Film, Schrader has fully adopted the techniques of the filmmakers he once studied, and the results are extraordinary. The static framing and measured pacing might suggest this is a film from a bygone age, but First Reformed is plugged directly into our planet’s current predicament. Toller’s malaise is

exacerbated by an encounter with Mary (Seyfried) and her husband Michael (Ettinger), a zealous activist whose talk of the irrevocable environmental disasters we are facing pulls Toller further towards the darkness. “Can God forgive us for what we’ve done to this world?” the priest asks, and the question weighs heavily on his soul until he snaps. Following the trajectory of another Schrader creation, Taxi Driver’s Travis Bickle, Toller’s extreme actions in the film’s second half feel both shocking and inevitable. Schrader is working once again with the inexperienced crew he used on Dog Eat Dog, but the two films couldn’t be more different. While that wildly entertaining crime comedy felt like a filmmaker cutting loose and trying any idea that came to mind, this is the work of a passionate, intelligent and audacious artist who knows exactly what he wants to say and how he wants to say it. You might have to remind yourself to breathe when First Reformed cuts to black after a climactic 20 minutes that grips like a vice, but when you have recovered your senses, your first thought will probably be the realisation that you’ve just experienced a masterpiece. [Philip Concannon] Released by Picturehouse

A Prayer Before Dawn

Pin Cushion

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Director: Jean-Stéphane Sauvaire Starring: Joe Cole, Pornchanok Mabklang, Vithaya Pansringarm, Panya Yimmumphai Released: 20 Jul Certificate: 18 What must it feel like to be thrown into a prison in Thailand, where you can’t even speak the language and you know that your life isn’t worth a damn to the convicted murderers around you? Billy Moore knows how it feels, and by the end of A Prayer Before Dawn you might think you have a pretty good idea as well. Jean-Stéphane Sauvaire’s adaptation of Moore’s autobiography spends much of its first hour simply making us experience the infamous Bang Kwang Central Prison, with Sauvaire’s use of real ex-cons as extras adding to the film’s intimidating atmosphere. With much of the Thai dialogue going unsubtitled, the film forces us to share Billy’s disorientation, but Joe Cole’s intensely physical performance – a mask of bravado hiding his panic and fear – keeps us riveted. The second half of A Prayer Before Dawn has a more conventional shape, as Billy uses Muay Thai boxing to fight for his life and freedom, but David Ungaro’s invigorating cinematography and the bruising sound design ensure every moment feels painfully authentic. [Philip Concannon] Released by Altitude

Director: Deborah Haywood Starring: Joanna Scanlan, Lily Newmark, Sacha Cordy-Nice Released: 13 Jul Certificate: 15 Deborah Haywood’s debut centres on a mother, Lyn (Scanlan), and her daughter, Iona (an otherworldly Newmark), who move into a small English town. The relationship between mother and daughter is unusual. They exist in a too-close-tobe-comfortable proximity to one another: they share one bed and, seemingly, one life. When Iona begins her new school and starts to gain independence, moving beyond her mother’s control, the relationship between the women is stretched to its limits – and then it snaps. Pin Cushion is visually overwhelming. Described by Haywood as a “fairytale,” the film, like Lyn and Iona’s house, is vivid, full of colour and overstuffed. It’s a deliberate decision used to create a sense of claustrophobia that reflects Iona’s higgledy-piggledy emotions, although, perhaps at times, less would have been more. Despite its dreamlike qualities, as the film progresses, both Pin Cushion and Haywood show their teeth. Bullying, sexuality, ostracisation, and the social other are themes that Pin Cushion explores to an unnerving and violent end. We can’t wait to see what this filmmaker does next. [Katie Goh]

In the opening minutes of Kevin Macdonald’s heartbreaking documentary Whitney, the exuberant synths of I Wanna Dance With Somebody play over a montage of images representing the period. To Macdonald, Whitney Houston is as synonymous with the 1980s as aerobics and shoulder pads. There’s an investigation within this broad documentary. Taking the traditional cradle-tograve approach, the film examines everything from Houston’s childhood (which was “idyllic” according to her family, despite her parents’ divorce) to the toll fame took on her marriage to Bobby Brown. The apparent goal is to discover what instigated her spiralling descent into drug abuse. All the key events make an appearance to illustrate Houston’s meteoric rise and crushing fall: her record-breaking seven number one singles, her Star-Spangled Banner rendition at

Terminal

Director: Vaughn Stein Starring: Margot Robbie, Simon Pegg, Max Irons, Dexter Fletcher, Mike Myers Released: 6 Jul Certificate: 15

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In Terminal, a bunch of shady characters’ paths cross in a neo-noir cityscape that screams Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet meets a dystopian Alice in Wonderland. If this sounds cool, it is. If this sounds ridiculous, it’s that too. The seedy dealings do not hold together on close inspection, but the film’s creative team seem to be having tremendous fun bringing this over-the-top neon world to life. Margot Robbie doesn’t get to show her full emotional range, but her carefully-crafted vocal and physical performance captivates. Meanwhile, Simon Pegg, sporting a sadness beard and dark secrets, is unsettlingly understated; Max Irons and Dexter Fletcher make an amusingly antagonistic pair of crooks; and Mike Myers brings an off-kilter energy to a night cleaner who is always in the right place at the right time. First time director Vaughn Stein, working with cinematographer Christopher Ross, proves adept at framing and lighting shots, making this a lot of fun and gorgeous to look at. If the summer calls for an escapist film full of darkness, grime, and horrible people, this is a good choice. [Carmen Paddock] Released by Arrow

Review

Released by Altitude

Incredibles 2

Director: Brad Bird Starring: Holly Hunter, Craig T Nelson, Sarah Vowell, Huck Milner, Samuel L Jackson, Catherine Keener, Bob Odenkirk Released: 13 Jul Certificate: PG

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This belated sequel begins with the superpowered Parr family broke and living in a dingy motel, the use of their abilities outlawed. Things look up, however, when the owners of a huge tech company offer to head up a PR campaign to make supers popular again. Helen (aka Elastigirl), with her non-smashy stretchy powers, is less likely to cause collateral damage than her musclebound hubby Bob (aka Mr Incredible) and is the obvious choice to head up the charm offensive, leaving Bob to look after the kids. Brad Bird once again makes a strong claim at being today’s finest director of lucid action, particularly with a brutal hand-to-hand fight sequence in a room with walls of strobing light that’s both gorgeous and ferocious. Since the original back in 2004, superhero flicks have become cinema’s chief money-makers. This fleet-footed sequel reminds us, though, that movies featuring god-like beings can challenge human-sized issues. It also reminds us that changing nappies and keeping house can be as demanding as punching bad guys, and that punching bad guys isn’t just a job for the boys. [Jamie Dunn]

Incredibles 2

Released by Pinpoint

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the 1991 Super Bowl, her disastrous 2002 interview. The greatest hits are great for a reason – but the film could’ve dug a little deeper. It’s hard not to compare Whitney to Asif Kapadia’s Amy. Both women possessed generation-defining voices and shared a tragic path to self-destruction. While Amy distilled the singer’s talent and life into an empathetic feature with a clear narrative voice, Whitney feels somewhat disconnected from its subject, more interested in observing the people around her in an assembly line of talking head interviews. It’s like reading a more insightful Wikipedia page. Undoubtedly the biggest bombshell the film drops is the sexual abuse Houston suffered as a child at the hands of cousin and singer Dee Dee Warwick. Curiously, Macdonald chooses to divulge this monumental piece of information just as the film winds to a close. It only comes across as an afterthought; an extra detail clumsily added in an otherwise competentlystructured film. Juxtaposed with Houston’s untimely death, her life is conveyed as one that has always been suffused with tragedy – despite what outward appearances may suggest. [Iana Murray]

FILM & TV

THE SKINNY


At Home Calibre

Director: Matt Palmer Starring: Jack Lowden, Martin McCann, Tony Curran, Ian Pirie, Kate Bracken Released: Out now

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Calibre’s plot could be written on the bullet that causes all the trouble in this sinewy thriller. Two friends go to the woods, do something stupid, pay dearly for it. Like all good genre films, the complexity of the dilemmas the characters face more than compensates for the fat-free set-up. Jack Lowden is Vaughn, and the camera barely leaves his side as he kisses goodbye to his pregnant wife in Edinburgh and heads off with Marcus (McCann), an old buddy from boarding school, on a hunting trip in the deepest, darkest Highlands. With his open face and wide, dewy eyes, Vaughn could be one of the deer they’re stalking. McCann’s Marcus is more angular and feral-looking, his overly pally patter and shark-like grin doing nothing to disguise his superciliousness. Writer-director Palmer has a great ear for dialogue: he’s nailed how pals with complicated pasts talk to each other and has a great sense for the menacing chatter across a boozy night in a less than friendly pub. Man-versus-nature classic Deliverance is his obvious touchstone, but Palmer’s stripped back style shoots for naturalism over John Boorman’s romanticism. Romanian cinematographer Márk Györi, meanwhile, clearly relishes the dark greens and browns of Scotland’s great outdoors, creating crisp wide shots and menacing dissolves, but he’s not afraid to go handheld and in close on the characters in their more panicked moments. The thriller’s grip does loosen late in the game when it becomes abundantly clear where it’s all heading. A few wrinkles in the shopworn plot or even a bit of sadistic exploitation wouldn’t have gone amiss. What gives Calibre its power in the end, however, is its relentless momentum and a moral heft that should leave you uneasy as the credits roll. A walk in the woods turns tragic for its characters, but it’s no picnic for us either, just as it should be. [Jamie Dunn]

Cobra Kai

Starring: Ralph Macchio, William Zabka, Courtney Henggeler, Xolo Maridueña, Mary Mouser Released: Out now

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The film industry is currently confronting its past like never before. Reboots of childhood-defining franchises continue to provoke both dizzy joy and vicious rage. Looking back at the films and TV shows we loved growing up, almost all of them contain some line that now makes us cringe, some value that now seems poisonous, some actor we now know more about. How do you deal with a past you can’t reject out of hand completely or embrace altogether? That’s essentially what belated Karate Kid sequel Cobra Kai is about. After Daniel LaRusso’s iconic (and illegal) crane kick floors the big blonde bully Johnny Lawrence in the explosive finale to the 80s classic, Cobra Kai’s camera crawls slowly in on his prone form, and then flashes forward to a future in which Johnny is a bleary-eyed bigot and LaRusso is a smiling success story with a pair of overprivileged kids. Immediately it scratches the itch that has spurred so many to flood the internet with fanfictions: we want to know what happened after the end credits rolled. Ralph Macchio (as LaRusso) and William Zabka (as Lawrence) settle back into the skin of their old characters like they’ve been living them all along, lending both a charm that goes beyond mere nostalgia. Mr. Miyagi taught Daniel about courage and discipline while Johnny was ruined by a Jordan Peterson-esque leader who worshipped unfeeling machismo. As the highlight reels from their glory days continue to play within their minds, they are both tasked with passing on what they have learned to the next generation. As well as being an outrageously fun continuation of an adored movie, Cobra Kai packs a genuinely poignant punch. [Ross McIndoe] Released on YouTube

Jeune Femme

Director: Léonor Serraille Starring: Laetitia Dosch, Grégoire Monsaingeon, Souleymane Seye Ndiaye Released: 16 Jul Certificate: 15

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We first meet Paula (Dosch) – the 31-year-old protagonist of Léonor Serraille’s debut feature – smashing her head against a door. She’s been thrown out of her older, wealthier photographer boyfriend’s flat. We watch as the now unmoored and effectively homeless Paula bounces from job to job and room to room, creating new versions of herself to suit her surroundings. Despite going through an emotional quarter-life crisis, Paula’s energy radiates. In the hands of another director, her carefree, carpe diem attitude would be irritatingly infantilising, but the all-female team behind Jeune Femme refuse cliché. Paula is loud, annoying, endearing, funny, good and bad (she’s a constant and terrible liar), attractive and repulsive. The main driving force of Jeune Femme is Paula’s relationships with those around her. Very much alone in Paris, she speaks to everyone and befriends strangers on the metro yet rarely makes authentic connections. When she joins the hyper feminine team at a lingerie store, she befriends the stoic security guard, Ousmane (Seye Ndiaye), who proves an exception. He’s far more likeable than Paula and restores balance to her intense energy. As Paula struggles to get her life back on track, she also attempts to patch up a complex relationship with her mother who has barred her from her home. Jeune Femme is about the terror of independence. “You’re a free woman!” Paula is told after her break-up. Alone and in sole control of her actions, Paula needs to make her own course and steer her own ship. It’s a joy to watch her begin to captain her own life. Extras Leonor Serraille’s short film Body is included. [Katie Goh] Released by Curzon

Released on Netflix

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July 2018

FILM & TV

Illustration: Rachel Davey

Review

53


The Numbers Game The Skinny chats to Lauren Hendry about Tetra-Decathlon, her new show about training for the world championships of a 14-event athletics competition and creating a piece of theatre from the experience

Photo: Mihaela Bodlovic

Photo: Mihaela Bodlovic

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ver the last few years, Lauren Hendry’s life has been dominated by numbers; 800m, 1500m, 3000m. Having never run on a racetrack until 2016, her new solo show, directed by double Fringe First winner Jenna Watt, Tetra-Decathlon chronicles her training for, and results of, the 14-event track and field competition of the same name in 2017. Hendry’s journey from lapsed acrobat to serious amateur athlete makes for compelling reading for someone who is more used to watching performers talk about anything else but numbers. “You’ve got trapped down the rabbit hole,” she laughs when we tell her about reading her blog. “My life is numbers!” Despite her background in acrobatics, Hendry had no experience in athletics, and had never trained for an event like the tetradecathlon, but a chance viewing of the Beijing World Athletics Championships in 2015 changed everything. “It was when Jessica Ennis-Hill had her comeback,” begins Hendry, “and she won the World Championships, and I was just totally inspired by that. But I couldn’t remember what the events were, so I started to Google them and in doing so, stumbled across tetradecathlon, which is so niche that their World Championships only had 13 competitors.” Emboldened by the idea of being 14th in the world at the World Championships, she joined a local athletics club, and started training on 1 January 2016. Hendry was aware that her challenge of competing from what she calls a “sitting start” was extreme from the very beginning, calling it “14 Kinds of Daft”. She knew it would be difficult but she was determined to finish it and create a show about it. “I’ve always been interested in theatre that’s based on true stories,” explains Hendry. “I always thought all the way through that because there was a place to start that’s what I’m interested in,

Interview: Amy Taylor

I can document everything throughout the whole process, rather than getting to the end of it and trying to think back. It was kind of the opportunity to do that, to make a piece of theatre on a true-life story, but as it happens, rather than retrospectively.” From the beginning, Hendry was determined to get to the World Championships and make a show about it; from her training, to the European Championships and then the Worlds. Between training for the World Championships and creating the show, which part was her favourite? “I can’t really separate them, because the training took a lot more effort,” Hendry says. “For me, competing, it feels like performing; it has the same build up to a set moment where you have to perform and you are judged by other people, or by the clock. “Without that moment, you can’t really see how the training’s been going, because it always feels awful, it always feels really hard,” she explains. “You can’t have the pay-off without it.” While she remains tight-lipped about the content of the show, or her results at the World Championships (“I was pleased with my results,” she says) Hendry hopes that Tetra-Decathlon will be an inspiring show. Not just for its content, but also its message of going for a seemingly-impossible goal and achieving something you never thought you could ever do, until you put your mind and your body into it. “Imagine if you’re a professional athlete: how hard do you have to work to be 15th in the world? People work all of their lives to be Top 20, and I just felt like I’d cheated it but then, actually doing the training, it didn’t actually feel like cheating!” Tetra-Decathlon will be presented at Festival 2018 as part of Glasgow 2018, and plays venues around Scotland, 27 Jul–26 Aug tetradecathlon.com/dates/

Stage Directions With the Fringe just a month away, Scotland’s theatre calendar is looking busy, so whether you’re looking forward to the festival, or not, here is a quick guide to the month in Scottish theatre before the month to end all months

W

hile preparations for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in August are heating up, the Scottish theatre calendar is as strong as ever, with a number of great productions taking place this month. From big musicals to filthy poetry, performing anger and the next generation of young dancers, Scotland’s stage is heaving with stories, talent and much, much more. Starting off the month is the return of Smut Slam, a quarterly spoken word night “where sex and storytelling collide.” The latest next instalment of the popular evening takes place for one night only at Woodland Creatures on Leith Walk on 2 July. Hosted by Cameryn Moore, the theme this time around is “holidaze,” only without the holiday pictures and with a lot more of their signature X-rated stories. There’s also a a guest panel of judges and the ‘Fuckbucket’ where audience members can anonymously submit questions and even confessions, if they dare. Next up is the Edinburgh Playhouse with two big musical productions: the musical adaptation of the film An Officer and a Gentleman and The

54

Review

Band, the new musical from Take That. Making its Edinburgh premiere, An Officer and a Gentleman runs from 2-7 July, and features the songs you may know from the movie including Up Where We Belong, as well as Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and Heart of Glass. The show follows Zack Mayo, a US Navy pilot in training who falls in love and has to learn to be himself, and other life lessons. The Band opens on 10 July and runs for five nights until 14 July, featuring everything that you might expect from a jukebox musical about one of the most popular boy bands of all time; teenage girls, hero worship, 90s fashions and, yes, those songs. Dubbed the fastest-selling musical of all time, this is your chance to see it before it transfers to the West End later this year. In Aberdeen, Aberdeen Performing Arts plays host to two different, but equally exciting projects. First up is Vent, at The Lemon Tree on 26 July, created and performed by the Scottish Youth Theatre National Ensemble. A new piece of performance that blends physical theatre and live soundscapes, Vent explores how we express

Words: Amy Taylor

anger; if we had eight minutes to vent our feelings, what would we do? And how could it change your life forever? The next day, on 27 July, YDance presents Project Y, their yearly showcase for dancers aged 16-21 who have completed their intensive four-week dance training programme, the Project Y Performance Course. This year, the troupe present a collection of four new dance works by some of the UK’s best young contemporary dancers. Ending the month is Scottish Opera’s Pagliacci, at the Paisley Opera House. If you haven’t heard of this venue before, it’s because this is a brand new one, described as a “huge tented structure,” where Pagliacci runs from 26-29 July. Directed by Bill Bankes-Jones, this promenade-style production puts the audience at the very heart of this tale of love and jealousy. Featuring a company of nearly 200, it stars Ronald Samm, Anna Patalong, Robert Hayward, Samuel Dale Johnson and Alasdair Elliott. theskinny.co.uk/theatre

THEATRE

Project Y Tour 2018

THE SKINNY


Star Power While digging through Edinburgh Fringe comedy reviews, canine critic Fringe Dog uncovers a scandal Words: Fringe Dog Illustration: Rachel Tunstall

i

t cannot have escape your attemtion that at world”s greatest arts festival nearly all reviews in every publicatiom is perfectly wrong !!! i sorry for straight barkin on this iwssue . i not want to acuse any critics of foulin on edimbrugh’s cobble streets when there lot of fixed penalty fines about. but in over 5000 fringe reviewes from 2017 only aboūt 600 has corect 5star ratin . i bin proffessional journlist long enuff now to know i maybe sittin on top of scandal .o boy, something doesnt add-up !!! i spend so long studyin reviews in 24hr library that kindly studemt offerwed me some performance enhancin dogs .o boy some border collies would be useful in this situation. collies is vary vary clever and we”d crunch case in no-time . but it turn out to be scam and insted of collies studemt have many blisters full of “smart drugs ‘. o boy i hookd on habit formin sevral naps per day .this is more than enuff to stop my brain being stupid .it actualy after smart nap and much study the answer came to me... when revewers write ratin they is not ratin the show ~ they is ratin themselves !!! know we know secret i can guarentee whenever you see frimge review it is 5star briliant show but when you see ratin on reweiw this is what it mean about critic , 5Stars o boy 5star reviews threw me off scent for longest time ,, in one column go comdy show ,; in another column 5stars . everythin here sum up with grate precisswion and it pass harsh audit !!! but i remembre when i rewiew i always carful to write something like “5star comedy show’ or “5stars to you’ to make it clear i writing about 5star briliant comedian and not i, fringe dog .the ratin is rite all right ,but only like a clock that stop at dins dins time and is always right !!! maybe this revewer is worth 5star but o boy it not rewiwers place to say !!! 4Stars not evryone can be perfct .that what i used to think when i see 4star rewiew. the critic is so close but also vary far away because ratin for show is still exactly wrong . i still think this revewer have potential as they confidenwt enuff to give 4star to themselfs but modesty prevent them thinkin they is as good as show .have a trainin dog clicker click and biscit 4star rewiewer

July 2018

,you is better than you thinks !!! 3Stars this revewer worry me most of all .have you ever seen what happen when a cat see anothr cat ??? it stay still and stare at cat as if in fear .i grew up in battersea dogs and cats home (dont worry ,we do our best to get along !!!)) i study cats and find a paralyisis of imdecision is curious way to greeet membre of own speces ,and it curious way to greet briliant 5star frimge show ,and it even more curious way to write about self .is it probleme of heart or head ??? this reweiwer would find it hard to decide ,like hamlet, 2Star o boy put your ears down and unbarr your teeth ,we wont get anywhere bein angry .if you is briliant 5star artiste you have nothin to fear from 2star rewiew even if that ratin besmirch you by assocsiation . all it tell you is that rewewer is in very dark pound, reactin to briliant 5star comedy with frustratwiom, resentment ,jelousy and anger .or maybe critic does not know joy ??? most of all emoticoms turn inward and choke on own chain, pity this rewewer and hope help arive. there nothin more heartbreakin than a wasted life 1Star a 1star revew is like hearin the word bathtime in august . it fringetime ,not bathtime !!! i comfess had i not bin so prejudice against 1star rewiews i would has gotten to solution of wrong ratin quicker. now i read 1stars in lite of my big study and no~one needs a head full of whizz to see rewiwer gone completes off on one .its a plaintive howl for helps .but no-one is beyond help .i think it was former prime ministre david cameron who say “staffordshire bull terrier is much misunderstood breed and need tuff love, hug a staffie today’’ . (actualy this poor advice up there with “hug a euroskeptic with refefurrendum’ . never hug a dog as we like personal space .top tip -- we prefur to sit on lap)) .if you sit 1star rewiewer on lap i iron-cast guarantee critic will think twice about takin own problems out on your briliants 5star show !!! love from fringe dog twitter.com/fringedog

COMEDY

Review

55


56

COMPETITIONS

THE SKINNY


Glasgow Music Sun 01 Jul

THE CLASSIC ACOUSTIC SONGBOOK WITH RONNIE & OLIVIA

ORAN MOR, FROM 17:00, FREE

Ronnie and Olivia play tunes from their Classic Acoustic Songbook in the cosy bar. BLOC+ JAM OPEN MIC

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Weekly Open Mic with host Jamie Stuart and friends. ARNO CARSTENS

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 18:00, £15

Frontman of Springbok Nude Girls and member of electronica project Bhelltower, Arno Carstens plays the hits solo. DAYLIGHT SESSIONS (ANNA SWEENEY + LINDSAY FERGUSON)

ST LUKE’S, FROM 13:00, FREE

A lazy afternoon with music, brunch, Bloody Mary’s, tea and cake for all ages.

Thu 05 Jul DECLAN HEGARTY

ORAN MOR, FROM 21:00, FREE

Fully trained folk harp player who also plays the guitar and sings, bringing his mult-instrumental talents to a regular Oran Mor crowd. SLIPPERY NIGHTS

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

The stalwart DIY collective bring another evening of top class alternative bands to Bloc.

FACENDO COSE (THE ROLY MO + THE REASON + JAMIE STRACHAN)

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 19:00, TBC

Six-piece soul and funk band from Glasgow. WOOZER + MY BAND COOL

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, TBC

Weezer and Guided By Voices tributes.

FIESTA X FOLD

BSB: EDWIN ORGAN + SNACK VILLAIN + EGOPATTERN

KELVINGROVE PARK, FROM 13:00, £79 - £135

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, FREE

Brand new festival by the team behind The West End Fiesta, in collaboration with the legendary Nile Rodger’s Freak Out Let’s Dance Party. ELECTRIC EEL SHOCK

AUDIO, FROM 18:30, £10

The Japanese rockers make a welcome return. SAMMY’S OPEN MIC NIGHT

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 20:00, FREE

Monthly, popular open mic night with house band The Bucks. Get down early to guarantee a seat or a performance slot.

Mon 02 Jul THE BLAS COLLECTIVE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Celtic Connections glitterati perform a night of inspiring covers, originals and classics. ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ GERRY LYONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, FREE

Come and see some of the best unsigned artists in the country for free.

Tue 03 Jul STRATA

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Enter a world blending minimalism, groove and unhinged free improvisation. AN EVENING WITH ALASKA THUNDERFVCK

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £28.65

Winner of RuPaul’s Drag Race AllStars Season 2, Alaska Thunderfvck brings the sass. ODDISEE (MOONCHILD)

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £19.25

Broadcast Summer Breakdowns offer free entry shows on Thursdays throughout July, with a different line-up each week. ROCK IT! FOR CHARITY: ROCK 4 MS (FUNDRAISER FOR MS SOCIETY SCOTLAND) (NOT LOOKING LIKE THAT + DANNY MORTIMER + SEEDY SANCHEZ + SAPIENN) BOX, FROM 20:00, FREE

July’s Rock It! For Charity is all about MS Society Scotland. Usual Rock It! For Charity rules apply. A. WESLEY CHUNG (THE DUKE OF NORFOLK + ALI BURRESS)

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £5

Californian-born, Glasgow-based Americana musician, who recently released his debut solo album on Glasgow’s LP Records. THE STANK JAM

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £4 - £5

Prepare your face to turn from sweet to downright sour as STANK comes to take over The Blue Arrow with smelly solos and ‘filfy’ beats.

Fri 06 Jul

CORRUPT THE SYSTEM (IFREANN + DAL RIATA)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £8

High energy, riff loaded four-piece metal band from Glasgow. ERIC PASLAY

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £12

Eric Paslay delivers a powerful punch as a renowned Platinumselling hit songwriter and dynamic performer.

BAR STOOL PREACHERS (ESPERANZA + STRUNG OUT NIGHTS) AUDIO, FROM 19:00, £8

American rapper and producer, known to his mammy as Amir Mohamed el Khalifa.

Brighton’s ska-infused, street punk inspired five-piece.

AUDIO, FROM 18:30, £17.50

Edinburgh’s seven-piece soul-funk monster.

EYEHATEGOD

The New Orleans noisemakers – founded by Jimmy Bower under a different line-up back in 1988 – take to the Weege, building their sound on elements of southern rock, blues riffs and hardcore punk.

Wed 04 Jul

DAMMIT PRESENTS: GUILHEM

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Aural acoustic aerobics for Jeff Rosenstock fans. EELS

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £39.90

Virginia’s own tragic hero, aka Mark ‘E’ Everett, and bandmates sing the lo-fi blues. AGE OF WOE (OLD GUARD + ANCIENT OF DAYS)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £6

Death/sludge/doom unit fueled by the desire to explore new soundscapes in the vast landscapes of punk and metal. ARCH ECHO

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 18:30, £7

Melodic riffers for your prog needs, or so they say. SAMH CHARITY SHOW (DOMINICIDE)

13TH NOTE, FROM 20:00, FREE

Charity show put on by Simple Promotions, in aid of SAMH. Donations on the door.

THE KATET PLAYS STEVIE WONDER

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £10 - £12

MARC BRITOVSEK (TOBY FLYNN)

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £6

Multi-instrumentalist born in the Highlands but living and studying in Glasgow. FOLKIFY

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £15

Former Hefner (no relation to Hugh) frontman, celebrating 20 years of Breaking God’s Heart by performing the seminal album solo and in full. CHRIS CLARK JAZZ

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

Chris Clark is one of the country’s premier jazz entertainers with an unrivalled knowledge and execution of the American Songbook. OLLY CHALK TRIO

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £10

Olly is without doubt one of the most gifted players of his generation.

Sun 08 Jul BLOC+ JAM OPEN MIC

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Weekly Open Mic with host Jamie Stuart and friends. TREMBLING BELLS

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £12

Ever-adored five piece line-up, fronted by the entrancing Lavinia Blackwall.

Mon 09 Jul THE BLAS COLLECTIVE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Celtic Connections glitterati perform a night of inspiring covers, originals and classics. ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ GERRY LYONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, FREE

Come and see some of the best unsigned artists in the country for free. FAST CAR TO FLORENCE

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £8

Indie rock trio from Nottingham. TAYNE (GRÜM~PÉ + A STANDARD MODEL)

THE OLD HAIRDRESSERS, FROM 19:00, £0 - £5

London-based experimental noise pop outfit by Matthew Sutton.

Tue 10 Jul

NOVA SCOTIA THE TRUTH

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

A Queen of sample-based electronic music and performance. JOSHUA BURNSIDE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, £6 - £7

Northern Irish Music Prize winner, for his debut album EPHRATA. PROTEST THE HERO

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 18:30, £15

The Ontario progressive metal quintet do their headcaving-cumdanceable thing. JAMES TAYLOR & HIS ALL-STAR BAND (BONNIE RAITT & HER BAND)

THE SSE HYDRO, FROM 18:30, £56.75 - £85.15

Legendary singer-songwriter and multiple Grammy Award-winner James Taylor brings his latest tour to Scotland. KASIM SULTON

HARD ROCK CAFE GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £20

THE CONTORTIONIST (PALM READER)

CATHOUSE, FROM 18:30, £13

Prog metal from Indiana.

PAUL GEMMELL & THE BLACK MAGIC BLUES BAND (ROB MUIR)

STEREO, FROM 19:00, £8

Funky, rocky, New Orleans-y blues band created by Paul Gemmell. LARRY GUILD

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £7 - £9

Coatbridge singer/songwriter considered one of the finest exponents of narrative writing on the acoustic scene today. JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

THE SSE HYDRO, FROM 19:30, £45.40 £124.85

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: PAQUE (MNDGNE (EASY + HHXX) + BEMZ + BANZEL + P. ADAMS (VENUE DJ)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. OTHERWORLD (PERSONALITY TOILET + MYSTIC ROCK)

LOVE LETTERS WEBSITE LAUNCH PARTY (HAIRBAND + FREAKWAVE + 4MINA + LALOLA + DJ MOONBATHER + DJ CHIPSLUT) NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:00, £5

Independent zine dedicated to femme/non-binary people in music, Love Letters launch their new website. JAMES KENNEDY (THE LOGAN’S + ADAM JAY)

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £7

James Kennedy celebrates the 1st anniversary of his Top 50 best selling album, Home. PAUL SIMON

THE SSE HYDRO, FROM 18:30, £73.80 £102.15

The classic folkster continues to croon without pal Art.

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, £6

SOULWAX

SWG3 GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £19.50 - £24.50

Alt rock/electronic band from Ghent, Belgium.

Mon 16 Jul THE BLAS COLLECTIVE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Seattle metal act.

Celtic Connections glitterati perform a night of inspiring covers, originals and classics.

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, FREE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, FREE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, £4

BSB: DANCING ON TABLES + CRYSTAL + GALLUS

Broadcast Summer Breakdowns offer free entry shows on Thursdays throughout July, with a different line-up each week. ALICYN YAFFEE TRIO

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £8

A rare bird among young guitar players, Alicyn Yaffee has a soulful style, emphasizing tone and feel over flashy technique. THE BLUE ARROW BIG BAND

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £8

Josh Elcock presents The Blue Arrow Big Band.

Fri 13 Jul

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: RETRO VIDEO CLUB (MOON STRANGER + THE GOOD ARMS + NEW WAVE TESTAMENT (VENUE DJ) + RORY TALKS (AFTERSHOW DJ SET)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. ECSTATIC VISION

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £10

Trance-inducing raw heavy psych. MR. AIRPLANE MAN

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £10

Margaret Garrett and Tara McManus make a sound which blends hypnotic blues, haunting slide guitar and idiosyncratic rock’n’roll with dreamy, yearning pop. PSYCHOSTICK

AUDIO, FROM 18:30, £12

US comedy rock outfit Psychostick bring their unique brand of “humourcore” to Scotland. JOHN RUSH & FRIENDS

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

Glasgow-based singer-songwriter playing ‘folk-tinged pop songs.’ THE MUSIC OF CHARLIE PARKER

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £8

An evening displaying the music of a world famous saxophonist.

Sat 14 Jul

VERSE METRICS (ADULT FUN + FREDDIE QUELL)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £4 - £6

Melodic and mathy rock from the tune-laden Scottish outfit. STREETRAVE MASSIVE SUMMER ALL DAYER

SWG3 GLASGOW, FROM 14:30, £35

25th anniversary of the last Sister Sledge STREETrave show in Ayr. SHAPES X BROADCAST 002

SHED, FROM 19:30, £8

Wed 11 Jul

Sat 07 Jul

Killer punk rock from Zaragoza featuring members of the equally banging Warsong.

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £12

REINA DEL CID

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £8

SCAT 23 PRESENTS: WALDO’S GIFT

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

A showcase of new talent from one of Glasgow’s best DIY labels.

Shapes return to Broadcast for another night of disco and house all night.

Sandy Nelson, Morna Young and Jon Reid, aka Folkify, present new ‘folked up’ arrangements of your favourite songs. Bristol-based jazz trio.

COLUMNA (ABESTOS BEACH + BRATAKUS)

GOLDMOLD

Sulton is one of rock’s most indemand session musicians and he has performed with icons including Joan Jett, Mick Jagger and Patti Smith.

Part singer-songwriter group, part rock band, you can find Reina del Cid and company at the intersection of lyrical storytelling, catchy riffs, and scorching solos.

JT the trousersnake returns to the UK, with even more pop bangers and slinky moves.

July 2018

DARREN HAYMAN (CARLA J. EASTON)

Thu 12 Jul

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, FREE

STOP THE CLOCKS

Oasis tribute night.

DALE BARCLAY & LAURA ST JUDE

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

A couple who work individually and collaborate wonderfully. TOM BANCROFT

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £10

Drummer Tom Bancroft takes to The Blue Arrow Jazz Club stage.

Sun 15 Jul

THE CLASSIC ACOUSTIC SONGBOOK WITH RONNIE & OLIVIA

ORAN MOR, FROM 17:00, FREE

Ronnie and Olivia play tunes from their Classic Acoustic Songbook in the cosy bar. BLOC+ JAM OPEN MIC

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Weekly Open Mic with host Jamie Stuart and friends.

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ GERRY LYONS

Come and see some of the best unsigned artists in the country for free. THE CREEPSHOW

AUDIO, FROM 18:30, £12

Country-tinged psycho-punk rock ‘n’ roll group from Toronto. HOUSE AND LAND

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £7 - £10

Duo of Sally Anne Morgan (fiddle, shruti box, banjo, vocals) and Sarah Louise Henson (vocals, 12-string guitar, shruti box, bouzouki).

Tue 17 Jul

AN EVENING WITH MARC COHN

ORAN MOR, FROM 20:00, £29.50

Grammy Award-winning American rhythm and blues singer, known for the ballad Walking in Memphis. AUFBAU PRINCIPLE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Caustic and doomed out post punk from Glasgow.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: STEPHANIE CHEAPE (LIAM DOYLE + SCARLETT RANDLE + FRASER MURRAY + CLUB DECODE (VENUE DJ)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. PALMIROS (THE CAPOLLOS + THE MEDICINE PRIESTS)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, £5 - £7

Three-piece rock’n’roll madness with a 21st century edge. PALLBEARER (FIRST TEMPLE OF THE ATOM)

STEREO, FROM 19:00, £14

Decibel-pushing doom heaviness from the Central Arkansas troupe. FEIS ROIS: CEILIDH TRAIL

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £7 - £9

A fivesome of young traditional musicians perform lively reels, jigs and beautifully crafted Gaelic songs. JACK COOKSON (JIM LANG + LEMON DRINK)

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £6

Multi-instrumentalist and singersongwriter based in Devon.

Wed 18 Jul TROUBLE FAIT

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

A proper musical vehicle for rock lovers out there.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: THE HUR (LAND OF RUBBER MEN + JOHN EDGE & THE KINGS OF NOWHERE + LIZZIE REID + HOLY SMOKES RECORDS (VENUE DJ)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. MINISTRY (CHELSEA WOLFE)

SWG3 GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £25.85

Industrial metal band founded by lead singer Al Jourgensen back in the early 80s.

NICK JONAH DAVIES (BURD ELLEN)

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £7

Solo instrumental guitarist based in rural Derbyshire.

Thu 19 Jul REPEATER

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

A night of alternative punk, rock and garage.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: NESHIIMA (IGNITE THE SKY + ARCHIVES + DEFECTOR + MOSHVILLE TIMES (VENUE DJ))

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: CRAWFORD MACK (MILLIE + BRIAN MCCAFFERT + ERIN PONSONBY + VENICE OF THE NORTH STUDIOS (VENUE DJ))

HIPPY FEATURING PAUL CLARK & EDDIE DANKS (PISHY TISSUE + SHAUN KENNY)

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

Singer-songwriter from Glasgow.

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

Find full listings at theskinny.co.uk/whats-on

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £5

BSB: SHREDD + LUMER + TONGUE TRAP BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, FREE

Broadcast Summer Breakdowns offer free entry shows on Thursdays throughout July, with a different line-up each week. AVANTE (IDLE FRETS + PYRAMIDS)

AUDIO, FROM 19:30, £7

Glasgow foursome led by brothers Ryan and Jordan Osborne. THE STANK JAM

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £4 - £5

Prepare your face to turn from sweet to downright sour as STANK comes to take over The Blue Arrow with smelly solos and ‘filfy’ beats.

Fri 20 Jul

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: SHAMBOLICS (THE MORNING RETAKES + THE VANITIES + COLOUR TRAP + VIDA (VENUE DJ) + DAN SOUTH (AFTERSHOW DJ SET)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

THE PICTISH TRAIL (FIRESTATIONS)

MONO, FROM 20:00, £12 - £15

Lost Map Records celebrate their 5th birthday with a series of special shows over the summer. The first is this headline show from label boss and Isle of Eigg resident, Pictish Trail.

PULL THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £10

An Amsterdam based contemporary indie jazz quartet.

Sun 22 Jul BLOC+ JAM OPEN MIC

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Weekly Open Mic with host Jamie Stuart and friends. NOT A SINGLE NOTE

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 18:30, £8.50

German alt punk band, with folk and blues influences.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: THE MULDOONS (SPERRY + THE RONAINS + BUFFLEHEID + SCOTTISH FICTION (VENUE DJ))

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

SARAH RECORDS TOUR: EVEN AS WE SPEAK & FRIENDS (BOYRACER + ACTION PAINTING! + SECRET SHINE + THE WAKE (DJ SET)) THE OLD HAIRDRESSERS, FROM 19:00, £10

Coinciding with Emotional Response Records reissuing tracks from Sarah Records’ catalogue, Not Unloved presents four bands from the label.

Mon 23 Jul THE BLAS COLLECTIVE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:45, £6

Celtic Connections glitterati perform a night of inspiring covers, originals and classics.

BLAME IT ON BIANCA DEL RIO (MYRA DUBOIS )

Come and see some of the best unsigned artists in the country for free.

THE VIBE (THE MOODY CHANTS + LUKE LAVOLPE BAND)

Edinburgh six-piece featuring shared boy/girl harmonies between lead singers Liam Mabon and Lisa Russell. SEC, FROM 18:30, £39.75 - £170.25

RuPaul’s Drag Race alumni and international hateful clown in a gown, Bianca Del Rio returns to the UK. HYBRID THEORY

CATHOUSE, FROM 20:00, £5

The UK’s leading Linkin Park tribute band. ROB FORD EXPLORER (FRANTIC + CANAL CAPITALE)

BROADCAST, FROM 18:30, £4 - £6

Instrumental math rock duo based in Reno, Nevada.

LOVERS TURN TO MONSTERS (PUPPY FAT + LIFE MODEL)

13TH NOTE, FROM 19:30, £6

One of Scotland’s most underrated DIY artists. THE BRASS MONKEYS

ST LUKE’S, FROM 19:00, FREE

An eclectic 16-piece ensemble based in Glasgow. EMILY MAGUIRE

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £10

Classically-trained multi-instrumentalist with five albums and two books to her name. MANDULU AND HEPHZIBAH

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

High octane contemporary folk harmony duo, whose songs are dark but upbeat and lyrically mature.

SCAT 23 PRESENTS: KITTY SINGS ERYKAH BADU (REBECCA VASMANT)

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £8

Kitty sings Erykah Badu songs with a house band and a collaboration treat from both DJ Rebecca Vasmant and Kitty.

Sat 21 Jul

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: THE PATRYNS (VAGABONDS + BUBBATREES + SABOTEURS + HIIP PRIEST (VENUE DJ) + THE NICKAJACK MEN (AFTERSHOW DJ SET)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ GERRY LYONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, FREE

CHARLEY CROCKETT

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £10

THE FLYING DUCK, FROM 16:00, £5

CORRUPT THE SYSTEM (ELDER DRUID + LUCIFER’S CORPUS) 13TH NOTE, FROM 19:00, £8.50

High energy, riff loaded four-piece metal band from Glasgow. EMMA MURDOCH

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

Emma is a singer/songwriter based in Glasgow.

BSB: DELPHI + FREAKWAVE + CARA ROSE

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, FREE

Broadcast Summer Breakdowns offer free entry shows on Thursdays throughout July, with a different line-up each week. THE STANK JAM

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £4 - £5

Prepare your face to turn from sweet to downright sour as STANK comes to take over The Blue Arrow with smelly solos and ‘filfy’ beats.

Fri 27 Jul CAEZAR

ORAN MOR, FROM 19:00, £12.50

Joe Donnelly and JJ Gilmour, formerly of The Silencers, touring with their new band Caezar. THE SANDEMANS (THE WARTIME COATS + THE COMMON PEOPLE + MILVUS MILVUS)

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £9

Five-piece indie rock band from Perth.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: LUCIA (WALT DISCO + VELVETEEN RIOT + RUN INTO THE NIGHT + THE NINTH WAVE (VENUE DJ) + PUBLIC (AFTERSHOW DJ SET)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

Woking-based heavy rock lot, adept at playin’ it hard and loud.

FIGHT FOR FRIDAY

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Cumbrian pop-punk for fans of All Time Low and New Found Glory.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: TWENTY FOUR (SENSEI + RUBIAN + THE PONTANGZ + RAVECHILD (VENUE DJ)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM

BARROWLANDS, FROM 19:00, £37.50

The New Jersey quartet play a reliably anthemic mix of pop-rock melodies retooled for a punkinformed audience.

PALM READER

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 18:30, £7

THE OTHER TWO SIDES (THE KAPLANS + DOLOS)

13TH NOTE, FROM 20:00, £4

The Other Two Sides makes it first appearance at legendary Glasgow booze and noise establishment, the 13th Note. WAVESHAPER (ROBERT PARKER + THE VAN DAMMAGE + ALEX)

AUDIO, FROM 19:00, £15

Electronic / Synthwave musician from Sweden. THE RUBENESQUES

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 19:30, £5

The Rubenesques are a big family of pals who create warm indie folk with soaring vocal harmonies.

Wed 25 Jul

LOST MAP 5TH BIRTHDAY (KID CANAVERAL + RANDOLPH’S LEAP)

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Lost Map turns five and they’re throwing some parties to celebrate.

DAMMIT PRESENTS: DON’T WORRY + LIGHTCLIFFE

Expect summer vibes with a grounding in chugging punky, rocky awesomeness.

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 20:00, £8 - £12

JOSEPH MILLER (BOBBY DEANS)

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £7

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: ALLOWAY (TAKE TODAY + STOP THE RAIN + ROYAL BLOOM + RIP IT UP (VENUE DJ))

Singer-songwriter based in Glasgow.

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

Mic Clark began his musical journey on violin then moved onto piano during his childhood and eventually picked up the guitar in his mid 20s.

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. HELLIONS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 18:30, £8

Australian hardcore punk band, formed from the ashes of The Bride. HYMN FOR HER (CARA ROSE + RILEY MUSIC)

BROADCAST, FROM 19:00, £7 - £9

Thu 26 Jul

Glasgow’s newest music and arts festival.

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £6

Inspired by the likes of The Clash and The Libertines, The Riot Vans are a group of bright young upstarts from Scotland.

Tue 24 Jul

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £5

FLYING MOON MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL

THE RIOT VANS (HOUDINI SAYS NO + DETER + A MONTH OF SUNDAYS)

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

Country blues invigorated by a hint of psychedelia, previously described as “Hell’s Angels meets the Amish.”

Singer, songwriter and musician from Wishaw with an incredibly rich, soulful voice.

KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights.

Texan musician with a unique sound, blending a rich and diverse heritage of both new and traditional music.

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. M.G.EVANS (NICOL & ELLIOTT)

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: THE LITTLE KICKS (ZOE GRAHAM + THE VIGNETTES + FIRST TIGER + EMUBANDS (VENUE DJ))

STRETCHED PRESENTS: SKELTR + GROUNDED

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Striking, expansive jazz sounds with a buzzing energy.

FAIRFOLLIES (SAVONA + JUPITER SKIES + STEFAN CLARKIN)

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £9

Drawing from a diverse range of musical ventures, FairFollies brings together songwriters and musicians from across Scotland to create an open and atmospheric sound, with an eclectic blend of Scottish indie and folk.

MIC CLARK - ACOUSTIC BUTTERFLY

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

FRASER URQUHART QUINTET

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £8

The dazzling young pianist is the musician most likely to keep the classic traditions of jazz alive.

Sat 28 Jul

GLASGOW LATIN FESTIVAL

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 13:00, £15

Live music, Djs, performances and dancing celebrating all things Latin.

KING TUT’S SUMMER NIGHTS 2018: VISTAS (FALSE FRIENDS + VICTORIA’S FLIGHT + FUTURE FIRSTHAND + LAB RECORDS (VENUE DJ) + TENEMENT TV CLOSING PARTY (AFTERSHOW DJ SET)) KING TUT’S, FROM 20:30, £8

King Tut’s Summer Nights returns for its seventh year, with more than 60 acts across 15 nights. MANTIS TOBOGGAN

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £5

Self-described “dimension jumping, sleep loving, Hawaiian shirt wearing pyjama pirates.” AN ORCHESTRAL RENDITION OF DR DRE: 2001

SWG3 GLASGOW, FROM 22:00, £17.90 - £21.90

A live orchestral rendition of Dr Dre’s album 2001, accompanied by DJs, singers and lyricists.

Listings

57


DEL AMITRI BARROWLANDS, FROM 19:00, £46.75

The Justin Currie-led Glasgow rock ensemble take in a retrospective sweep of their entire output. U2 TRIBE

SHED, FROM 19:30, £15

U2 tribute night.

STRUGGLETOWN PRESENTS: THE FINAL STRUGGLE

AUDIO, FROM 14:00, £10

An all day punk/emo/hardcore/ indie fest, bidding farewell to Struggletown. HUGH KEARNS

PIE & BREW, FROM 20:00, FREE

A colourful lyricist and expert in harmonica neck-brace playing. DOUGLAS WHAITES QUARTET

THE BLUE ARROW, FROM 19:30, £5 - £10

A jazz quartet that will allow you to sit back, relax and enjoy the music.

Sun 29 Jul

THE CLASSIC ACOUSTIC SONGBOOK WITH RONNIE & OLIVIA

ORAN MOR, FROM 17:00, FREE

Ronnie and Olivia play tunes from their Classic Acoustic Songbook in the cosy bar. BLOC+ JAM OPEN MIC

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Weekly Open Mic with host Jamie Stuart and friends. TURBULENT HEARTS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 19:30, £8

Sun-kissed, LA-tinged rock from the underbelly of the USA. CHAKA DEMUS AND PLIERS

SWG3 GLASGOW, FROM 19:30, £27

The Jamaican duo return 25 years after exploding on to the UK chart scene.

ACT OF DEFIANCE (PROLAPSE A.D. + D3VILMAYCRY + UPROAR + OF ONE BLOOD) CATHOUSE, FROM 18:30, £13

Featuring Chris Broderick and Shawn Drover of Megadeth, Matt Bachand of Shadows Fall and Henry Derek of Scar The Martyr. DEL AMITRI

BARROWLANDS, FROM 19:00, £46.75

The Justin Currie-led Glasgow rock ensemble take in a retrospective sweep of their entire output. FLOWER CORSANO DUO (ASHTRAY NAVIGATIONS + NACKT INSECTEN)

THE OLD HAIRDRESSERS, FROM 20:00, £8 - £10

Primal duo featuring Chris Corsano on drums and percussion and Mick Flower on shahi baaja.

Mon 30 Jul THE BLAS COLLECTIVE

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Celtic Connections glitterati perform a night of inspiring covers, originals and classics. BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW, FROM 19:00, £28.65

The moody San Francisco rockers return to the UK, affected cool and bluesy dirge still very much in place. EARTHLESS

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 18:00, £15.40

The majestic acid rockers tread the boards again, scorching audiences with their brain-fried riffery. ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC NIGHT W/ GERRY LYONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 20:00, FREE

Come and see some of the best unsigned artists in the country for free. THE QUEERS

AUDIO, FROM 19:00, £15

Punk-rock outfit formed by New Hampshire native Joe King (aka Joe Queer) back in 1981.

Tue 31 Jul

ALL BETTER + CRASHES

BLOC+, FROM 21:00, FREE

Brighton-based dirty pop. MONÉT X CHANGE

AUDIO, FROM 19:00, £20

SLAY! presents Monét X Change, fresh from the tenth season of RuPaul’s Drag Race.

Edinburgh Music PLEASE! BELIEVE!

LUNIR

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

THE SAFARI LOUNGE, FROM 20:00, £5

Sunday night of EcosseEmo from Dundee.

Mon 02 Jul

SYKKO DOLLZ (JOLLY JOKER)

BANNERMANS, FROM 20:00, £6 - £8

Sleazy rock’n’roll. Monday’s don’t get better than this. RUFUS WAINWRIGHT

ROYAL LYCEUM THEATRE, FROM 19:00, £35 - £55

The American-Canadian singer/ songwriter and composer brings his suitably luscious orchestration and charismatic vocals back to the UK. MYLES KENNEDY

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 19:00, £27

Rock royalty Myles Kennedy, of Alter Bridge and Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators, heads out on tour.

Tue 03 Jul

AGE OF WOE (DOLOUR + RAZOR SHARP DEATH BLIZZARD + SOMAESTHESIA)

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £8

Death/sludge/doom unit fueled by the desire to explore new soundscapes in the vast landscapes of punk and metal. RUFUS WAINWRIGHT

ROYAL LYCEUM THEATRE, FROM 19:00, £35 - £55

The American-Canadian singer/ songwriter and composer brings his suitably luscious orchestration and charismatic vocals back to the UK.

BANNERMANS, FROM 21:00, FREE

STIFF LITTLE FINGERS

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 19:00, £22

70s punk-pop foursome par excellence, on the go now for a ridiculous amount of years.

58

Listings

OPEN MIC (JEDI PITSS & THE HAN SOLO BOUNTY HUNTERS)

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, FROM 19:00, TBC

WHITEHILL GROVE

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:30, £8

BANNERMANS, FROM 15:00, FREE

Anthemic indie rock from Edinburgh.

LIROY (THE VIOLET KIND + LOU MCLEAN + JAN BLANCHARD)

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

Free music all day from acoustic to blues and rock. THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 19:00, TBC

An exploration of sumptuous pop melodies and guitar among earnest, heart-aching lyrics, Liroy is the one-woman creation of Liz Pomeroy.

Mon 09 Jul ELECTRIC EEL SHOCK

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £10

The Japanese rockers make a welcome return. LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Tue 10 Jul

PRESSURE VALVE UNPLUGGED

BANNERMANS, FROM 17:00, FREE

ZUCCHERO

Ex-The Smiths singer and renowned whinger takes to the road.

Blues-rocker Zucchero is one of Italy’s biggest international stars.

Thu 05 Jul

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £9

FAST CAR TO FLORENCE

LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Sat 14 Jul

TYTAN (RUNEMASTER)

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £9 - £11

NWOBHM at its finest.

HOUSE AND LAND (BURNT PAW)

WAVERLEY BAR, FROM 19:30, £6

Duo of Sally Anne Morgan (fiddle, shruti box, banjo, vocals) and Sarah Louise Henson (vocals, 12-string guitar, shruti box, bouzouki). AN EVENING OF TEMPERAMENTAL GUITAR MUSIC (MY ELECTRIC LOVE AFFAIR + THE WILDHOUSE POP GROUP)

THE SAFARI LOUNGE, FROM 20:00, FREE

Melodic white noise.

ST. COLUMBA’S HOSPICE FUNDRAISER

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 12:00, TBC

An all-day fundraiser for St. Columba’s Hospice featuring a stacked bill of local acts.

Sun 15 Jul OPEN MIC

BANNERMANS, FROM 15:00, FREE

GUILHEM (BABAR LUCK + LOVERS TURN TO MONSTERS + BENNY MONTEUX)

Indie rock trio from Nottingham.

Free music all day from acoustic to blues and rock.

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £8

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:00, TBC

BANNERMANS, FROM 21:00, FREE

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Guilhem of Lost Love playing acoustic.

ZED PENGUIN (LONG DISTANCE)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £6

Alternative Edinburgh trio led by Matthew Winter, with strong local support. HERD OF MUSOS (JAMES HALL)

LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

Wed 11 Jul TAYNE

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £5

FIRESIDE, FROM 20:00, FREE

London-based experimental noise pop outfit by Matthew Sutton.

Fri 06 Jul

Monthly Live Jam Session with some of Scotland’s leading musicians playing lounge grooves from many genres.

Double bassist James Hall welcomes a herd of Edinburgh’s finest musicians to share in roots, jazz, blues, folk and traditional sounds. THE HITS OF BEYONCÉ AND DESTINY’S CHILD

THE QUEEN’S HALL, FROM 19:00, £20

A 13-piece live band with a full string section and three female vocalists perform the hits of Beyoncé and Destiny’s Child.

AN ORCHESTRAL RENDITION OF DR DRE: 2001

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 19:00, £23.50

A live orchestral rendition of Dr Dre’s album 2001, accompanied by DJ’s, singers and lyricists. BEER THOUSAND: A GUIDED BY VOICES TRIBUTE (MY BAND COOL)

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

A night celebrating Dayton, Ohio’s finest, with live music from My Band Cool (Rapid Tan/Savage Mansion/Herbert Powell). All proceeds go to Edinburgh North Food Bank.

Sat 07 Jul

KID KLUMSY (BUZZBOMB + THE EDDIES + 4 PAST MIDNIGHT + FORREST CAN’T RUN)

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £6.50 - £9

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, TBC

Classic rock covers from the 60s to present day.

Sun 08 Jul

THE QUEEN’S HALL, FROM 19:30, £25 - £30

BANNERMANS, FROM 15:00, FREE

CRANACHAN

THE ALIBIS

The Alibis return for their first gig of 2018.

USHER HALL, FROM 19:00, £60.50 - £71.50

MORRISSEY

The former Squeeze piano tinkler does his thing, accompanied as ever by his 20-piece Rhythm and Blues Orchestra.

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:00, TBC

Stacked night of local indie/rock.

Wed 04 Jul

Punk rock’n’roll.

Free music all day from acoustic to blues and rock.

COLOUR CARNIVAL (DURTY WURKS + JOHNNY WALLACE + MATT HILL)

Local artists play stripped back sets, before the public get to be the stars at karaoke.

Sun 01 Jul OPEN MIC

Cologne-based duo LUNIR bring their kaleidosopic future-soul back to Edinburgh for their first full UK headline show for over a year.

EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL: JOOLS HOLLAND FESTIVAL THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £37 - £54.50

MOTHER EAT MOTH (SPHINCTER)

A night of loud music and killer tones, with fuzzy noise/punk trio Mother Eat Moth. THE DUKE OF NORFOLK (ALEX MAXWELL + ALI BURRESS)

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 19:00, £5 - £7

The music of Oklahoma-born Adam Howard, aka The Duke of Norfolk, fits somewhere in the indie folk realm between the Tallest Man on Earth and Bon Iver.

JAMMIN’ AT VOODOO

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

DOYLE (MISFITS) (IRON ALTAR)

CRANACHAN

Classic rock covers from the 60s to present day. LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 12:00, TBC

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Mon 16 Jul SPEEDBUGGY

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £8 - £10

Country rock.

Tue 17 Jul

PRESSURE VALVE UNPLUGGED

BANNERMANS, FROM 17:00, FREE

Legendary Misfits guitarist makes his debut in Scotland’s capital.

Local artists play stripped back sets, before the public get to be the stars at karaoke.

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

Wed 18 Jul

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 19:00, £15

LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Thu 12 Jul

ATTICUS OLDMAN (VICTOR SIERRA + FELINE & STRANGE + MISHKIN FITZGERALD) BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £10

A cracking night of steampunk action. BABUSHKA

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:30, £10

BaBushka takes the audience on a journey through more than three decades of the creative brilliance of the Queen of Pop. VERSE METRICS (NONIMALS)

NOYZE

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £5

Ambient rock with a twist of indie.

EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL: BRATISLAVA HOT SERENADERS

FESTIVAL THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £22.50 - £27.50

Sensational 21-piece band playing vintage swing, hot jazz and dance music from the 20s and 30s with extraordinary authenticity and pizazz. JAZZMAIN

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:45, £12

Afternoon session of driving jazz rhythms fronted by Nick Gould on tenor. EDINBURGH FOLK CLUB (MIRIAM ERASMUS)

SUMMERHALL, FROM 20:00, £5 - £10

Melodic and mathy rock from the tune-laden Scottish outfit.

Weekly club that showcases the wide international world of folk and related music.

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

Thu 19 Jul

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £4

LOVE LIVE MUSIC WEEK

A special week of Live Music celebrating Leith Depot, in support of local community groups including Save Leith Walk.

Fri 13 Jul

EVIL BLOOD (AM BASTEIR + DEATH KOMMANDER)

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £5

Reassuringly noisy night taking in Evil Blood’s longstanding brand of speed metal, with suitably thrashy support.

EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL: DAVINA AND THE VAGABONDS

FESTIVAL THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £18.50 - £27.50

Minnesota blues outfit blending brassy old-timey jazz, bluesy torch balladry and soulful pop.

THE ALPHABOX: GHOST RHYTHMS ALBUM LAUNCH (NUMBER STATIONS + ITCHY HASHY) SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £5

Edinburgh duo The Alphabox launch their second album Ghost Rhythms, scheduled for release in August 2018. MHENWAR HUWS

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

New project from Rafe Fitzpatrick.

Fri 20 Jul

GROAN (ELDER DRUID + LUCIFERS CORPUS)

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, TBC

UK-based riff rockers building their sound on tales of witches, wizards, wine and weed. EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL: DAVINA AND THE VAGABONDS

FESTIVAL THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £18.50 - £27.50

Minnesota blues outfit blending brassy old-timey jazz, bluesy torch balladry and soulful pop. AN EVENING WITH NATALIE MERCHANT

THE QUEEN’S HALL, FROM 20:00, £30

A unique opportunity to see the celebrated singer play towns and cities chosen herself and not usually included on her tours. TROUBLE FAIT (GOTHZILLA)

WEE RED BAR, FROM 19:00, £5

A proper musical vehicle for rock lovers out there. GODFLESH (OF SPIRE & THRONE)

SUMMERHALL, FROM 20:00, £20

The legendary industrial-metallers return to the road, helmed by Justin Broadrick and G.C Green.

SHARON NEEDLES PRESENTS CELEBRITY MORGUE LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 19:00, £20 - £45

A eulogy of songs from stars that are no more from the RuPaul’s Drag Race Goth Queen.

Thu 26 Jul

GHOST DANCE COLLECTIVE (FRANTIC CHANT + REAL LIFE ENTERTAINMENT) WEE RED BAR, FROM 19:00, £6

Ghost Dance Collective combine influences from The Byrds, Pink Floyd, Tame Impala, Wooden Shjips and more to bring together their unique melodic sound. HYMN FOR HER (AWKWARD FAMILY PORTRAITS + OCEANCODE)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, TBC

Country blues invigorated by a hint of psychedelia, previously described as “Hell’s Angels meets the Amish.”

Fri 27 Jul

WEE RED BAR, FROM 19:00, £5

Edinburgh-based politicised punk/ dub/soul/ska seven-piece. SAHARA (SLEEPLESS GIANTS + CRYSTAL + SPYNN)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £4

REFUGEE BENEFIT

STEPHEN MCLAREN

Another fantastic benefit for a great cause featuring local acts.

Errant Media alum and happy hardcore dream pop king, Stephen McLaren.

Sat 21 Jul

Sat 28 Jul

MACTALLICA (TALK OF THE DEVIL)

BANNERMANS, FROM 20:00, £10 - £12

The Metallica and Ozzy/Randy Rhodes tributes join forces for an epic night of classic metal. EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL: AVERAGE WHITE BAND

ANTI-SYSTEM (SOCIAL INSECURITY + DISTORTED VISION) BANNERMANS, FROM 20:00, £7

Killer night of punk. FOLDA (OAKLND)

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 19:00, £7

FESTIVAL THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £25 - £37.50

Folda create their own brand of dark electronic pop.

BIG SANDY AND HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

Local punks launch their new EP in style at the Depot.

The legendary Scottish soulmeets-funk outfit play a set of hits.

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:30, £15

Since forming in 1988, Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys have emerged as one of the world’s most respected practitioners of American roots music.

BLAME IT ON BIANCA DEL RIO (MYRA DUBOIS )

USHER HALL, FROM 20:30, £38.50

RuPaul’s Drag Race alumni and international hateful clown in a gown, Bianca Del Rio returns to the UK. POCKETS (LITTLE LOVE AND THE FRIENDLY VIBES + ZOEE)

WEE RED BAR, FROM 19:00, £5 - £6

Six years in the making, Pockets release their album, Pockets and the Narwhal.

Sun 22 Jul OPEN MIC

BANNERMANS, FROM 15:00, FREE

Free music all day from acoustic to blues and rock. CRANACHAN

DUNDEE’S ALMOST BLUE FESTIVAL

CLARKS ON LINDSAY STREET, FROM 16:00, FREE

All day festival in Dundee across multiple venues.

DUNDEE’S ALMOST BLUE FESTIVAL (HAVANA SWING) CLARKS ON LINDSAY STREET, FROM 16:00, FREE

All day festival in Dundee across multiple venues.

DUNDEE’S ALMOST BLUE FESTIVAL (BOOGALUSA) CLARKS ON LINDSAY STREET, FROM 19:30, FREE

All day festival in Dundee across multiple venues.

CONROY’S BASEMENT, FROM 19:30, £5 - £6

NEW URBAN FRONTIER (FERRAMOANS + THE FARTING SUFFRAGETTES)

FISTYMUFFS EP LAUNCH

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

Sun 29 Jul OPEN MIC

BANNERMANS, FROM 15:00, FREE

Free music all day from acoustic to blues and rock. CRANACHAN

BANNERMANS, FROM 21:00, FREE

Classic rock covers from the 60s to present day. KELLY WILLIS AND BAND

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:30, £15

The Austin-based singer-songwriter is touring to promote her seventh album, Back Being Blue.

AMY DUNCAN (CANDYTHIEF + MOCK DEER)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £7

An evening of alt/anti-folk and excellent songwriting with Edinburgh’s loop-based multi instrumentalist Amy Duncan.

THE PEOPLES SHOW (SKYY BOII, BIGG TAJ, FRESH ELEMENTS, BARE JOKEZ, YAYA, A BILLZ, DJ P45, DJ JAMAL AND DJ EBEATZ)

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 19:00, £6

PAPER RIFLES (LOST AVENUE + QUESTION THE MARK)

Edinburgh indie punk rock band.

Thu 05 Jul FRANKLY, THE SMITHS

CLARKS ON LINDSAY STREET, FROM 19:00, £10

Prepare for an eclectic mix of Smiths classics and fan favourites, courtesy of this highly acclaimed tribute act.

Sat 07 Jul BLEED FROM WITHIN

CONROY’S BASEMENT, FROM 19:30, £5 - £6

PRESSURE VALVE UNPLUGGED

Local artists play stripped back sets, before the public get to be the stars at karaoke.

Wed 25 Jul

THE BOMBPOPS (UNIFORMS + GOODBYE BLUE MONDAY)

FLOWER CORSANO DUO

WEE RED BAR, FROM 19:00, £5

Primal duo featuring Chris Corsano on drums and percussion and Mick Flower on shahi baaja. MISSY MCANULTY

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, TBC

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £8 - £10

Missy Mcanulty, an MTV accredited artist, has belted her soulful sounds in music venues around the globe.

XANDER LYONS (KILGRVSTON + BOOK KLUB)

Tue 31 Jul

Killer punk from the USA.

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 19:00, £5

After a two year solo trip to Scandinavia, Xander Lyons returns to Scotland with new songs and a four-piece backing band of his Napier University colleagues.

PRESSURE VALVE UNPLUGGED

BANNERMANS, FROM 17:00, FREE

Local artists play stripped back sets, before the public get to be the stars at karaoke.

Wed 04 Jul MELTED

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:00, FREE

Afro-disco screamers. 4TH JULY AT BEAST

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £4

DJ Jonny soundtracks your Wednesday with all the best in pop-punk, metalcore, house & EDM and there’s even beer pong. WRAP-IT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

DJ Craig cures your Wednesday woes at The Garage.

SUNNY SIDE UP (RYAN MARTIN + LYLA) LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3

DJ NICK(ERS)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

Tue 10 Jul

Euan Neilson plays the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

AJA: SLAY!

CHURCH, FROM 19:00, £15 - £35

RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 9 and All Stars 3 fan favourite.

Thu 19 Jul

THEATRE OF HATE (THE MEMBRANES)

CHURCH, FROM 19:00, £17

Previously disbanded 80s post-punk unit, now putting in the odd live appearance with Kirk Brandon at the helm and various new members.

Thu 26 Jul

SHARON NEEDLES PRESENTS CELEBRITY MORGUE

CHURCH, FROM 19:00, £20 - £45

HIP HOP THURSDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

UNHOLY

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £2 - £4

Cathouse’s Thursday night rock, metal and punk mash-up. ELEMENT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, TBC

Ross McMillan plays chart, house and anthems with giveaways, bouncy castles and, most importantly, air hockey. FOUNDRY (KENNY CAMPBELL + SLUHG (LIVE))

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £5

Expect fast-paced electro, unrelenting acid, the kicking noise of hardcore and everything in between.

A eulogy of songs from stars that are no more from the RuPaul’s Drag Race Goth Queen.

Fri 06 Jul

Fri 27 Jul

Resident DJ John McLean brings you the biggest tunes and best deals to make your weekend one to remember.

THE BEE GEES STORY – NIGHTS ON BROADWAY

BEAT GENERATOR LIVE!, FROM 20:00, £12

A tribute to the Bee Gees through a live concert, featuring their songs from over four decades.

Sat 28 Jul

SOLAR SONS (KING WITCH + INDICA)

CHURCH, FROM 19:30, £5

Midsummer metal night at Church Dundee. LIZZIE AND THE BANSHEES

BEAT GENERATOR LIVE!, FROM 20:00, £8

Sun-kissed, LA-tinged rock from the underbelly of the USA.

BANNERMANS, FROM 17:00, FREE

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of electronica and bass, with a special guest or two oft in tow.

Highly accessible hits from heaven.

Tue 24 Jul

TURBULENT HEARTS (CHOKING SUSAN)

I AM

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Heavy rock and metal-styled offerings.

NULL / VOID: 1ST BIRTHDAY BASH

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £8 - £10

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

Indoor hot tubs, inflatables as far as the eye can see and a Twitter feed dedicated to validating your drunk-eyed existence.

Thu 05 Jul

Mon 30 Jul

THE VOODOO ROOMS, FROM 19:00, FREE

#TAG TUESDAYS

INDICA (BABAR LUCK + HAYSTACK MONOLITH + CAIRNGORMS YOUNG TEAM)

Glaswegian metal band led by shouty vocalist Scott Kennedy.

Ben Salter is an Australian songwriter and performer, based in the southern state of Tasmania.

BEN SALTER

KILLER KITSCH

Sunny Side Up believe in nourishing music lovers with their fix of ear candy.

Siouxsie and the Banshees tribute act.

Classic rock covers from the 60s to present day.

Funk, disco, boogie and house.

BEAT GENERATOR LIVE!, FROM 17:00, £12

A night to remember filled with various forms of entertainment that range from dancers to beatboxers to Djs.

BANNERMANS, FROM 21:00, FREE

CRATER COVE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

BANNERMANS, FROM 19:30, £5

Heaps and heaps of music at Bannermans in a night raising funds for the Scottish Association for Mental Health.

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

LEITH DEPOT, FROM 19:30, TBC

Sun 01 Jul

Eclectic Tuesday nighter playing the best in house, techno and electronic – or, in their words ‘casually ignoring shite requests since 2005’.

Wed 04 Jul

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 19:00, £8 - £9

Indie rock from local turf.

Tue 03 Jul

SAMH FUNDRAISER (SOMAESTHESIA + TICKLE + ENGINE OF VENGINCE + TEXTURE + SHASTA FAY)

Cerebral, mathematic indie rock from London and Brighton.

LOST IN VANCOUVER

Dundee Music

FRESH! FRIDAY

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £0 - £6

GHOST GIRLS

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

Expect the unexpected, your 90s nostalgic dance classics, your 00s R&B and more. HARSH TUG

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

OG Kush + hip-hop bangers with Notorious B.A.G. FRIDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

A selection of funk and soul and 60s and 70s hits. TRAX

Sun 01 Jul

CATHOUSE, FROM 22:30, £5 - £6

Industrial goth rock disco.

DJ Daryl kicks off the first weekend of the month, spinning hip-hop, grunge, trap and dance tunes.

STEREO, FROM 23:00, £0 - £3

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £6

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

RUSH -004- (MR NAGA + CAMMY DE FELICE)

RUSH is back to give you hard techno all night long.

Mon 02 Jul BURN MONDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Long-running trade night with Normski and Mash spinning the disco beats. BARE MONDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Lasers, bouncy castles and DJ Gav Somerville spinning out teasers and pleasers. Nice way to kick off the week, no?

FRESH BEAT

Dance, chart and remixes in the main hall with Craig Guild, while DJ Nicola Walker keeps things nostalgic in G2 with flashback bangers galore. SUB CLUB PRESENT: HUNEE & SASSY J

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, £12 - £15

Sub Club bring in Rush Hour’s finest Hunee and the genius behind Patchwork, Sassy J. FRIDAY NIGHTS

SHED, FROM 23:00, £4 - £6

Student-friendly Friday night party, playing (as one might expect) cheesy classics of every hue.

THE SKINNY


Glasgow Clubs DABJ WITH MACHINE WOMAN

KILLER KITSCH

THE BERKELEY SUITE, FROM 23:00, £5

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

DABJ bring in Russian-born, Berlin-based DJ, Anastasia Vtorova, aka Machine Woman.

BASS INJECTION: RESIDENT LAUNCH NIGHT

AUDIO, FROM 23:00, £5

A brand new night showcasing the biggest and the best of drum’n’bass and bassline. JAMAICA SPECIAL (MARSHMELLO + SARRA WILD)

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, £5

All things reggae, dancehall, dub and Jamaican-influenced, with Caroline Murphy and Gee Ball.

Sat 07 Jul ROYALE SATURDAYS

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £4 - £8

Resident DJ Bobby Bluebell plays a mix of chart and electro. MONSTER HOSPITAL

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

Botch meets Beyonce DJ smash. A club night like no other. GLITTERBANG

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Disco divas and Euro-pop anthems for those ready to sweat. SATURDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

Eclectic Tuesday nighter playing the best in house, techno and electronic – or, in their words ‘casually ignoring shite requests since 2005’. #TAG TUESDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

Indoor hot tubs, inflatables as far as the eye can see and a Twitter feed dedicated to validating your drunk-eyed existence. I AM

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of electronica and bass, with a special guest or two oft in tow.

Wed 11 Jul

SMALL TALK W/ DJ ADIDADAS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

Happy Meals’ Lewis seduces w/ Eurowave + Vaporbeat. BEAST

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £4

DJ Jonny soundtracks your Wednesday with all the best in pop-punk, metalcore, house & EDM and there’s even beer pong. WRAP-IT

Nick Peacock, Alex O and John Ross spin a Saturday-ready selection of Northern soul and 60s and 70s hits.

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £5 - £6

AFLOAT (AIDAN + CAL + LEWIS)

CATHOUSE SATURDAYS

DJ Craig cures your Wednesday woes at The Garage.

Or Caturdays, if you will. Two levels of the loudest, maddest music the DJs can muster; metal, rock and alt on floor one, and punky screamo upstairs.

The Afloat residents cruise by once again, inviting some guests to share the booth now and again.

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

DRUGSTORE GLAMOUR

I LOVE GARAGE

Garage by name, but not by musical nature. DJ Darren Donnelly carousels through chart, dance and classics, the Desperados bar is filled with funk, G2 keeps things urban and the Attic gets all indie on you. LEZURE (LENNY B2B DCLN (ALL NIGHT LONG))

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

A group of pals renowned for booking some of the most interesting artists, local and international. SUBCULTURE (ANDREW WEATHERALL)

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, £10

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic, oft’ joined by a carousel of super fresh guests. LGBT UNITY FUNDRAISER (NENA ETZA + SIMONOTRON + TRYB)

THE ART SCHOOL, FROM 23:00, £3 - £10

Fundraiser in the Old Vic Bar. Expect hot feel good house, latinx, hip-hop, pop, queer, trap and afro beats in one big mash up. UPROAR SCOTLAND PRESENTS SUMMER SESSIONS

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £5

Thu 12 Jul

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

The Queens of the Glasgow disco scene. HIP HOP THURSDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Euan Neilson plays the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. UNHOLY

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £2 - £4

Cathouse’s Thursday night rock, metal and punk mash-up. ELEMENT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, TBC

Ross McMillan plays chart, house and anthems with giveaways, bouncy castles and, most importantly, air hockey. ELECTRIC SALSA (WECHT (ALL NIGHT LONG))

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £0 - £5

Recreating the fun, passion and atmosphere felt at their favourite clubs the world over. REGGAE GOT SOUL (STUART COSGROVE + PAUL MOLLOY + FELONIOUS MUNK + HECTORRR)

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 20:00, £10

RETURN TO MONO (JOSEPH CAPRIATI) SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, £16 - £20

Monthly night from Soma Records, often with special guests. FRIDAY NIGHTS

SHED, FROM 23:00, £4 - £6

Student-friendly Friday night party, playing (as one might expect) cheesy classics of every hue.

CLEAN SHAVE – NO.1 ALL OVER (HIGH TRACKSUIT + DJ DISPERSER) THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, £3

Reggae, dub and dancehall with live manipulations and other goings on.

Sat 14 Jul ROYALE SATURDAYS

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £4 - £8

Resident DJ Bobby Bluebell plays a mix of chart and electro. DAMMIT ALL TO HELL

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

The best in pop-punk, emo, indie, rock, pop and other shit. ANNA & HOLLY’S DANCE PARTY

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Rock’n’roll, garage and soul.

SATURDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

Nick Peacock, Alex O and John Ross spin a Saturday-ready selection of Northern soul and 60s and 70s hits. CATHOUSE SATURDAYS

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £5 - £6

Or Caturdays, if you will. Two levels of the loudest, maddest music the DJs can muster; metal, rock and alt on floor one, and punky screamo upstairs. I LOVE GARAGE

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

Garage by name, but not by musical nature. DJ Darren Donnelly carousels through chart, dance and classics, the Desperados bar is filled with funk, G2 keeps things urban and the Attic gets all indie on you. MOONLIGHT 003: METRIST (SOFAY B2B RIBEKA)

STEREO, FROM 23:00, £5 - £8

For their third party, Moonlight bring in Brighton producer and DJ Metrist. SUBCULTURE

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic, oft’ joined by a carousel of super fresh guests.

OUTER CIRCLE ALL DAY TERRACE PARTY (CRAIG HAMILTON + GOURLAY + LOPASS + CHARLIE CRAIG + JEZZ SIMPSON + WILLIAM GUILFOYLE B2B GREGG DUNSMORE + AARON SWANSON) THE COURTYARD, FROM 14:00, £3 - £5

A community that consists of minimal house and dub techno music lovers. TIGER & WOODS (ALL NIGHT LONG)

THE BERKELEY SUITE, FROM 23:00, £8

The disco edit Kings, Tiger & Woods play all night long.

AUDIO, FROM 21:00, £10

Govanhill International Festival and Carnival fundraiser.

DIVINE! (ANDREW DIVINE)

Fri 13 Jul

Sun 15 Jul

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £0 - £6

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

A big night of beats.

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, £5

Funk, soul, psyche, ska and more from one of Glasgow’s longest running clubs.

Sun 08 Jul CLIFFHANGER

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, TBC

A hearty blend of emo, drive-thru, old school and new school pop punk, to see your Sunday through to the stars. SESH

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Twister, beer pong and DJ Ciar McKinley on the ones and twos, serving up chart and remixes through the night.

Mon 09 Jul BURN MONDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Long-running trade night with Normski and Mash spinning the disco beats. BARE MONDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Lasers, bouncy castles and DJ Gav Somerville spinning out teasers and pleasers. Nice way to kick off the week, no?

Tue 10 Jul

FRESH! FRIDAY

Resident DJ John McLean brings you the biggest tunes and best deals to make your weekend one to remember. DEATHKILL 4000

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

Ultra-cutting edge dark electro, hip-hop and post-punk. SHAKA LOVES YOU

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Hip-hop and live percussion flanked by wicked visuals. FRIDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

A selection of funk and soul and 60s and 70s hits. RUCKUS

CATHOUSE, FROM 22:30, £5 - £6

Sarah Legatt’s monthly hip-hop, trap and R’n’B night. FRESH BEAT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £6

Dance, chart and remixes in the main hall with Craig Guild, while DJ Nicola Walker keeps things nostalgic in G2 with flashback bangers galore. NIGHTRAVE 5TH BIRTHDAY (NIGHTWAVE + FRIENDS)

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £0 - £5

SESH

Twister, beer pong and DJ Ciar McKinley on the ones and twos, serving up chart and remixes through the night.

Mon 16 Jul BURN MONDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Long-running trade night with Normski and Mash spinning the disco beats. BARE MONDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Lasers, bouncy castles and DJ Gav Somerville spinning out teasers and pleasers. Nice way to kick off the week, no?

Tue 17 Jul

BUCKFAST SUPERNOVA

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

Marble Gods will be living their best lives playing indie-pop gems, R&B smashes, sweet disco beats and the gr8est pop songs of all time ever. KILLER KITSCH

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Eclectic Tuesday nighter playing the best in house, techno and electronic – or, in their words ‘casually ignoring shite requests since 2005’.

#TAG TUESDAYS

FANTASTIC MAN

BEAST

MISBEHAVIN

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £4

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £5 - £6

Indoor hot tubs, inflatables as far as the eye can see and a Twitter feed dedicated to validating your drunk-eyed existence. I AM

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of electronica and bass, with a special guest or two oft in tow.

Wed 18 Jul DON’T BE GUTTED

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

Nefarious beats for dangerous times. BEAST

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £4

DJ Jonny soundtracks your Wednesday with all the best in pop-punk, metalcore, house & EDM and there’s even beer pong. WRAP-IT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

DJ Craig cures your Wednesday woes at The Garage.

ALGORHYTHM (WILLIAM THE SQUID + KEO + ERNESTO HARMON + ADAM ZARECKI) LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

A collective of music lovers dedicated to bringing beautiful sounds to some of Glasgow’s best venues.

Thu 19 Jul PRAY 4 LOVE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

All love songs + all bangers. HIP HOP THURSDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Euan Neilson plays the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. UNHOLY

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £2 - £4

Cathouse’s Thursday night rock, metal and punk mash-up. ELEMENT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, TBC

Ross McMillan plays chart, house and anthems with giveaways, bouncy castles and, most importantly, air hockey.

PALA (VEITCH + CASEY + STENGO)

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £4 - £5

Pala residents playing all night long.

Fri 20 Jul FRESH! FRIDAY

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £0 - £6

Resident DJ John McLean brings you the biggest tunes and best deals to make your weekend one to remember. SUGO

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

Shake what you got to the sound of the best of the worst Italo / Euro trash from the last four decades. THE LANCE VANCE DANCE

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Exotic dreamy disco.

FRIDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

A selection of funk and soul and 60s and 70s hits. CATHOUSE FRIDAYS

CATHOUSE, FROM 22:30, £5 - £6

Screamy, shouty, post-hardcore madness to help you shake off a week of stress in true punk style. FRESH BEAT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £6

SINGLES NIGHT

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Beans + Divine explore the hits on 7” vinyl. SATURDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

Nick Peacock, Alex O and John Ross spin a Saturday-ready selection of Northern soul and 60s and 70s hits. CATHOUSE SATURDAYS

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £5 - £6

Or Caturdays, if you will. Two levels of the loudest, maddest music the DJs can muster; metal, rock and alt on floor one, and punky screamo upstairs. I LOVE GARAGE

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

Garage by name, but not by musical nature. DJ Darren Donnelly carousels through chart, dance and classics, the Desperados bar is filled with funk, G2 keeps things urban and the Attic gets all indie on you.

BREAK STUFF: LINKIN PARK SPECIAL

STEREO, FROM 23:00, TBC

One year on, Break Stuff remembers Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington. INFINITI (BAKE + SHAUN)

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £0 - £5

Bake and Shaun filter by bpm, sort by energy and explore the infinite rhythms and moods of the upper reaches of the tempo spectrum. SUBCULTURE

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic, oft’ joined by a carousel of super fresh guests. MOJO WORKIN’ (FELONIOUS MUNK)

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, £2

Northern soul, Motown, 60s R’n’B and more, all at 45rpm.

Sun 22 Jul IN:SYNC

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Get IN:SYNC with Lotrax, Ros T and RCEF for a night of everything House and Disco. CLIFFHANGER

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, TBC

A hearty blend of emo, drive-thru, old school and new school pop punk, to see your Sunday through to the stars. SESH

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Twister, beer pong and DJ Ciar McKinley on the ones and twos, serving up chart and remixes thorough the night.

Mon 23 Jul BURN MONDAYS

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Long-running trade night with Normski and Mash spinning the disco beats. BARE MONDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Lasers, bouncy castles and DJ Gav Somerville spinning out teasers and pleasers. Nice way to kick off the week, no?

Tue 24 Jul

Dance, chart and remixes in the main hall with Craig Guild, while DJ Nicola Walker keeps things nostalgic in G2 with flashback bangers galore.

GASLIGHT ANTHEM AFTERPARTY (DJ BOAB)

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £0 - £7

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

PARTIAL (SNO)

Promoting nights to dance at between Glasgow and Edinburgh, est. 2014. FRIDAY NIGHTS

SHED, FROM 23:00, £4 - £6

Student-friendly Friday night party, playing (as one might expect) cheesy classics of every hue. FLOORED MUSIC (CUCINA POVERA)

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, TBC

Floored’s irregular residency continues with live performance from Cucina Povera plus more to be announced.

Sat 21 Jul ROYALE SATURDAYS

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £4 - £8

Resident DJ Bobby Bluebell plays a mix of chart and electro.

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

All the electronic dance.

Celebrate 5 years of Nightrave in style with Nightwave and a mystery selection of her close DJ pals.

July 2018

Find full listings at theskinny.co.uk/whats-on

OBZRV MUSIC

Incoherent madness for those with a death wish. The worst club night in the world.

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:00, FREE

Punk rock rammy. KILLER KITSCH

Eclectic Tuesday nighter playing the best in house, techno and electronic – or, in their words ‘casually ignoring shite requests since 2005’. #TAG TUESDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

Indoor hot tubs, inflatables as far as the eye can see and a Twitter feed dedicated to validating your drunk-eyed existence. I AM

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of electronica and bass, with a special guest or two oft in tow.

Wed 25 Jul FREAK LIKE ME

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

Soul, hip-hop and funk.

DJ Jonny soundtracks your Wednesday with all the best in pop-punk, metalcore, house & EDM and there’s even beer pong. WRAP-IT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

DJ Craig cures your Wednesday woes at The Garage. MINDSET (GOURLAY + CRAIG HAMILTON )

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

A well and truly overdue residents night on the back of busy collaborations and bookings over the last six months at La Cheetah.

Thu 26 Jul

BREAKFAST CLUB W/ GERRY LYONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, FREE

80s themed party extravaganza. HIP HOP THURSDAYS

Retro-pop, alt, dance and electro from DJ Drewbear. I LOVE GARAGE

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

Garage by name, but not by musical nature. DJ Darren Donnelly carousels through chart, dance and classics, the Desperados bar is filled with funk, G2 keeps things urban and the Attic gets all indie on you. RAPID PT 3 (ÉCLAIR FIFI + AFRODEUTSCHE)

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

THE RUM SHACK, FROM 21:00, TBC

REGGAE SHACK

Live music and DJs.

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, TBC

SLIDE IT IN

RENEGADES OF FUNK (CHESTER + NOWICKI)

Thu 05 Jul

UNDERGROUND SOCIETY

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Your weekly dose of indie rock’n’roll.

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, £2 - £4

Ross McMillan plays chart, house and anthems with giveaways, bouncy castles and, most importantly, air hockey.

HEATERS: ALGORYHTHM (C-SHAMAN)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £1 - £3

Algorhythm’s monthly Wednesday party at La Cheetah has quickly become an institution and the trio of residents can be found laying waste to any party they soundtrack.

SUBCULTURE

Cathouse’s Thursday night rock, metal and punk mash-up. ELEMENT

All new, all fun, all cheese club night.

The cheapest midweek party in town, serving up a mix of house, techno and a dollop of disco.

Part 3 of Éclair Fifi’s residency party, where she is joined by Manchester artist and new Skam records signing, Afrodeutsche.

Euan Neilson plays the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. UNHOLY

WICKED WEDNESDAYS

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £8 - £10

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic, oft’ joined by a carousel of super fresh guests.

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Wed 04 Jul

Sun 29 Jul

HI-FI REBEL

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

JUICE

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £0 - £2

Dan & Ami K make weird waves through house and techno.

Fri 06 Jul

FLY (LEMON DRIZZLE + MOUNT LUXMORE)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £6

CATHOUSE, FROM 23:00, TBC

Edinburgh and Glasgow-straddling night, with a powerhouse of local residents joined by a selection of guest talent.

SESH

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

Classic rock through the ages from DJ Nicola Walker.

SUBSTANCE X OVERGROUND

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

An expansive night of electronic music from two of Edinburgh’s heavyweights, as Substance and Overground team up.

Fri 27 Jul

Mon 30 Jul

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £6

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Yer all-new Friday at Hive. Cheap entry, inevitably danceable and novelty-stuffed. Perrrfect.

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

The Loose Joints resident and Outer Periphery head honcho goes B2B with Nowicki all night long. SUMMER SESSIONS WITH PAUL N’JIE

A chronological history of soul, taking you through four decades of the best soul, funk, disco and hip-hop, with a touch of smooth R’n’B coupled and big club house classics. SHAKE APPEAL

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

Six decades of rock’n’roll under one roof, hosted by the ultimate DJ trivium.

SUMMER SENSATION (JOEY RIOT + ANDY WHITBY + WHIZZKID + MIKE REVERIE AKA MOB + AV18)

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 21:00, £19

Five headliners come together for the sound of the summer, with bounce, UK hardcore and hardstyle. DATE NIGHT

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

A mixtape of love, lust and nostalgia.

Twister, beer pong and DJ Ciar McKinley on the ones and twos, serving up chart and remixes through the night. BURN MONDAYS

Long-running trade night with Normski and Mash spinning the disco beats. BARE MONDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Lasers, bouncy castles and DJ Gav Somerville spinning out teasers and pleasers. Nice way to kick off the week, no?

Tue 31 Jul KILLER KITSCH

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £3 - £5

Eclectic Tuesday nighter playing the best in house, techno and electronic – or, in their words ‘casually ignoring shite requests since 2005’. #TAG TUESDAYS

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

A selection of funk and soul and 60s and 70s hits.

Indoor hot tubs, inflatables as far as the eye can see and a Twitter feed dedicated to validating your drunk-eyed existence.

CATHOUSE, FROM 22:30, £5 - £6

SUB CLUB, FROM 23:00, TBC

FRIDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

CATHOUSE FRIDAYS

Screamy, shouty, post-hardcore madness to help you shake off a week of stress in true punk style. FRESH BEAT

THE GARAGE GLASGOW, FROM 23:00, £3 - £6

Dance, chart and remixes in the main hall with Craig Guild, while DJ Nicola Walker keeps things nostalgic in G2 with flashback bangers galore. EZUP

LA CHEETAH CLUB, FROM 23:00, £0 - £6

The Ezup crew return with their standard electric atmosphere and stellar guests. FRIDAY NIGHTS

SHED, FROM 23:00, £4 - £6

I AM

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of electronica and bass, with a special guest or two oft in tow.

Sun 01 Jul COALITION

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, FREE

Believe presents the best in bass DJs from Edinburgh at his weekly Sunday communion.

Mon 02 Jul MIXED UP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Monday-brightening mix of hiphop, R’n’B and chart classics, with requests in the back room.

Sat 28 Jul

Tue 03 Jul HECTORS HOUSE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

Craig McHugh brings some Ibiza vibes to Òran Mór this summer.

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats.

BLOC+, FROM 23:00, FREE

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £4 - £5

ORAN MOR, FROM 23:00, £8

GONZO

The quest to bring epic nostalgia back in the form of all things MTV2 (pre-trash) and 120 Minutes continues. The return of Indie Disco. SHAKA LOVES YOU

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, FROM 23:30, £3

Hip-hop and live percussion flanked by wicked visuals.

SATURDAYS AT THE BUFF CLUB

BUFF CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6 - £7

Nick Peacock, Alex O and John Ross spin a Saturday-ready selection of Northern soul and 60s and 70s hits.

PROPAGANDA

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 22:30, £3 - £5

Clubber’s favourite of indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like. WITNESS: THE LAST ONE (ROSS + FAULT LINES)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

After seven years, 526 Wednesdays, seven monthly Fridays, hundreds of guests and a countless amount of hours, Witness throw one final party at Sneaky Pete’s. CLUB MERCADO: SUMMER NEON PARTY (GREG MARTIN + STEVIE CARNIE + PAUL MONCUR)

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £6 - £10

Legendary Edinburgh nightclub returns bringing you the finest in funky, classic house and modern disco. HILLTOWN DISCO & PALIDRONE PRESENT: SYNC 24

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £6 - £10

Hilltown Disco and Palidrone bring Cultivated Records boss Sync 24 to the capital for his Scottish debut.

RIVIERA PARAISO (FRANK + ANDREA MONTALTO)

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

Join resident Montalto and Lindsey (Supermodel / 50% PURE) as they explore avant-techno experiments. DJ SCRATCH AND SNIFF (FINIFLEX)

FIRESIDE, FROM 20:00, FREE

Student-friendly Friday night party, playing (as one might expect) cheesy classics of every hue. SUMMER SESSIONS WITH CRAIG MCHUGH

FLIP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, £0 - £4

MIDNIGHT BASS

Brand new weekly Bongo night by Electrikal Sound System, dishing out drum and bass, jungle, bassline, grime and garage. TRASH

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Alternative Tuesday anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie, punk, retro and more.

A creative and improvisational live electronic dance music project by New York producer-vocalist Marilyn Carino and musician Fiona Soe Paing.

Sat 07 Jul GET TA STEPPIN’

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, FROM 23:00, £5

50s and 60s R’n’B and soul tunes played out on original 45s. MESSENGER

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

Conscious roots and dub reggae rockin’ from the usual beefy Messenger Sound System. BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, FROM 21:00, £0 - £4

Saturday mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics thrown in for good measure.

HECTORS X EYEANGLE RECORDS (GARETH SOMMERVILLE + LIAM DOC + CHRIS ROUX + KAELIN LENNON) SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

Following their spot on room one takeover of Hectors at Cab Vol back in March, Eyeangle make their Sneakys debut. CLUB MADCHESTER PRESENTS GET LOOSE (STEVIE MADCHESTER)

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £5

60s, punk, new wave, classic acid and classic and modern indie dance.

Listings

59


Edinburgh Clubs SAMEDIA SHEBEEN: NYEGE NYEGE SPECIAL (DJ KAMPIRE + ASTROJAZZ)

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £5 - £7

Samedia Shebeen welcome Uganda’s hottest electronic music export, stalwart of the East African afro-bass scene and protege of Diplo, DJ Kampire. JACUZZI GENERAL (MARTYN FLYNN)

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

Dip your toe into the sounds of pleasurepower house Jacuzzi General.

SMOKIE & THE BANDIT AND CUSTOM MAJOR

FIRESIDE, FROM 13:00, FREE

The old Edinburgh stalwarts return to the capital to reunite for one whole day of pumping tunes, dancing and scranning of tasty barbecued treats out in the sunshine.

FLIP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, £0 - £4

Yer all-new Friday at Hive. Cheap entry, inevitably danceable and novelty-stuffed. Perrrfect. PROPAGANDA

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 22:30, £3 - £5

Clubber’s favourite of indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like. TEXTURE: DONA AKA DJ PLANT TEXTURE (ALL NIGHT LONG)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

Texture return to Sneaks with an all night exploration into the sound of Itality’s DJ Plant Texture. DILF

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £6 - £10

Dark and dirty men only house party. LEZURE DJ TAKEOVER

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

Sun 08 Jul

Dance music aficionado collective, Lezure seize control in Palms on Friday 13th, continuing to charm dancefloors all over Scotland.

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Sat 14 Jul

SUNDAY CLUB

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of/ handle on a Sunday. SPINBACK

TRAVERSE THEATRE, FROM 19:00, £11

Groove to the golden sounds of the 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond. COALITION

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, FREE

Believe presents the best in bass DJs from Edinburgh at his weekly Sunday communion.

Mon 09 Jul MIXED UP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Monday-brightening mix of hiphop, R’n’B and chart classics, with requests in the back room.

Tue 10 Jul HECTORS HOUSE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. MIDNIGHT BASS

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £4 - £5

Brand new weekly Bongo night by Electrikal Sound System, dishing out drum and bass, jungle, bassline, grime and garage. TRASH

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Alternative Tuesday anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie, punk, retro and more.

Wed 11 Jul WICKED WEDNESDAYS

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

All new, all fun, all cheese club night.

HEATERS: HAPTIC (C-SHAMAN)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £1 - £3

Haptic’s parties are always a riot and packed full of good times. It’s about time they hit the sweatbox.

HEADSET

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6

Skillis and friends playing garage, techno, house and bass, with special guests often joining in. BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, FROM 21:00, £0 - £4

Saturday mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics thrown in for good measure.

SNEAKS 10TH BIRTHDAY! TEESH W/ JAMIE TILLER (DJ CHEERS)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

TEESH invite Music From Memory boss Jamie Tiller to help celebrate ten years of Sneaky Pete’s. KEEP IT STEEL: SPIN THE WHEEL

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £5

The world’s greatest metal club returns with the best game show in town.

OVERGROUND: CANALSIDE AFTERPARTY (WRISK + AMI K + PALIDRONE DJS + JAMIE CONFIDANCE + JUSTIN BICKLER + JOE + MORE) THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £4 - £6

Afterparty for Hometown Promotions’ Canalside: The Edinburgh Canal Party, rounding off the day in style.

Thu 19 Jul

UNDERGROUND SOCIETY

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

The cheapest midweek party in town, serving up a mix of house, techno and a dollop of disco.

Dan & Ami K make weird waves through house and techno.

Edinburgh and Glasgow-straddling night, with a powerhouse of local residents joined by a selection of guest talent. THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, £0 - £4

Wed 25 Jul

FLIP

Yer all-new Friday at Hive. Cheap entry, inevitably danceable and novelty-stuffed. Perrrfect. PROPAGANDA

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 22:30, £3 - £5

Clubber’s favourite of indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like. TELFORT’S GOOD PLACE: SMALLPEOPLE

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

Telfort invites back two heavyweight kindred spirits from the depths of the Hamburg house scene to his very good place. DANGER ZONE (DJS BALL & SCROTES)

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £5

Metropolis team up with local heavyweights So Electric, providing you with only the finest selection in tunes and DJs in a one night only stand off. MAIN INGREDIENT

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

THE HIVE, FROM 21:00, £0 - £4

SHADOWPLAY (DJ FRANKIE D)

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, FROM 23:00, £5

BUBBLEGUM

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of/ handle on a Sunday.

Saturday mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics thrown in for good measure.

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, FREE

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

WASABI DISCO (KRIS WASABI)

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £5

HI-FI REBEL

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Your weekly dose of indie rock’n’roll. JUICE

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £0 - £2

Dan & Ami K make weird waves through house and techno.

Fri 13 Jul FLY (PHAZED)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £6

Edinburgh and Glasgow-straddling night, with a powerhouse of local residents joined by a selection of guest talent. ANYTHING GOES PSYTRANCE

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, FROM 23:00, TBC

All you cosmic lovers and those missing out on Shiva Sonic have no fear cos Anything Goes is here. ELECTRIKAL

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £6

Soundsystem party-starters, part of a music and art collective specialising in all things bass.

60

Listings

Tue 17 Jul HECTORS HOUSE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. TRASH

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Alternative Tuesday anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie, punk, retro and more.

Wed 18 Jul WICKED WEDNESDAYS

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

All new, all fun, all cheese club night.

HEATERS: OCTO TRAX (C-SHAMAN)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £1 - £3

Fresh new duo and label bringing their skills through from the West for their debut release party at Heaters.

HEATERS: DJ SEINFELD (C-SHAMAN)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £1 - £3

Hot house potato and meteoric riser, DJ Seinfeld graces his alma mata at Heaters for a wild Sneaky’s debut.

Thu 26 Jul

UNDERGROUND SOCIETY

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

The cheapest midweek party in town, serving up a mix of house, techno and a dollop of disco. HI-FI REBEL

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £6

Mon 16 Jul

An occasional dance party from the people behind Headset and Soul Jam.

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

All new, all fun, all cheese club night.

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, TBC

METROPOLIS X SO ELECTRIC (PROPHECY + THOMSON)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 23:00, £4 - £5

WICKED WEDNESDAYS

Your weekly dose of indie rock’n’roll.

THE BONGO CLUB, FROM 22:00, £6 - £8

Monday-brightening mix of hiphop, R’n’B and chart classics, with requests in the back room.

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £0 - £2

DJs Ball and Scrotes playing the finest in 70s/80s soft rock anthems, AOR and power ballads.

Thu 12 Jul

SKIN TIGHT

Alternative Tuesday anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie, punk, retro and more.

Soul Jam invite Rubadub record punter and Sunny Side Up (La Cheetah) heroine Lyla to help destroy your Wednesday morning with a healthy dose of disco hitters.

FLY (EVOLVE)

A night of reggae, featuring a live set from Jamaican singer Tall Rich.

MIXED UP

TRASH

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £6

Sneaky’s continue their 10th birthday celebrations.

The cheapest midweek party in town, serving up a mix of house, techno and a dollop of disco.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

Fri 20 Jul

Mutant disco and sleazy electro throbbers spun til late in a trashy boozer. Kris Wasabi in control all night.

UNDERGROUND SOCIETY

HECTORS HOUSE

SOUL JAM: LYLA (PERCY MAIN + TUESDAY GONZALEZ)

A mix of classic goth, post-punk, new wave, dark wave, synth, deathrock and more.

SNEAKS 10TH BIRTHDAY PT. 2

Tue 24 Jul

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £0 - £2

Sat 21 Jul

SUNDAY CLUB

Monday-brightening mix of hiphop, R’n’B and chart classics, with requests in the back room.

JUICE

Your weekly dose of indie rock’n’roll.

Sun 15 Jul

TALL RICH (LIVE) (DJ WILLIAM TELL + BIGGA U)

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats.

HI-FI REBEL

Enter Planet Dust. Italo heat and proto house from a man clad in studded leather.

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

MIXED UP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Main Ingredient continue their bi-monthly residency and bring their anything goes ethos to Paradise Palms. Expect live synths, percussion, guest musicians and their vast record collections.

OTHER THUMPERS (DONALD DUST)

Mon 23 Jul

DECADE BEACH PARTY

Decade celebrates its 6th birthday with their annual beach party, playing pop punk and party anthems.

GROOVERS 1ST BIRTHDAY (VINCENZO D’AMICO + SESENTAYUNO + OSCAR JAMES + KENNY MCLEAN + THOMSON + DILS + PLUS1) THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £6 - £10

To celebrate their first birthday, Groovers have invited a top Groover to play for the evening, Vincenzo D’amico. PERCY MAIN SOCIAL CLUB

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

An evening with you, Percy and a bag full of boogie throbbers and haus melters.

Sun 22 Jul SUNDAY CLUB

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of/ handle on a Sunday. COALITION

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, FREE

Believe presents the best in bass DJs from Edinburgh at his weekly Sunday communion.

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Fri 27 Jul FLY (TONTO)

Edinburgh and Glasgow-straddling night, with a powerhouse of local residents joined by a selection of guest talent. FLIP

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, £0 - £4

Yer all-new Friday at Hive. Cheap entry, inevitably danceable and novelty-stuffed. Perrrfect. PROPAGANDA

THE LIQUID ROOM, FROM 22:30, £3 - £5

Clubber’s favourite of indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like. LIONOIL: ELLES & PERCY MAIN

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £5

The Edinburgh record makers and party champions invite Queen ELLES of Netil Radio and Suspiciously Delicious fame to get deep with honcho Percy Main. FIRST EDITION (BALTRA)

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £8 - £12

Techno night from Glasgow and Edinburgh crews on the first floor of Mash House. RAW DRUM & BASS

THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £3 - £4

Representing the full spectrum of drum and bass featuring residents Aesthetics, Upfront, Jammin and Reevah.

POWERHOUSE: HEDONISM, UNITY & FREEDOM (MECHANOID + DARK ALI + LUCID) THE MASH HOUSE, FROM 23:00, £6

Edinburgh underground heavyweights bringing the heat to the upstairs of the Mash House. NIKNAK

PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

NikNak are back with B2B bangers and 2018 startovers. Let's start afresh with fresh tracks and new leaf blowers.

Sat 28 Jul BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, FROM 21:00, £0 - £4

Saturday mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics thrown in for good measure. RIDE (LOW REN + YUNG CHEX)

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, £0 - £2

00’s R’n’B. Y’all gon make me lose my mind, up in here, up in here. JACKHAMMER

LA BELLE ANGELE, FROM 23:00, £10

Jackhammer presents a top secret headliner, plus support from Wolfjazz and Keyte for a traditional night of nosebleed techno.

FINITRIBE PARADISE PALMS, FROM 21:00, FREE

Finitribe return for their monthly residency at Palms, known for booking legends such as Justin Robertson, Timothy ‘Heretic’ Clerkin and Jon Pleased Wimmin.

Sun 29 Jul SUNDAY CLUB

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of/ handle on a Sunday. COALITION

SNEAKY PETE’S, FROM 23:00, FREE

Believe presents the best in bass DJs from Edinburgh at his weekly Sunday communion.

Theatre Glasgow Theatre

Edinburgh Theatre

Oran Mor

Festival Theatre

12-14 JUL, 6:30PM, £15

4-7 JUL, TIMES VARY, £15.50 - £49.50

GIRLS NIGHT OOT

Mon 30 Jul

Sequel to feel-good production I Will Survive, featuring songs from the 60s right through to modern hits. Frothy as it comes.

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

23-28 JUL, TIMES VARY, £10 - £14

MIXED UP

Monday-brightening mix of hiphop, R’n’B and chart classics, with requests in the back room.

Tue 31 Jul HECTORS HOUSE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 23:00, £0 - £4

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. TRASH

THE HIVE, FROM 22:00, FREE

Alternative Tuesday anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie, punk, retro and more.

THE GREATEST BY ALAN MUIR

A chance encounter between a cantankerous pensioner and a cynical blogger uncovers a comical tale lost in Scottish legend.

Platform SOUTH BEND

27-28 JUL, TIMES VARY, £4 - £8.50

A tale of hope, of love, of a small country and a vast one, of a good Samaritan and a relationship gone bad.

The King’s Theatre

MOTOWN’S GREATEST HITS: HOW SWEET IT IS

12 JUL, 7:30PM, £23.90 - £30.90

Dundee Clubs Fri 06 Jul ROOMS RESIDENTS

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

A selection of Reading Rooms residents hold the fort for the evening, playing good vibe tunes all night long.

Sat 07 Jul ALL GOOD

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

All Good return to the Reading Rooms.

Fri 13 Jul

BOOK CLUB (DENSE & PIKA)

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, £5 - £15

The Good Stuff DJs spin all genres of disco house and techno, alongside anything else they damn well fancy.

Sat 14 Jul ROOMS RESIDENTS

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

A selection of Reading Rooms residents hold the fort for the evening, playing good vibe tunes all night long.

Fri 20 Jul ROOMS RESIDENTS

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

A selection of Reading Rooms residents hold the fort for the evening, playing good vibe tunes all night long.

Sat 21 Jul LOCARNO

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

Live show taking you through all of the favourite Motown hits, including tunes from Lionel Richie, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, The Four Tops, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, The Jackson Five and more. ABBA MANIA

11 JUL, 7:30PM, £14.50 - £19.50

Internationally touring celebration of Sweden’s most famous export. THE BAND: TAKE THAT’S NEW MUSICAL

2-14 JUL, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

For five 16 year old girls in 1992, the band is everything. 25 years on, we are reunited with this group of friends as they try once more to fulfil their dream of meeting their heroes. SOME GUYS HAVE ALL THE LUCK – THE ROD STEWART STORY

8 JUL, 7:30PM, £22.75 - £25.65

Brand new theatrical production celebrating the career of one of rock’s greatest icons, Rod Stewart. FAME THE MUSICAL

30 JUL-4 AUG, TIMES VARY, £16.90 - £59.40

New singalong production of the stage musical, based on the classic 80s film of the same name.

Theatre Royal

STAGE EXPERIENCE – SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL

BOOK CLUB

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:00, TBC

The Good Stuff DJs spin all genres of disco house and techno, alongside anything else they damn well fancy.

A night of spoken word and choons in Edinburgh, hosted by ex-Scottish slam champion and annoyingNationwide-adverts poet Iona Lee. EDINBURGH MONOLOGUE SHOWDOWN

26 JUL, 8:00PM, £3 - £4

In the style of a poetry slam, actors compete with monologues to be crowned champion in front of a live audience by a professional jury.

King’s Theatre Edinburgh WIZARD OF OZ – THE BEYOND BROADWAY EXPERIENCE

19-21 JUL, TIMES VARY, £17 - £19.50

Join Dorothy and all her friends for this enchanting, epic production based on the 1939 film.

North Edinburgh Arts Centre VENT.

23-28 JUL, 7:30PM, £10 - £12

A new piece of contemporary performance blending physical theatre, live soundscapes and an absorbing design from some of Scotland’s most exciting new theatre makers.

The Edinburgh Playhouse THE BAND: TAKE THAT’S NEW MUSICAL

2-14 JUL, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

For five 16 year old girls in 1992, the band is everything. 25 years on, we are reunited with this group of friends as they try once more to fulfil their dream of meeting their heroes. AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN THE MUSICAL

2-7 JUL, TIMES VARY, £16.50 - £75.90

Mon 02 Jul

MONDAY NIGHT IMPROV (BILLY KIRKWOOD + STUART MURPHY + GARRY DOBSON)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £3

Hold on tight for this fast, frantic unpredictable showdown of improvised comedy games where the same game is never played twice.

Tue 03 Jul

GLASGOW HAROLD NIGHT

BLACKFRIARS BASEMENT, FROM 20:00, FREE

One hilarious show, completely improvised by two teams, based off an audience suggestion. Improv comedy at its finest.

Wed 04 Jul

COMEDIAN RAP BATTLES (NEIL THE WEE MAN BRATCHPIECE)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £4 - £6

Comedy and rap collide.

NEW MATERIAL COMEDY NIGHT

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Resident host Julia Sutherland introduces a variety of stand-up comedians from the Scottish circuit delivering all new material.

Thu 05 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + JARLATH REGAN + ANNA MATERSKA + JAMES NOKISE + BRUCE DEVLIN)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians. YESBAR VIRGINS

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Graham Barrie introduces a selection of fledgling comedy talent handpicked fae Scotland.

Fri 06 Jul

THE FRIDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + JARLATH REGAN + ANNA MATERSKA + JAMES NOKISE + BRUCE DEVLIN)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

BLACK MAGIC – THE LITTLE MIX SHOW

Traverse Theatre

Sat 07 Jul

31 JUL, 7:00PM, £13 - £19

A highly energetic tribute show that follows in the footsteps of the award-winning girl band, Little Mix.

Tron Theatre

PRIDE & PREJUDICE* (*SORT OF)

Fri 27 Jul

Sat 28 Jul

WAX LYRICAL

12 JUL, 8:00PM, FREE

A selection of five fledgling comedians do their best to win over the audience and graduate Yesbar’s Comedy Sunday School.

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

Best-loved Dr. Seuss characters spring to life onstage in a new Stage Experience production of Seussical.

VENT.

READING ROOMS, FROM 22:30, £8 - £12

Fireside

YESBAR VIRGINS: COMEDY SUNDAY SCHOOL

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Based on true events, An Officer and a Gentleman The Musical follows the Oscar-winning film starring Richard Gere.

1-14 JUL, TIMES VARY, £9 - £17

Reading Rooms regulars Phazed team up with local record suppliers Le Freak Records to bring Londonbased Ryan Aitchison, aka Mella Dee, to the Rooms' booth.

Broadway treasure – originally produced in 1948 – telling the story of the production of a musical version of William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew and the conflict on and off-stage.

Sun 01 Jul

27-28 JUL, TIMES VARY, £19.15

The Locarno boys, Red & Steven, Reuben and Max will once again bring their alternative slice of 50s & 60s (and a little 70s) music to the Small Town Club. PHAZED AND LE FREAK RECORDS PRESENT MELLA DEE

KISS ME, KATE

Glasgow Comedy

Men, money and microphones will be fought over in this irreverent, all-female adaptation of Jane Austen’s unrivalled literary classic. 23-28 JUL, 7:30PM, £10 - £12

A new piece of contemporary performance blending physical theatre, live soundscapes and an absorbing design from some of Scotland’s most exciting new theatre makers.

ULSTER AMERICAN

28 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, £9 - £20.50

Oscar-winning actor Jay, director Leigh and Northern Irish playwright Ruth’s heated discussion over a new play escalates to a violent climax. MARK THOMAS – CHECK UP: OUR NHS @ 70

29 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, £9.50 - £21.50

Based on a series of interviews with leading experts in and on the NHS and residences in hospitals and surgeries, Thomas uses his own demise to explore the state we’re in. MEEK

31 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, £9 - £15

In a society where private lives become political and freedom of expression is not an option, Irene finds herself imprisoned.

Wee Red Bar

TWELVE TWELVE THEATRE: A DOUBLE BILL

4-7 JUL, 7:00PM, £12

Double bill of Heroes, written by Gemma McGinley and directed by Connel Burnett, and Mr Noose Tie, written by Jim Rennie and directed by Saskia Ashdown.

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

THE SATURDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + JARLATH REGAN + ANNA MATERSKA + JAMES NOKISE + BRUCE DEVLIN)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

Sun 08 Jul

YESBAR VIRGINS: COMEDY SUNDAY SCHOOL

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

A selection of five fledgling comedians do their best to win over the audience and graduate Yesbar’s Comedy Sunday School. STEPHEN BAILEY: CAN’T THINK STRAIGHT

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £12.50

The man from Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit On The Side (nah, us either) heads out on a stand-up tour.

THE SKINNY


Comedy FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

ED BYRNE: SPOILER ALERT TRAMWAY, FROM 20:00, £24

NEWS HACKS

YESBAR VIRGINS

THEWEECOMEDYWEEKEND

ORAN MOR, FROM 19:00, £12

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

CABARET VOLTAIRE, FROM 18:30, TBC

Writer of the long running hit topical radio show Watson’s Wind Up, Rikki Brown presents a fresh take on the news and those making the news.

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you.

Recognized as one of the finest observational comics in the industry, the Irish comic asks questions like “Is life that bad?” and “Are we spoiled?” in his new show.

Sat 21 Jul

Mon 09 Jul

Sun 15 Jul

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 21:00, £17.50

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £12 - £15

FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you.

ROSCO MCCLELLAND & CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD (FRINGE PREVIEW DOUBLE BILL)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Work-in-progress sneak peak previews of the upcoming Fringe shows before they’re taken to Edinburgh in August.

Tue 10 Jul

RED RAW (MARC JENNINGS + MC HAMMERSMITH)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts. LIGHT BULB

BLACKFRIARS BASEMENT, FROM 20:00, FREE

An alternative comedy showcase and brand new night of stand up comedy.

Wed 11 Jul

NEW MATERIAL COMEDY NIGHT

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Resident host Julia Sutherland introduces a variety of stand-up comedians from the Scottish circuit delivering all new material. STUART MITCHELL & LARRY DEAN: FRINGE PREVIEW DOUBLE BILL

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £4 - £5

MICHAEL REDMOND’S SUNDAY SERVICE (MICHAEL REDMOND + CHRIS SCOTT + RACHEL JACKSON + ROB KANE) THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Chilled Sunday night laughs to see the weekend out. YESBAR VIRGINS: COMEDY SUNDAY SCHOOL

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

A selection of five fledgling comedians do their best to win over the audience and graduate Yesbar’s Comedy Sunday School. FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you. BARRY HILTON

CLASSIC GRAND, FROM 19:00, £22

One of South Africa’s favourite comedians and a firm worldwide favourite.

Mon 16 Jul

JAY LAFFERTY & LIAM WITHNAIL: FRINGE PREVIEW DOUBLE BILL

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £6

Scottish comedy circuit favourites Liam Withnail and Jay Lafferty give us a sneak peek of their upcoming festival shows.

Tue 17 Jul

RED RAW (ROB KANE + RAY BRADSHAW)

Work-in-progress sneak peak previews of the upcoming Fringe shows before they’re taken to Edinburgh in August.

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts.

Thu 12 Jul

Wed 18 Jul

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £10

Resident host Julia Sutherland introduces a variety of stand-up comedians from the Scottish circuit delivering all new material.

THE THURSDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + STU & GARRY + BRYAN GHOSH + LIAM WITHNAIL + BILLY KIRKWOOD)

Start the weekend early with five comedians. YESBAR VIRGINS

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Graham Barrie introduces a selection of fledgling comedy talent handpicked fae Scotland. ED BYRNE: SPOILER ALERT

TRAMWAY, FROM 20:00, £24

Recognized as one of the finest observational comics in the industry, the Irish comic asks questions like “Is life that bad?” and “Are we spoiled?” in his new show.

Fri 13 Jul

THE FRIDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + STU & GARRY + BRYAN GHOSH + LIAM WITHNAIL + BILLY KIRKWOOD) THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit. ED BYRNE: SPOILER ALERT

TRAMWAY, FROM 20:00, £24

Recognized as one of the finest observational comics in the industry, the Irish comic asks questions like “Is life that bad?” and “Are we spoiled?” in his new show.

Sat 14 Jul

THE SATURDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + STU & GARRY + BRYAN GHOSH + LIAM WITHNAIL + BILLY KIRKWOOD) THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £3

NEW MATERIAL COMEDY NIGHT

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

SCRAM! (CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD + ROSCO MCCLELLAND + MARC JENNINGS + STEPHEN BUCHANAN + RACHEL GRAHAM)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £4 - £5

SCRAM! is the brand new sketch and ensemble night from some of Scotland’s finest new comedians. Stand-up, sketches and improv.

Thu 19 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (BRENDON BURNS + JOHN ROSS + DONALD ALEXANDER + JOE MCTERNAN + JANEY GODLEY)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians. YESBAR VIRGINS

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Graham Barrie introduces a selection of fledgling comedy talent handpicked fae Scotland. CROSSMYLAFF COMEDY: FRINGE PREVIEWS

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 20:00, £8

Preview of Edinburgh Fringe comedy shows, featuring Chris Forbes and Rosco Mcclelland.

JAMIE MACDONALD: BLINKERED (FRINGE PREVIEW)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £5 - £6

Blind Jamie is taking a long hard look at this blinkered world.

Fri 20 Jul

THE FRIDAY SHOW (BRENDON BURNS + JOHN ROSS + DONALD ALEXANDER + JOE MCTERNAN + JANEY GODLEY) THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

THE SATURDAY SHOW (BRENDON BURNS + JOHN ROSS + DONALD ALEXANDER + JOE MCTERNAN + JANEY GODLEY)

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

Sun 22 Jul

YESBAR VIRGINS: COMEDY SUNDAY SCHOOL

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

A selection of five fledgling comedians do their best to win over the audience and graduate Yesbar’s Comedy Sunday School. CHRIS HENRY: BALLOONATICS

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 15:00, £7 - £9

A show the whole family will love, Balloonatics promises to be a chaos-filled, nonsense-packed hour of balloons, laughs and excitement. FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you. CHRIS HENRY: AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DATES

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £10

Chris Henry’s hilarious tale of how he is still single at 40 is a hysterical account of putting yourself out there on a global scale.

Mon 23 Jul

FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you. NEIL DELAMERE: CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE (WORK IN PROGRESS)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £8 - £10

Star of BBC’s Blame Game and Soft Border Patrol, Neil Delamere thinks he has that “illusion of control” idea sussed. It’s doubtful. SCOTT GIBSON: EDINBURGH FRINGE PREVIEW SHOW

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £8

Edinburgh Fringe Previews for Scott Gibson’s two shows, Tales From The Battlefield VOL 1 and Anywhere But Here.

Tue 24 Jul

RED RAW (GUS LYMBURN + CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts. SCOTT GIBSON: EDINBURGH FRINGE PREVIEW SHOW

THE HUG AND PINT, FROM 19:30, £8

Edinburgh Fringe Previews for Scott Gibson’s two shows, Tales From The Battlefield VOL 1 and Anywhere But Here.

Wed 25 Jul

MAZ’S MAGGIES BENEFIT (MICHELLE MCMANUS + RAY BRADSHAW + ELAINE MALCOLMSON + SUSIE MCCABE)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £10

A charity comedy benefit raising funds for Maz’s Maggies.

Graham Barrie introduces a selection of fledgling comedy talent handpicked fae Scotland.

Fri 27 Jul

THE FRIDAY SHOW (JOHN MOLONEY + ED PATRICK + JAMIE MACDONALD + YVONNE CARROLL + RAY BRADSHAW) THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

Sat 28 Jul

THE SATURDAY SHOW (JOHN MOLONEY + ED PATRICK + JAMIE MACDONALD + YVONNE CARROLL + RAY BRADSHAW)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians. THE LATE SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 22:15, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a late night comedy show, with some of the best comedians on the circuit. CROSSMYLAFF COMEDY

THE GLAD CAFE, FROM 20:00, £10

An evening of stand-up comedy featuring a hand-picked selection of local up and coming comics. THE EARLY SHOW

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

Sun 29 Jul

YESBAR VIRGINS: COMEDY SUNDAY SCHOOL

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

A selection of five fledgling comedians do their best to win over the audience and graduate Yesbar’s Comedy Sunday School. FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you. LARRY DEAN & STUART MITCHELL: WORK IN PROGRESS DOUBLE BILL

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 16:45, £4 - £5

Work-in-progress sneak peak previews of the upcoming Fringe shows before they’re taken to Edinburgh in August.

Mon 30 Jul

AN AUDIENCE WITH FORMER WWE/ WCW/ECW WRESTLING LEGEND RAVEN

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 19:45, £15 - £25

Besides being a professional wrestler, Raven is also a professional stand-up comic and an in-demand public speaker. FRANKIE BOYLE (WORK IN PROGRESS 2018)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 18:00, £12 - £15

If you want to see Frankie Boyle telling jokes, and for some of them to totally die, this is the show for you.

Tue 31 Jul

RED RAW (BILLY KIRKWOOD)

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts.

Edinburgh Comedy

NEW MATERIAL COMEDY NIGHT

YESBAR, FROM 20:00, £3

Resident host Julia Sutherland introduces a variety of stand-up comedians from the Scottish circuit delivering all new material.

Thu 26 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (JOHN MOLONEY + ED PATRICK + JAMIE MACDONALD + YVONNE CARROLL + RAY BRADSHAW)

Sun 01 Jul PROGRESS!

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

Monkey Barrel’s rising comedy star showcase; swing by and catch the stars of tomorrow. TBC IMPROV THEATRE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

YESBAR, FROM 19:30, £10

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

July 2018

Find full listings at theskinny.co.uk/whats-on

THE EARLY SHOW

Resident MC Viv Gee hosts a weekend comedy club with some of the best comedians on the circuit.

THE STAND GLASGOW, FROM 20:30, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians.

The To Be Continued crew return with more sketches, scenes and improvised antics.

Bitch Night presents TheWeeComedyWeekend, in association with Cabaret Voltaire over three nights and two rooms.

Mon 02 Jul

RED RAW (GUS LYMBURN + BRUCE FUMMEY)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts.

Tue 03 Jul PROJECT X

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

All-new student night themed around the film of the same name, Project X.

Wed 04 Jul VIVA LA SHAMBLES

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £4 - £5

Anarchic comedy mayhem from Scotland’s finest young acts. TOP BANANA

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

Monkey Barrel’s comedy competition for new folk on the scene.

Thu 05 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (MARK MAIER + JONNY PELHAM + BRUCE FUMMEY + BRYAN GHOSH + SUSAN MORRISON)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians. SPONTANEOUS POTTER

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

A brand new Harry Potter play from some of Edinburgh’s most top notch improv wizards. ALFIE BROWN: WHATEVER WORKS

Sun 08 Jul

THE SUNDAY NIGHT LAUGH-IN (JAMES NOKISE + RO CAMPBELL + MC HAMMERSMITH + AMY MATTHEWS) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Chilled Sunday night comedy to see out the weekend. STU & GARRY’S FREE IMPROV SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

Monkey Barrel’s rising comedy star showcase; swing by and catch the stars of tomorrow. TBC IMPROV THEATRE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

The To Be Continued crew return with more sketches, scenes and improvised antics. JOHN LYNN: ADDICTION DICTION

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 18:00, £5 - £6

John Lynn has many addictions in his life, and some of them he likes.

Mon 09 Jul

RED RAW (KIMI LOUGHTON + MARC JENNINGS)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts. PETER PANCAKES’S COMEDY EXTRAVAGANZA!

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, FREE

Phil O’Shea brings a handpicked selection of riotous lols to Monkey Barrel.

PROJECT X

THE COMEDY SHOW (RAY BRADSHAW + DAISY EARL + ROSS LESLIE + ALFIE BROWN)

THE BASEMENT THEATRE, FROM 20:00, £10.50 - £12.50

Weekly comedy show at the Basement every Friday and Saturday night, with a different line-up and headliner each week, combining up-and-coming talent with Fringe favourites. TOM STADE: WORK IN PROGRESS

THE BASEMENT THEATRE, FROM 19:00, £5

Tom brings a new work-in-progress show with special guests.

Sat 07 Jul

THE SATURDAY SHOW (MARK MAIER + JONNY PELHAM + BRUCE FUMMEY + BRYAN GHOSH + SUSAN MORRISON)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG SATURDAY SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £14

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy. THE COMEDY SHOW (RAY BRADSHAW + DAISY EARL + ROSS LESLIE + ALFIE BROWN)

THE BASEMENT THEATRE, FROM 20:00, £10.50 - £12.50

Weekly comedy show at the Basement every Friday and Saturday night, with a different line-up and headliner each week, combining up-and-coming talent with Fringe favourites.

Wed 11 Jul MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

Monkey Barrel’s comedy competition for new folk on the scene.

Thu 12 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (DAVE JOHNS + SUSAN MORRISON + JAMES NOKISE + KIMI LOUGHTON + MARTIN MOR) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians.

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

Monkey Barrel’s rising comedy star showcase; swing by and catch the stars of tomorrow. TBC IMPROV THEATRE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

The To Be Continued crew return with more sketches, scenes and improvised antics.

Mon 16 Jul

RED RAW (GARETH WAUGH + ROSS MCLELLAND)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts. ACTOR’S NIGHTMARE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:30, £0 - £3

PROJECT X

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

All-new student night themed around the film of the same name, Project X.

STUART MITCHELL & CHRIS FORBES: FRINGE PREVIEW DOUBLE BILL

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £4 - £5

Work-in-progress sneak peak previews of the upcoming Fringe shows before they’re taken to Edinburgh in August.

Wed 18 Jul

TOPICAL STORM (MARK NELSON + KEIR MCALLISTER + STUART MURPHY + VLADIMIR MCTAVISH) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £7

The big weekend show with five comedians.

The big weekend show with five comedians. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG SATURDAY SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £14

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

TBC IMPROV THEATRE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

The To Be Continued crew return with more sketches, scenes and improvised antics.

DAVEY REILLY: DISPOSABLE CAMERA (WIP) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 18:00, £5

After finding an unprocessed camera for sale, Davey Reilly spent years deliberating over whether or not to get it developed.

Mon 23 Jul

RED RAW (RO CAMPBELL + WAYNE MAZADZA)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts.

Tue 24 Jul BRIGHT CLUB

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5

Seriously smart stand-up. Comedy and Academia collide. Described by Robin Ince as, “A very good idea.” PROJECT X

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

All-new student night themed around the film of the same name, Project X.

Wed 25 Jul TOP BANANA

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

Monkey Barrel’s comedy competition for new folk on the scene.

JAMIE MACDONALD: BLINKERED (FRINGE PREVIEW) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Thu 26 Jul

THE THURSDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + RAY BRADSHAW + ADAM ROWE + ANNA MATERSKA + JOE HEENAN)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians. SPONTANEOUS POTTER

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

Fri 20 Jul

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £17.50

Monkey Barrel’s rising comedy star showcase; swing by and catch the stars of tomorrow.

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £10 - £12

THE SATURDAY SHOW (DAVE JOHNS + SUSAN MORRISON + JAMES NOKISE + KIMI LOUGHTON + MARTIN MOR)

PROGRESS!

Blind Jamie is taking a long hard look at this blinkered world.

A brand new Harry Potter play from some of Edinburgh’s most top notch improv wizards.

Sat 14 Jul

STU & GARRY’S FREE IMPROV SHOW

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 13:30, FREE

TOP BANANA

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG FRIDAY SHOW

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

Chilled Sunday night comedy to see out the weekend.

Satirical comedy at its best.

Thu 19 Jul

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £6 - £12

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

THE FRIDAY SHOW (DAVE JOHNS + SUSAN MORRISON + JAMES NOKISE + KIMI LOUGHTON + MARTIN MOR)

THE SUNDAY NIGHT LAUGH-IN (HAILEY BOYLE + ROB KANE + JOE MCTERNAN + LIAM FARRELLY + DAVEY REILLY)

PROGRESS!

SPONTANEOUS SHERLOCK

Fri 13 Jul

Sun 22 Jul

Legendary free Sunday afternoon improv show.

Monkey Barrel’s comedy competition for new folk on the scene.

An entirely improvised Sherlock Holmes comedy play from Scotland’s hottest improv troupe.

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 13:30, FREE

Legendary free Sunday afternoon improv show.

Tue 17 Jul

TOP BANANA

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

STU & GARRY’S FREE IMPROV SHOW

BONA FIDE (JAY LAFFERTY)

Fri 06 Jul

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £10 - £12

Chilled Sunday night comedy to see out the weekend.

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Tue 10 Jul

All-new student night themed around the film of the same name, Project X.

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG FRIDAY SHOW

THE SUNDAY NIGHT LAUGH-IN

Scotland’s leading improv comedians are dropped into two-person scenes, but only one actor has a script.

A split bill stand-up comedy show, featuring comics Megan Shandley and Joe McTernan.

The big weekend show with five comedians.

Encompassing some of the greatest life advice ever to be recorded in the history of the world (hopefully), as Chris sets out the rules of modern existence for his infant son.

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

THE BASEMENT THEATRE, FROM 21:00, £5

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £6 - £12

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £14

PROGRESS!

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

THE FRIDAY SHOW (MARK MAIER + JONNY PELHAM + BRUCE FUMMEY + BRYAN GHOSH + SUSAN MORRISON)

KING’S THEATRE EDINBURGH, FROM 19:30, £22.50

Sun 15 Jul

Alfie Brown is back with new jokes in a new show. MEGAN SHANDLEY & JOE MCTERNAN: TOLERATE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG SATURDAY SHOW

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 13:30, FREE

Legendary free Sunday afternoon improv show.

New material specially written for the night by some of the countries finest comedians.

THE BASEMENT THEATRE, FROM 19:30, £5

CHRIS RAMSEY: JUST HAPPY TO GET OUT OF THE HOUSE

THE FRIDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + RAY BRADSHAW + ADAM ROWE + ANNA MATERSKA + JOE HEENAN) THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG FRIDAY SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £10 - £12

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

Sat 21 Jul

THE SATURDAY SHOW (SEYMOUR MACE + RAY BRADSHAW + ADAM ROWE + ANNA MATERSKA + JOE HEENAN)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians.

THE THURSDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + VLADIMIR MCTAVISH + CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD + JORDAN WISTUBA + SCOTT AGNEW)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £5 - £10

Start the weekend early with five comedians. SPONTANEOUS SHERLOCK

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

An entirely improvised Sherlock Holmes comedy play from Scotland’s hottest improv troupe.

Fri 27 Jul

THE FRIDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + VLADIMIR MCTAVISH + CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD + JORDAN WISTUBA + SCOTT AGNEW)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £6 - £12

The big weekend show with five comedians. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG FRIDAY SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £10 - £12

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

Sat 28 Jul

THE SATURDAY SHOW (HAILEY BOYLE + VLADIMIR MCTAVISH + CHRISTOPHER MACARTHUR-BOYD + JORDAN WISTUBA + SCOTT AGNEW)

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 21:00, £17.50

The big weekend show with five comedians. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY’S BIG SATURDAY SHOW

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £14

Monkey Barrel’s flagship night of premier stand-up comedy.

Listings

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AN AUDIENCE WITH FORMER WWE/ WCW/ECW WRESTLING LEGEND RAVEN THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 15:00, £15 - £25

Besides being a professional wrestler, Raven is also a professional stand-up comic and an in-demand public speaker.

Sun 29 Jul

THE SUNDAY NIGHT LAUGH-IN

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £5 - £6

Chilled Sunday night comedy to see out the weekend. STU & GARRY’S FREE IMPROV SHOW

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 13:30, FREE

Legendary free Sunday afternoon improv show. PROGRESS!

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

Monkey Barrel’s rising comedy star showcase; swing by and catch the stars of tomorrow. TBC IMPROV THEATRE

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £5

The To Be Continued crew return with more sketches, scenes and improvised antics.

Mon 30 Jul RED RAW

THE STAND EDINBURGH, FROM 20:30, £3

Legendary new material night with up to ten acts. MONKEY BARREL COMEDY PRESENTS: WIP

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:30, £0 - £3

Four of Monkey Barrel’s very favourite acts combine forces for a bumper night of works in progress.

Tue 31 Jul PROJECT X

MONKEY BARREL COMEDY CLUB, FROM 19:00, £0 - £3

All-new student night themed around the film of the same name, Project X.

Glasgow Art

Art GoMA

CELLULAR WORLD

1 JUL-7 OCT, TIMES VARY, FREE

A group exhibition that introduces the key thematic concerns of this year’s Glasgow International Director’s Programme, including questions of identity and individual, and collective consciousness at a time of prolific social change and uncertainty, when reality can often seem more like science fiction. JACK KNOX: CONCRETE BLOCK

6 JUL-13 JAN 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

One of Scotland’s most influential artists of the 20th century, Jack Knox presents an exhibition looking at a ten-year period of work, from the late 1960s onwards.

House For An Art Lover

LESLEY PUNTON: BELOW, THE ROCKS PLUNGED INTO DARKNESS

1-15 JUL, 12:00AM – 12:00AM, FREE

TRANSIENT MOMENTS

2-30 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

A collection of black and white images by Scottish landscape, fine art and travel photographer John McKenna, exploring the concepts of transience and impermanence in contemporary Japan.

Cass Art Glasgow

CLYDEBUILT SUMMER EXHIBITION

1-8 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

A showcase of Glasgow’s art and design talent; a mix of styles and mediums from 13 artists that present a varied look at what is being created in Glasgow today.

Cyril Gerber Fine Art

JACK KNOX RSA RSW RGI HFRIAS D.LITT (1936-2015): PAINTINGS & DRAWINGS

7-28 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

A new exhibition of works by Jack Knox to coincide with the forthcoming show at the Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow.

This never before seen body of work includes photos taken by Steven Berkoff during a period in the Autumn of 1966, when he was an actor with The Citizens Theatre.

The Common Guild

KATINKA BOCK: RADIO PIOMBINO

3-7 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

For Glasgow International 2018, The Common Guild will present a solo exhibition of work by the Paris-based, German artist Katinka Bock, her first in the UK.

The Lighthouse A DAY OUT

1-22 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Graphic design studio A Day Out is Graham and Malcolm: a twentynine-year-old skateboarder and a retiree of the Stockholm hardcore punk scene. Here they share some of their work and approach, which they aim to keep rigorous, irreverent and adventurous. VISAURIHELIX

Studio Pavilion presents a solo exhibition of new work by artist Lesley Punton. Below, the rocks plunged into darkness continues her exploration into mountain landscape and a consideration of how we experience, encounter and inhabit wild spaces.

6 JUL-1 JAN 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

Hunterian Art Gallery

The Modern Institute @ Airds Lane

STILL MOVING: THE FILMS AND PHOTOGRAPHS OF ULRIKE OTTINGER

1-29 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

The Hunterian presents a solo exhibition of moving image works and photographs by the internationally renowned filmmaker and artist Ulrike Ottinger, accompanied by a retrospective screening of her key films. THE PHILOSOPHY CHAMBER: ART AND SCIENCE IN HARVARD’S TEACHING CABINET, 1766-1820

1-15 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

13th Note

STEVEN BERKOFF: GORBALS 1966 14 JUL-16 SEP, TIMES VARY, FREE

An exhibition bringing rare items from Harvard University’s extraordinary collections to Scotland for the first time.

Mary Mary

PEARL BLAUVELT AND ALEANA EGAN

3 JUL-4 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

An exhibition of drawings by the late American artist Pearl Blauvelt and works by Irish artist Aleana Egan.

New Glasgow Society BILDER

27-29 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Bilder brings together the work of eight Glasgow-based artists who predominantly make paintings.

Platform SCALED UP

1 JUL-5 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

A collection of new large scale paintings that have been specifically created for Platform’s exhibition wall.

Six Foot Gallery RACHAEL REBUS: WOMEN’S WORK

Celebrating the 150th anniversary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s birth, sound and audiovisual artist Louise Harris takes inspiration from the many geometric forms found in his architecture to transform the Tower of The Lighthouse.

URS FISCHER: MAYBE

5 JUL-25 AUG, 12:00PM – 5:00PM, FREE

The Modern Institute presents an exhibition of new work by Urs Fischer, spanning across the Aird’s Lane gallery space and adjacent Bricks Space, as part of Glasgow International 2018. MARC HUNDLEY: THE SAME DIFFERENT GAME

5 JUL-25 AUG, 12:00PM – 5:00PM, FREE

Canadian artist and designer Marc Hundley presents a new exhibition at The Modern Institute.

The Old Hairdressers AMOUR-PROPRE

1-3 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

The series of paintings presented at this exhibition aim to circle notions relating to the self.

Tramway

MARK LECKEY: NOBODADDY

1-15 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

For his solo exhibition at Tramway, Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Leckey has taken inspiration from a small statuette of the biblical figure of Job on display in the Wellcome Collection in London. HERE TO STAY?

7 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

This Upper Foyer exhibition created by young people with connections to Central and Eastern Europe looks at their experiences of cultures, identities and belonging, in the context of Brexit. CHILDREN’S EXHIBITION

7 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

Rachael Rebus was one of the many talented artists who exhibited at the Six Foot Gallery last year in the 2018 Showcase and this time, she's back for her very own solo show.

An exhibition of bold, playful and engaging artwork that will introduce children to ideas and materials commonly used in contemporary art, through tactile experience, digital interaction, and movable shapes and forms.

Walnuts and pears you plant for your heirs is a new exhibition by the Canadian artist Stephanie Hier.

3-13 JUL, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

7 JUL, 1:00PM – 6:00PM, FREE

Glasgow Print Studio

Street Level Photoworks

David Dale Gallery and Studios

STEPHANIE HIER: WALNUTS AND PEARS YOU PLANT FOR YOUR HEIRS

5-21 JUL, 12:00PM – 5:00PM, FREE

ADE ADESINA AND JUNE CAREY: A COLLABORATION IN PRINT

1-29 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

This exhibition brings together two very different artists working in print, with their own visions of a surreal nature. ALLAN RICHARDSON

1 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Glasgow-based painter and printmaker, Allan Richardson has been a member of Glasgow Print Studio for around 15 years and describes his personal areas of interest as etching, mezzotint, collagraph and linocut.

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Listings

3-13 JUL, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

MARCIN KRUPA AND LAURA MANESCAU

Two exhibitions running alongside each other in Gallery 2.

JAMES PFAFF: ALEX & ME

1 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Alex & Me is an artistic reappropriation of James Pfaff’s archive, a tribute to a significant broken love and an authentic road trip through North America in the late summer of 1998. BRIAN GRIFFIN: POP

14 JUL-16 SEP, TIMES VARY, FREE

POP is a comprehensive exploration of the music photography of Brian Griffin who shot album covers, single sleeves, posters and press, for The Clash, Depeche Mode, Iggy Pop, Kate Bush and many more.

NET EFFECT: CELEBRATE ART

Young emerging artists explore their place in the world, through projection, sound, storytelling, printmaking and sculpture.

Transmission Gallery

TRANSMISSION ANNUAL MEMBERS’ SHOW: HOME OF MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY

1-21 JUL, 11:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

Celebrating the artist-run space, with works from its membership spanning across sculpture, painting, video and installation.

Edinburgh Art

Edinburgh College of Art

DEAD IMAGES: FACING THE HISTORY, ETHICS AND POLITICS OF EUROPEAN SKULL COLLECTIONS

2 JUL-25 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

&Gallery INITIAL SIGHTING

7 JUL-1 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

Introducing four new artists to &Gallery, exhibiting a selection of painting and collage: Joanne Hummel-Newell, JFK Turner, Karine Leger and Susan Laughton.

Arusha Gallery L.A. SUMMER

5-22 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

A group show of local and international painters exploring the aesthetic of Los Angeles as a place of artistic inspiration.

City Art Centre

IN FOCUS: SCOTTISH PHOTOGRAPHY

7 JUL-12 MAY 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

In Focus: Scottish Photography showcases the City Art Centre’s photographic collections, charting the development of fine art photography in Scotland from the 19th century to present day.

ROBERT CALLENDER: PLASTIC BEACH

1-8 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Focusing on a selection of Robert Callender’s work, the exhibition addresses environmental concerns, ways and means of recycling; issues that underline the enduring and absolute relevance of Robert Callender’s ideas, particularly his later work, which took a distinctly ecological turn with his significant installation Plastic Beach. THE RE(A)D BED

1-8 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

This exhibition at the City Art Centre features The Red Bed (1916) from The Human Comedy series by James Pryde (1866-1941) in the City of Edinburgh collection, alongside work from Lothian Health Services Archive and the Alt-w Fund. PLATFORM: 2018

27 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

Edinburgh Art Festival’s dedicated showcase for artists at the beginning of their careers. The 2018 edition, selected from an open call by artists Jonathan Owen and Hanna Tuulikki, brings together four female artists: Renèe Helèna Browne, Annie Crabtree, Isobel Lutz-Smith, and Rae-Yen Song.

Coburg House Art Studios INTERSECTION

14-15 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

A textile exhibition by Coral Fowley, exploring colour, light and pattern.

DOK Artist Space TREMBLING

20-25 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

An exhibition of new work by Glasgow based artist Katy Hundertmark, including a live performance on July 20th, 6-9pm.

Dovecot Studios SCREEN FOR ANOTHER FOCUS: DAVID PENNY

2-11 JUL, 10:30AM – 5:30PM, FREE

As part of the 10-year anniversary of Dovecot’s new life at the old Infirmary Street Baths, artist David Penny has created an exhibition of photography and video work interpreting the extraordinary craftsmanship of the weavers at Dovecot Tapestry Studio. LIBERTY ART FABRICS & FASHION

28 JUL-12 JAN 19, 10:30AM – 5:30PM, £4.50

Dovecot Gallery brings to Scotland a major retrospective celebrating the innovative retailer and design studio Liberty London. Featuring over 100 garments and fabrics spanning 140 years, this exhibition explores how textiles bring art into everyday life. THE SCOTTISH GALLERY AT DOVECOT STUDIOS: CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY

2-11 JUL, 10:30AM – 5:30PM, FREE

A special display of a selection of outstanding contemporary jewellers curated by The Scottish Gallery to complement the current exhibition by photographer David Penny, Screen for Another Focus.

DEAD IMAGES explores the contentious legacy of collections of human skulls, assembled during the 19th and early 20th centuries and still held in public institutions in Europe. THE COMMON SENSE

26 JUL-25 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

Melanie Gilligan’s dystopian drama is set in an eerily familiar future. Over 15 short episodes, it tracks the impact of a new immersive technology that enable individuals to tap into the sensations of others.

Edinburgh Printmakers TRANSLATING TRAVELS

3-21 JUL, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

British-born, Bergen-based artist, Imi Maufe will be showing work from the past fifteen years – a collection of travels that have been developing into contained boxed pieces that can also involve collaboration with other artists. NÀDAR / PRAKRITI

27 JUL-20 OCT, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Nàdar / Prakriti is the first solo UK exhibition by Indian artist Ravi Agarwal, including new prints commissioned and published by Edinburgh Printmakers.

Embassy Gallery JULY SHOW

27 JUL-19 AUG, 12:00PM – 6:00PM, FREE

A collaborative interactive exhibition by Flora Hunt and Ella Walker with responsive performances by Mara Menzies. MAKING CHALK MARKS ON WATER

7-15 JUL, 12:00PM – 6:00PM, FREE

Artist in Residence at Edinburgh College, Lynne McBride invites HND Contemporary Art Practice students to join her in engaging with artist-led archives across Scotland.

Ingleby Gallery CALLUM INNES

4-14 JUL, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

Callum Innes took part in Ingleby’s very first exhibition in July 1998 and 20 years on, this exhibition of his newest Exposed Paintings opens this new chapter in the gallery’s history. TWENTY

4-14 JUL, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

An exhibition to celebrate 20 years of Ingleby gallery and the opening of their new premises in the old Glasite Meeting House at 33 Barony Street. JACOB’S LADDER

26 JUL-20 OCT, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

An exhibition celebrating mankind’s relationship with space and our enduring attempts to fathom the unfathomable. Included are rare historical works alongside contemporary artists whose work considers the imaginative territory between Earth and the heavens.

Inverleith House JACKIE MORRIS & ROBERT MACFARLANE: THE LOST WORDS

1 JUL-2 SEP, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

An exhibition by Jackie Morris & Robert Macfarlane in Inverleith House.

National Museum of Scotland ART OF GLASS

Open Eye Gallery

ROLAND FRASER: NEW CONSTRUCTIONS

2-21 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

New constructions in reclaimed wooden panels.

WHISTLER TO BLOW: 150 YEARS OF BRITISH PRINTMAKING

2-21 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

In association with John Anderson, the Open Eye Gallery mounts an exhibition to include some of the finest British printmakers of the 20th century.

Royal Scottish Academy RSA

RSA OPEN EXHIBITION OF ART 2018

1-25 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Drawing from artists across the whole of Scotland and beyond, this exhibition in the RSA’s Lower Galleries showcases a wide range of small and medium sized works selected through open submission.

Scottish National Gallery

REMBRANDT: BRITAIN’S DISCOVERY OF THE MASTER

7 JUL-14 OCT, TIMES VARY, £0 - £12

This exclusive new exhibition, which will only be shown in Edinburgh, reveals how the taste for Rembrandt’s work in Britain evolved over the past 400 years. ARTISTS AT WORK

1 JUL-2 SEP, TIMES VARY, FREE

Artists at Work is an exhibition of works by members of staff from across the entire organisation. It is a varied and inspiring selection created by, among others, gallery attendants, conservators, retail team members and volunteers.

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

NOW: JENNY SAVILLE, SARA BARKER, CHRISTINE BORLAND, ROBIN RHODE, MARKUS SCHINWALD, CATHERINE STREET AND OTHERS

1 JUL-16 SEP, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

The third instalment of NOW will feature a major survey of works by renowned British artist Jenny Saville, spanning some 25 years of the artist’s career across five rooms. EMIL NOLDE: COLOUR IS LIFE

14 JUL-21 OCT, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, £8 - £10

Emil Nolde (1867-1956) was one of the greatest colourists of the twentieth century. Nolde felt strongly about what he painted, identifying with his subjects in every brushstroke he made, heightening his colours and simplifying his shapes, so that we, the viewers, can also experience his emotional response to the world about him. RAQIB SHAW: REINVENTING THE OLD MASTERS

1 JUL-28 OCT, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

Eight works by Raqib Shaw will be shown, alongside two paintings which have long obsessed him: Joseph Noel Paton’s The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania, 1849 and Lucas Cranach’s An Allegory of Melancholy, 1528.

Scottish National Portrait Gallery SCOTS IN ITALY

1 JUL-5 MAR 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

A new exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland will examine the diverse work of 15 established and emerging glass artists in Britain today.

A showcase of the Scottish experience of Italy in the eighteenth century, a time when artistic, entrepreneurial and aristocratic fascination with the country was reaching boiling point.

1 JUL-25 NOV, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, £7 - £10

1 JUL-27 OCT 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

1 JUL-16 SEP, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

RIP IT UP: THE STORY OF SCOTTISH POP

The first major exhibition dedicated to Scottish pop music, exploring the musical culture of the nation over more than half a century, from influential indie pioneers to global superstars.

HIDDEN GEMS: SCOTLAND’S AGATES

1 JUL-2 SEP, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

A new display exploring the beauty and variety of Scottish agates will examine how agates form, their diversity of colour and texture and how their allure has captured the imagination of scientists and amateur enthusiasts alike.

THE MODERN PORTRAIT

A display collating paintings, sculptures and works from the Portrait Gallery’s 20th-century collection, feat. a variety of well-known faces, from Ramsay Macdonald to Alan Cumming, Tilda Swinton to Danny McGrain.

HEROES AND HEROINES 1 JUL-31 MAY 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

A re-examination of major Scottish figures which questions our habit of framing history around individuals and idols.

ART AND ANALYSIS: TWO NETHERLANDISH PAINTERS WORKING IN JACOBEAN SCOTLAND

1 JUL-26 JAN 20, TIMES VARY, FREE

A small exhibition focusing on two 17th century artists, Adrian Vanson and Adam de Colone, showcasing a group of paintings which have been examined by paintings conservator Dr Caroline Rae, along with the findings from her research. IN FOCUS: THE EXECUTION OF CHARLES I

Talbot Rice Gallery

LUCY SKAER: THE GREEN MAN

26 JUL-6 OCT, TIMES VARY, FREE

Lucy Skaer’s exhibition The Green Man has at its heart an exploration and reanimation of the desire to collect. Skaer will select from the collections of the University of Edinburgh and has invited fellow artists to inhabit the galleries of Talbot Rice alongside her – Fiona Conner, Will Holder, Hanneline Visnes and Nashashibi/Skaer.

The Fire Station BIODIVERSITY

26 JUL-26 AUG, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

1 JUL-26 JAN 20, TIMES VARY, FREE

Biodiversity is the outcome of research and work developed during Siobhan Healy’s time as an Artist in Residence at ECA in collaboration with the artist and writer Alasdair Gray.

VICTORIA CROWE: BEYOND LIKENESS

The Fruitmarket Gallery

An exhibition centred around a painting of the execution of Charles I – based on eye-witness accounts and contemporary engravings – by an unknown Dutch artist. 1 JUL-18 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

This exhibition brings together a group of the best portraits by the distinguished artist Victoria Crowe. PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES: TRANSPORTATION PHOTOGRAPHS FROM NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND

1 JUL-13 JAN 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

Planes, Trains & Automobiles is the third in a series of thematic exhibitions exploring the exceptional permanent collection of photography at the National Galleries of Scotland.

THE REMAKING OF SCOTLAND | NATION, MIGRATION, GLOBALISATION 1760-1860

1 JUL-21 JUN 20, TIMES VARY, FREE

An exhibition exploring the lives and careers of the Scots behind the period of dramatic change between 1760 and 1860, when Scotland rapidly attained a central role in European cultural life and in Britain’s industrial and imperial expansion.

Stills

TACITA DEAN: WOMAN WITH A RED HAT

7 JUL-30 SEP, TIMES VARY, FREE

Taking performance as its theme, this exhibition of the work of Tacita Dean will be presented in the context of the Edinburgh International Festival, bringing into focus Dean’s understanding of the possibilities and complications of performance.

Upright Gallery OLIVIA TURNER: DEPARTURE OF THE LINE

2-20 JUL, TIMES VARY, FREE

Olivia Turner’s paintings play with perspective, composition and structure and draw inspiration from the powerful, solid structures and materials of Brutalist architecture of the late 20th Century.

Dundee Art

PROJECTS 18

1 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Projects 18 is a series of four exhibitions aimed at providing a platform for new talent in photography from Scotland. THE DAYS NEVER SEEM THE SAME

26 JUL-28 OCT, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Bringing together the work of photographer Gunnie Moberg and influential filmmaker, poet and writer, Margaret Tait. Both artists shared a strong connection to Orkney: the place, its people and its landscape.

Summerhall

THE ROMANCE OF THE GARDEN: FRAGMENTS AND MEMORIES

1-13 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Married for 51 years, Dawson and Liz Murray share a great passion for plants and have spent the 21 years since they moved to Fife designing a beautiful garden which provides a constantly changing source of inspiration for their work. SATELLITE: VAS AT SUMMERHALL

1-13 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Satellite will track the progress of some of the 25 aspiring artists that the VAS Graduate Showcase have featured over their last four annual exhibitions and will also feature works by their associate members. FRITZ WELCH: CRYSTALLINE CHRYSALIS CRISIS

1-13 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Artist and musician Fritz Welch presents Crystalline Chrysalis Crisis in Summerhall’s Machine Shop – a bunker-like area in the former veterinary school, housing its defunct metal-lathe, responding to the space’s architectural and interior features. SUZANNE TAYLOR: SCAPES

1-11 JUL, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

The show is a retrospective body of work by artist Suzanne Taylor covering the last several years, bringing together painting, collage, screen printing and photography.

DCA: Dundee Contemporary Arts EVE FOWLER: WHAT A SLIGHT. WHAT A SOUND. WHAT A UNIVERSAL SHUDDER

1 JUL-26 AUG, TIMES VARY, FREE

DCA present the first major European exhibition of American artist Eve Fowler’s work. Having exhibited widely over the past two decades in the US, Fowler is one of the most significant artists of her generation, using art and language to disrupt and unsettle the dominant power structures that control much of the world around us.

The McManus REVEALING CHARACTERS

1 JUL-31 DEC, TIMES VARY, FREE

Part of a joint exhibition of selected works from the City’s permanent collection, Revealing Characters includes an array of portraits, which examine the construction of identity. FACE TO FACE

1 JUL-31 DEC, TIMES VARY, FREE

Part of a joint exhibition of selected works from the City’s permanent collection, Face to Face includes an array of portraits, which examine the construction of identity. PORTRAITURE

1 JUL-31 DEC, TIMES VARY, FREE

In the history of art, ‘the portrait’ has taken on many guises, from exact likenesses to abstract collections of ideas and emotions. Selected from the City’s permanent collection, this exhibition includes an array of portraits, which examines the construction of identity.

REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION

1 JUL-1 APR 19, TIMES VARY, FREE

An exhibition examining the cultural consequences of the national religion becoming Protestantism in 16th century Scotland.

THE SKINNY


Collabs Continued The collaborations keep coming in Scottish design – here are a few of 2018’s newest offerings

Jennifer Kent

T

he Scottish design scene remains distinctive for its continually evolving approach to collaboration. Dedicated design fans will note partnerships and alliances forming in everchanging iterations as contemporary designers working in Scotland and internationally demonstrate their enthusiasm for each other’s work with what has come to be termed simply the ‘collab’. Recent design collabs during the first half of 2018 feature a wealth of exceptional people and products. On the east coast, menswear designer Kestin Hare created his interpretation of a modern Edinburgh hotel room featuring a curated selection of exceptional design from Scottish studios. The graphic energy of Jennifer Kent’s burnt orange and navy Frame lambswool throw – itself a collaboration with furniture designer Derek Welsh – formed a key part of the installation. Kent says, “We’re proud to have our Frame blanket included in the showcase alongside items from some of Scotland’s best designers and makers.” Other notable items on display included Andreu Carulla’s RR201 Recycled Polystyrene Stool for El Celler de Can Roca, Tom Pigeon’s Shipwreck rug, ceramic cups and a coffee pot by Myer Halliday, as well as pieces by Instrmnt and furniture-makers Namon Gaston and David Watson. The display was on show above Hare’s Cruiser Store – part of the Custom Lane design centre in Leith. Where did the idea come from? “Scottish Enterprise and Scottish Development International challenged me to create what a modern Edinburgh hotel room can look like surrounded with a curated selection of the best Scottish-made products,” says Hare. “It was a unique opportunity to challenge the preconceptions of modern Scottish design. Every detail was carefully considered and I sourced the best of Scottish designers and makers, from photographers to furniture makers and textile designers down to bed linen, drinks

July 2018

Words: Stacey Hunter

BUTE x Graphical House

and ceramics.” Meanwhile, on the west coast, Bute Fabrics – a design and weaving super-studio – unite a variety of designers in Scotland through a multitude of collaborative projects. Founded in 1947 on the Scottish island after which they take their name, Bute Fabrics supply an international marketplace with exquisite, high performance woollen textiles. Working with Glasgow graphic design studio Graphical House, Bute redeveloped their brand to reflect their modern, international and collaborative approach. Graphical House founder Daniel Ibbotson describes how their modern logotype design for Bute “retains the key features of original, while the new diagonal-strike motif evokes the angles of the textiles on the loom. A flexible colour palette can be adapted to reflect changing seasons and distinct markets.” An innovative new website enables designers to create and share digital mood-boards, while a bespoke sample box and swatch block system allows customers the freedom to interact with the fabrics, colours and textures intuitively – an industry-leading approach to sampling. Taking art direction to new levels, Graphical House worked with the aforementioned furniture maker Derek Welsh and photographer Reuben Paris to build a bespoke display system for their photoshoots, making it possible to present the fabric in precisely composed panels and tightly defined rolls. “Working with Graphical House enabled us to think differently about our products and how they are communicated to our markets, both existing and new in what’s been a game-changing rebrand for Bute Fabrics,” says Managing Director John Glen. After the success of their debut wallpaper collection Glasshouse, which features geometric shapes and botanical elements inspired by the relationship between the garden greenhouse

Andreu Carulla’s RR201 Recycled Polystyrene Stool, Tom Pigeon Carpet

and urban architecture, Bespoke Atelier have collaborated with Bute Fabrics and Morgan Furniture to create high quality printed fabric for upholstery. The lush botanical patterns from the Glasgow-based design studio led by Marion Parola and Yvonne Elliot-Kellighan have been printed onto Bute’s high quality woollen fabric complementing the beautifully crafted forms of the new Chevy dining chair by Morgan Furniture. Together, the three design companies created pieces that are fully designed, woven and manufactured in Britain and which made their first public appearance at Clerkenwell Design Week 2018 – where, fittingly, at Morgan Furniture’s London showroom, this year’s focus for CDW was on the theme The Art of Collaboration. Finally, and going from east to west and back again – the Delta Award is one of the most prestigious in Europe, awarded by the Barcelona-based Association of Industrial

DESIGN

Design (ADI-FAD) since 1961. This year, Catalan product designer Andreu Carulla – whose studio recently opened an office in Edinburgh – was invited to design this year’s trophy. The result is a simple interpretation of the iconic Delta shape in stainless steel, cut in such a way that allows for the trophy to be manipulated into various different shapes by the winners, reflecting the variety and individuality of each one. Carulla collaborated with Bute Fabrics to produce a fabric information tab on each trophy, with each category differentiated by a different colour from the mill’s new Alchemy collection. A subtle yet distinctive way to showcase the Scottish textile manufacturer to the best designers and brands, both in Spain and internationally. We will be returning to collaborations over the coming months – get in touch at localheroes.design@gmail.com if you have a collaborative design project to share with us.

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The Skinny July 2018  

The Skinny is Scotland's leading entertainment and listings magazine.

The Skinny July 2018  

The Skinny is Scotland's leading entertainment and listings magazine.

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