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.co.uk

ISSUE 41•February 2009•FREE

sexy: Underwear for valentine's Classy: Glasgow Film Festival Busy: tam dean burn @ the tron Messy: Brodinski at death disco

The

Phantom band

Rachel Maclean

scotland's most exciting young artist, in the skinny showcase

As glasgow's legendary chemikal underground approachES ITS 15th birthday, THE LABEL'S Newest act take their HAUNTING debut album on tour Across the land

Music | Film | clubs | theatre | games | books | events | art | fashion | listings


SKINNY HALFPAGE No6 Paths.pdf

BREAKING BOUNDARIES IN MUSIC 36 BLAIR ST, EDINBURGH. 0131 220 6176

DUTY FREE

live and tax free

6th February the vivians, smoked glass, the marvels 7pm - 10pm free entry!! no tickets required

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exlovers + young husband www.myspace.com/emmythegreat over 14s

C

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Y

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SICK NOTE

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THURSDAY 26TH FEBRUARY + STRICKEN CITY FREE ENTRY 11PM-3AM

DJ T

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WEDNESDAY 25TH 11PM-3AM

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Friday 27th February

EROL ALKAN BOY 8-BIT HOT PINK DELOREAN HOSTS & RESIDENTS UTAH SAINTS www.sugarbeatclub.com

DOORS 10pm-4am

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2 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

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Sun 01 March Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire ST ED JU OUNC N AN

Lyle Lovett wednesday 18th march 0131 668 2019 edinburgh queens hall 0871 220 0260 plus Special Guest TIFT

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Editorial I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who first started the association between media and events. I imagine Vanity Fair have been throwing high-end glamorous parties since the start, and Joseph Stalin certainly knew how to make sure the papers gave the right report on his speeches. I reckon The Skinny sits happily somewhere between the two. And, since the riotous launch parties We threw back in 2005, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always taken it as something of a given that we pull the social stops out from time to time. This month weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re involved with a heap of different get-togethers, and as we happen to think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all pretty interesting Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just run through them here so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re clued in â&#x20AC;&#x201C; like a one-man listings service. On the first Saturday of the month, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hosting a discussion in collaboration with the UNESCO City of Literature release of Conan Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Lost World for the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Big Readâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; campaign. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried to come up with something that touches on the evolutionary themes of this classic dinosaurs story, and also plays into the fact itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 200th anniversary of Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth (he has associations with evolution too, see). The result is an event called Digital Evolution, and the subtitle makes it pretty clear what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;what can gaming tell us about where life came from and where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heading?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve assembled a high-calibre panel, with the brilliant sci-fi author Ken MacLeod â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make some head-spin projections as to where technological forms of life are heading â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and synthetic biologist Dr Alistair Elfick, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be there to ground things in scientific reality. More info is on page 29, and Josh Wilson provides an overview of evolutionthemed games on page 22. From 13 February, the RSA will be running a reconfigured exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New Contemporaries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; surveying new work from the best recent graduates from Edinburgh College of Art. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right behind this more selective approach (the RSA Student Show used to be a bit of a mish-mash), and Rosamund West looks forward to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on offer, while weighing up the new plan, on page 28. We're also delighted to be offering an award

THE SKINNY February 2009 Issue 41, February 2009 Š Radge Media Ltd. Let us know what you think

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4 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

to one of the exhibitors, about which youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll doubtless hear more soon: but suffice to say weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be pushing the promotional boat out to make sure our chosen artist is given as much exposure for their sure-to-be-quality work over the coming months. Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day is all about coming together, and The Skinny is all about the love, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little less than an orgy of collaboration for a creative evening get-together at The Bowery: The Skinny, Ten Tracks, Fife Kills and the re-branded Collective Gallery are all teaming up to put on a mellow night of fun. There will be live sets from Rob St John, Eagleowl and My Kappa Roots, DJ sets from Ten Tracks curators, and booze in teacups. All this is free-entry; a preview is on page 48. The second half of the month sees us turn our attentions to Glasgow. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thrilled to be working closely with the ever-growing, ever-more-impressive Glasgow Film Festival. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re popping in and out of the cinemas, be sure to pick up a copy of your daily CineSkinny (see what we did there? Well we like itâ&#x20AC;Ś) which will keep you up to date with news, reviews, and something to make into a paper aeroplane should someone two rows down be digging their popcorn a little too enthusiastically. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much on Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll not attempt a survey here, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve features on pages 18 (Film) and 52 (Clubs) with pointers as to how to get the most from what is a carnivallike variety show of first-rate screen-stuff. And speaking of carnivals, on 21 February is the next instalment of Death Disco, with The Skinny in place to support the new music angle theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re set to pursue over the next 12 months. DD is pretty much Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest club night right now, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pleased to be able to support them as they refuse to rest on their laurels and keep trying new angles. Brodinskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming to rock it this month, and we have a look at his career to date on page 39. In a self-regarding magazine-y way, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pretty pleased with the spread of associations here. Ticking off sections of The Skinny weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got Games, Books, Art, Music, Film and Clubs all covered, in formats ranging from thoughtprovoking discussion to debauched shakedowns. Clearly if anyone makes it to all of these, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re awesome and you should probably marry them. Of course, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll only know if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at all the events if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there too. But hell, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s month, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be in it to win it.

Publisher Editorial

Editor Online & Music editor Clubs editor Heads Up editor Deviance editor Fashion editor Theatre editor Film editor DVD editor Comedy editor Books editor Games editor Art & Showcase editor Food & Drink editor Aberdeen editor

Sophie Kyle Rupert Thomson Dave Kerr Chris Duncan Erin McEIlhinney Nine Lindsay West Gareth K. Vile Gail Tolley Michael Gillespie Lizzie Cass-Maran Keir Hind Josh Wilson Rosamund West Ruth Marsh Jaco Justice

Production

Creative director Production editor Subeditors

Matt MacLeod David Lemm Euan Ferguson Paul Greenwood Paul Mitchell Gillian Watson

Sales

Enterprise manager

Lara Moloney

Research

Listings editor Club listings

Becca Pottinger Andrew Cooke


Contents

6 8 9 10 14 16 18 22 23 24 27 29 30 50 52

Showcase

Rachel Maclean's psychedelic video art.

Heads Up

Want to find out how to make a magazine of your own? Zine-o-Rama at The Forest is here to help.

Competitions

Win tickets to GlasgowFilm Festival and to see Susan Calman at the Magners Glasgow International Comedy Festival.

Fashion

Pretty pants never go out of style. But though 90210 is back on our screens, should it be back in your wardrobe?

Food & Drink

Louise Loftus heads to Loch Fyne to sample Scotland's indigenous aphrodisiac.

Deviance

Ariel Silvera on trans liberation; and Slutty Mcwhore on the irregularities of sex work , and salami.

DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…

+ FLASHGUNS + MIDDLE CLASS RUT

GLASGOW GARAGE

FRI 13TH FEBRUARY

b

+ CHEEKY CHEEKY AND THE NOSEBLEEDS +ROGUES

+GUESTS

GLASGOW ARCHES

GLASGOW QMU

THU 19TH FEBRUARY

THU 19TH FEBRUARY

b

b

Peter Doherty +GUESTS

GLASGOW BARROWLAND T

+GOLDEN SILVERS + TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB + LES CORPS MINCE DE FRANCOISE

GLASGOW BARROWLAND

U TUESDAY SOLD O 24TH

FEBRUARY

THURSDAY 26TH FEBRUARY

b

b

Film

FEATURING

Our pick of the Glasgow Film Festival, plus reviews including Woody Allen's Vicky Christina Barcelona

PRESENTS

G[X7Tej\a%##?bfgJbe_WEXTW%##,

Games

GLASGOW GARAGE

Josh Wilson survyes computer games to have taken an evolutionary theme, plus the new Singstar reviewed.

Books

Keir Hind takes on this year's Big Read project.

Theatre

Gareth K Vile interviews Tam Dean Burn about his several current projects and we take a glimpse at the upcoming National Review of Live Art.

Comedy Why the comedy club may just be the perfect place for a first date.

SUNDAY 29TH MARCH

+ NEW EDUCATION

HAUNTS

GLASGOW GARAGE

FRIDAY 27TH FEBRUARY

THE BRONX "THE BRONX" NEW ALBUM IN STORES NOW ON WICHITA RECORDINGS

RA RA RIOT

+ THE VIVIANS + BOYCOTTS

+ WE SEE LIGHTS

SUNDAY 8TH FEBRUARY

THURSDAY 12TH FEBRUARY

GLASGOW KING TUTS

GLASGOW KING TUTS

GLASGOW CAPTAINS REST THURSDAY 26TH FEBRUARY WWW.MYSPACE.COM/PASSIONPITJAMS WWW.MYSPACE.COM/HOCKEY WWW.BEARHANDSBAND.COM

Emilíana Torrini

GLASGOW KING TUTS

TUESDAY 17TH FEBRUARY

Art

+ ABSENT ELK + A-LIX

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

Past Showcase stars Fraser Gray and Kevin Harman join the best of last year's degree shows at the RSA New Contemporaries show, and we take a trip into the world of Charles Avery

SUNDAY 8TH MARCH

KRISTINHERSH

Music

On the cusp of Chemikal Underground's 15th birthday, Darren Carle looks back (and forward) with co-founder Alun Woodward and The Phantom Band. Hell, Aidan Moffat(left) even throws in a poem.

Clubs

Cab Vol turns four with Erol Alkan leading the celebrations.

glasgow king tuts

monday 18th may

GLASGOW ARCHES SUNDAY 8TH MARCH

Listings School of Seven Bells (left) are one of our live music highlights playing this month: 24 February, Captains Rest, Glasgow.

NEW SINGLE ‘UFO’ OUT NOW www.sneakysoundsystem.com ww.myspace.com/sneakysoundsystem

aberdeen lemon tree

tuesday 19th may

TICKETS 24HRS 08444 999 990 • www.ticketmaster.co.uk • www.gigsinscotland.com

IN PERSON GLASGOW Tickets Scotland, EDINBURGH Ripping, DUNDEE Grouchos & all Ticketmaster Ticket Outlets.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 5


the skinny showcase This month The Skinny Showcase presents Rachel MacLean, who is in her final year at ECA. We first saw her work at Keep Calm and Carry On in the vaults of Edinburgh's Cowgate and were collectively entranced. Skillfully edited technicolor videos blending humour and horror playing out in the dank dark surrounds of haunted Niddrie St were a sight to remember. Rachel describes her practice thus: "My work slips inside and outside of history and into imagined futures, presenting a hyperglowing, artificially saturated surface that is both nauseatingly positive and cheerfully grotesque. A synthetic visceral, edible space in which Mary Queen of Scots dines with the 'it' girls of Sex and the City, sea creatures swim with acrylic finger nails and 'Neds' dance around a sausage

Stonehenge. My videos stylistically unify the aesthetic of The Edinburgh Bargain Store, Hieronymus Bosch and High Renaissance painting with MTV style green screening and channel changing cuts. I use my own body as a platform for constructing alternative personas that can then be cloned, mutated, objectified, worshiped and murdered at will. inspired by the Britney Spears head shaving, I am interested in the moment at which constructed identity throws its self up and tips into its opposite. The instant of self-consumption, when the signature white smile of the teen pop sensation begins to hungrily gnaw at its own image." You can see her videos on The Skinny's website at www.theskinny.co.uk

FOR THE CHANCE TO SEE YOUR WORK HERE, EMAIL PICS AND INFO TO SHOWCASE@THESKINNY.CO.UK

6 THE SKINNY February 2009


Affordable student only bus travel!

www.buymyunirider.com

February 2009

THE SKINNY 7


Heads Up

Do and DIY

Gutter Talk

Love is in the air at Stirling's MacRobert

Edinburgh's DIY symposium aims to show people just what you’re capable of when you put your mind to it (and have a little help from an expert). Allan

Polly & Millhouse

TOM

Emma

Koko

Caroline

Allan Gray, 21 What does valentine’s day mean to you? To be honest, not that much really. I’ve got a girlfriend, so it’s an opportunity to do something nice. But I think a lot of single people end up feeling a bit left out. WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? I’m pretty hopeless with the romance side of things! Surprised my girlfriend with a trip down to London to see Lion King the musical, though. DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? (Ed: my brother-in-law received a banana guard for Christmas, which fascinated me for some reason) If we could include a plastic bag from a shop, then yeah! Oh, a banana guard! Yes, I’ve seen those! Kate Hazell

We’re not just talking knocking up some shelves in your bedroom here (IKEA instructions clutched in one hand), although that’s part of it; the DIY ‘movement’ has been gaining momentum over recent years, as society realises sharing our knowledge and skills may be the key to our survival. The ethos is simple: you want something done, then get it done yourself – remove the need to rely on other people’s expertise that can be expensive, time-consuming and plain unsatisfactory. Plus there’s that added degree of pleasure in solving your own problems, whether it’s fixing your computer or planting your first row of veggies. This month a bunch of like-minded folk from different organisations have come together to create Edinburgh’s DIY Gathering and Symposium. Between February 5 – 9 there will be all sorts of introductory sessions (such as bike maintenance, herbalism, vegan cooking and home brewing) helping you see how easy it is to input more DIY into your life. Says participant Anarchist Teapot: “[Such] gatherings are fantastic opportunities… to learn new skills and get excited about things”, and are all about “grassroots organising and activity without profit-seeking or exploitation”. Not all the venues have been confirmed yet but you

can count on The Forest to be at the centre of things. On 7 and 8 February they’re hosting Zine-o-Rama, open to all who want to come along and browse through the range of handcrafted publications for free. Zines are basically handmade mini-magazines, and you can find one on just about any subject; it’s a great way to get your message across without interference and without, in the words of one zine writer, “worrying about perfectionism”. Expect independent writing on wind power, generator building and social organisation, from writers who probably wouldn’t have had their ideas published if they hadn’t up and done it themselves. Keep an eye on the website for details of exactly what’s happening where. And should you have a skill you’re willing to share, if you’ve built your own composter or can make killer jam, then go to the forum and sign up; somewhere out there is a young jam-making Jedi, looking for their fruit-preserving Obi-Wan. Go forth, share the force. [Edward Whelan] http://diyedinburgh.blogspot.com/ http://diyedinburgh.freeforums.org/ www.eco-action.org/teapot/index/.html www.theforest.org.uk

Also on...

The Skinny highlights bits & pieces coming up in February The Beltane Society celebrate Imbolc on 4th, with a party on at Old St Paul’s Church Hall, the same day Stellar Quines begin their tour of new production Baby, Baby at the Tron… Dr Sketchy Edinburgh holds their Valentine Massacre on 7th, Craig Barrowman’s exhibition on Aberdeen’s Castlegate opens at Peacock Arts on 13th and the Fringe First winning The Tailor of Inverness continues its Scottish tour, stopping in at Eden Court Theatre for mini-run

8 THE SKINNY February 2009

from 18th – 21st. The Middle Eastern Film Festival at The Filmhouse is on till 19th and well worth more than one look… Wounded Knee performs live at DCA on 19th whilst contemporary dance director Tanja Liedtke brings her tour of Twelfth Floor to the MacRobert on 20th, along with an after-show discussion… and Kabarett closes the month with a bang at the Voodoo Rooms on 27th. See The Skinny online at www.theskinny.co.uk for further details.

IS 2009 A LEAP YEAR? No? Yes? I’ll say yes. WHAT’S THE NEXT THING YOU’RE GOING TO SEE AT THE MACROBERT? Whatever one’s not sold out, so I can get in for free! (Alan works there)

Emma Houston, 17 WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING ANYONE HAS EVER DONE FOR YOU? Getting taken out, being spoiled, the usual. Take me to a foreign land, where there’s sun, I don’t care where! DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? I have actually seen a banana case! They are SO cool! You know what? I’m going to buy one! And then you could get washing powder balls and stick them together and stick an apple in it! WOULD YOU LIKE US TO SEND YOU ON A BLIND DATE WITH A MEMBER OF THE SKINNY EDITORIAL STAFF? If they’re hot! Hmm, that doesn’t actually work if it’s a blind date…so, only if you have a selection of really hot people. As I am a dancer and a musician, someone who’s interested in the same things as me — not that I’m accepting this offer! IS 2009 A LEAP YEAR? I don’t know, I’m a dancer! Actually, maybe. Do you know or are you genuinely asking me?

Polly Wade, 18 & Millhouse McLean, 21 WHAT DOES VALENTINE’S DAY MEAN TO YOU? Polly: Not much as I’m at uni here and he’s at uni in Blackpool, so we’re going to have a fake Valentine’s Day. We haven’t decided when yet! WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? P: I cooked Mill a full English breakfast this morning - I wanted to surprise him, M: I’m not a romantic kind of guy. Polly: Yes, you are! You always buy me Kit-Kats because they’re my favourite chocolate. DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? M: When transporting fruit? I think I’ll go with a no, for now... I might experiment? IS 2009 A LEAP YEAR? P: It might be, mightn’t it? M: I suppose? I thought it might be something you might know...? P: Why, because you think I could propose...? WHAT’S THE NEXT THING YOU’RE GOING TO SEE AT THE MACROBERT? P: We don’t know what films are on, but I’ve never been to the MacRobert, but I do want to go.

Koko Lu, 29 WHAT DOES VALENTINE’S DAY MEAN TO YOU? I don’t really care about Valentine’s Day because I think if you’re happy together every day should be like Valentine’s Day. Also, there’s a story from Korea or Japan, that every 14th of the month should be a romantic day. WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? I think it depends on the kind of person you are, but I think lying in the bath, watching a movie and then cooking for your love, that’s romantic for me. DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? I’ve never heard of a banana guard! But I might use it if I came across it — I like things to be organised and in their right place.

Tom Wintle, 26 WHAT DOES VALENTINE’S DAY MEAN TO YOU? Very little. I don’t think of it as valuable, I don’t think it’s a necessary way to express feelings.

WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? I took an ex-girlfriend to a nice hotel, cost me an arm and a leg. DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? I very rarely transport fruit. I’ve never heard of a banana guard in my life; I can imagine it could be very useful, though. WOULD YOU LIKE US TO SEND YOU ON A BLIND DATE WITH A MEMBER OF THE SKINNY EDITORIAL STAFF? No, I’ve had really bad experiences with that kind of thing. [Ed – with blind dates, not with dating Skinny staff. We hope.] WHAT’S THE NEXT THING YOU’RE GOING TO SEE AT THE MACROBERT? I don’t go to the MacRobert very much - last thing I saw was The Reader, it was very good, though I didn’t expect it to be.

Caroline Kemp, 30 WHAT’S THE MOST ROMANTIC THING ANYONE HAS EVER DONE FOR YOU? My last girlfriend used to steal stuff for me — she’ll probably end up reading this – but I’m not saying any more… DO YOU USE PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT WHEN TRANSPORTING FRUIT? No, I don’t, but there’s a girl in my class who does and we all take the piss. They’re brilliant, they’re so funny — they’re yellow, like a banana! WOULD YOU LIKE US TO SEND YOU ON A BLIND DATE WITH A MEMBER OF THE SKINNY EDITORIAL STAFF? I don’t know who writes what, I just read it to know what’s on; I might date them if they gave me a folk music column! IS 2009 A LEAP YEAR? Don’t know. Yeah? Why? Would it fuck up Valentine’s Day? WHAT’S THE NEXT THING YOU’RE GOING TO SEE AT THE MACROBERT? I want them to start showing the Che Guevara films. I saw Part One, and it was awesome, and I really want to see the second part. But they never show stuff like that!


QUIZ TIME WITH UNCLE FINBARR 1. Cliff Jones was the lead singer of which Britpop outfit, who had a number 14 album with Leisurenoise in 1999?

New Year (sort of), new dross. This year as ever, there have been a multitude of bands tipped for the top. This month's quiz takes a look at those who have been consumed by the hype machine in the past and / or talked up or dressed down by their peers. Some made it, some didn't. How much do you know about them?

8. Who are the current holders of Q Magazine's Best New Act Award, despite one of their members having been a joint recipient of The Best Act In The World Today the previous year?

13. Which tragic, late country singer did Steve Earle once describe as, "the best songwriter in the whole world and I'll stand on Bob Dylan's coffee table in my cowboy boots and say that"?

4. Which songstress won the BBC's Sound of 2006 award?

9. Mark Gee of iZine said the following about which influential North England act: "as he had promised they would, they become the greatest band in the world. Most of the critics agreed with him. Most paid due homage. They were no longer the question mark or the cliché. They were the statement and the definition."

14. Which British R n B / hip-hop diva, real name Niomi Arleen McLean-Daley, swept all before her upon her arrival on the scene, including the 2002 Mercury Music Prize, but was more recently in the press for punching a male police officer in the groin whilst in custody?

5. And which streetwise New York geez scooped the same gong in 2003?

10. Who did cultural historian Piero Scaruffi controversially describe as "the most overrated band ever"?

6. Which greasy Coventry threepiece were voted "most likely to break your windows" by the NME in 2007?

11. The lead singer of which post-punk outfit described Oasis as "repetitive Luddites," going on to say, "I think Oasis are the most overrated and pernicious band of all time. They had a totally negative and dangerous impact upon the state of British music. They have made stupidity hip."

2. Which blues rock band were the first to sign to Noel Gallagher's Sour Mash Records in 2001? 3. Dizzee Rascal arrived on the scene with much gusto in 2003, but what was the title of his debut album?

7. Which shortlived mid-90s Britpop band appeared on the cover of Melody Maker before they had even released any material, and shortly after became the first act to appear on Top of the Pops without ever having released a single?

12. Influential music website Allmusic described Paddy McAloon as "one of the most underrated lyricists of the '80s". Of which band is he the lead singer?

It just slipped out me hands!

15. In 1999, who became the youngest male solo artist to reach number 1 in the UK (he was 19)? 16. Which American duo, according to online accumulative blog The Hype Machine, were the most spoken about band on the internet in 2008? 17. Which Rolling Stone backed Florida outfit hit the charts with I'm Not Gonna Teach Your Boyfriend How To Dance With You last year, but failed to hit the spot with their debut album, according to many critics? 18. Which two Scottish bands scooped The Skinny's prestigious Album Of The Year Awards in 2007 and 2008 respectively? 19. Who won the inaugural Mercury Music Prize in 1992, before going on to an illustrious and highly decorated career? 20. On the same topic, which producer, composer and tabla player scooped 1998's equivalent and has scarcely been seen or heard from since?

WIN TICKETS TO

SUSAN CALMAN, THE LATE SHOW AND A FREE NIGHTS ACCOMODATION The Magners Glasgow International Comedy Festival is set to return next month with an impressive line up featuring some of the world’s greatest comedians. Running from 12 - 29 March, this year’s programme boasts a unique blend of comedy to suit all tastes with 370 shows across 51 venues. From stand-up to comedy dramas and films, the festival offers a huge range of comedic talent from Ross Noble and David O’Doherty (IF comedy award winner 2008) to Simon Munnery and Jerry Sadowitz, to name but a few. The Skinny has teamed up with Magners and Novotel hotels to offer a great package on Friday 20 March that includes: 2 tickets to Glasgow’s own Susan Calman, with her wry take on repopulating the earth “Susan Calman is the last woman on earth” @ Blackfriars, 8pm 2 tickets to The Late Show, a late night comedy club where anything goes with the festivals top comedians and celebrity guests, @ Blackfriars, 11pm And if that wasn’t enough we will also be providing a night’s accommodation courtesy of Novotel, with a double room for you to rest your jaws and funny bones from all the laughter. Just answer the question before 1 March for your chance to win. If you would like any further information check out http://www.glasgowcomedyfestival.com.

WIN TICKETS TO THE GLASGOW FILM FESTIVAL Glasgow has always been known for its vibrant cultural landscape, and this year is no different as the annual Glasgow Film Festival arrives in February. The GFF runs for 11 days which will be stuffed with films and special events across 12 key venues. The Skinny have teamed up with the GFF this year to bring you The Cine-Skinny - a comprehensive guide to the best of the GFF. To be in with a chance to win tickets for you and a friend to three different films at the GFF, including Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Valentino: The Last Emperor, and My Mexican Shiva, answer this question:

MY MEXICAN SHIVA

What is The Skinny & GFF 2009 daily guide to the festival called?

How many shows will be hosted at this year’s Magners Glasgow International Comedy Festival?

A)The Mini-Skinny B)The Cine-Skinny C)The Film-Skinny

To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions

To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions

Usual Skinny T&C’s apply, these are available on request by contacting competitions@theskinny.co.uk.

DUNCAN KAY

Usual Skinny T&C’s apply, these are available on request by contacting competitions@theskinny.co.uk.

FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 9


Fashion

Bra, £45 and French pant, £24; both by Elle Macpherson Intimates @ Frasers Necklace, £30; and Purple Wool Scarf (round shoulders), £17.50; both by Linea @ Frasers

Undercover

Romance Why be coy? It's obvious why underwear and Valentine's go together Hair & Makeup: Kylie Macbeth using MAC / www.kyliemacbeth.com Photos: Koko Brown / www.kokobrown.com Model: Sam @ Model Team Styling: Clare Cameron Shot at The Club, 14 Greendykes Rd, Broxburn Tel: 01506 085 2264

10 THE SKINNY February 2009


FASHION

CARDIGAN BY MANGO, £35 BRA, £32 AND FRENCH PANT, £22; BOTH BY ELLE MACPHERSON INTIMATES @ FRASERS HEART PENDANT BY UNTOLD @ FRASERS, £22

BRA, £50; THONG, £32; SUSPENDER BELT, £33; ALL BY LEGABY @ FRASERS STOCKINGS BY CHARNOS @ FRASERS, £10

CAMI, £55 & KNICKERS, £20; BOTH BY KAREN MILLEN STOCKINGS BY AGENT PROVOCATEUR, £15

FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 11


Fashion

Skinny Jeans roz leslie

True love never dies but may be slightly blind – welcome back, 90210 We’ve said it before, and just to prove the theory, we’ll sure as hell say it again: fashion is one big rotating, recurring, mess of déjà vu. With the lords of trend dictation seemingly forever on the rebound, exes we were sure we’d got rid of just keep showing up on those damn catwalks. And, before we have a chance to change the locks and our phone numbers, they’re back in our wardrobes. With this in mind, it’s come to our attention lately that a former flame has inexplicably inched its way back into fashion editorials, and though we’re still thankful for the memories, we’re not sure how to fit that old high school crush into our grow’d up lives. Vogue does Beverly Hills, 90210? We never thought we’d see the day… Let’s be clear, however: we’re talking vintage, Beverly Hills, 90210, not the souped up, pimped out, newbie 90210; newly squished into the gaping, O.C. –shaped hole on E4. Because, unless your pop culture periscope has been down for most of the recent past, you can’t have failed to notice this brand, spanky new 90120, so brazen as to broadcast naked, without the ‘Beverly Hills’ prefix, nor even the comma. But don’t be fooled. Though we highly commend its recurring roles for old alumni, this is not the 90210 we’re rebounding with. (Wheeling out Shannen Doherty unmuzzled is a nice trick and all, but really, we’re holding out for Luke Perry. And have been since 1993.) Nope, the E4 trash is 90210 slicked up and buffed out for the Gossip Girl generation, and whilst we’ll probably still reluctantly squeeze it into our hangover TV viewing schedule, we have no business

12 THE SKINNY February 2009

with it here. Beverly Hills, 90210, as we knew and loved it, was nothing if not a big Super Mario Land where ‘90s fashion went to play by the pool, drinking Bud Light in Global Hypercolour t-shirts. It was acid- and stonewashed 501’s worn high at the waist and rolled up at the ankle, with oversized blazers emitting just a faint hint of shoulder pad. It was big, bold body-con mini dresses in florals that ran from the subtle & sublime to the vast & ridiculous. It was – for pity’s sake – braskimming, cut-off t-shirts, which may or may not have said ‘Coors’ on them. Now, admittedly, when Henry Holland unveiled his 90210-soaked S/S ’09 collection, we were certainly the ones sniggering and tossing a few eye-rolls in the direction of the polka-dot denim. But cut to forty minutes ago, and the high street’s new season is fit for a Beverly Hills marathon – cut-off tees and acid-wash minis included (yes, Topshop, we mean you.). So, we can get on board with the floral prints on stretchy fabric, and we can deal with a little bit of bleached out, stone-kissed denim. And if we can just squint our eyes and pretend we’re in a Motley Crue video, maybe we can give a light shoulder pad a whirl after a few drinks. But the cut-off tees? Well, apart from being deeply unflattering, they simply remind us too much of a painful episode in which Kelly gets tricked into joining a cult, and we just can’t go back there. Oh, 90210, maybe we do still love you, but let’s take things slow. We’ve been burned by rolled-up jeans before. [Lindsay West]

The Finnished

Product Sarah Jamieson meets Aberdeen-based, Finnish-born designer Tytti Peltoniemi, and checks out her gorgeous handbag collection. Designer Tytti Peltoniemi is easy to spot in a crowd. Maybe it’s the retro glasses, or the sharp blonde bob; or maybe it’s the way she proudly swings one of her leather handbags over her arm and comes forth with squeals of genuine delight at being in your company. Tytti Peltoniemi (pronounced “two-tee”) Made-to-Order handbags have been making a bold statement in mainland Europe, and now its Scotland’s turn. Tytti moved to Scotland from her native Finland in December and is now setting up her industrial sewing machines and hanging colourful leather skins in her Aberdeen studio. After graduating with a BA (Hons) in Fashion from Manchester University, Tytti moved to Amsterdam and created waves last year at the Amsterdam International Fashion Week (AIFW), collaborating with Danish designer Claes Iverson. Her current ‘Garbage’ bag collection (inspired from the humble yet practical plastic bag) featured recently in fashion magazine Grazia as the ‘must have’ black bag alongside fashion icon Marc Jacobs’ shoes. Inspiration for Tytti’s creations is drawn from everything from art to architecture, and even individual colours, shapes or textures. “One painting can inspire an entire collection with its mood or palette,” she explains. Her Aalto collection was inspired by the work of architect Alvar Aalto, using clean lines and natural shapes. The Butterfly pouchettes are

Butterfly Clutch

stunning in their simplicity, with an antique 1950s butterfly brooch made from sterling silver and enamel gracefully adorning each bag. Her tactile design aesthetic means you have to both see and feel her creations to best appreciate them. Super soft and very pliable, elk leather from Finland is one of her favourites amongst the diverse leathers she uses. When asked “Why leather?”, Tytti answers simply: “It’s all about sustainability and supreme quality.” Tytti’s gorgeous website showcases her whole collection and emphasizes the made-to-order concept, which keeps waste at a minimum. As Tytti explains,“I don’t make a bag if there isn’t a wearer for it.” Tytti already has her bags stocked in Che Camille in Glasgow; and with goals to run for the Scottish Design Awards, Tytti is a whirlwind of a business-person, with philanthropic goals and even better handbags. www.tyttipeltoniemi.com

Facebook: PELTONIEMI MADE-TO-ORDER Stockist: Che Camille, Floor 6, Argyle Arcade, Buchanan Street, Glasgow; or order online from Tytti’s website Tina Tote

Garbage Bag


FASHION

FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 13


Food & Drink

It Mussels Be Love:

Romantic Foods for Getting Fresh With Valentine's Day on the horizon, Louise Loftus heads to Loch Fyne to sample Scotland's indigenous aphrodisiac (no, not Buckfast) Let me preface this article with an apology for the raunchy reference above. Allow me, also, to declare at the outset my desire to get us both through this without any mention of the associated aphrodisiac effects of oysters. Except for that mention, just then. However, this is a Valentine’s issue and, as such, some mention of smoochery must be made. “No romance please, we’re Scottish!” you cry. And in many ways you’re quite right. But just because hugging only came to Scotland in the late nineties – and an unsolicited attempt might still garner you a chibbing in the Gorbals – does not mean that we ought not to participate in the farce for fun. Particularly, dear reader, when the food is as good as this. So, are you sitting comfortably? Snuggled with a loved one? Good. Then I’ll begin. There are restaurants that you always imagine you’ll visit some day. You pass them often, in transit, en route to elsewhere. You promise yourself that you will head out there some time, with someone you love (or in the very least ‘dig’), because it’s a place that should be saved, until it can be shared. Loch Fyne Oyster Bar, ensconced as it is between hills that draw the breath from you, and the ethereal dark waters of Loch Fyne, is one of those places. I am accompanied on this visit, in the name of research, by my good friend Beard. Beard’s slightness of frame belies an appetite that would make an elephant blush. His enthusiasm for food, quite legendary in these parts, almost outstrips my own. A good man to take to lunch, is Beard. The drive, to the soundtrack of Gram Parsons, has been pleasant. But the day is baltic and dreich and the warmth as we enter, of staff and of stove fires, dotted at intervals, is most welcome. The immediate impression is one of homeliness, of a little house by the sea. All whitewashed walls, bleached wood and art, depicting sea life and fat, happy people eating oysters. An interior that accomplishes a nod to the nautical theme, without appearing contrived, is a feat in itself. The setting goes a long way to lending the décor this air of authenticity. How could it not, when every window offers views of the loch which plays host to all of the oysters, mussels, salmon and crabs, among others, that land on your plate? Don’t fret about that though, it looks as though they had an awfully good life. With the enthusiasm of children in a fine sweets

emporium, Beard and I select an oyster in every available flavour (£1.50-1.75 each). Oysters with garlic breadcrumbs, oysters baked with bacon, blue cheese and spinach and oysters on ice, with shallot vinegar and Tabasco and with chilli and coriander dressing. Duly delivered, they look almost too pretty to eat. Almost. “Get your superlatives out”, instructs Beard. The saucepot. And, since by this point I’ve sampled the wine, I will. The warmed oysters are rich and brim with flavour; on ice the flavours of the Tabasco, shallot and chilli are clean and sharp. All taste ridiculously fresh. As does the smoked salmon fillet with wasabi and soy (£7.95), cut so perfectly it just falls apart in your mouth. Bliss.

"Every window offers views of the loch which plays host to all of the oysters, mussels, salmon and crabs that land on your plate." By this point we are thoroughly enjoying ourselves and our enthusiasm for ordering threatens to get out of hand. Be aware of this, dear reader, if you visit. The place ain’t cheap. We rein ourselves in a little and order mussels mariniere (£5.50) which arrives in a steaming pot, beautifully presented. The mussels themselves are plump and tasty, the mariniere sauce is creamy, garlicky, but not too rich. Finally, a shared crab, salmon and herb fishcake is crumbly and surprisingly light. The accompanying Arran mustard mayonnaise dip is tangy and a perfect compliment to the crumbliness.

Fat and happy, we round things off with a pot of coffee in front of the fire. A sleepy contentedness descends. Before making the long drive back, might I recommend a constitutional? Behind the restaurant are a couple of short walks, allowing you to take in the views of the surrounding hills and perhaps indulge in some hand-holding and dreamy eye gazing, brought on by the oysters. There is even a two-story tree house, where you might sit, legs swinging, and contemplate the nature of things in companionable silence. You can recreate the Loch Fyne effect at home with smoked salmon, mussels and some delectable sweet treats purchased from the shop. As mentioned, it’s not a place that’s terribly friendly on the wallet. But

14 THE SKINNY February 2009

if you can’t at Valentine’s, when can you? Skinflints might want to hold out for the food fair on 9 and 10 May, when there will be a farmers market on the shore selling Loch Fyne produce, as well as venison, cheeses, cakes and Fyne Ales. Admission is free. Well, we got through it. And I only mentioned aphrodisiacs once. And that time, just then. Put simply, if Loch Fyne doesn’t get you in the mood for smoochery, I’ll eat my hat. Dipped in Arran mustard mayonnaise. Loch Fyne Restaurant & Shop, Clachan, Cairndow, Argyll PA26 BBL Tel: 01499 600 264 www.lochfyne.com


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“This looks � bit rom�ntic for �s; there’s � love t�nnel!” w�s Bi� Rob’s first impression. My comp�nion w�s ri�ht; we entered the n�rrow ��p between t�ll Roy�l Mile b�ildin�s thro��h � t�nnel of �rched twi�s st�rred by f�iry li�hts. Inside, we were met by � j�xt�position of styles. A modern b�r with orchid-st�men stools opposes � firepl�ce �nd bookshelf, whilst yo� c�n dine sittin� on str�i�ht b�cked wood �nd le�ther or see-thro��h pl�stic ch�irs. It works, there’s no sense of conflict, �nd once settled in it’s e�sy to see why, �fter j�st over � ye�r of b�siness, Montieth’s holds style b�r �nd cockt�il b�r �w�rds. For st�rters, m�ssel �nd h�ddock risotto w�s �ood, b�t �ll th�nder w�s stolen by the sc�llops en cro�te. A h��e sc�llop shell �rrived �pp�rently n�ked on � pl�te, closed �nd se�led by � rim of p�ff p�stry, which o�r w�itress whipped open with dr�m� �nd ceremony. Inside fo�r pl�mp sc�llops nestled with chilli j�m �nd rocket - the best sc�llop dish I h�ve h�d in � lon� while. Pi�eon, chorizo �nd p�ncett� be�t confit r�bbit’s le� in the b�ttle of the m�ins b�t both were well conceived dishes �nd cooked j�st ri�ht. The pi�eon wo�ld h�ve been even better if it h�d come with the �dvertised p�y lentils, b�t we h�d to m�ke do with chickpe�s inste�d. Most of the few minor �ripes don’t seem worth mentionin� �s they were �ll o�twei�hed by positives. It didn’t m�tter th�t the service w�s sli�htly sh�ky; the st�ff were convivi�l �nd enth�si�stic �nd left � �ood impression �nyw�y. Monteith’s works well �nd they h�ve done �n excellent job with the sm�ll sp�ce they’ve been �iven. The men� is neither che�p nor is it b�d v�l�e; h�ppily the prices don’t seem to be over infl�ted by the centr�l kilt-�nd-c�shmere loc�tion. Go if yo� c�n, it’s diffic�lt to think of m�ny pl�ces th�t wo�ld �ive � better impression this V�lentine’s D�y. [B�rn�by Se�born] WWW.MONTEITHSBAR.CO.UK

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Merc�ry M�i� h�s t�ken �ll the �l�mo�r �nd ele��nce of � by�one er� �nd �iven it � contempor�ry twist – we kicked off o�r me�l with pre-dinner cockt�ils from � speci�lly cre�ted list inspired by cl�ssic cockt�ils from the ��s �nd ��s �nd bro��ht b�n� �p to d�te by renowned mixolo�ist, Nick Str�n�ew�y. In ����, the flyin� bo�t M�i� (� ‘Merc�ry’ model) f�mo�sly took off from the River T�y, tr�vellin� to So�th Afric� completin� the lon�est se� pl�ne jo�rney ever. In keepin� with the �vi�tion theme I ordered Merc�ry M�i�’s si�n�t�re cockt�il, The Avi�tor. With its he�dy mixt�re of �in, lemon j�ice, m�r�schino �nd crème de violette, it p�cked � p�nch �nd cert�inly �ot the ni�ht off to � flyin� st�rt. O�r st�rters of sc�llops (te�med with � v�nill� ‘froth’) �nd slow br�ised pork belly were �enero�sly sized portions �nd completely delicio�s. Afterw�rds I h�d the r�ck of l�mb, cooked to perfection

�nd �ccomp�nied by � red onion t�rt, cr�shed pe�s �nd port j�s; Steve pl�mped for the s�lmon with chorizo cr�shed pot�toes, fennel relish �nd s�ffron �nd v�nill� s��ce. He w�s s�pposed to s�ve me � bit to try (� necessity in the interests of jo�rn�listic rese�rch, I told him) b�t when I looked �p from my l�mb, �ll th�t w�s left to see w�s the p�ttern on the pl�te. It w�s very �ood, I’m told! We sh�red the �ssiette of desserts (no, we didn’t know wh�t th�t me�nt either, b�t it t�rns o�t to be � selection of mini�t�re p�ddin�s, so now yo� know…) which incl�ded cocon�t, p�ssionfr�it �nd m�n�o p�nn�cott�, lemon t�rt with clotted cre�m ice cre�m, �nd w�ln�t ice cre�m. T�sty yet li�ht, it w�s the perfect endin� to � most enjoy�ble me�l. So f�r, Alchemy in the D�ndee Apex hotel is the only rest��r�nt in D�ndee to �chieve � AA rosettes - b�t we co�ld h�ve �nother contender here. [S�s�n Anderson] WWW.MERCURYMAIA.COM

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Dundee Contemporary Arts 10th Anniversary Exhibitions Programme 2009 17 January-8 March Timecode Ross Birrell, Graham Dolphin, Ceal Floyer, Douglas Gordon, Ilana Halperin, On Kawara, David Lamelas, Kelly Mark, Tatsuo Miyajima, Ugo Rondinone, Christian Stock and Thomson & Craighead 20 March-21 June The Associates Steven Cairns, Raydale Dower, Katy Dove, Luke Fowler, Fiona Jardine, Kevin Hutcheson, Graham Little, Lucy McKenzie, Duncan Marquiss, The Lonely Piper, Alan Michael, Ellen Munro, Scott Myles, Robert Orchardson, Clare Stephenson, Stephen Sutcliffe and Andy Wake 7 June-22 November No Reflections Martin Boyce Scotland & Venice curated by DCA for the 53rd International Art Biennale Venice 4 July-30 August Susanne Nørregård Nielsen, Ganghut and Rob Hunter & John Louden 19 September-29 November It’s Burning Everywhere Thomas Hirschhorn 12 December14 February 2010 No Reflections Martin Boyce Exhibition Opening Hours Tues to Sat 10.30am-5.30pm Sun 12 noon-5.30pm Open late Thurs until 8.30pm Admission Free

152 Nethergate Dundee DD1 4DY 01382 909900 www.dca.org.uk

Dundee Contemporary Arts is supported by

Reg Charity no. SC026631

DCA10 MAP SKINNY 155x125.indd 1

29/1/09 17:02:22

February 2009

THE SKINNY 15

Food & Drink

Restaurant & Bar Reviews


deviance

trailblazers of trans liberation have a lot to say about owning our experiences, expressing them and being provocative. Kate Bornstein’s writings come to mind, where she speaks about playing around with one’s gender identity as a way of positive self-exploration. Leslie Feinberg’s exploration of the role of trans folk in history in hir book, Transgender Warriors, gives a wider context in which to interpret the contemporary trans experience. Julia Serano talks about how, as trans people, we present a quandary that throws traditional notions of ‘man’ and ‘woman’ into question. And how this is something we should embrace.

"The trailblazers of trans liberation have a lot to say about owning our experiences, expressing them and being provocative"

kate bornstein speaks about playing around with one’s gender identity as a way of positive self-exploration

More than Remembrance Ariel Silvera wants to remember. But also, to be proud.

Every year, we observe the Transgender Day of Remembrance on 20 November. It began in the US and spread across the world. It is now an international observance, and has helped raise awareness of violence against trans people, the sheer scale and brutality of it. The Day of Remembrance is important. It has worked all over the world to put a human face to the harsh realities faced by trans people in all societies. It has given a voice to the trans community, which is usually silenced from all sides. But now that the date has passed, I look back another year and feel that I want more. On the Day of Remembrance, we celebrate lives cut tragically short. We celebrate them in their diversity and we mourn their passing. But essentially, these are lives destroyed brutally, and this tragedy does hang in the air for me. Passing is a constant concern for trans people

for our own personal security. At a recent discussion on the venue of a trans conference, the issue of whether the area was ‘safe’ was raised. We needed to raise it, but it also dismayed me that this is still where we are. We have to prevent tragedies. And this is a-ok. But what about the day-to-day ins and outs of being trans? Our only other meeting date in the calendar is Pride, and it is not always a friendly place to be. The alliance between LGB, T, and of late, Queer and Intersex, is a tenuous alliance. It is an alliance based on the overlaps of different communities, both personal and political. Speaking just for the T part, we’re finally realising that we cannot depend on the other letters to fight our fights. And that’s fine. The cissexual lesbian community looks after many issues that only concern cissexual lesbians. Ditto for cissexual gay men.

New articles due soon... I may claim to be all indier-than-thou most of the time, but I’ve got a real soft spot for Erasure, especially the Wild! album, which came out when I was eleven or twelve. It’s a really delightful collection of pop songs, and I still pretty much know it by heart. And they’re also significant in that, although there are plenty of out gay musicians nowadays, Andy Bell’s been in it for the long haul. So I’m pleased to offer an interview with him this month, which you can find in the Deviance section at theskinny.co.uk: Paul

16 THE SKINNY February 2009

Mitchell talks to him about changing attitudes to sexuality in the UK. We’ve got more to offer on the site, too: our new columnist, Phoebe Henderson, who’s exploring her sexuality through a set of challenges she’s set herself. You can follow Lewd Awakenings, a monthly account of her adventures, online - beginning with 'The A Word', her first, nervous foray into anal sex. I haven’t the faintest idea who ‘Phoebe’ really is (one of my mates? someone I’ve gotten off with? Rupert?), but she’s an engaging, witty writer who’s got more to offer than just titillation. I’m looking forward to finding out what she does next, so be sure to bookmark her. www.theskinny.co.uk

Don’t get me wrong. The alliance ought to be maintained, because pooling our resources makes us all stronger. But if we can recognise that our health issues are vastly different to those of other queer people, can we not say the same about Pride? And I don’t just mean a Pride day, with a parade and confetti, though that would be nice. I’m talking about pride, about happiness and self-respect. Early gay and lesbian lit dealt a lot with tragedy, and with good reason, due to the criminalisation of homosexuality in many parts of the world. Throughout the twentieth century, though, the tide slowly turned. As gains were made and sexuality became more open and liberated, the same happened with gay and lesbian cultural manifestations. Thus Gay Pride was born. Trans folk are experiencing a similar process, especially now that we are in the public limelight. The

When I’m surrounded by fellow trans folk, I hear incredible stories and experiences. Of love, of hot sex and hot kink, fun adventures in gender bending, as well as sometimes bittersweet dealings with our loved ones. There is sadness, and there is tragedy sometimes too. But there is so much more richness there, such diversity. And these voices are talking. We’re, as they say, standing up to be counted. We’re talking about what a new vagina feels like and creating YouTube videos detailing different stages of transition. Trans men make the news, and a perhaps surprising amount of people seem fine with Thomas Beatie experiencing his life as he chooses it. There is so much to be proud of, unwritten novels and unfilmed features with our stories. For me, there has been nothing more liberating in my life than to come out as a transsexual woman to myself. I want us all to work to end the fear and hatred towards trans folk. I want to remember the dead who didn’t need to be killed. But I also want the world to know there’s much more to who we are. We are not pathetic. We are strong, incredibly so in many cases. We’re civil servants, scientists, working and middle class. We’re boys and girls and everything in between. We’re lovers and writers, occasionally we drink too much and regret it the next day. And we can never do anything right, if you ask our parents. In short, we’re people. Not headlines. “Cissexual” is a term used by Julia Serano to describe “people who are not transsexual and who have only ever experienced their subconscious and physical sexes as being aligned”. www.juliaserano.com

Book Review Laid Bare by Rachel Francis

rrrr After twenty years in the sex industry, New Zealander Rachel Francis has penned a detailed account of her experiences. What sets her apart from the ‘happy hooker’ memoirists, frequently derided by critics for representing only the upper levels of the industry, is Francis’ familiarity with so many sectors: as well as escorting, she’s worked on the streets, been a dominatrix, and opened her own brothel. She’s also well-qualified to compare the industry before and after decriminalisation, although some readers might appreciate a deeper examination of this aspect. Francis makes it very clear that she chose the profession, took great pride in her work, and refused to take shit from anybody. This said, she does not shy away from discussing difficult clients, corrupt police, and

attention from the less savoury parts of the underworld. This balances well with the more titillating details, not to mention fetishes that I’m still struggling to comprehend (e.g. "Worm Man', who liked...well...). Although occasionally Francis emphasises her strength of character to the point of repetition, this might well be expected given the prohibitionist refrain that sex workers can never be empowered. It’s a small quibble about a book that has much insight to offer its readership – outsiders and sex workers alike. [Nine] Out now, published by Steele Roberts. Circa £17, p&p included, via Francis' website Www.steeleroberts.co.nz


Customer Service

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Slutty McWhore

THE GREEN ROOM VENUE

Slutty McWhore gives her perspective on why sex work isn't 'a job like any other' ... and it's not about the sex.

THU 5TH LIVE MUSIC FROM JOYSTICK DISCO, LITTLE MISS FUNCTION AND HOMEWORK FOLLOWED BY DJS JOEY REYNOLDS & JOHN TINSLEY. ALL BROADCAST LIVE ON TSM RADIO. 10-3 £4 ENTRY.

FRI 6TH

DJ MISJAH, STEPHEN BROWN, WOLFJAZZ, KEYTES & GAVIN RICHARDSON GO HEAD TO HEAD IN THE ULTIMATE TECHNO SHOWDOWN! £8 ENTRY 11-3 WEEKEND TICKETS AVAILABLE £14.

SAT 7TH JAM THE BOX BRING YOU THE BEST IN HOUSE, TECHNO, FUNK & SOUL, AS THEY SETTLE INTO A NEW RESIDENCY HERE AT GRV. 11-3 £4/£3 ENTRY.

FRI 13TH MORE MUSICAL MAYHEM AS DIRT ARE JOINED BY DJ KID ILL (RED ALERT) PLUS MORE SPECIAL GUESTS TO BE ANNOUNCED. EXPECT THE USUAL BRILLIANT COMBINATION OF ELECTRO, TECHNO, B-MORE, GHETTO AND HIP HOP. 11-3 FREE BEFORE 12 £4 AFTER. SAT 14TH

AFTER A SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH AT THE GRV LAST MONTH, SUBSTANCE PRESENT THE ONE & ONLY SURGEON, (TRESOR, COUNTERBALANCE) AND SMEES (MERCUROCHROME) IN HIS SCOTTISH DEBUT. SO NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS THIS VALENTINE’S DAY, SUBSTANCE STILL LOVES YOU! 11-3 £10 IN ADVANCE.

THU 19TH NAPIER’S FINEST PERFORM LIVE, FEAT. HOMEWORK, ERIN TODD & TRAGIC O’HARA, FOLLOWED BY DJ’S THROUGH TILL 3AM. 10-3 £4/£3 ENTRY

FRI 20TH

Alasdair Boyce

Most people who have never used the services of a sex worker – and, regrettably, sometimes even those who have – are under the impression that what we do is ‘easy money’. They believe that we are lazy good-for-nothings who are allergic to ‘proper’ work, and they have little respect for us. There is, however, a very good reason why we charge such high prices for the sexual acts we are willing to perform, and it’s only partly because we sleep with people we would often prefer not to for money. In my opinion, it’s not my clients’ demands on my body which justify the price, but their expectation that I will stroke their egos just as much as I stroke their cocks. The cynical amongst you will no doubt point out that sex work is essentially a customer service industry and that I, like any other customer service employee, should just accept the ‘customer is king’ mantra. But this point of view fails to take into account that there is actually a considerable difference between working, say, in a deli and serving salami, and slapping somebody else’s salami for a living. Deli employees are expected to be friendly and treat their customers with respect and courtesy, but that is really all we ask of them. You will never find the wee Saturday girl in Peckhams standing at the counter, holding onto the hand of an adoring customer and being bombarded with questions: Do you love serving me salami? Is this the biggest and best piece of salami you’ve ever seen? Would it be possible to get some extra salami for free? Would you like to meet after work so we can enjoy my big salami together? Deli customers understand that the Saturday girl, no matter how pleasant she may be, views them

only as customers, and that salami-selling is a mere transaction for her. She, lucky girl, will never have to turn down customers who constantly ask her out, and who simply cannot understand that she should not want to spend time with people as fascinating and good-looking as they are! In the erotic massage industry, men want to buy an hour of fantasy and flattery just as much as they want the massage itself. I really don’t mind boosting the egos of men who are lonely, depressed or just simply nice people, but every so often, I come across some arsehole who thinks the world revolves around him, and who brings this attitude with him onto my massage table. A more savvy, business-minded erotic masseuse might just grin and play along in the hope that he will become a repeat customer, but I just cannot bear the idea of this. It seems manipulative and fake, and if there’s anything that makes my job bearable, then it’s striving to forge some genuine connection with my clients, no matter how small and insignificant. My aversion to stroking the male ego stems from my belief that insincere flattery – and not sex! – is the most non-feminist act for any sex worker. I have never felt demeaned by being paid to perform a sexual act on a man, but it is humiliating to be expected to simper, coo and just generally dumb myself down to be successful in this trade. I am an intelligent, well-educated woman and, if I have to hide that to turn a man on, then, well, he can just fuck off. I would probably make far more money if I laid the flattery on thick but, luckily, there are still plenty clients who appreciate my wisdom/wanking combo.

Get Slutty's chat online

theskinny.co.uk/blogs

DUBSTEP PRODIGY RADIKAL GURU BRINGS HIS OWN CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED FUSION OF DUBSTEP, REGGAE AND HEAVY DIGITAL. WITH SUPPORT FROM ADHAM, EMINENCE & JAMMIN J. 11-3 £4 BEFORE 11:30 £6 AFTER.

SAT 21ST EVERYONE’S FAVOURITE B-BOYZ CONTINUE TO BRING DOWN THE HOUSE WITH THEIR SUPERB FORMULA OF AWESOME MOVES, SMOOTH GROOVES AND FUNKY, FUNKY BEATS. HIP HOP, RNB & BREAKDANCING. 11-3 £5 ENTRY.

Lambda

THU 26TH THE BRIDGE RECTIFIER CREW ONCE AGAIN DEMONSTRATE THEIR ENTIRELY UNIQUE STYLE OF COMPLETELY LIVE DANCE MUSIC. WITH EVERYTHING FROM TECHNO & ELECTRO TO DUBSTEP & JUNGLE. A TRULY CLEVER CONCEPT YOU HAVE TO SEE. 11-3 £4/£2 ENTRY

FRI 27TH

COME FURTHER YOUR ADVENTURES IN RETRO STEREO WITH CRAIG JAMIESON! A FAB MIX OF FUNK, SOUL, MOTOWN & GARAGE PUNK. SPECIAL GUESTS HAVE INCLUDED GLASVEGAS, TEENAGE FANCLUB AND BELLE & SEBASTIEN. 11-3 £5 ENTRY.

SAT 28TH JACKHAMMER: KICKING OFF AT 2PM, SLAM AND DAVE ANGEL ARE HERE TO TAKE YOU RIGHT THROUGH TO THE WEE SMALL HOURS IN A 13 HOUR TECHNO MARATHON! WITH SUPPORT FROM WOLFJAZZ & GEE-DUBS.

LIVE MUSIC INFO: WWW.MYSPACE.COM/THEGRV WWW.THEGRV.COM // 37 GUTHRIE STREET EDINBURGH // 0131 220 2987

February 2009

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Glasgow Film Festival 2009:

Celebrating Cinema City Gail Tolley looks at the highlights of this year’s Glasgow Film Festival. During the golden age of cinema, when going to the pictures was as regular an activity as going to church, Glasgow was home to more cinemas than any other city in Europe, a feat that earned it the title of ‘Cinema City’. This year’s Glasgow Film Festival will be striving to reclaim the title, not just through an exciting programme of films across more than 10 venues but also in quite a literal sense; the windows of several former cinemas will be the backdrop for a series of short and archival films allowing some magnificent buildings to relive their halcyon days. Another highlight includes the UK premiere of Last Chance Harvey, nominated for several Golden Globes and the festival’s closing Gala performance. The main programme also features films from the American underground, the burgeoning Mexican film industry as well as a retrospective on the queen of elegance, Audrey Hepburn. We asked four individuals from Glasgow’s film scene what they were most looking forward to. David Mackenzie, Film Director (Hallam Foe, Young Adam): “I am very happy that I will be in Glasgow for the GFF this year. And what better time to get lost in cinema than a wet, dark February. Here are a few things that caught my eye from this year’s programme: • Good: I saw the play this is based on at Perth Rep when I was about 16 (over 25 years ago!) and I’ve never forgotten it. So I am interested to see how it makes it to the screen. • Bronson: The screenplay was written by a friend - I read it and it’s bound to be extreme. I’ve heard Tom Hardy’s performance is full on. • The Black Audio Film Collective These ‘80s trailblazers gave a lecture at my college. I remember Handsworth Songs being a surprisingly beautiful, poetic and poignant study of racial unrest. I would love to see their stuff again. • True Things: The Short Films of Miranda July (from the Shorts Film Festival) If her feature Me and You and Everyone We Know and her other work in other media are anything to go by, these shorts are going to be interesting. • Robin and Marion (from the Audrey Hepburn retrospective) A lovely post-heroic romance with Sir Sean in one of his best. • Infinite Space – The Architecture of John Lautner

I spent most of last year in LA and I left with a significant appreciation of Lautner, so I am looking forward to this film by Scots director Murray Grigor. And anyway, I love just turning up at film festivals and going to the first thing I can get a ticket for. Happy viewing!” David Mackenzie’s latest film Spread, starring Ashton Kutcher, will be premiering at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. He is also one of the founding members of Sigma Films. Allan Hunter, Co-Director of Glasgow Film Festival: “If there is any Scot with a desire to make a feature film then they really need to see Elevator. Shot in just eighteen days in the lift of a Bucharest theatre, it was made for a mere 200 Euros by a director who taught himself how to make films. The premise is simple but instantly involving - a young couple enter a lift in an abandoned factory and find themselves trapped. The execution is taut and claustrophobic as we realise that nobody can hear their screams and there is no possible means of escape. Over a tight running time director George Dorobantu transforms this true story into a tense, palm-sweating thriller.” Christine McMillan, Scottish Screen, the national development agency for the screen industries in Scotland: “The festival launch always finds people in our office nail biting or generally agonising over what to cram into two weeks. I try to choose films related in some way to Scottish Screen so I’m looking forward to New Town Killers by Richard Jobson and some more of the Great Scots stand which Scottish Screen is sponsoring this year. I like the sound of the Bill Paterson conversation event and The Divine Lady by Frank Lloyd, who I see as a bit of an unsung hero. I’d also like to see some short films and pick one from the Audrey Hepburn retrospective; the Bette Davis strand was great last year.” Steve Slater, Senior Producer, Tramway, Scotland’s internationally acclaimed venue for contemporary visual and performing art: “I

Editorial Gail Tolley: Film doesn't have to be unsociable Being a film fan isn’t always the most sociable thing. Hours spent in a darkened room don’t exactly encourage healthy human interaction. But film festivals have always provided a bit of an antidote to this; hundreds if not thousands of people gathering over 10 days for a plethora of events can more than make up for it. This year we’re going to be covering Glasgow Film Festival with a daily guide that you can pick up at one of the 11 venues across the city; it’ll have interviews, features, reviews and

18 THE SKINNY February 2009

coverage of all the best (and most sociable!) events. From specially curated club nights to networking for young filmmakers, it’s proof that film fans can be a companionable bunch if they want to. And there’s even more sociability in our online guide to hosting the very best Oscar party. If there’s anything that can be guaranteed at the Oscars, it’s a few ‘choice’ outfits, over-emotional acceptance speeches and someone being robbed of the gong they truly deserved, thus giving everyone the perfect opportunity to shout or laugh at the glamorous, sensational and bizarre world of Hollywood.

Top: LastChanceHarvey; above, right: Audreey Hepburn Retrospective

guess like most people movies hold a central place of reference, memory and inspiration in everyday life. For me a key factor in my movie going experience is that it should have a hook for my heart and soul, something that will move me deep inside and give me sustenance and enjoyment when revisited in memory. So in no particular order my top must see films in this mega-fest of films are: • True Things: The Short Films of Miranda July. A truly gifted artist and film-maker, July creates the sort of quirky off the wall realism that confronts us all everyday – if only we could step back and see life for what it is. • The Black Audio Film Collective: Handsworth Songs & Seven Songs for Malcolm X. Two undisputed classics of the documentary genre; these

are films as timely and perceptive now as they were twenty-odd years ago. • Encounters At The End Of The World. Werner Herzog is for me among a handful of filmmakers who still challenge and involve the viewer in the process of film-making. • And finally, for my inner Geek – Outlander – I just can’t resist the mix of Vikings and Aliens….My kind of Valhalla!” Make sure you pick up The Skinny’s daily festival guide which will be available at all festival venues and on our website www.theskinny.co.uk Glasgow Film Festival runs from 12th-22nd February. The full festival programme is available at www.glasgowfilmfestival.org.uk www.glasgowfilmfestival.org.uk www.sigmafilms.com www.scottishscreen.com

February film events There’s a whole host of film treats across Scotland in February. Give yourself a pat on the back if you managed to get a ticket for the Bruce Campbell event at the Cameo in Edinburgh on 5 February. It sold out in 13 minutes flat. The star of The Evil Dead trilogy will be doing a Q&A in person after a screening of his new film My Name is Bruce. Look out for tickets for a second screening, which will hopefully also be attended by the actor. At the Filmhouse, also in Edinburgh, the Middle Eastern Film Festival will be continuing throughout February including several films that you’ll be unlikely to have the opportunity to see at the cinema again. The programme includes the work of several important female Iranian directors including Rakhshan Bani

Etemad (Nargess), Tahmineh Milani (Two Women) and Manijeh Hekmat (Three Women). In Dundee, as part of the DCA’s Timecode exhibition there will be a special screening of Chris Marker’s La Jetee and his experimental short Sans Soleil, an influential exploration of time, space and memory. It takes place on 3 February. And of course Glasgow will be ablaze with the film festival between the 12th and 22nd of February.


Gail Tolley catches up with Penny Bartlett and Rosie Crerar, co-directors of Scotland’s independent short film programme, The Magic Lantern.

AN ADVENTURE IN MUSIC AND ART GLASGOW April 30th - May 1st 2009 100 live acts, 15 venues over 2 days plus art events and free download compilation ONE TICKET ALL ACCESS Bands announced so far: 85 Bears, Be A Familiar, Derosa, Black Sun, Come On Gang!, Copy Haho, Drums of Death, Edie Sedgwick, Eugene McGuiness, European Union, Fangs, Findo Gask, Galchen, Geordi La Force, Hudson Mohawke, Isosceles, Lesser Panda, My Tiger My Timing, Manda Rin, Mitchell Museum, Micachu, Oh Atoms, Pearl & The Puppets, Pulled Apart By Horses, Punch And The Apostles, Plugs, Panama Kings, Rustie, Remember Remember, Rogues, Sirens Sirens, Stricken City, Sucioperro, Still Flyin, The Ray Summers, The Xcerts, These Monsters, Three Trapped Tigers, Tommy Reilly, We Have Band, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Y'all Is Fantasy Island, Zoey Van Goey................. many more to be announced

15 city centre venues curated by: 50 Bones Records, A Badge Of Friendship, Deadly People/This Is Not London, Tam Coyle, Diverse Promotions, Domino Records, Gigwise, Glasgow School Of Art, Jim Gellatly, LuckyMe, 1965 Records, Moshi Moshi, Q Radio, Republic Of Music, Rock-A-Rolla, Rockfeedback, This Is Fake DIY, Transgressive Records

2 Day Ticket - £42. 1 Day Ticket - £23.50 on sale now! Order early save £7 Limited number of 2-day tickets priced £35 available Tickets and updates available from www.hinterlandfestival.com

WHILE short films are often treated in the industry as a stepping-stone to feature-length work, The Magic Lantern aims to promote shorts as a valid art form in their own right. Set up by Penny Bartlett and Rosie Crerar in 2006, The Magic Lantern showcases exciting and innovative short films across Scotland and has most recently programmed The Shorts Film Festival (13-15 Feb) at Glasgow Film Festival. We sat down with them both to find out more.

but we also approach a lot of filmmakers directly.

How did you come to set up The Magic Lantern?

Penny: We’re showing a retrospective of Miranda July’s (‘Me, You, Everyone We Know’) short films as well as a showcase of films produced last year through the Scottish Short film initiative GMAC Shortcuts, alongside a strong line-up of the best new international shorts which includes some exciting new local work, and some great artist film and video programmes.

Rosie: We wanted to create a platform where people could see top international short films alongside a range of narrative, archive, experimental and local work, as we seek to present short film as an art form in their own right. Considering how significant shorts are in the industry there often aren’t a great deal of opportunities in which to view them. Penny: We want to encourage debate around the films, by juxtaposing interesting combinations and encouraging people to stay around after the programme or take part in a Q&A to encourage discussion. We’ve also started to notice regulars who come to each event which is great.

Penny: We keep it as diverse as possible within these themes with contemporary films as well as films from twenty, thirty, forty years ago, and a real blend of narrative based and more experimental work. What do you have lined up for this year’s Glasgow Film Festival?

Rosie: And we’ll have a late night programme at Glasgow’s legendary Subclub, including a closing party at Optimo with a programme of classic avant-garde films along with an eerie David Lynch style red room where Lynch’s early shorts will be screening! We’ll also be reclaiming Glasgow as ‘Cinema City’ with some short programmes back projected onto the windows of former cinemas across the city centre!

How do you go about planning each programme?

TO KEEP UP-TO-DATE WITH THE MAGIC LANTERN’S EVENTS CHECK OUT WWW.MAGICLANTERN.ORG.

Rosie: We start with a theme or a filmmaker that we want to explore in more depth and then go from there. We source films from archives such a BFI and LUX,

FOR THEIR GLASGOW FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAMME PLEASE VISIT WWW. GLASGOWFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.UK WWW.MAGICLANTERN.ORG

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The Magic


Film

Film Reviews Doubt Director: John Patrick Shanley Starring: Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, Viola Davis Released: 6 Feb Certificate: 15

The Class Director: Laurent Cantet Starring: Francois Bégaudeau Released: 27 Feb Certificate: 15

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“The dragon is hungry.” Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) thus describes Sister Aloysius (Meryl Streep), principal of St Nicholas School in the Bronx. For anyone with Catholic school experience, such a comparison would incite laughter. Though absurd, it is often an accurate metaphor. Flynn’s friendly approach to students clashes with Sister Aloysius’ strict methods and their conflict peaks with the radical addition (for 1964) of a 12-year-old African American child named Donald Miller. The ostracised alter boy bonds with Father Flynn but a question over the nature of their relationship arises when Donald returns to class from the rectory, upset and with alcohol on his breath. Novice Sister James (Amy Adams) notifies Sister Aloysius who begins an investigation. With a history of stints at various parishes, his well-manicured nails, and the pressed flowers in his bible, Father Flynn only fuels the fire. The conclusion provides little besides a validation of the film’s title and a new view into the church’s servants, and its antiquated ideas that marginalise the nuns and protect the priests. [Sara Nowak]

Laurent Cantet’s docudrama set in a tough Parisian Junior High, pits co-writer Francois Bégaudeau as Mr. Marin, a young teacher desperate to make a success out of teaching literature to a class of 13-year-olds of mixed abilities and varying backgrounds. In a powerful comment on classroom issues, the interaction between Marin and his pupils gives a valuable insight into the stresses of being a teacher today. Somewhat stealthily, a narrative emerges which then grips. Marin’s attempts to tame the aggressively disruptive Souleymane backfire when the school makes a questionable decision to allow two pupils to sit in on a staff meeting where Souleymane’s behaviour will get discussed. The move will have devastating consequences for Marin and his class. The deserved Cannes Palme D’Or winner is a perceptive, considered drama, beautifully improvised in ways Ken Loach or John Cassavetes would appreciate. . [Matt Arnoldi]

Che: Parts One and Two Director: Steven Soderbergh Starring: Benicio Del Toro Released: Out Now/20 Feb Certificate: 15

rrr In the four decades since his death, Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara has remained an icon of popular culture while our knowledge of the man has become as threadbare as many of the T-shirts that bear his image. With Che, Benicio Del Toro and Stephen Soderbergh set out in earnest to educate us. Rather than a classic biopic the director gives us two exhaustively detailed - and at times exhausting - procedurals of guerrilla war, released as two separate films. Che: Part 1 plunges us directly into the day-to-day concerns of the Cuban Revolution. Action is sporadic, short-lived and confused; questions of ideology and discipline are debated at length in jungle clearings. Che’s growth as a gifted, meticulous leader and fiercely committed revolutionary is carefully documented but there is little room for much sense of an inner life. It is the details which keep the attention: the élan of the cigarsmoking, bearded freedom fighters; a row of pens in the top pocket of a combat jacket an unlikely symbol of rank. Where the first film ponderously plots the course of a successful revolution, Part 2 recounts Che’s doomed attempt to foment one in Bolivia. Disowned by the local communist party, and receiving little support from an indifferent local population, Che’s band is pursued through the forests by government forces. A sense of intimacy and tragedy accompanies Che in his flight, the tragedy of a man whose commitment to an ideal of revolution propels him to an ignominious death in a foreign land. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

Vicky Cristina Barcelona Director: Woody Allen Starring: Rebecca Hall, Scarlett Johansson, Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz Released: 6 Feb Certificate: 12A

rrrr Woody Allen’s latest, Vicky Cristina Barcelona, is ostensibly the tale of two young American women spending a summer in Barcelona. Vicky, played by Rebecca Hall, is pragmatic and engaged to be married while Scarlett Johansson’s Cristina is something of her opposite: a quixotic searcher who knows only what she does not want. The pair’s meeting with Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), a Spanish painter and seducer, results in a series of situations which throw into relief the tension between freedom and stability at the heart of human endeavour. Allen knows what he is about here, employing Christopher Evan Welch as a comically arid narrator whose commentary is set against the electricity of Allen’s stars and Barcelona’s atmosphere of carnal liberality, ably rendered in the cinematography of Juan Aguirresarobe. The result is a simultaneously farcical and sympathetic portrait of the ecstasies and perils of being seriously romantic in the twenty-first century. [Tyler Parks] vickycristina-movie.com

Che: Part One is in cinemas now; Che: Part Two is released on 20 Feb.

Bolt Director: Chris Williams, Byron Howard Starring: John Travolta, Miley Cyrus, Susie Essman Released: 6 Feb Certificate: PG

rrr Facing inevitable comparisons, Disney’s latest offering has aspired to Pixar’s style, and with a shared creative umbrella, Bolt’s 3D visuals certainly come up to standard. Bolt (John Travolta) is a Hollywood primetime canine, dubiously groomed by his scenery-chewing director into believing his superpowers are genuine, until reality bites when he haplessly gets mailed to Manhattan. Traversing home to his beloved co-star Penny, self-discovering adventures ensue with help from wily cat Mittens and sedative-dodging ‘Scrappy to his Scooby’ hamster Rhino. The movie owes much thematically to Toy Story, yet lacks its standard of wit as well as the referential cleverness seen in Wall-E. The opening sequence is stunning and leaves one pondering whether, if having rolled with the idea of an omnipotent dog, the story may have been more original. Classically Disney however, the film has some genuinely touching moments and like a reliable pooch, will endear most who encounter it. [Juliet Buchan] www.disneymovies.co.uk/bolt

20 THE SKINNY February 2009


ALFRESCO: THE COMPLETE SERIES DIRECTOR: STUART ORME STARRING: STEPHEN FRY, HUGH LAURIE, BEN ELTON RELEASED: 2 FEB CERTIFICATE: 15

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DVD Reviews APPALOOSA

THE CHASER

DIRECTOR: ED HARRIS STARRING: ED HARRIS, VIGGO MORTENSEN, RENEE ZELLWEGER RELEASED: 2 FEB CERTIFICATE: 15

DIRECTOR: HONG-JIN NA STARRING: YUN-SEOK KIM, JUNG-WOO HA, YEONG-HIE SEO RELEASED: 2 FEB CERTIFICATE: 18

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Before Fry and Laurie were Fry and Laurie, Robbie Coltrane was Hagrid and Ben Elton sold his soul, there was Alfresco. This DVD contains both series (and the original North West pilots) of a genuine treat. The pace of sketch shows is now so relentless that it’s almost exciting to watch a programme (originally broadcast in 1983) where sketches can last up to fifteen minutes, and elaborate scenarios are allowed to breathe. There is a rawness to the material which is immensely appealing, if only because we can see the genesis of the group’s continuing concerns: race, masculinity and Thatcherism (Elton); class, authority and Britishness (Fry and Laurie); and an insistent juxtaposition of high and low culture. Many skits (such as a POW camp escape-piano routine) miss the mark, but there are some real gems here, including the Wallies, a demented Beatles medley and the sight of Emma Thompson dressed as a punk. [Michael Gillespie]

A man’s gotta do what a man’s gotta do, and that Ed Harris has returned to the director’s chair after eight years is taking Clint Eastwood’s opinion that the western is the American heritage film very seriously. Harris here crafts a flawed movie that’s commendably old-fashioned and devoid of irony or academic intent. Drawing heavily from the mythos of Wyatt Earp, the plot is the old west standard of a marshall (Harris) and his deputy (Mortensen) arriving in a lawless town to rid the place of a not so jolly rancher (a badly accented Jeremy Irons). Of course, a nuisance of a woman (Zellweger) comes between them, and there are bar room brawls and shootings: so far, so cliché. Yet the film, for all its dated touches and lack of formal daring, is made with a formidable passion. There’s also a palpable War On Terror subtext, and the cast are clearly relishing every minute of it. [Michael Gillespie]

As the Three 6 Mafia so memorably told us, it’s hard out here for a pimp. Especially for Jung-ho (Kim), a former cop in dire financial straits and fearing that his girls are defecting to his competition. In fact, they are the victims of serial killer who, if his methods are anything to go by, has clearly been watching way too many torture porn movies. Or at least, director Hong-jin Na has, not to mention copious (and very bad) B-movies, television shows and the excellent South Korean thriller, Memories of Murder. If that film was Peter Kay does Seven, this is Insomnia by way of Hustle & Flow. If that makes it sound appealing, it shouldn’t. The director’s viewing has clearly clouded his judgement: the plot is driven almost entirely by convenient coincidences, the central character’s morality is never truly called to account, and the treatment of women is frankly disgusting. Watch this and you’ll need a few chasers. [Lisa Bourke]

WWW.NETWORKDVD.CO.UK

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WWW.THECHASERFILM.COM

GOMORRAH

GYPSY 83

YOU BELONG TO ME

DIRECTOR: MATTEO GARRONE STARRING: SALVATORE ABRUZZESE, SALVATORE STRIANO, TONI SERVILLO RELEASED: 9 FEB CERTIFICATE: 15

DIRECTOR: TODD STEPHENS STARRING: SARA RUE, KETT TURTON, KAREN BLACK RELEASED: 16 FEB CERTIFICATE: 15

DIRECTOR: SAM ZALUTSKY STARRING: DANIEL SAULI, PATTI D’ARBANVILLE, JULIEN LUCAS RELEASED: 23 FEB CERTIFICATE: 15

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rrrrr Gomorrah is being released in the US under the banner “Martin Scorsese presents”, and while that director’s ouvre may explore the culture of the criminally inclined Italian working class, there is nothing to compete with the sheer brutality, unrelenting bleakness and stagnant despair at the heart of Matteo Garrone’s stunning film. Don’t let the grimness of the description put you off: this powerful investigation of Naples’ Camorra crime syndicate is so richly layered, so intensely photographed and so forcefully driven that it grabs the heart from the first frame and never lets go. That may sound cliché, but it’s the only way to describe this visceral portrait. If it has precedents, they are not so much in traditional gangster films, but in European realism and underground documentary. There are no MTV gimmicks or sexy sharpshooters here: we bear witness to a way of life that is all too violent, all too futile and all too believable. [Steven Dalziel]

Before goofing it up with the Another Gay Movie franchise, Todd Stephens made this slight but charming road movie, in which life lessons are learned and nothing is ever the same again after that Stevie Nicks tribute show. The show itself is the inciting incident which gets overweight misfit Gypsy (Rue) and her goth friend Clive (Turton) out of their Ohio town and off to New York City. Along the way, they hook up with an alcoholic one-hit-wonder (Black in all her scenery chewing glory), an Amish runaway and a closet case frat-boy. While the film is fairly straightforward in its style and storytelling, Stephens is clearly in love with the road and with his characters, which makes them hard to dislike. The production design and costumes are superb (often the downfall of micro-budget cinema) and the double sex scene must be the most tender ever set in a public toilet. [Lisa Bourke]

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Short, sharp and with a landlady so sweet it really, really hurts, Sam Zalutsky’s debut reworks the best of Hitchcock and Polanski for a quarter of the budget but with maximum impact. Jeffrey (Sauli) is a young architect first seen (in a symbolic opening that’s perhaps a little too obvious) building his dream house. An unhealthy infatuation with an apathetic one night stand (Lucas) leads him to rent an apartment from a generous landlady (D’Arbanville) who should really think about fixing those floor boards… To give much more away would be disserviceable, but what is truly remarkable is how intense the film actually gets, despite the limited resources, light-hearted tone and derivative plot. Much of this is down to Sauli’s likable vulnerability, as well as gallows humour and an understanding of the mechanics of suspense. Then there’s a performance from undervalued counterculture icon D’Arbanville (of Bilitis, Flesh and Big Wednesday) that is genuinely unnerving, slightly hysterical and always entertaining. [Michael Gillespie]

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FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 21


Games

Virtual Petri Dishes The Drill Hall in Edinburgh plays host to the most fascinating computer games Expo ever! Scientific fact! As part of the UNESCO City of Literature scheme, The Skinny is hosting a discussion about… Videogames (and genetics and evolution and other stuff like that)! Titled "Digital Evolution: What Can Gaming Teach Us About Where Life Came From and Where It's Heading?," the event will feature leading science and writer types (SF author Ken MacLeod, synthetic biologist Dr Alistair Elfick and general games knowit-all, Brian Baglow) who will discuss what is a fascinating question at a time when the boundaries between technology and biology are becoming ever more blurred. And so it is with minimal scientific and theological gusto (not wanting to steal anyone’s thunder, you understand), that this month we take a casual look at some noted evolutionary titles and scour them for Darwinian inspiration. One game everyone will probably have heard of – it being really recent and getting a lot of press – is Spore. A game from the folk that invented The Sims, which aims to simulate a species' entire evolution, from first ever bacterium to intergalactic space scoundrels. Bigged up due to its expansive, all encompassing nature, Spore lets you guide your single celled thingy through the primordial soup, up to multi cellular stature, out of the soup, through society and then boldly on into the big black. All the while allowing you to control its physical and mental nature by choosing from a few common traits seen in reality land (they had some evolutionary biologists on board and everything!) but the game seemed to fall short of any real life simulation because it tried too hard to be… fun. Allowing you to undo any evolutionary changes at any stage (so as to avoid any hideously deformed creatures you have worked on dying from, um, evolutionary pressures after a good few hours of toil) also had the effect of rendering the whole thing pointless (although it is entertaining to gift a creature 30 legs and one eye, in some kind of crazed bid to make the universe's best tap dancer). Another, much better game at simulating life, genetics and evolution was the Creatures series. Setting out to be a life simulator (with actual creatures and chemical processes modelled on our own), and being much smaller (16 creatures at once, as opposed to

a galaxy full) in scale and scope than Spore, it achieved something much more true to life. Your task was to rear cute ‘Norn’ creatures on a space ship. Feeding, teaching, training, treating and breeding the little freaks to your heart's manipulative content. Being based on a whole range of biological principles the game would allow you to find creatures

with ideal genotypes for a given situation (much like in life) and breed them to amplify this fact. Like real people, some might get fat easier or be more resistant to a disease. Others could suffer depression, have a mad case of ADD, or even just be a weird colour. You could see how these things panned out across the generations, and could in theory select for traits which were beneficial for your Norns' survival (or just funny to watch), much like selection of dairy cattle or the breeding of more meat efficient spherical cows in real life. All this served to make for an excellent and compelling life simulator, and this was a good decade ago. Sadly poor sales (the game didn’t quite have the broad appeal of Spore; it was a fair amount more serious) meant that this life sim never got past a hyper Tamagotchi stage, though the concepts it touted were pretty darned sound. Although these two probably do evolution most competently, other games did attempt something similar. For example Evolva saw you controlling creatures which would evolve depending on what they ate, gaining the traits of whatever it was they just killed. Great fun in theory, although Evolva’s scientific merit is held back by the fact these evolutions would generally allow them super laser eyes and rocket legs, and your creatures were a team of interplanetary assassins; although the theory should stand because it’s hilarious. It is fair to say that games have tried and will continue to try and mimic life, from the humble (and mostly dead) Tamagotchis of yesteryear, to 50-armed space spore creations and a whole bunch of crazy games that we don’t even know about (they haven’t been conceived yet). Game designers will no doubt keep trying, but until these digital lives stop trying to be entertaining, their merit as life forms will forever be in question. Which is probably for the best, as no one wants real life inside their computer, do they? Imagine the mess! [Josh Wilson] digital evolution: what can gaming tell us about where life came from and where it's heading? out of the blue drill hall, sat 7 feb, 7pm.

ARTIFICIAL LIFE GAMES SPAN FROM THE SIMPLE CELL-BASED LIFE (LEFT)TO THE INTERACTIVE, 3D SIMULATOR SPORE (RIGHT, ABOVE)

This is a free, ticketed event. for your ticket call 0131 467 4630 or email evolution@theskinny.co.uk

Reviews Silent Hill: Homecoming

singstar 3

Konami Out 21 February on Xbox 360 & PS3 £49.99

Sony Out now on PS3 £39.99

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22 THE SKINNY February 2009

up the game. from a little sister to dear old Gran. The experience itself hasn’t changed much from the original, you still sing the song trying to match the pitch bars on screen and accumulate points. Of course it’s still not perfect, as at its heart it’s still a karaoke game, and if you don’t like karaoke, then there just isn’t any point playing. Still the interface is great and there’s a lot of fun to be had with this, so fans of the genre should take a deep breath and get ready to sing their guts out. [Graeme Strachan]

Ever a cryptic series, this game begins with protagonist Alex Shepard waking up strapped to a hospital gurney, being wheeled through a dilapidated hospital, where patients are being tortured. It’s a pretty grim opening, even for a Silent Hill title, but from the moment you gain control of Alex, the tension wears off. Part of the problem is how clunky the controls are. Since the PS1 original, characters have always moved around slowly and combat has often been clumsy. However, as you fumble around the dark building, there are some genuine scares - a wheelchair comes crashing down a set of stairs, a door will mysteriously fly shut as you approach it. Some of these are pretty textbook, but others actually catch you off guard. For the best part the attack and dodge system works, except the dodging and counter mechanic is difficult to pull off, with no clear indication of when you are about to be attacked. Firearm combat also uses a new over-theshoulder system that works rather well. Kudos must go to the developer for making the game’s combat slightly more dynamic than that which has gone before. The only problem is that Alex feels too powerful for enemies to put the frighteners on you after a few

encounters. Some puzzles also require a bit of backtracking and fumbling about in the dark for a specific item. And some sections lack effective signposting, meaning you are unsure where to go next. While not a bad game by a long shot, veterans will not help but feel they are treading over familiar ground, while newcomers may be put off by how clunky it all feels next to slicker action games out there. If you are a fan though, this is definitely worth a playtest. [Dave Cook]


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time, inhabited by dinosaurs and apemen. They too must take part in an ancient struggle for survival …

BOOKS

Evolve Your

The Lost World is a classic tale of adventure and discovery that has been enthralling readers since it first appeared in 1912. To celebrate Arthur Conan Doyle’s 150th birthday and Charles Darwin’s bicentenary, readers from Scotland, London, Shropshire, Hampshire and South West England are joining the Lost World Read 2009. Let’s read it together!

Reading!

Visit www.lostworldread.com for further details.

Keir Hind introduces this year's big reading project: The Lost World Read, where we'll all be encouraged to get involved with one aptly chosen book... Cover illustration: De Agostini Picture Library / Getty Images.

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AFTER bringing you Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde last year, and Kidnapped the year before that, the nation’s biggest group reading project is back, and this time the title that we’ll all be reading is Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Lost World. This year, it’s taking place in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and even parts of England. This book has been chosen for good reason - it’s a fantastic adventure story, sure, but there’s a tie-in here, not only to the 150th Anniversary of the birth of Conan Doyle this year, but also the bicentenary of Charles Darwin. The Lost World is heavily grounded in Darwin’s theories, following a reporter and an explorer seeking out the one place in the world where dinosaurs somehow survived. When they arrive, they must fend off some savage ape-men, an apparent set of living missing links - which were a novelty in fiction (to say the least) when The Lost World was first published. There are events aplenty to compliment the book giveaway. Arthur Conan Doyle is commemorated by tours, a play, an exhibition focusing on him and the probable model for Sherlock Holmes, physician Joseph Bell, and even an evening with the man himself (okay, so he’s played by the historian Owen Dudley Edwards, but keep quiet about that). Darwin will be commemorated in much the same way, with tours and some rather excellent sounding discussions of his theories. One of these, a conference Digital Evolution on 7 February at the Drill Hall on Dalmeny Street, is even sponsored by, um, The Skinny magazine. See our listings online for details of this and all the other events. Now, no book is an island – all books, if enjoyed, should lead to more reading. The Lost World was published in 1912, and fiction itself has evolved since then. So it seems appropriate to list four more books that can be read after you enjoy The Lost World, which are all linked to it in one way or another. Consider it an evolution in your reading experience! Where to start… well:

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES

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BY ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

Not a huge departure from The Lost World, but you can’t read Doyle without dipping into Sherlock Holmes! This is probably the most famous Holmes title. Holmes and Watson go travelling out to Baskerville Hall, where an apparently ghostly creature roams… Is this some supernatural menace? Who can get to the bottom of this mystery? Well, maybe the world’s greatest detective…

Like this: the ‘lost world’ in this book is our world, destroyed by some sort of (obviously bizarre) apocalypse. The survivors are kept alive by the normalised air supplied by the Jorgmund Pipe, but when it bursts, our narrator and a band of assorted heroes must risk life and sanity to go and fix it. A fantastic book from last year, and one which includes all the fun of a normal O X F O R D W O R L D ’ S C L A S adventure S I C S story whilst acknowledging, and even revelling in, the daftness of the form.

ARTHUR AND GEORGE BY JULIAN BARNES

Moving on further, the Arthur of the title is Conan Doyle, the George is George Edalji, wrongly convicted for some ‘horse slashings’, a case that Conan Doyle was really involved in - the book is based on a true story. Is George guilty, or did prejudice taint his trial? Who can get to the bottom of this mystery? Well, maybe the creator of the world’s greatest detective…

Reviews

That’s one way that books can evolve. Pick up your copy of The Lost World to begin your own journey through the ideas of Conan Doyle and Darwin. And quickly! [Keir Hind] LOST WORLD READ EVENTS WILL BE TAKING PLACE ALL THROUGH FEBRUARY. CHECK OUR ONLINE LISTINGS FOR DETAILS. WWW.LOSTWORLDREAD.COM

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JURASSIC PARK BY MICHAEL CRICHTON

Why this? Well, Jurassic Park is an update of sorts of Conan Doyle’s The Lost World (and when Michael Crichton wrote a sequel, he made his debt obvious by actually calling it The Lost World). Crichton couldn’t get away with having explorers find dinosaurs, so he concocts a plot where dinosaur DNA has been recreated. If you enjoy the adventure of The Lost World, you’ll enjoy the adventure in this book. Just don’t examine the science too closely…

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The Lost World A3 Poster [PRINT].indd 1

THE GONE AWAY WORLD BY NICK HARKAWAY

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THE AMERICAN DREAM

ELEGIES FOR THE DEAD IN CYRENAICA

BY HARMON LEON

BY HAMISH HENDERSON

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THE LIEUTENANT BY KATE GRENVILLE

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PENTTI AND DEATHGIRL BY EMMA RENDEL

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On his quest to experience the American dream from a variety of starting points, writer and comedian Harmon Leon goes undercover, and in doing so comes up against all manner of alarming people. He pitches in with carnies, poses as a Canadian in order to buy a fake green card, and hangs out with the ‘God Hates Fags’ nutjobs over at the Westboro Baptist Church. Leon takes enthusiastically to each role, and often parodies the people he spends time with, while (mostly) going undetected. At times, his findings seem more suited to stand-up than to the written word, but the book is an entertaining read throughout, occasionally interspersed with more sobering points of view. It’s left up to the reader to decide which chapter most closely resembles your own personal hell – I’m torn between the Marijuana American Dream, in which pot-farmers get stoned and talk shit ad nauseam, or the Swinger American Dream (Leon’s companion, surveying the aftermath of a party, blurts, “I don’t think I ever want to have sex again”). [Nine]

Last year Polygon revived interest in the work of the Scottish poet and folklorist Hamish Henderson by publishing a fantastic biography of him by Timothy Neat. They’ve now followed that up by reprinting this sequence of poems, which Henderson intended to be read as one long poem. Elegies for the Dead in Cyrenaica was written mainly during the time that Henderson was serving in North Africa during the Second World War. It’s partly a modernist work, and was praised by T.S. Eliot as such, but it also draws on the folk tradition that Henderson would later concentrate on working within. This is complex poetry, and to be approached carefully, but please do; it’s full of curious, fascinating imagery, like when “lean seedlings of lament spring like swordsmen around us”, for example. It looks at the war from both sides, and it looks forward to the world after too. Each elegy has its own distinct voice, and there are a selection of introductions too, to lead you through the collection without too much confusion. A very fine reprint. [Keir Hind]

With a Booker shortlist nomination and an Orange Prize already under her belt, the hype surrounding Kate Grenville’s new pre-colonial novel is to be expected. Set in pre-Secret River Australia, the novel’s gentle hero is Daniel Rooke, a boy genius who is socially inept and looks for patterns in prime numbers to pass the time. He might well have a behavioural disorder, but the Kingdom in the 1700s still needs men to feed its war machine. So, while Cook is charting the New World, Rooke soon follows as Official Astronomer. As New World life becomes increasingly raw, Rooke soon turns to the Aborigines: translating their language, mapping their linguistics, and developing friendships where friendships based on words had previously failed him. Grenville masterfully depicts the brutal simplicity of the early settlers’ life in New South Wales. While insight into Aboriginal life is lacking, through Rooke’s peaceable, curious character, the moral tragedy of the Aboriginal compromise and the cowardice of the collective are neatly wrought. Grenville has stuck to what she knows, but she has done it well. [Renée Rowland]

Pentti and Deathgirl are two separate narratives, making this book less of a graphic novel than two graphic short stories. The first focuses on the titular Pentti, a Finn who works on a farm with his brother and who exhibits the sort of homophobia from which it is clear that he is almost certainly gay himself. Everybody who knows him is terrified by him, and by the end of the story it becomes clear why is, as you might imagine, a girl obsessed with death, but not her own – rather, other people’s. This results in quite a heap of tragedy, in what is a rather glum story, though a strange attempt is made at a happy ending. The art here is deliberately basic, but it still seems oversimplified. The stories are similarly simplistic, and as a whole this collection is too slight to really read much into, and doesn’t work well as a whole. It might distract you for about 20 minutes, but after that, there’s no real reason to re-read. [Ryan Agee]

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OUT NOW, PUBLISHED BY POLYGON

RELEASE DATE 5 FEB, PUBLISHED BY CANONGATE

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FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 23


Theatre

Year of the

Horse Tam Dean Burn is a Glasgow legend. Gareth K Vile catches up with his latest projects

Tam Dean Burn ought to be taking it easy. Having established himself as an archetypal soap villain on River City, an adventurous, engaged performer throughout the 1990s and a thoughtful interpreter of Pinter in the Citizens’ Caretaker, it is surprising that he retains the enthusiasm and imagination of an actor at the start of his career. In the next month, he can be found playing a gangster in the NTS’s Dolls, making a cameo in Andy Arnold’s Defender of the Faith, hosting political cabaret night Manifesto and presenting Year of the Horse, a personal journey into the politics and art of Harry Horse. Harry Horse was a perennial figure on the Scottish scene. Banjo-player, singer in Swamptrash and children’s author, his cartoons for the Sunday Herald became increasingly scathing as they attacked the British state’s militarism. Until his death in 2007, Horse’s imagery revealed his distinctive vision of a decaying, brutal world. Tam Dean Burn explains how the series developed. “The first one, he just sent the image – The Demons of Baghdad – and then they asked him to add text. He’d never been asked to write like that before – he used to write songs and children’s books. I think he discovered a lot about himself.” The title was dictated by the series of cartoons themselves. “That came out of the fact that there were fifty two cartoons in total he did.” Perhaps surprisingly, TDB did not know Harry Horse while he was alive. “I had seen the cartoons on and off. I was stunned by the ones I had seen but I didn’t really realise how much effect it had on me until I discovered that he had died.” Almost immediately, he began work. “I had been doing live plays on the radio station Resonance in London – and they said that the play for Sunday had fallen through. I came off the phone, and on the front page there was Harry Horse’s death. I was gobsmacked, and thought we could do some kind of tribute to Harry. I got some of the cartoons and the text, four tracks from his band Swamptrash and one of his books, The Last Polar Bear. Alison Peebles read this live from Glasgow onto the radio and we went between me doing the cartoons and his tracks for an hour tribute.” As he engaged with Horse’s pieces, TDB recognised a kindred spirit. “On the very last cartoon he did, he

lists his heroes: Blake and Burns. The romantic radical poets! We had so much in common.” A recurring theme of Burn’s Manifesto is the rescue of Rabbie Burns from the heritage industry, reclaiming him as both poet and revolutionary. And while neither Tam Dean Burns nor Harry Horse are luddites, they reach back to the past to understand the present. They are willing to entertain mythology and marginalised ideas. “The themes that Harry brings up are from interesting areas: the very last one he did was about Atlantis rising.” This mixture of the mystical and the political is mirrored throughout the cartoons. “In hindsight, I saw how much we had in common politically as well. The whole anti-war thing, he was vehemently against Blair and Bush but also the way he was looking at 9/11 before I picked up on it, about the World Trade Centre, and I was thinking that this must be the only national paper in the world that had someone saying – how did World Trade Centre Seven come down all by itself?” This sympathy encouraged Burn to develop his relationship with Horse’s work. “I started including the cartoons within the Manifesto Cabaret at the Tron,” he remarks, before Horse’s “family picked up on it. His sister could see that I wasn’t just trying to cash in: we tried to get an exhibition at the Edinburgh Festival last year. We did manage the Nairn Festival, and I performed in the gallery.” The final work is even more layered and sophisticated, with Burn fusing the illustrations, original score and performance into an integrated study of the cartoons’ message. The final pieces fell into place: patronage from the Tron’s new boss, and the enthusiasm of a famous DJ. “Andy Arnold said – if you do a smaller part in Defender of the Faith, you can do another show up the stairs afterwards. I have a seven-minute scene in Defender – and then I go on at nine o’clock for Year of the Horse! Then I approached Twitch – Keith McIver – I worked with him at The Arches. Keith had put an obituary to Harry Horse on the Optimo website: Keith said Swamptrash were the best live band he ever saw. So much of my life seems to be synchronicity!” www.tron.co.uk

Theatre can be unpredictable February is when the season begins: The National Review rolls into Glasgow, the big theatres start their programming after the pantomime mayhem, Manipulate reminds Scotland that puppets aren’t just for children and the roads unfreeze enough to let the odd English touring company make it north. Even if the audiences are sadly smaller, and there is less chance of seeing venerable critics performing a crazy dance at the command of a man in drag, performance is back in business. Manipulate is a festival of animation and puppetry, mostly at the Traverse. Apart from a welcome return for 1927’s Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, they are presenting pieces that use puppetry to

24 THE SKINNY February 2009

above: Tam dean burn Below: Harry horse cartoons

tackle adult themes. The Mother of All Enemies is a queer/political/humanist/satirical/scatological re-imagining of ancient shadow puppetry. Then Twin Houses uses the difficult relationship between puppet and person to consider issues of control and possession. Perfect for those mid-winter blues. There is also a small invasion of Russian Ballet. Despite my love of Scottish Ballet and mania for anything strange and Belgian, I still believe that Russian classical ballet has unparalleled technique and drama. For a more contemporary angle, Scottish Dance Theatre are continuing their almost non-stop schedule in Dundee with two new works, and Natasha Gilmore gets her very funny Blank Album back on the road. It is such a relief for the holidays to be over and have the theatre save me from any more social life. [Gareth K. Vile]

Top 5 events The Skinny's picks for theatre across Scotland in February

Baby Baby

Established and relatively young companies Stellar Quines and Perissology team up to tell the stories of those girls on the fringes: single mothers. 4 –7 February Tron Theatre, Glasgow

X-Factor Dance: Query

Scottish veteran Alan Greig teams up with Yankee choreographer to expose gender boundaries in a work inspired by Gore Vidal.

Hair

3 February Eden Court Theatre, Inverness 10 February Gordonstoun School 17 & 18 Feb, Assembly Rooms, Edinburgh 21 February Gilmorehill, Glasgow

4-28 Feb, Church Hill, Edinburgh

1927- Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

Revival of classic sixties musical. Could be a period piece or might still be frighteningly relevant- either way, it has great tunes.

Scottish Dance Theatre

Two new works from a company that is energetic and imaginative.

Oddly sensual and sinister, this is a welcome return for an old Fringe favourite. Part of Manipulate and one for fans of Gorey and gory.

21-24 February, Dundee Rep

6 Feb, Traverse, Edinburgh


Both Dance House in Glasgow and Edinburgh’s Dancebase are known for their wide range of classes and programmes. Gareth K Vile speaks to Karen Wood, Creative Director at Dance House, and Fiona Campbell meets Sue Hawksley, artist in residence at Dance Base and professional researcher of the body

Karen Wood’s programming at Dance House is based on clear principles. “I really wanted to rebuild the sense of the dance community in Glasgow, because it felt as if it had become fragmented.” She approached this in three ways: by setting up workshops, aimed at introducing new techniques – “Each season has at least one training opportunity geared at professional dancers”; offering ‘Creative Labs’, week long residencies “to give artists space and time to explore ideas at their early stages”; and finally, “introducing the informal Friday Dance Cocktail – the sharing of work from the Creative Lab, a professional class and an opportunity for networking.” Discussing February’s highlights, Karen pointed out the range of areas that Creative Labs support. “Black Swan Dance Theatre will hopefully be

working towards next year’s mental health awareness festival – Emma Park is going to be exploring bi-polar disorder.” If Black Swan engage with social issues, the following Lab demonstrates how art-forms cross-fertilise. “Anna Henson is an American at the art school doing the MFA. She took part in our dance for camera training and was hugely inspired and keen to explore the techniques. She’s going to be working with Glaswegian composer Kirsty Blackwood.” After that, Sasha Kyle, a winner of the Directors’ Award at The Arches, will be working with dancers for her latest piece. The sharing at the end of each residency on a Friday afternoon offers the public a chance to see work-in-progress, and for the artists to receive informal feedback. [GKV]

Theatre

Bodies of Work

Sue Hawksley’s CV reads like a wish list of accomplishments. After training at the Royal Ballet School, Hawksley has performed for Rambert, Scottish Ballet and Philippe Genty, as well as choreographing and teaching throughout the UK. Now in Edinburgh and focusing on her PhD with Edinburgh College of Art and the University of Edinburgh exploring embodiment through dance, philosophy and technological mediation, Hawksley has turned her attentions to research-based practices. In 2007 she established articulate animal as “a vehicle to facilitate creative practice and research focusing on the moving body with an emphasis on interdisciplinary inquiry”. From 9 February articulate animal will be undertaking a two week residency at Dance Base. Hawksley will set up improvisational processes and structures to explore embodiment and meaning in movement: “I like the fact that we spend our lives (apparently) in our ‘body-minds-in-the-world’, with all the attendant feelings and sensations of ‘being-ness’, yet know so little about what this is.” Collaborating with “widely experienced, articulate and independent-minded” dance-artists and musicians, including composer Suzanne Parry, Hawksley welcomes the cross-fertilisation of ideas likely to germinate in an artistically rich environment: “the residency is a great opportunity to develop ideas with a fabulous group of people. I’m interested in them and what they will see and do with the problems.” More concerned with questioning than searching for answers, her work takes many exciting, unexpected directions.[FC] The residency will culminate in a free studio showing on 20 February at 4pm, followed by an informal questions and answers session.

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YEAR OF THE HORSE

IMAGES + TEXT BY HARRY HORSE MUSIC BY KEITH McIVOR (OPTIMO) PERFORMED BY TAM DEAN BURN

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FEATURING MUSIC BY THE PASTELS

February 2009

THE SKINNY 25


Theatre

Reviews

Previews

Richard Alston

National Review of Live Art

Theatre Royal , glasgow, 20 Feb

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The Arches, 11-15 Feb

Music is where Richard Alston starts: “I don’t have ideas. I’m pretty stupid really. It’s music that gives me ideas.” Alston doesn’t choose a piece of music for intellectual reasons, it’s a gut feeling. That’s how he felt about Philip Glass’s Songs from the Liquid Days and Hoagy Carmichael’s jazzy singing and imperfect piano playing. Glass’s music inspired Blow Over, Alston’s breathtaking new piece. Even though it was first performed in October, the performance at the Festival Theatre was in fact a world premiere as one of the dancers had fallen ill and another had to learn the main part just 12 hours before. Dancers race along the sharp diagonal space to keep up with Glass’s urgent music. It’s a spatially complex, architectural group dance with dancers going off stage just to return and continue the never-ending cycle of changes, or following Glass’s song lyrics, the cycles of ‘changing opinion’. A radiant musical, Shuffle it Right uses Carmichael’s jazzy songs and explores the syncopated rhythm with a light and humorous touch. There is a lot of detailed, careful dancing in this piece – dancers interact with each other minding every pause or change of rhythm in Carmichael’s songs. Shuffle it Right follows a dark and meditative piece, Body and Soul, choreographed by Martin Lawrance and inspired by Schumann’s Dichterliebe, A Poet’s Love. Although the piece threatens to drown in its own vague intensity, there are some touching sequences as the dancers lyrically portray the anguish of love. Alston might claim he has no ideas, but Blow Over contradicts his self-deprecation and shows his choreographic brilliance. [Agata Maslowska]

Having taken a few years to explore Tramway, the National Review of Live Art has returned to The Arches. A five-day-long celebration of the cutting edge, the NRLA is the place to discover the most daring performers and difficult ideas that can hardly be expressed in words. Guided by indefatigable and amiable host Ian Smith, the NRLA invites professional and newcomers to expand their perceptions of what can be performed. The best way to enjoy the National Review is to pick a day at random, take a friend and see as much as possible. This guarantees a mixture of the profound and the silly, the trite and the moving. Then repair to the bar and discuss the highlights, and get into the questions posed by the event. What is art? Did I really want to see that? Why can nobody agree on what makes this good or that terrible? Is there any easy way to talk about live art? Live art is a fluid category, encompassing anything from choreography through to installation spaces. This year, Raimund Hoghe subverts dance, while Third Angel, a company who have worked with the RSAMD and created full-length dramas, present a ritual for two people. Fan favourite Franco B returns for anyone who is not squeamish and Billy Cowie, who recently ‘toured’ Scotland with a 3D video dance, unveils his new piece – onto the ceiling. The NRLA heralds the new year of radical performance, kicking off the New Territories 2009 programme. A jamboree of old stars and young hopefuls, it is undeniably unique and intense. [Margaret Kirk] www.newmoves.co.uk

Scottish Opera's La Traviata

Mission Possible Macrobert, StirlinG, 11 Feb

Edinburgh Festival Theatre

Drew Farrell

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26 THE SKINNY February 2009

Like most of the good ‘uns, La Traviata [The Fallen Woman] is one of the oldest stories in the book: a less than reputable girl meets a stand-up gent and love flourishes. At least, till the fates/family/society intervene... Immortalised in numerous plays and films – in an unusual moment of intertextuality, the opera that working girl Julia Roberts attends in Pretty Woman is La Traviata – Verdi based his opera on Alexandre Dumas’ play La Dame aux Camelias, a daring decision at the time. Scottish Opera’s production makes a few of its own, and carries off the majority superbly. Italian soprano Carmen Giannattasio as the lead Violetta Valery is a meeting of performer and role that opera lovers wetdream about; passionate, robust, in complete control of her instrument, she keeps one spellbound throughout, never falling into the melodramatic overacting that is a danger when playing the emotional Violetta. Giannattasio is not the only highlight. Designer Tanya McCallin’s set and director David McVicar’s staging are a masterclass in stage design; one simple structure resided throughout, making lengthy scene changes unnecessary, the locale switched through imaginative use of lighting, props and two large, stunning black silk curtains. Party scenes were packed with people, food and wine abounded in a way rarely seen on stage, and the whole was placed upon an oversized portion of Violetta’s gravestone, allowing the characters to literally dance, romance and weep on her grave. The poetry was let down by the lead male, Federico Lepre; he came across as a wet fish, especially beside Giannattasio. Finding his feet in the ‘angry’ portions of the plot, he came off as more creepy than earnest, his caresses more slimy than affectionate. Fortunately the rest of the cast, including the chorus, were able to make up for him, in particular Richard Zeller as Giorgio Germont. La Traviata is being supported by the Cross Border Touring Fund, enabling Scottish Opera to travel to Northern Ireland for the first time since 1990, and is a very worthy recipient. The company have put together a strong production, and raised the bar for their future outings. [Erin McElhinney]

Dance gets a big dose of testosterone in the newest touring production by progressive arts company State of Emergency. In their fifth National Showcase Tour, entitled “Mission Possible – Dads & Lads Move!”, five dancers take audiences on an exploration of the male psyche. Three revered black British choreographers have created “snapshots” of the modern male consciousness, scrutinising relationships such as father-son and casual friendship. State of Emergency is no ordinary dance company. Using aesthetic and athletic talents for more than mere entertainment, they are committed to promoting black choreographic works, and have launched careers with their intellectually charged productions. The company’s director, Deborah Baddoo, has always maintained a philosophy of inclusive and active promotion of marginalised talent. However, the ambitions of the company do not stop with equalising the dance industry. Previous Mission productions have focused on crucial community issues ranging from teenage sexual behaviour to refugees. The creators of this three-part performance, Jeanefer Jean-Charles, Kwesi Johnson and Colin Poole, bring their eclectic backgrounds, ranging from hip-hop to funk to Brazilian martial arts, to the stage. Praised throughout the UK for their dancing and creative talents, these three artists use their broad stylistic range to infuse fresh energy and perspectives into this presentation of male existence in the 21st century. [Melissa Trachtenberg]

www.scottishopera.org.uk

www.macrobert.stir.ac.uk

Get more reviews Online: theskinny.co.uk


Lizzie Cass-Maran explains why the comedy club is the perfect place for a first date. First dates are crucial. You want to get to know each other in a relaxed atmosphere, without the pressure to be romantic. You want to have fun together and avoid awkward silences. You want a few drinks to settle your nerves, but not so many you forget your dateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name. You want to have plenty to talk about, but time to talk about it. Most of all, you want to get laid. Dinner and a movie? PassĂŠ. Follow my simple guide and find out why a night of comedy is the perfect plan.

And the getting laid? Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve shared laughter and maybe a little light humiliation and are feeling like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known each other for years. You feel relaxed, happy, and just the right amount of drunk. Do you really need to ask?

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What if it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funny? What if we have different ideas of what is funny? The problem with comedy is that the only way to practise is to do it. My advice for a delicate situation like this is to stay away from new act nights and go to an established gig with experienced comedians (normally the weekend shows). Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see an array of quality acts and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be something for everyone. If you do discover that the two of you have radically different senses of humour, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid the relationship is pretty much doomed to failure. If the relationship is doomed to failure, knowing this on the first date can save a lot of time.

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So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so great about comedy? The general format of a comedy gig is: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;drinking, comedy, more drinking, more comedy, drinking, more comedy, drinking.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; This is the perfect format for a date. The entertainment comes in short bursts and gets you laughing right away, which instantly calms you down and lowers your defences. Drinking is expected, but rounds at the bar are nicely spaced to avoid paralysis. During the break, you find instantly that you have plenty to talk about â&#x20AC;&#x201C; discuss who you found funnier and why, and let the actsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; material sneakily segue you into talking about your own life. And you know what comedians talk about a lot? Sex. Perfect way to bring up the subject. Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve laughed about it, doing it will be so much more relaxed. What if they pick on me? Contrary to popular belief, the main objective of your average comedian is not to make the audience members feel bad about themselves. The point of talking to the audience is to bond with them, personalise material and create a unique experience. Studies show that sharing laughter speeds up the bonding process as well as sending feel-good hormones careening through your body. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just good for the comedian, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for you too. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bonding as a room, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also bonding as a couple. If the act does mock your dodgy glasses, go with it. Being able to laugh at yourself is very sexy. And as youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been bonding so well, this mockery will stir up defensive feelings in your date and leave them quietly thinking about how actually, those glasses make you look kinda cute. The only time comedians are likely to be genuinely vicious is to silence someone who is behaving like a cock. If you behave like a cock, you may be made to look like a cock. So donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t behave like a cock (see above re: not drinking too much). This advice is pretty much good for all first dates, all comedy club experiences and also anything else ever.

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Laugh them into bed

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Top 5 comedy shows for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Steadfastly single or sickenenly entwined, there are plenty of laughs to be had around the country this February 14th. Check out our website for full details.

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FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 27


Art

RSA New Contemporaries The RSA Student Show is no more. Rosamund West heralds the arrival of RSA New Contemporaries. This year, the RSA’s Student Show has been completely redesigned. The old car boot sale system of everyone bring, everyone display, has been ripped asunder to be replaced by a selected show a year in arrears which offers 2008’s graduates the chance to reconsider, refine and make again in the cold dark months following the degree show. Those who have visited previous RSA student shows will remember the vast, confusing scale, the disparity of the work, the somewhat baffling concept of inviting all the final year fine art undergraduates from all of Scotland’s art schools to turn up and put in a piece. In fairness, I remember participating in the exhibition myself, and I remember it to have been exhilarating. The opportunity to display in the daddy of all Scottish galleries, to have your work written about and photographed, was new and exciting. I remember the hilarity that ensued when one of my classmates was demonised by the tabloids for an ill-conceived Mickey Mouse – Taliban crossover work, and the sense of shock when another became the hate figure of animal rights activists for a genuinely touching film of the last moments of a poisoned mouse. I think the bittersweet disappointment at not causing such controversy still resonates with a few of us. While the Student Show used to be an exhilarating first brush with the real live media art world, it was also a bit of a school play of an exhibition. All the kids got in, even the “special” ones. For the viewer, it was an overwhelming mish-mash. For the embryonic artist, it was a distracting challenge to complete a resolved artwork during the lead up to the degree show. The new format offers something altogether different and, dare I say, better. Instead of a glittering distraction in an already stress-filled time, it now offers last year’s graduates a purpose and perhaps a hope after the degree show has been dismantled, the certificate framed and hung on the wall, and the cocoon-like support structure of art college has fallen away. Having to work out how to simultaneously make ends meet and make art after the comparative (at the time unrealised) luxury of four years at art school is pretty damn hard. The more opportunities and support that exist for recent graduates the better.

Fraser Gray: scuff

Kevin Harman: Love Thy Neighbour (2008)

Alex Mcandrew: Torn Apart (2008)

The Skinny caught up with some of this year’s participants to hear how they were finding the experience of life and the RSA. Fraser Gray, who featured in our June '08 Showcase, has spent the months since graduating in a Wasps studios scholarship in Dundee, and has taken part in a variety of exhibitions throughout Scotland. He plans to exhibit new painting works exploring “the bastardisation of the Scottish landscape” in a composition borrowed from Caravaggio’s The Calling of St Matthew. The Skinny feels the works will nicely complement the horrific Landseer paintings over the road.

A fuss over cross-over Charles Avery Charles Avery Charles Avery is mainly what I’ve been saying, art-wise this month. As is probably quite evident from the fevered review we publish this month. Put simply, I loved it in a way that almost never happens in visual art. I am in awe. In other news, I’ve been wondering about the line at which art and music meet, because there seems to be an increasing crossover between the two . I suppose it’s always been there, in all the folk who go to art school to form bands, and in all the animators who just want to make music videos. I think it feels different now because it’s less commercially driven: as the record contracts and accompanying

28 THE SKINNY February 2009

ludicrous advances dry up, musicians are concentrating more on the grassroots level, on gigging and low budget visuals, frequently supplied by your friendly neighbourhood video artist. There have been a few nights recently (which shall here remain nameless), where live bands and DJs have played alongside artworks of video or sculpture or whatever, and I think the collaboration helps to create something altogether new. It removes art from its at times rarified surrounds, it exposes it to a whole new audience, and it changes its meaning a little bit because it is no longer in a 'contextless' white cube: it is suddenly part of the entertainment, which means it will be viewed in an entirely different, more emotional way. And the music gets a free video. Long live artistic crossover.

Alex McAndrew is submitting the frankly dazzling black mountain sculpture he showed in his degree show. He’s spent the months since graduating trying to balance working and making, and talks about a “six month slump” which he feels a lot of his contemporaries have experienced since leaving college. He points out, fairly, that while the new show format is beneficial in terms of an exhibiting goal, it is difficult for those without a studio or funding to actually make anything new.

Kevin Harman, who featured in our July '08 Showcase, stayed on at ECA to do a masters. For the RSA show he’s departing from his site specific, guerrilla style work (keen observers will recall his skip rearrangements and the near-legendary Stolen Doormats of Bruntsfield) in order to make something more permanent. He’s collected hundreds of old tools and stripped their surfaces, effectively removing and keeping their individual histories of toil. He’s planning on using the fragments to construct a large, intricate floor and wall mounted piece. Since graduating, he’s pursued a variety of projects, including working at a bronze foundry in London assisting on work by high profile artists such as Marc Quinn and the Chapman Brothers. He sees this as a challenge: “The standard of work has to really be improved to be viewed on that level. That’s what I’m doing.” RSA New Contemporaries RSA, The Mound, 14 - 25 Feb. £2 / £1 (conc.)

Top 5 events The Skinny's picks for art across Scotland in February

INTRODUCTION TO THE ISLANDERS NATIONAL GALLERY OF MODERN ART, EDINBURGH. 'TIL 13 FEB

Charles Avery's hugely enjoyable multimedia exhibition, receiving a rave review from us this month.

PEACEMAKERS OF ISRAEL AND PALESTINE OUT OF THE BLUE, THE DRILL HALL, EDINBURGH. 23 FEB – 2 MAR

Incredibly timely photography exhibition, with images documenting the work of peacemakers from both sides of the conflict taken in December of last year.

SEBASTIAN BUERKNER TRAMWAY, GLASGOW. 6 FEB – 22 MAR

First Scottish exhibition for the German-born artist. His innovative animation work blurs the boundaries between painting and film.

MEMBERS’ SHOW GENERATOR PROJECTS, DUNDEE. 'TIL 8 FEB

Annual members’ exhibition: much variety, occasional confusion, certain hidden gems in all media.

MIXED PALETTE RECOAT, GLASGOW. 'TIL 1 MAR

Group show of painters both local and international chosen for the strength of their image making.


Charles Avery

Sandy Smith & Alex Gross

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Collective gallery

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Charles Avery’s Islanders is an astonishingly good exhibition. ’Good’ is necessarily too facile a term: it is fascinating, entrancing, a truly immersive experience that is quite frankly a joy to behold. I first went an hour and a half before the gallery closed and became so absorbed I only made it halfway through. Making the return trip was a pleasure, and I felt disconcertingly exhilarated upon leaving. The Islanders is an ongoing project, which has thus far spanned four years. Avery has essentially created a whole new world, an island far away from civilisation previously undocumented by modern cartography, complete with weird creatures, mythic rituals and even its own pantheon of gods. Mr Impossible, the god created after a philosophical argument in the pub who uses his divinity to solicit casual sex with mortal women, is a particular stroke of genius. The world is manifest in the gallery in the form of drawing, sculpture, skewed taxidermy and lyrical, witty writing. It emerges gradually in the course of exploring the space, as fragments of material culture and pseudo-folk tale accumulate to form an imaginary society, Avery creating a multi-dimensional version of magical

The image that has stuck in my head is that of a giant, undulating surface covered in a thick coat of multicoloured glitter. Somewhere between Joseph’s technicolor dream coat and Aladdin’s magic carpet, it would have looked more comfortable in a kid’s crèche than in a trendy gallery. However, if you can force your eyes away from the glittering monster then the rest of this show is well worth a look. The videos are undoubtedly the highlight of the show: juxtaposing the vast, far-reaching landscapes of North America with everyday human objects or voices: there seems to be a distance created between nature and man. The human elements are out of place, disturbing the calm. The video Waiting for Reoccurrence has its back turned to a footpath or viewing area, so that only the shuffle of footsteps, the heavy breathing of a walker and the throwaway remark of a tourist is heard but not seen, until

realism. The work explores a multitude of themes, from the nature of tourism and of exploration, through pitch perfect asides on the nature of intellectualism, to questions of class, of prejudice, of addiction. The world is one of glamour and squalor, of minutely skewed realities that create the illusion of exoticism while simultaneously mirroring our own. Henderson’s Eggs, for example: a government approved recipe for pickled eggs that are “bitterly disgusting, yet ruinously addictive”, whose “value is so assured that in the underworld they are used as currency”. Avery metaphorically explores issues of culpability in the existence of addiction in our own world, while never losing a sense of a magical other. In an art world where we all too frequently spend time in galleries looking without seeing, standing in front of works through a sense of obligation rather than as a result of any sort of engagement, The Islanders is a rare gift. If you only see one exhibition this month, or indeed this year, make it this one. Go. There are only a couple of weeks left. [Rosamund West]

Art

Reviews

the eruption of a geyser in the middle distance sets off multiple ‘ahhs’ and kids run into shot to have their photo taken. Gross and Smith’s work oscillates between the sublime and the mundane, but above all questions man’s place within the landscape. The two untitled sculptures are intentionally ambiguous: my first thought was a twisted torso; however, they could equally be inspired by a rugged landscape; with the aggregate still showing through there is a certain roughness which creates intensity and immediacy. To enjoy this exhibition takes a certain amount of perseverance: the meanings aren’t obvious and it would be easy to walk in and out in five minutes. However, once your retina’s recovered from the shock of an intense overindulge in glitter, there is plenty of thought provoking material to make the trip worthwhile. [Sophie George]

Previews Patrick Jameson Sierra Metro

Patrick Jameson’s installation Eliel will be the third show at Edinburgh’s exciting new art space Sierra Metro. It promises to be interestingly varied, comprising digital animation alongside a series of sculptural objects, some of which will perform a soundtrack to the exhibition. If possible, it would be wisest to come on the preview night when there will also be a live set from Konx Om Pax, maker of soundscapes and animations. Jameson’s installation takes its name from the Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen who designed the Finnish pavilion for the 1900 Paris Exposition. The show is inspired not only by the aesthetics of the pavilion building itself but also by the chunk of rock that it housed, the Bjurböle Meteor. The beautiful black glass-like material, which fell to earth in 1899, symbolises a link between the material and the

sublimely out-of-this-world. Jameson’s animation, which forms the dominant part of the exhibition, shows the physical building from a perspective which draws attention to its less conspicuous patterns and relationships. In identifying different traits as significant, Jameson changes our perception of objects; he calls his work “proposals for new understanding of the material world.” Jameson’s work may not leap to the same conclusions as the man who finds a watch on the beach, but it does encourage the viewer to try to understand the world in a new way, and look for something “more than nature or human endeavour”. [Mark Herbert] The exhibition preview runs from 7pm, 31 Jan. Sierra Metro is open 1-5pm on Saturdays & Sundays.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 29


Music

A Chemikal

Solution

After nearly 15 years in the game, Chemikal Underground is showing no let-up in releasing great music. In fact, co-founder Alun Woodward tells Darren Carle that it’s time to turn up the heat.

“Sugar sure, kandy pop, just don’t let the music stop.” Never underestimate a good pop song, and Kandy Pop by Scottish disco-rockers Bis certainly is a good pop song. Perhaps more pertinently, though, it allowed the trio of hyper teenagers to become the first unsigned band to perform on Top of the Pops. At the same time, fledgling record label Chemikal Underground, formed by Glasgow quartet The Delgados in 1994, were looking on. Both parties came together in 1996 to release The Secret Vampire Soundtrack EP, the label’s, and indeed Bis’s, biggest commercial success to-date. Alun Woodward, co-founder of Chemikal and erstwhile Delgado, lays down the impact of Kandy Pop in no uncertain terms. “Bis at that time were one of the most lauded bands in the UK, and everything from radio, press to TV wanted to support them, so it came to us without a great deal of effort. To then have

"we assumed that if a label released nothing but great music, then enough people would agree and support them” that money pretty much set us up for the next five years. It enabled us to record albums by Mogwai, Arab Strap and The Delgados, so it was crucial to our early development.” There’s no doubt that the Scottish indie scene would be a very different place were it not for such acts. In fact, their reverberations are still being felt today. From quietly pressing a few of their own singles to suddenly finding their signings soundtracking a Guinness advert (Arab Strap), or fronting a ‘No Sell Out’ NME cover feature (Mogwai), it was certainly a meteoric rise, yet one which Woodward seemed oblivious to at the time. “We assumed that if a label released nothing but great music, then enough people at magazines, ad agencies and radio stations would agree and play and support them,” he reasons. “The world of the naive is a wonderful one.” Among their fervent supporters was the late John Peel. The legendary DJ’s ‘Festive Fifties’ regularly featured Chemikal acts and he even hosted their fifth birthday party. “Like most people into music I spent my nights listening to, and falling asleep to, John Peel,” says Woodward. “So to have him like my band and label so much was obviously an important pat on the back.” It would be fair to say that Mogwai and Arab Strap have been the label’s biggest successes, at least critically,

In answer to the Charity Karaoke Jam For all the selfless intentions that charity records are known for, there's no question its alliance with karaoke covers and cynical X-Factor campaigns has become an increasingly dominant force on the musical landscape in recent years. Well here's respite: this month the stalwarts of independent rock (and Davey Byrne from Dumbarton) are bringing the soul back. The Red Hot Organization continues its crusade to raise AIDS awareness with Dark Was the Night - a meeting among many of the most notable names in contemporary rock and folk

30 THE SKINNY February 2009

music. Two years in the making, could this be the greatest charity album of all time? Paul Mitchell finds out more from Red Hot's John Carlin and The National's Brothers Dessner who co-curated the effort. Elsewhere in Music this issue, Darren Carle looks back on Glasgow label Chemikal Underground's rise while keeping an eye on its future with co-founder Alun Woodward and The Phantom Band's Richard "The Turd". Aidan Moffat even swings in with a Valentine's poem for you to cut out, consider, and stick in a card to your betrothed. There's rakes of other good shit, like, but I just ran out of room to tell you about it. /Dave

but the well doesn’t dry up there. Aereogramme, for one, are cult favourites who simply never made the impact many hoped. Tellingly, their farewell message-board post in 2007 summed up a lot: “The never-ending financial struggle coupled with an almost superhuman ability to dodge the zeitgeist has taken its toll.” Woodward agrees and concedes that the worst part of running the label is “dodging financial raindrops, it’s always tiresome at best”. The Chemikal net has also been thrown a little farther afield in recent years, catching the likes of Los Angelesbased Radar Bros for their first few albums as well as off-shoot Mount Wilson Repeater. The globe-spanning Cha Cha Cohen were an earlier, unfortunately shortlived, signing. However, there’s no denying that the bulk of Chemikal’s roster is home-grown. “We [meaning he and fellow ex-Delgado Stewart Henderson] sign bands on recommendations from friends,” reveals Woodward, “from demos, from buying their records or from seeing bands live.” Admirably, he doesn’t look back on the early years with misplaced nostalgia. “I appreciate that we had great UK success around this time, but it would be depressing beyond all belief to think that it was cultural bread and water from now ‘til our dotage,” he says. And there appears no better time than now for such words to be uttered. The first quarter of 2009 sees Chemikal releasing three new albums. “I have thought for some time that we should be more productive,” says Woodward. They are albums that say a lot about the label too. After Ten Years of Tears with Arab Strap, Aidan Moffat – a man described as having “contributed to more headaches in and around Chemikal Underground than alcohol” – releases the debut with his latest group, The Best-Ofs, on Valentine’s Day. At the other end of the spectrum are The Phantom Band, relatively unknown (for now), but proving that Chemikal are still releasing terrific music from local acts simply because they like it. Finally, in the middle, De Rosa follow their 2006 debut with Prevention in March. Here we have the old hand who is practically part of the furniture, the plucky young upstarts and everything in between. Understandably, Woodward flags them all as talents to take note of. “They have all made great albums. Hopefully the rest of the world will agree in the coming months.” We can hope, but if not, after 15 years it seems certain that Chemikal Underground aren’t going to let the music stop now. www.chemikal.co.uk

A Muso’s Top 10: Parts & Labor "The impetus for starting this band was that Dan [Friel, keys] had composed the first Parts & Labor songs on this broken toy keyboard from the 80s that he got as his first instrument as a kid," says BJ Warshaw of the formation of these Brooklyn experimental rockers. "There’s always been this underlying thought process about trying to stave off being consumed by new technologies and recycling and reusing what’s available – sometimes to greater results than the supposedly newest and best thing." It's no surprise then that when quizzed about his ultimate compilation for the proverbial desert island, BJ's list features songs from a similar lineage of artists renowned in their day for pushing the

boundaries of sound. "These are my good vibes songs for any time of year," he offers. When can you ever argue with DEVO? 1. Brian Eno - Needles In The Camel's Eye 2. Queen and David Bowie - Under Pressure 3. Wire - Outdoor Miner 4. DEVO - Beautiful World 5. John Coltrane - A Love Supreme 6. Can - Future Days 7. Pink Floyd - Us and Them 8. Oneida - Sheets of Easter 9. Fleetwood Mac - Go Your Own Way 10. Boredoms - Super Going Parts & Labor play Captain's


It took five years of arguing before they agreed on a name, but now The Phantom Band have finally arrived they've got the year off to a flying start. Rick Anthony tells Darren Carle about the trials and tribulations behind their debut album.

With cloth face masks at the ready, some juvenile pseudonyms dreamt up and a debut album that embraces tinges of doo-wop to full-blown folk, The Phantom Band have definitely landed. However, while other fledgling bands may argue about suitable parameters of hair height and trouser tightness to compliment their image, this Glaswegian sextet almost didn’t pass the first hurdle of band formation: agreeing on a name. For five years they have laboured under a slew of ever-changing monikers. NRA, Los Crayzee Boyz, Tower of Girls, Wooden Trees and Robert Louis Stevenson are just a few of them. Admirably taking an early-morning Sunday call, singer Rick Anthony, who also answers to ‘Richard The Turd’ (I did warn you), dispenses any myths that may surround his band’s elusive past. “You know, if we couldn’t think of a name we’d just tell the bar staff to write up whatever they wanted on the blackboard,” he reveals, lounging on an “old man’s comfy chair”. Fortunately they eventually settled on The Phantom Band, purely because – after a couple of weeks playing under the name – none of the band had fallen out over it. Early gigs have seen the enigmatic troupe perform in costumes, with scarecrow masks completely obscuring their faces. Anthony audibly shrugs when trying to piece together any kind of timeline that would help explain their elusive nature. “It’s like the chicken and the egg,” he fudges. An early demo recorded at Chem 19 with Paul Savage caught Chemikal Underground’s collective ear enough for them to release debut album

Checkmate Savage last month. “You know that they’re putting stuff out because they really like it,” enthuses Anthony. “They’re not just trying to get the next big Scottish band.” It seems fair to say that Chemikal Underground have struggled to break a band to the extent of their holy triumvirate of The Delgados, Mogwai and Arab Strap. With any luck, and some justice, The Phantom Band could see themselves enter this pantheon. Thankfully, Anthony is undaunted by such hype-mongering. “It doesn’t even register, man,” he claims. “Don’t get me wrong, if we can make a go of it and succeed, we’d be laughing... but it’s not like we’ve put all our eggs in one basket. It’s not like ‘we’ve got to make it!’ I don’t think that’s particularly healthy for creating interesting music.” Making uninteresting music is not something likely to be ascribed to The Phantoms. Checkmate Savage is a smorgasbord of ideas, styles and reference points. Anthony himself is indebted to the likes of Tom Waits and Bill Callahan, though his lyrics are certainly idiosyncratic. “A lot of it comes from just singing at the time [of rehearsing],” he reveals. “Building things around little phrases, random stuff you hear and gradually piecing it together. Even if the meaning isn’t a specific story, it’s an atmosphere. A lot of our songs are about creating an atmosphere or creating a feel that complements the music. When you hear the whole song back it makes more sense than when you’re staring at it on a page.” Musical reference points take in anyone from Stereolab’s metronomic Krautrock to fellow Scottish

A Chemikal

oddballs The Beta Band, as well as the broader strokes of skewed-country and even traditional folk on the beautiful song Island. It’s experimental for sure, but sounds more akin to childlike exploration than, say, some kind of rigid science project. In fact, Anthony admits their songs are in a perpetual state of flux. “With any song, it’s weird to think ‘this is the version that’s going to be on the album,’” he says. “We’ve played each song in so many different ways and then you record it and suddenly it’s like ‘that’s going to be the definitive version, is it?’” If naming the band proved problematic, it seems recording these ‘definitive’ versions also caused a few headaches. “The general, practical procedure of recording the album was basically geared towards generating arguments,” laughs Anthony. “We’re all passionate about the band and we all have strong views about how we think it should be. We act like a dysfunctional family – that’s about the closest analogy I can imagine.” That being the case, The Phantom Band are a family we’d happily be part of. Checkmate Savage is out now via Chemikal Underground. The Phantom Band play King Tut’s, Glasgow on 26 Feb; Madhatters, Inverness on 27 Feb; Tolbooth, Stirling on 28 Feb and The Tunnels, Aberdeen on 1 Mar.

The Delgados set up Chemikal Underground and release their first single, Monica Webster, in June 1995.

| 1995

| 1996

| 1997

Arab Strap leave Chemikal and sign with Go! Beat. They release Elephant Shoe before returning to Chemikal in 2001. “I don't think they realised what it was they really wanted until they left it behind,” laments Woodward.

| 1998

| 1999

| 2000

May: Mogwai release their first EP, 4 Satin on Chemikal, followed in October by their seminal debut album Young Team. Bis play Top of the Pops, the first unsigned band to do so. They sign to Chemikal, allowing the label to expand.

| 2001

He deafens with his beating, he defeats all other sense; he’s howling for a meeting, he’s screaming in suspense; he clamours up the air, his eardrums torn apart: Can you hear him over there? Can you hear my heart? How to Get to Heaven From Scotland by Aidan Moffat & The Best-Ofs is released via Chemikal Underground on 14 Feb. www.aidanmoffat.co.uk

| 2002

Fifteenth birthday approaches. Alun promises “something special”. Albums by Aidan Moffat, The Phantom Band and De Rosa are released in the first quarter...

Arab Strap announce they are to split after ten years together. They play their final show in Glasgow on the 4th December but secretly play their final-final show in Japan on the 17th.

Arab Strap release The First Big Weekend. It receives extensive airplay and later an instrumental version is used on a Guinness advert. Their debut album The Week Never Starts Round Here is released later in the year along with Delgados’ debut Domestiques.

| 1994

I’ve always rather fancied myself as the author of greetings cards, though I’ve no idea how to go about getting into the business. Is it a difficult industry to join? Are any sort of further education degrees required? By the standards of cards you can find in high street shops, it seems unlikely, so my lack of academic achievement probably wouldn’t be much of a handicap. But where would I begin? Well, I decided to do it myself. I would write and design the cards and start my own company, small at first, internet-based. But like most of my grand ideas, time and money intervened and the whole concept was abandoned. I justified my own laziness with a new idea: isn’t it ethically irresponsible to manufacture greetings cards in environmentally disastrous times? Aye, whatever. I mention this as an explanation of the offering below. This little verse was intended to be a Valentine’s card (it was originally called Clifftop Valentine) but the card was never completed, so I gift it to you now. Cut it out, copy it, post it or email it to someone you love this February 14th and if it works, you owe me a pint. (Ladies will have to copy it and change the gender. Obviously.)

www.phantomband.co.uk

Fukd id, a spin-off label, is launched to release limited edition singles by bands not necessarily on the roster. Most notably, Interpol release an EP limited to one thousand copies.

Time-Line

In years to come, Aidan Moffat's name will surely become synonymous with Burns as one of the nation's great bards. Until such times, he ponders a career as a gift card writer and offers us a Valentine's Day poem.

| 2003

Mogwai reignite their feud with Blur and contemplate a new line of ‘Blur: Still Shite’ t-shirts.

The Delgados announce they are splitting but will continue to run the label.

| 2004

| 2005

| 2006

| 2007

| 2008

| 2009

Chemikal celebrates five years at Glasgow’s Garage with sets from its main acts. John Peel hosts and rather enjoys. Alun Woodward claims to have no memories of events after 7pm.

Mogwai become displeased with Blur ahead of a joint headlining slot at T in the Park. T-shirts expressing their disdain are printed up for the event.

Ballads of the Book, an ambitious collaboration between Scottish authors and musicians, is released. A live extravaganza takes place the following month.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 31

Music

What's in a name?

Moffat’s Lament:

A Clifftop Valentine


MUSIC Unusual and innovative music from Scotland and beyond Compiled by Milo McLaughlin The Phantom Band - Folk Song Oblivion Ironically for a band that once changed their name for every gig, you will be hearing the name The Phantom Band everywhere this year. Possibly the first true contenders to The Beta Band’s crown – not because they’re trying to sound like them, but because their melodies and inventiveness are equally as effortless. This is a taste of the eclectic first album Checkmate Savage, out now on Glasgow’s Chemikal Underground Records. Recording the Impossible - Popsex Paul Vickers has been responsible for some weird shit in his time, both with Dawn of the Replicants and The Leg. However, his latest collaboration, inspired by Ivor Cutler and at times sounding like a lost episode of Father Ted directed by David Lynch, is off-the-scale bananas, and the track Popsex is a weird little ditty about pop-up books and filthy thoughts. The album is out now on Edinburgh’s SL Records. Aidan Moffat & The Best-Ofs - Oh Men! As if last year’s I Can Hear Your Heart wasn’t outrageous enough, here the king of oversharing and under-shaving and his new band let loose a beery-breathed knees-up about the inability of his fellow fellas not to gape like morons at the sheer loveliness of the female form in all its guises. From the album How to Get to Heaven From Scotland, it’s released by Chemikal Underground (with a sleazy wink and a wandering hand) on 14 February, Valentine’s Day. Read a full review of the album in Records this issue. Thomas Truax - Joe Meek warns Buddy Holly 3rd February 2009 marks the 50th anniversary of Buddy Holly’s death. In this ingenious tribute, New York musician Thomas Truax tells the tale of how Joe Meek, the unhinged record producer (and this column’s patron saint), was told it would happen from beyond the grave, and some years after his prophecy was proven to be true (give or take a year) he shot himself and his landlady – again on 3 February. In another genius piece of release date irony, it comes out on Edinburgh’s SL Records on the very same date this month.

WWW.CHEMIKAL.CO.UK WWW.SLRECORDS.NET HEAR THE ABOVE TUNES ON THE CHEMIKAL UNDERGROUND AND SL RECORDS PODCASTS AT WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

32 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

Not Lost in Translation On the verge of his band's third LP hitting the shops, Asobi Seksu's James Hanna tells Nick Mitchell about its inception WITHOUT knowing Asobi Seksu’s back-story you could make an informed guess. Perhaps they are a Japanese band inspired by hearing Kevin Shields’ distorted guitar soundtrack Scarlett Johansson and Bill Murray’s prolonged cinematic flirtation in a Tokyo hotel? No, ‘Asobi Seksu’ means ‘playful sex’, not ‘crossgenerational platonic romance’. But it is Japanese, and one half of the band does hail from that part of the world, and they certainly do owe a debt to the My Bloody Valentine guitarist. To dispel that myth entirely though, Asobi Seksu are in fact one of countless buzz bands to have flown the Brooklyn indie nest in the past few years, and this month they release their third full album, Hush. The duo of James Hanna and Yuki Chikudate caused a shallow but sustained ripple of hype with their 2006 LP Citrus, a record that combined Hanna’s tremolobending shoegaze guitar with Chikudate’s crystalline vocal style. In the time between the two albums they drafted a whole new set of backing musicians, but this new line-up wasn’t borne of any creative tension, according to Hanna: “Yuki and I made a decision that this band was going to be the two of us and that we would hire people to play live. We were always the

songwriters so it seemed a natural decision. Coming out and saying we are the band has really clarified things in a positive way.” A renewed clarity also happens to be the most noticeable change in the Asobi sound on Hush. Whereas Citrus relied on looming walls of feedback and murky clouds of noise, Hush is a much more accessible, focused record. “On Hush we set out to make something highly textured without relying on the same things that hopefully worked on Citrus,” Hanna says. “We knew we wanted something glassier and the layers to be a bit more transparent this time around. It took us a lot of trial and error to find textures that we found new and exciting that were also a bit more subtle and didn’t clog up every inch of audio space.” But Hush could have turned out very differently had Hanna’s dream producer returned his call: “We tried to contact Brian Eno to work on Hush, though I think people thought I was joking when I said it. He’s obviously out of our range but I figured there was no harm in giving it a try. For the next record I think we are going to ask Phil Spector.” That may be a joke on Hanna’s part, given Spector’s current predicament, but it’s also another clue to the kind of musical heritage Asobi Seksu revel in. Not

merely introspective shoegazers, they also distil the symphonic pop pioneered by Spector on his 1960s recordings of The Ronettes and The Crystals. The one element of their sound, however, that critics always latch on to is shoegaze. Does Hanna tire of this? “I have mixed feelings about it. On one hand I obviously love a lot of the music from that era, it was a huge influence on the way I learned to play guitar and helped me to learn how to think texturally as well as linearly. On the other hand I think the comparisons are out of hand and I think there are a lot of misconceptions of what we are and what we are trying to do.” Whatever wayward guesses are made about Asobi Seksu this time round, with its tight pop aesthetic, Hush will surely open their music up to a wider audience. Hanna, for his part, is ambivalent on that score: “Hopefully Hush represents us challenging ourselves to not just repeat the things that people seem to like about us. As far as our appeal goes, that remains to be seen. I really do hope people enjoy the record but past that I have no say in the matter.” ASOBI SEKSU PLAY ABC2, GLASGOW ON 14 FEB. HUSH IS RELEASED ON 16 FEB VIA ONE LITTLE INDIAN WWW.ASOBISEKSU.COM

Easy Rider: Max Cavalera Watch it, Europe: all your Yakult and croquettes belong to Max Cavalera. The ex-Sepultura and Soulfly legend dropped us a fax with the rider he needs while he’s out on the prowl in Europe, but he’ll have a fight on his hands if he wants the Irn Bru though. 1. My General Glo!!! [wife Gloria] The only person that puts up with me and helps me fuck shit up around the world! From Siberia to South

Africa, we’re always together on the frontlines. 2. My Urban Camouflage, which everyone calls ‘Max Pants’ - I haven’t worn jeans in more than 15 years!

these food and drink items: Mezzo Mix (drink -Germany and Austria), Irn Bru, Yakult, croquettes, Shoarma (food -Holland), tuna pizza (everywhere!).

3. My Black Ark! It’s a CD case that holds 350 CDs - I take it on every tour.

5. My “Durag” - it’s what Gloria calls my bandana collection, which is mostly made out of t-shirt sleeves.

4. Munchies! When in Europe I search for

SOULFLY PLAY ABC, GLASGOW ON 6 FEB.


CPL Skinny 3-Split Ad-PRINT.pdf

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A Chronicle

Sarah Cass

Music

Dark Was The Night:

34 THE SKINNY February 2009

"If you like these artists you’re going to be knocked out by the quality of music on the record.” Clockwise from top left: Dessner Brothers & John Carlin, Bon Iver, Yo La Tengo, Cat Power, Blonde Redhead, New pornographers, The National, Beirut,Sufjan Stevens

Sylvere H

“As far as compilations go I don’t know of another one in contemporary music that pulls together as many artists at such a high level of quality. So many people donated time and effort to this, it would be nice if it could be considered a ‘must have’.” So says Aaron Bryce, he of The National, and co-producer of Dark Was The Night along with twin brother and bandmate Bryce. A total of 31 exclusive tracks have been recorded for the compilation, which will be available as a double CD, triple vinyl and download album, with profits benefitting the Red Hot Organization – an international charity dedicated to raising funds and awareness for HIV and AIDS. The National twins and Red Hot founder and director John Carlin relied on their weighty music industry contacts book to draw contributions from a dazzling array of contemporary musicians, including, but certainly not limited to, David Byrne, Arcade Fire, Sufjan Stevens, Antony Hegarty, Feist, Bon Iver, Stuart Murdoch, Conor Oberst, Dave Sitek (TV on the Radio), Grizzly Bear and… this is a bloody tall list. As Bryce explains “We really tried to be very inclusive about it, which explains why it’s really long. We wanted it to be ambitious and big.” Ambitious and big would indeed be a fitting way to mark the 20th anniversary of the Red Hot Organisation, which has produced many compilation albums since inception, raising millions of dollars for AIDS awareness campaigns worldwide. Carlin seems to be particularly excited about this launch. “If you like these artists you’re going to be knocked out by the quality of music on the record,” he tells us without a hint of a sales pitch. “Everything released on the record is an original exclusive track. Aaron, Bryce and I were determined to make a classic ‘folk’ album. I’ve been around longer than those guys, and I’ve seen the way in which folk music had been used by prior generations, say Dylan, Neil Young, through to Wilco. Putting on the guise of folk artists was

used as a mark of authenticity, even if those artists had come from a different place. What I was hearing with contemporary rock bands was the use of folk more as an idiom that was being arranged and utilised in a way that classical music had been traditionally. For example, new bands like Arcade Fire, The Decemberists, The National etc, almost play as if they’re a chamber quartet, very controlled, intelligent, but using folk as a populist and highly effective medium.” Turns out, the Dessners and Carlin go way back, with Aaron having worked for Red Hot while the twins were in the process of getting their band up and running. “As we got more successful I couldn’t keep the job so I left just before Alligator came out in 2005,” he recalls. “As I was leaving John suggested it would maybe be a good idea to do a record together someday. The opportunity came up quite quickly because we were meeting so many of our peers and at the same time so many of those people were starting to crest as independent musicians and were entering the top ten and things like that. That was 2005 and it’s taken two or three years to pull it together.” So, the trio resolved to put together an album of music John calls “American Roots Music”. In the past, Red Hot compilations have tended to be ‘tribute’ albums to specific songwriters, such as Cole Porter or Gershwin, but as Bryce rationalises: “In recent years we felt that the tribute record has become so ubiquitous, like in New York every other month there’s a Neil Young, Bob Dylan or Paul Simon tribute with a bunch of artists covering those songs so that didn’t necessarily feel the right direction for this.” The American folk theme was expanded to include reinterpretations of Celtic (Stuart Murdoch) and English (Grizzly Bear) folk songs because, according to John, “a lot of that music came to America as well.” They are at pains to point out though, that not all of the 31 tracks could be considered as folk in the traditional sense. “Sufjan Stevens, for example, really used it as an opportunity to explore a whole new sound for him,” explains Bryce. “He’s done stuff with electronics before but this song has a lot of sequence beats; it’s really ambitious at over ten minutes long and pretty wild in terms of where it goes. Certainly he was incredibly generous in creating something great and we also found ourselves getting a little out of control...in a good way.” After almost three years assembling the cast, sorting out the paperwork and the actual production, there’s a tangible sense of pride in their accomplishment. All three, however, lament the absence of the Animal Collective from the compilation, with LCD Soundsystem and MGMT also mentioned as desirable contributors. “There were some people who said no but that was because they weren’t available due to touring or whatever,” says Aaron, “but we’re quite happy that we’ve gotten a really good snapshot of who’s who in the indie music scene right now.” “We’ve all seen how the record industry has changed in the past few years, offers John in parting. “It used to be really difficult to get the best tracks from artists, mostly due to their management – not the artists themselves. They had to keep the good stuff for their own records because that’s

Samuel Kirszenbaum

TIm Soter

Aaron and Bryce Dessner of the National, and John Carlin of Red Hot Organisation, talk to Paul Mitchell about the process of creating one of the most anticipated compilation albums of all time

how they made money. Nowadays, they don’t really make money from selling records – or from having their records illegally downloaded I should say – but they make money by raising their profile and touring and getting involved in projects like this. This record came out incredibly well because so many artists gave us stand-out tracks. Some of them have said that these are among the best tracks they’ve ever done.” Judge for yourself when Dark Was the Night is released on 16 Feb via 4AD. www.myspace.com/darkwasthenight


In his organisation's 20th year, Red Hot founder John Carlin explains the ever-present need to be vigilant about HIV and how the creative industry can help bring it to the fore

Michael Lavine

and Clued In

Red Hot 4 U Dark Was The Night is the fifteenth collection from the Red Hot Organisation, dedicated to fighting Aids through pop culture. Paul Mitchell looks at four of the highlights from the past twenty years. Red Hot + Blue (1990)

The original in the series. Prince turned it down, but Sinead O’Connor, David Byrne, Tom Waits and U2, among others, were happy to perform a series of Cole Porter covers. What made the compilation extra special was the fact that almost every song had an accompanying video portraying the effect of Aids on society. These videos were directed by the likes of Neil Jordan, Jonathan Demme and Jim Jarmusch.

No Alternative (1994)

Indie rock was riding the crest of a wave when this appeared. Pavement, Smashing Pumpkins, Soundgarden, Sonic Youth and even a hidden Nirvana track conspired to really capture the zeitgeist. Now, as a snapshot of that era, the collection remains an important cultural landmark, not least because the Goo Goo Dolls are on there with a song that isn’t Iris.

America is Dying Slowly (1996)

Stefano GioVannini

The hip-hop answer to No Alternative, the collection was ostensibly designed to appeal to young African-American men, but the line-up is so good almost everybody bought it. Biz Markie, Wu-Tang Clan and Common were among the producers and rappers all pulling together for some once-in-a-lifetime collaborations. Star turn was, of course, Celebrity Big Brother’s very own Coolio, with a track other than Gangsta’s Par...oh hang on, I’ve done that one.

Red Hot + Riot (2002)

Over 70% of the world’s estimated 30 million HIV/Aids sufferers live in Sub-Saharan Africa. This collection paid tribute to the work of late Nigerian Afrobeat founder Fela Kuti with all proceeds going towards Aids related projects in Africa. Spanning hip-hop, jazz, ‘world’ music, and electronica, contributors included Macy Gray, Kelis, Bugz in the Attic, Blackalicious, Nile Rodgers and Kuti’s son Femi. Dark Was the Night is released on 16 Feb via 4AD. www.myspace.com/darkwasthenight

www.redhot.org

February 2009

THE SKINNY 35

Music

Red Hot

David Byrne is someone I will be eternally indebted to. I was an art critic in the 1980s at a time when most of the creative people in NY were incredibly affected by the issue of Aids. Many people I was friends with either died or were dying by the end of the decade, it was really quite traumatic. I came up with what, at the time, was a novel concept of doing a tribute album and asking contemporary musicians to cover the songs of Cole Porter, who was a closeted gay American songwriter. Prince was the first asked to participate, but his people told me he ‘didn’t do covers’. So I started thinking about other potential artists. David Byrne said ‘yes’ because the sister of his wife at the time had Aids and eventually died of it. That gave us the kudos we needed to push on. The primary mission of Red Hot is Aids awareness. This is important because whilst HIV infection is not necessarily a death sentence, infection rates in the US and UK are actually rising. We focus on awareness because the scale of money required for research and real social care is so vast that a music industry project can’t really make a tremendous difference there. The unique thing about Aids is that compared to other diseases that have affected the planet to the same scale, Aids is entirely preventable. You can do things to lower your risk of getting cancer, or heart disease; but Aids can be 100 per cent prevented by various behavioural precautions such as practising safe sex. The people who are most at risk are essentially young people. Young people take their cues from popular musicians, so Red Hot tries to deal with this in cultural rather than institutional language. My biggest critique of American approaches (and I can’t comment on other states in this regard) is the mixing of so-called morality and health education. Fortunately, now the Bush administration has expired, things might improve. Bush tried to introduce his compassionate conservatism and one of the main areas in which he played that out was dedicating money to the issue of Aids in developing nations, with the caveat that they wouldn’t give money to organisations that were handing out condoms or promoting safe sex. He wanted to promote the idea of abstinence, but in a world of teenagers and raging hormones, that’s just not going to happen. We’re wired so it doesn’t happen. Worldwide there are so many layers to the issue; safe sex awareness and distribution of low-cost condoms are essential. So are social programmes for people who are already infected so we can get low-cost or no-cost drugs to them. Beyond that, there’s a dimension to this problem at an economic and social level that has filled me with fear from the beginning of doing these projects. Potentially you have a generation of people who are sick and infirm. You have to treat them as individuals and try to prevent more people from being ill. But, really what you have is a kind of umbrella that opens out wider than just those infected. You’ve got elderly not being cared for because a generation of younger people are sick themselves. People who are sick can’t farm their land, can’t produce food. Also, in Africa there are other problems going on right now which are not conducive to improving the situation. Aids, poverty, hunger are all entwined conditions which have to do with our own monetary wellbeing. People don’t look at the big picture. I’m raising the issue now because I think things are going to get worse in the next few years, because we’re in a global economic crisis. The West will be focused primarily on maintaining its own standard of living and not so much with helping people outside. The long- and mid-term effect of that could be devastating. I don’t delude myself into thinking that what Red Hot does in itself is going to change anything; it’s a voice in a chorus striving to make incremental change. There’s a vacuum of leadership in our society from an economic, political and social perspective. People in positions of authority in those spheres haven’t been enlightened in doing so over the past twenty or thirty years, it really has been creative people who have particularly given youth culture something a little bit more substantive to think about. I’ve been incredibly proud that I am fortunate to have had an idea which made sense at a given time and has become a lightning rod for other creative people and an audience to rally around. People remember the projects we’ve done years later, and that does make me proud. It’s a nice remembrance of my friends who have died from the disease but I also like to think I’ve contributed positively to music culture.


MUSIC

Sparrow & The Workshop:

They’ve Got It All Chicagoan Jill O'Sullivan was attracted to Glasgow by its musical culture: now she's becoming a part of it. Ally Brown gets gushy over Sparrow & The Workshop mean and bitter,” says Jill, “so I wanted to know how to be like that, how to get rid of your conscience and your heart so you can just be cruel without feeling bad about it.” So that’s what she means when the music grinds to a halt and the spotlight lands on her breath-stopping wail: “Take away my heart so I can be free!” It’s a stunning climax, especially live where Gregor’s drums sound more like a runaway train than a dashing horse. But Sparrow & The Workshop’s talents don’t end there. The Last Chance is another tale with Southern Gothic themes, in which Jill’s bittersweet twang flies dramatically over Gregor’s rollicking, flaring rhythms. Try The Gun too, which wears a lulling acoustic melody like a mask, hiding a bleak tale of domestic abuse; and then there’s Swam Like Sharks’ impassioned folk lament, or You Got It All’s soulful defiance. “We’re working on an EP right now,” offers Jill. “We’ve recorded about ten songs and we’re still choosing,” and it’s apparently slated for “a spring release”. But don’t wait that long – go watch them live first. See the ones standing at the front, mindlessly clapping out of time, with glazed-over eyes and fixed dumb grins? That’ll be us, the super-fans. Join the club. SPARROW & THE WORKSHOP PLAY 13TH NOTE, GLASGOW, ON 6 FEB; THE BOWERY, EDINBURGH, ON 18 FEB; THE TWISTED WHEEL, GLASGOW, ON 19 FEB; THE FLYING DUCK, GLASGOW ON 12 MAR AND THE WEE RED BAR, EDINBURGH ON 14 MAR.

MARKUS THORSEN

SPARROW & The Workshop only formed a year ago, have never released a record, and their achievements so far have been modest, but you need to know about them. If only they’d ever toured, I’d have the T-shirt and a month off work to follow them. But that’s for the future, because I’m in real danger of becoming a super-fan, and you are too. If it’s tempting to demarcate singer and songwriter Jill O’Sullivan as the ‘Sparrow’, and the rhythm section as ‘The Workshop’, that’s not far from the truth, though they’re very much a team. Jill used to perform solo as Dead Sparrow, but she benefits hugely from the creative input provided by drummer, Gregor, who also sings, and of bassist Nick. They found each other through Gumtree after Chicagoan Jill and Welshman Nick moved to Glasgow from London: serendipity saw them move into Gregor’s girlfriend’s flat, and the rest is history. But it’s not, yet - they haven’t actually achieved anything. This is it: they’ve had sessions with Vic Galloway and Edinburgh blogger Song By Toad, they’ve supported British Sea Power, and they’ve had discussions with “one or two” labels. Few others have cottoned on - now is a good time. Your first stop to Sparrow super-fandom is the track which best shows off all their talents: The Devil Song. Beginning with an ominous duet, warning of doom like a ghost story told by a desert campfire, Gregor’s galloping rhythm gives the song a cinematic transition, away from the story-tellers and into the story, harmonised over Nick’s spaghetti western bassline. “I have to talk to frustrated people at my work, and some of them can be really

SWAM LIKE SHARKS BY SPARROW AND THE WORKSHOP IS AVAILABLE NOW VIA WWW.TENTRACKS.CO.UK WWW.MYSPACE.COM/SPARROWANDTHEWORKSHOP

Chords Before Style Who needs a strategy when you can resign yourself to drinking meths in a ditch? Okker's Scott Wright tells Ewen Millar why five-year plans are overrated

INDIE music has always had an uncomfortable schism. We’d all like to believe in a DIY aesthetic that insists where, if you do it your way - on your terms - success will follow; the reality is that there is a narcissistic obsession with youth and fashion amongst indie-rockers and hipsters. Many bands have a self-imposed shelf-life – make it before 30, or hang up the telecaster, get a proper job, and forever contemplate how they ‘could have been contenders’. Ask yourself – how many local bands do you still see going into their thirties (that aren’t punk)? It’s a nice feeling to actually discover a band who aren’t breaking out the protractor to make sure their hair zig-zags at exactly the right angle across their face , or are desperately seeking ‘the deal’ before it’s too late. Edinburgh four-piece Okker, signed to American label Radio is Down, seem cut from the same cloth as Touch & Go stalwarts Slint and Polvo, both in their sound and their attitude. And like their early-nineties progenitors, they’re great. We had a chat with Scott Wright from the band.

IAN MARRS

Where do Okker fit in to our nation’s great musical pantheon? We’re not exactly sure what the local scene is. There are some people who like us purely for our music, which is just as well because our image alone ain’t gonna get us anywhere, and we don’t promote ourselves nearly enough, which can be our downfall. As a result, we have had some bad gigs. The truth is, our type of music has never been popular – even the likes of Slint only gained a real fanbase years after their demise, but we just want to make music we like and get it out there. I think we very much have a music first policy: chords before style. A lot of times, A&R types seem more interested in the ‘local buzz’ that a band is generating, rather

36 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

than the music itself. How did you end up on an American record label? It was through MySpace that Ralf, a friend of ours from Germany, recommended us to Radio Is Down, a nice victory for quality over quantity. We sent a CD of ten songs and they loved it, so things worked out nicely – they’re an ideal label for us. I also had the privilege of meeting RID’s main man Matt Lebens in the USA in August. He’s a top bloke. Your music features a lot of time changes – is this a conscious choice, or do you just jam away together and see what happens? Conscious certainly, contrived no. It’s more an evolutionary process based on an original idea rather than just jamming for three hours to see what comes out. We like surprises and to add unpredictable elements as we have low boredom thresholds and short attention spans – hence, the tracks tend to be fairly short. Where do you see Okker in the future? In a ditch drinking meths? We’re not a band with a plan. We’ll continue to write new material and keep playing for as long as we feel is relevant; hopefully we will know when we’ve reached our sell-by date. Too many bands keep going and end up jumping the shark – I can’t see us doing that really. Did I mention we’re not a band with a plan? OKKER PLAY THE GRV, EDINBURGH ON 3 FEB WWW.MYSPACE.COM/OKKERO


Music

February 2009

THE SKINNY 37


Music

Growing Up With Ladyhawke She apparently has “the most boring name you could possibly, think of”, but when Pip Brown adopted the moniker 'Ladyhawke', the world began to take notice. As Darren Carle found out, it was a mixed blessing. to help keep Brown on her game is her maturity and grounding, which are in evidence throughout our conversation. Ladyhawke has been no overnight success, with Brown having cut her teeth with Wellington bands Two Lane Blacktop and Teenager before adopting her current moniker from an obscure 1985 Richard Donner film. “I started Ladyhawke three years ago and I was demoing everything in my bedroom and with my friend in his studio,” she reveals. “I play all the guitars on the record and some of the bass. I prefer it like that. I mean it’s not that I’m a control freak, it’s just that I know what I want.” “Big production, big synths and big guitar riffs,” it seems is what she wants. However, despite being labelled as an eighties kid trying to re-imagine The Breakfast Club soundtrack, Brown is at pains to avoid such pigeon-holing. “The thing with music is you’re constantly discovering stuff,” she explains, “and that’s exactly how I’ve evolved, from a child listening to The Beatles, The Pretenders, Blondie and Kraftwerk to a teenager obsessed with Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Stone Temple Pilots and Soundgarden. I was just constantly hunting for new music, constantly looking in record stores, and my friends would say ‘you should really listen to this and this’, you know? Right now with me it’s like a combination of all of that mixed into one.”

“I’m more excited about my next album,” she confesses, validating a feeling that tonight’s show exhibited a certain level of ennui around the likes of breakthrough single Paris is Burning. “It’s going to be a bit different; it’s going to be more Bowie meets the Pixies. I think it’s going to be my nineties grunge influences. I almost feel like people are going to follow me evolving as a human being, starting off as a child listening to the radio in the eighties, then getting older and getting a bit more ‘angsty’.” However, Brown isn’t quite ready to relinquish her childhood yet, as we discover from her little side

project. “I’m obsessed with video games. I’ve recorded from my NES [the original 80s Nintendo console]. I’ve recorded all the sounds from every different game you could imagine and put them into silly, crappy tracks, some really weird songs that have really heavy guitars mixed with really cheesy Nintendo sounds. They’re never going to be used for anything, but...” she trails off, and we wouldn’t completely rule out seeing a conceptual Mario World-goes-metal album yet.

the Buzzcocks with Pete Shelley in 1975, releasing the iconic Spiral Scratch EP on tiny independent label New Hormones, thus sparking off the DIY movement, giving rise to ‘indie’ as we know it – then quit just as promptly, forming Magazine shortly afterwards. The group released four quality albums before calling it a day in 1981. Since, Devoto has released a solo album, masterminded another project, Luxuria, and spent the ‘90s slipping into happy obscurity as a photo archivist. All of which partially explains the off-kilter decision to reform Magazine just as the collective thirst for the reformation of our favourite post-punk bands has been quenched somewhat: Devoto chooses to remain a

staunchly independent figure on the margins. So why reform Magazine in 2009? “Circumstance, as much as anything played a role,” he admits. “Dave [Formula, Magazine keyboardist]’s kind of the connector of all of this. A promoter got in touch with Dave about concerts and promotion for his album… and then called him back about a week later saying ‘Is there still a chance that Magazine might want to…?’. Dave said ‘Well…I can always ask,’ and that’s kind of how it all began.” Reaction to the tour has far exceeded Devoto’s expectations: “I’m not much of a ‘culture-vulture’ these days, so I don’t know…the response has pleasantly

surprised me.” Although he shies away from the ‘postpunk’ pigeonhole, the band’s cult status does rankle somewhat: “it is flattering, and a bit… annoying”. The question remains: is this Magazine worth a second read? The best that fans can wish for is that Devoto and company can retain the glorious unpredictability that made them such an exciting prospect in their heyday. So we let the man himself have the last word: “You never know, do you?”

david anderson

From Jim Morrison’s early performances with his back to the audience to Michael Stipe’s self-conscious ‘sing-murmuring’, music has a history with the, shall we say, socially awkward. Phillipa ‘Pip’ Brown is no such household name, but can certainly join this gang of misfits. Late last year, her debut solo album – under the pseudonym Ladyhawke – received critical acclaim and modest chart success, resulting in a worldwide tour with the diminutive New Zealander playing to hundreds of finger-on-the pulse fans every night. Not bad for someone who has suffered years of pathological shyness and odd behavioural tics, later diagnosed as Asperger’s, a form of autism characterised by atypical speech, clumsiness and difficulties in social interaction. None of these are evident when I speak to the pop revivalist, fresh off the stage at Cabaret Voltaire, but the question still remains: why would such a person place themselves in the limelight? “I guess I love playing music and I’m old enough to deal with the consequences of that now,” she asserts. “I know that part of making music is playing and I love playing live. Sometimes it’s hard. I can’t describe it, it’s like you see all these people standing there and I just don’t know what to say and sometimes it feels like there’s a wall, which is silly, but I try my best.” Her best, it seems, is good enough, but also likely

Ladyhawke supports Ting Tings at 02 Academy, Glasgow on 25 Feb. www.ladyhawkemusic.com

Magazine: A Second Read The post-punk pioneers turned New Wave nearlymen reunite after almost 30 years apart this month; Gillian Watson asks Howard Devoto why now?

Although The Skinny is reluctant to do a Sarah Palin (remember her?) and saddle anyone with the “maverick” tag, there’s no more accurate way to describe Howard Devoto, founding member of influential punk bands the Buzzcocks and Magazine, and self-proclaimed man “on the run to the outside of everything”. The latter play Glasgow’s O2 Academy on Monday 16 February as part of a brief UK reunion tour. The reunion prompts a renaissance of sorts for Magazine, with Touch and Go, a double-CD anthology of the highlights from the group’s varied career scheduled for a February release. While contemporaries such as Gang of Four have enjoyed a critical re-emergence in the wake of the Noughties post-punk revival, Magazine are still largely a cult concern. Which is somewhat tragic, given that, listening to their landmark first single Shot By Both Sides, it’s clear that the bands forming the new wave of New Wave owe much more to Magazine’s more melodic and dense music than to the Gang’s self-aware agit-funk. Yet one suspects that Magazine linchpin Howard Devoto is unfazed by issues of timing and his place in history. Not one to hang around when he felt a project had reached its natural conclusion, he co-founded

38 THE SKINNY February 2009

Magazine play O2 Academy, Glasgow on 16 Feb. Touch and Go: Anthology 02.78 – 06.81 is released on 9 feb via emi. www.myspace.com/magazineofficial


MUSIC

Brodinski:

French Bliss Energetic and prodigiously accomplished, Brodinski is one of the fasting rising DJs and producers in the business. Chris Duncan profiles him ahead of his appearance at Death Disco this month.

HAILING from France, Brodinski is not to be pigeonholed with the rest of his Parisian peers. While global reknown has come the way of the Ed Banger crew, Brodinski’s home is at Mental Groove and Turbo Recordings. And his taste in music is broad, something reflected in his own productions and his DJ sets which may encompass techno, bass heavy house straight through to more melodic minimal. With a reputation for impeccable live sets Brodinski plays with a kind of energy that isn’t always shown by other DJs. He refuses to subscribe to the school of laptop DJing and frequently jumps around with excitement to his favourite tracks during a set. The hot fuss started with Brodinski’s debut track Bad Runner, that leaked on to popular blogs months before its release on Mental Groove in October 2007. Supported by everyone from Soulwax, Tiga, Chloe, Erol Alkan, A-Trak, Busy P, Switch and Laurent Garnier the track was one of the sleeper hits of the year. When the track was eventually released the subject ‘Bad Runner’ had garnered over 3500 views on Erol Alkan’s forum. Brodinski’s new found fan base just couldn’t wait to get their hands on it. The flipside Solaris was a subtler and seductive slice of techno, displaying in a single release the breadth of Brodinski’s appeal. It was at this time Brodinski told Fact magazine that he would like to record for both Erol Alkan and Damian Lazarus’ labels, and his first release seemed to sum up that ambition. Since then Brodinski has only

risen in the ranks of his peers. While having the vision to produce signature tunes is the key to the highest level production, having the insight to interpret others’ material is more appropriate to the remixer. No slouch in this field, since Bad Runner’s release Brodinski has remixed the likes of Bonde de Role, Klaxons, Das Pop, Shoes, D.I.M, Heart Revolutions and Adam Sky. Each remix has had a different approach, from the acidic (D.I.M), to vocal techno (Das Pop) to melancholic end of evening material (Klaxons). With the Oblivion EP released last year to great success, and Bad Runner featuring on many impressive compilations, it seems like Brodinski is some kind of wonder kid among his fellow artists. Boys Noize, Soulwax, Crookers and Radioclit have all proclaimed their love for Brodinski’s work and surprise that a hit like Bad Runner came from a sixteen year old. Brodinski is currently touring Europe, playing with Steve Aoki and Bloody Beetroots. He begins his festival dates on April 4 at Garorock Festival. He will perform alongside The Dirtbombs, Erol Alkan, Ebony Bones, Metronomy and Miss Kittin & the Hacker. February 21 sees him play Death Disco at The Arches alongside Jokers of the Scene, the Filthy Dukes and resident DJs.

& WWW.STAGANDDAGGER.COM A one-ticket-gives-access-to-all music event across London, Leeds and Glasgow in May 2009 London 21st | Leeds 22nd | Glasgow 23rd

DEATH DISCO, THE ARCHES, 11PM, SAT 21 FEB. TICKETS £14 - 1/2 PRICE TICKETS AVAILABLE BY REGISTERING AT WWW.DEATHDISCO.NET. ADVENTURES IN THE BEETROOT FIELD

SkinnyAd.indd 1

29/1/09 15:07:45

FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 39


Music

In The

Commix To outsiders of both Cambridge and the drum and bass scene, the historic English town may seem like an unlikely location for a burgeoning junglist community, but Chris Duncan hears differently

To outsiders of both Cambridge and the drum and bass scene, the historic English town may seem like an unlikely location for a burgeoning junglist community. Yet it boasts a holy trinity of drum and bass artists in the form of Nu:Tone, Logistics and Commix, the latter of which have just recorded a mix for Fabric. Commix duo George Levings and Guy Brewer have created an excellent and interesting mix for the latest instalment of the ever-popular Fabriclive series. Guy explains how they set about creating the release: “Creating a mix is almost like a jigsaw puzzle – there were a couple of tracks we knew would go at the beginning of a mix, a couple we knew would go at the end, and slightly harder tracks that would fill the gaps. It’s quite exciting because we were able to include new, key tracks that we play in our sets, but for us it was also important to showcase some older material that has really influenced us. Listening to this mix, we hear what drum and bass was when it started out - we hope to enlighten people about where it came from.” “To be honest, a lot of the drum and bass scene depresses us at the moment,” says George. “In fact, we’d like to say it’s almost completely removed from what we do.” It’s not every day that you hear an artist condemn the very scene that they are such a part of. But Commix appear to have taken this frustration and attempted to re-invent the genre. “We’re hoping to regain the interest of the people who gave up on the drum and bass scene a few years ago, perhaps they’ll listen to someone like D-Bridge and rediscover something new about it.” Commix have been perfecting their art for a long time now. Guy speaks about how the pair began making music and how they arrived at where they are today: “I think when we first started writing music, we were really trying to emulate what our favourite producers were doing at that time. So it was just after Bad Company, Ed Rush and Optical had been doing that one sound for a long time, then Marcus Intalex came along and did more soulful, house influenced tracks - and that really had an effect, it was something really different at the time.” “It all just sort of came together,” says George. “Again, going back to the friends we used to hang around with, one guy’s brother used to be in the Nextmen - a scratch DJ. So we had a lot of old records with old hip-hop acapellas, it all kind of fitted into that sound nicely. Then we started finding addresses of record labels and sending some tracks out.” “Around the same time, Dan Nu:tone was a good friend of ours as well, and he’d just signed to Hospital, so we played tracks to Tony and the

Hospital crew,” adds Guy. “They started becoming interested in what we were doing, we did the EP and it went from there.” “When it comes to DJing we’re into the full spectrum of drum and bass, we just don’t like anything cheesy at all. “ George agrees: “There’s so much tasteless music out there, and as a DJ, you’ve got to kind of A&R what’s around. One of the best people around is Steve Bug. He can play for hours and he doesn’t really do much, but it’s just so down the same line of funky techno. And we aspire to that in drum and bass - not really narrow-minded or just one-levelled, but have a bit of experimentation in it. It’s always that kind of DJing that we’ve looked up to as well: the rolling sets, rather than Hype’s energy-trip mixing. The latter is very impressive at the end of the day, and you can’t take away from what someone like Andy C can do to a crowd, but it’s not personally what we aspire to be. We’re much more down the road of Fabio, Marcus Intalex and Doc Scott, who just roll it out nicely for hours on end - you don’t get bored at any point, it just flows in the right direction. At the moment we’re really influenced by techno and use across as much of that style of DJing that we can. Really progressive sort of sets.” Guy adds: “We’re really influenced by tech housey stuff, and I suppose minimal stuff as well. On the minimal side of things Troy Pierce, Mathew Jonson, Conrad Black; on the housier side of things - Steve Bug obviously, Johnny D...” “Ben Watt’s more disco stuff too. It’s really changing for us at the moment, we’re really into it. We spend a lot of time listening to our techno. Everyone needs a niche with house music, as there’s so much of it.” So what are the future plans for Commix after the release of the new mix? “We’re spending a lot of time making house music mainly, tech-house, deep house. A lot of what we’ve learnt from drum and bass crosses over with it. Not a great deal. Once you’ve learnt production values like drum and bass which, as far as I’m concerned, is some of the most highly pressured music in terms of production, I think it’s quite easy to transfer that over into other genres. It’s something we’re really interested in doing now. To be honest, I don’t want to get to age 40 or 50 and be like, “I’m a drum & bass DJ,” still going out and playing every weekend. I think it’s important for us to get involved with production as a whole in terms of doing house and techno stuff. I’d like to do down-tempo albums, anything really.” Fabriclive44 is released on 9 Feb

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The Secret's Out Currently flourishing under the celestial guise of School Of Seven Bells, one-time Secret Machines rocker Ben Curtis educates Billy Hamilton on the unique functionalities of his new girl-fronted band The turn of the year brings with it a clean slate or, as the saying goes, out with the old and in with the new. For School of Seven Bells vanguard and one time Secret Machines axe-man Ben Curtis, such a flush-out can’t come soon enough: “It’s been frustrating doing something new when everyone is referring to another project – I don’t think people realise that,” he tells me from his home in Brooklyn. “When I started Secret Machines, that was the statement I made and I did it. Now I feel like it’s done.” And done it is. Having departed Secret Machines in 2007 to make good on a longstanding promise to collaborate with ex-On!Air!Library! twins Alejandra and Claudia Deheza, Curtis has morphed from spaceage rocker to purveyor of ethereal, tribal rhythms. Released late last year, School of Seven Bells’ debut long-player Alpinisms is a master-class in antithetical fusion, combining the twins’ abstract dreamscapes with Curtis’ penchant for sequence and effects to create one of 2008’s most spellbinding records. “The idea was initially just to make music; it was just a matter of growth and pushing ourselves and appreciating the situation,” says the Oklahoma-born Curtis of the group’s formulation. “Claudia and Alejandra have really strong musical personalities and it’s very different to my ears. It’s weird, chemistry is a really important part of making music with people and their habits are completely different from lots of people I’ve encountered. Making music is all to do with habit. Other people’s habits are really backwards but with these two it works.” Reviews of Alpinisms were littered with languid nods to psychedelia and shoegaze, often failing to pick up on the inventive blend of instrumentation and harmonies that made the album such a bold proposition. “Specific genres were nowhere near in our minds when we started off,” states Curtis. “We can accept that though because I think people are painting it in a positive way but we’re not trying to achieve those sounds. We were worried about genre definition and wanted to be openended. We don’t really want to make the sort of music that alienates people but we have no idea where we’re going next. It’s exciting and terrifying.” One of Alpinisms’ most engrossing features is the vocal interplay between Claudia and Alejandra, where the siblings’ lucid mews seem to orchestrate the celestial nodes of guitar and key. As Curtis explains: “The production idea and sound is totally informed by what is happening in the vocal. It’s an arrangement in itself. It’s a cool way to work, starting from a really human point.” Sounding happy and content, this is a man completely at ease with this current project, as if the heavy skin of his past has finally been shed. “It’s weird that there’s a comparison between School of Seven Bells and Secret Machines,” he remarks. “But I think they’ve begun to reduce. There are so many people that have no idea what I’ve done before. It’s just reassuring to know that I can do something like this and it works and it’s going to be a constant. This collaboration is amazing and really satisfying.” And the benefits of working with two preening ladies, compared to two clammy rockers? Curtis laughs: “It’s entirely more pleasant, believe me.” School of Seven Bells play Captain’s Rest, Glasgow on 24 Feb and return to support Bat For Lashes at QMU, Glasgow on 8 Apr.

Credit to the

Edit

Sub Club’s well-established Subculture night continues to entice and amaze clubbers this month with a real post-Film Festival treat

Sub Club’s well-established Subculture night continues to entice and amaze clubbers this month with a real post-Film Festival treat. After the reels have been packed away for the evening, resident Harri provides the finest house music soundtrack to be found in Glasgow, while local art collective Pointless Creations will transform the Sub Club into a visual feast. Freshly spliced movies, textured projections and mirrorballs will all play a part in altering the Subby across the weekend. As if the weekend’s new décor wasn’t enough there is also a guest DJ slot from Greg Wilson. One of the key players behind the rise of the electro-funk club scene in the eighties, he officially retired in 1984 but has taken to the decks on rare occasions over the past few years. Although primarily identified as a DJ in the Manchester club scene, Wilson was born in 1960 in Wallasey, across the River Mersey from Liverpool. He grew up listening to American soul music via the 45s bought by his older siblings and the music played in the family-owned pub downstairs. Wilson began to immerse himself in the club scene. He saw British funk bands like Heatwave at the Hamilton’s ‘GetTogethers’, and met local established DJs Terry Lennaine and Dave Porter. Lennaine took Wilson for his first trip to Spin Inn in Manchester, the primary record shop in the north of England for soul and funk. And in 1976, Terry Lennaine and Dave Porter took a 16-year-old Wilson to the Timepiece, a black club in Liverpool, to witness the spinning talents of Les Spaine. Wilson was hooked. Wilson was also an early champion of what became known in the UK as electro-funk. He introduced an entirely new audience to the sounds of the genre with the first regular specialist dance night at Tony Wilson’s recently opened Hacienda in Manchester. The Hacienda initially appealed to an alternative rock audience, but Greg Wilson’s residency helped shift the club into a venue for cutting-edge dance music that would gain it fame and notoriety later in the decade. Wilson’s return to DJing and his arrival at the Sub Club is a reason for real excitement and another date to look out for in February, a month which is spoiling clubbers for choice.[Chris Duncan]

www.myspace.com/schoolofsevenbells

February 2009

THE SKINNY 41

Music

School of Seven Bells:


RECORDS

The Dirty Dozen Two '80s icons crash the party this month, but are they going to embarrass themselves among the fresh-faced indie kids? Nick Mitchell finds out Boy-girl-boy trio Sky Larkin make raw, in-yer-face garage rock, but it feels like there’s something missing from Beelines (***, Out Now). That is, until it dares to go all discordant and nuts in the 30-second outro. As I’ve said before in this here column, the word ‘epic’ gets bandied about far too often these days. The works of Milton or Wagner are perhaps epic; not so the latest Ministry of Sound compilation. Some bands still aim to be ‘epic’ though, such as Future Loop Foundation, whose The Sea And The Sky (***, 2 Feb) is at least approaching the true definition of the word. On Let Me Be/Take Heart In Your Hope (***, 16 Feb), two ‘reworkings’ of songs from his last album, acoustic singer/songwriter Dan Arborise cleverly taps into an age-old problem for the music critic: it’s impossible to rip into soft, pleasant folk songs without appearing hatefully cynical. And I’m not falling into that trap. Cage the Elephant are young, in-demand and popular, but don’t hold that against them. Back Against The Wall (***, 2 Feb) may be as original as 12-bar blues, but it’s still a cut above the worst indie-by-numbers bands that stalk the darker corners of the Dirty Dozen. Not quite as fresh, but The Datsuns worship at the same rock’n’roll shrine. So Long (***, 16 Feb) is a two-minute, double-speed barrage that’s pleasingly DIY, but the same old rockstar grunts and yowls do spoil it a bit. If listening to Franz Ferdinand is like sipping a champagne-based cocktail in a style bar, then another of Scotland’s biggest bands is the musical equivalent of downing Buckfast in a bus shelter. Yes, The View are back, with their shambolic sound intact, but there’s not much of a song behind Shock Horror (**, 2 Feb). Unlike those Dundonian tykes, the All-American Rejects are,

CRYSTAL STILTS

well, too American to be loved on this side of the Atlantic. Gives You Hell (*, 2 Feb) sounds more like a marketing strategy than a song – file in the ‘fake rock’ drawer next to Panic At The Disco. On a different script altogether are The 39 Steps. Leeds producer Kato piles scratchy sampling on top of a jazzy hip-hop beat on Coming Clean (***, 2 Feb), which sounds like Four Tet before guest singer Laura Fowles’ silky tones give it more of a Portishead feel. Admit it: you’ve always wanted to know what The Specials fronted by Ian Beale would sound like. Man Like Me will happily realise your dream with Single Dad (***, 2 Feb). It’s brash, dumb, but somehow, almost... likeable? For Guns ‘N’ Roses, all the years and dollars spent on Chinese Democracy were not wasted. Better (****, 2 Feb) is – of course - ludicrously overproduced

and irony-free, but it still has a heart, and a stomping guitar riff. Now prepare for controversy, or just quality pop romanticism, because Morrissey is back. I’m Throwing My Arms Around Paris (****, 16 Feb) is as grand as odes to celibacy come: “Only stone and steel accept my love”. Nah, we do too Mozza. February’s Single of the Month is not by Crystal Castles, nor indeed Crystal Antlers, but the latest crystalline-monikered band: Crystal Stilts. Departure (****, 9 Feb) has all the ingredients of a shoegaze classic: gritty, faltering bass, pitched, resonant guitar, and a singer who sounds like our man Morrissey on Valium. CRYSTAL STILTS PLAY CAPTAIN’S REST, GLASGOW ON 21 FEB AND SNEAKY PETE’S, EDINBURGH ON 22 FEB.

Single Reviews U2

ELECTRICITY IN OUR HOMES

STATE BROADCASTERS

GET ON YOUR BOOTS

GYMNASTICS

OUR FAVOURITE PARK

15 FEB, ISLAND

16 FEB, 4AD

23 FEB, ELECTRIC HONEY

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Hiroshi Sugimoto’s artwork for U2’s forthcoming album, No Line On The Horizon, may be more apt than he realises. Get On Your Boots is not so much the sky meets the sea as it is Bono’s ego meets his libido, as the lecherous wee charmer chirps a paean to saving the world and gettin’ it on. Despite sterling work from The Edge, Bono’s oddly juxtaposed allusions to revolution and bringing the sexy back are awkward and detract from an otherwise strong single. Bono has amassed enough goodwill to be forgiven his indulgences, but he’s got to draw the line somewhere. [Ray Philp]

So these guys can be seen playing über-short sets in London’s trendiest nightspots (‘cos they’re all down there) and generating quite the buzz that attends mysteriousness. Hyped (and that is the word) as the natural successors to Talking Heads and other more obscure post-punk outfits such as Diagram Brothers, really - with nonsensical yet subversive wailings, and staccatoed lyrical and musical humour- their genealogy stretches all the way back to Devo. They’ve even got the matching outfits, just missing the hats. Repeat ad nauseum: “I am… a gymnast, I will be judged… at practice! – Bends my back… oooh”. [Paul Mitchell]

Glasgow six-piece State Broadcasters’ new single Our Favourite Park is a familiar lesson in Scottish folk/twee Americana. With rich instrumentation (strings, glockenspiel, tambourines and jangly guitars), bluntly melancholic lyrics and strong local accents, this pleasant pop song unavoidably calls fellow Scots Broken Records and We See Lights to mind. Released on Stow College label Electric Honey, Our Favourite Park - perhaps not coincidentally - evoke elements of Belle and Sebastian but without the requisite jauntiness and would surely resonate with fans of that group’s style. This stands them in good stead for the release of their forthcoming debut LP. [Lauren Mayberry]

WWW.U2.COM

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ELECTRICITYINOURHOMES

STATE BROADCASTERS PLAY CAPTAIN’S REST, GLASGOW ON 15 FEB.

EMMY THE GREAT

MITCHELL MUSEUM

EUGENE MCGUINNESS

FIRST LOVE

WARNING BELLS

FONZ

23 FEB, CLOSE HARBOUR

OUT NOW, MISTER TRAMP

23 FEB, DOMINO

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First Love is a good song – Emmy’s sweet and sincere vocals come across well over sombre acoustic guitar, and the baroque electric accentuates the chorus beautifully. But if there’s a reason to pick up this single, it’s the amazing B-side, Burn Baby Burn, featuring Young Husband. A more upbeat, souredpop number, the supporting track’s strength lies in its biting lyrics against a backdrop of cheeriness. It takes some skill to sing “You’re shit” so sweetly. Come for the main event – the title track from Emmy’s LP – but save some time for the supporting act. [Jason Morton] EMMY THE GREAT PLAYS KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 14 FEB; MOSHULU, ABERDEEN ON 15 FEB AND CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 16 FEB. WWW.EMMYTHEGREAT.COM

THE LAFONTAINES

According to Michel Foucault, medieval folk would deal with their mentally ill by chucking them on a ‘ship of fools’ and letting them set sail together into the sunset. If such a ship was ever looking for a cabaret band, then it could do worse than Mitchell Museum, who cheerfully sing about nearly drowning in a hospital of razors, whilst sounding like Mercury Rev jamming with Panda Bear (while presumably laughing hysterically and twitching lots). But the line between genius and madness is very flimsy indeed: with this lot channeling the spirit of Animal Collective into slabs of power-pop, there’s probably real method to the madness. [Ewen Millar]

With a name like Eugene McGuinness, you’d expect someone with a whiskeysoaked, sentimental origin, but in actuality this lad is the latest graduate from Domino’s School of Guitar Pop. Fonz zips by in an crunchingly glam manner, despite the lyric “it was so lovely”, that unfortunately cannot help recalling Scouting for Girls. McGuinness combines the odd fantastic couplet - “we said so well, and synchronised our watches/arranged for the meeting of our crotches” - with some pointedly mundane moments. Catchy enough, but far too light on real entertainment to have a lasting impact. A puerile pleasure. [Jamie Scott]

AVAILABLE VIA THE BAND’S WEBSITE WWW.MITCHELLMUSEUM.CO.UK

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/EUGENEMCGUINNESS85

FIRST AID KIT

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SUPERSTAR

DRUNKEN TREES EP

OUT NOW, FOUNDRY MUSIC LABS

23 FEB, WICHITA

MORE BAD TIMES EP

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23 FEB, COOKING VINYL

Perhaps it’s because of the constant media blitzing of American hip hop, but there seems something quizzical about rap done with a central Scottish accent. Perhaps it’s the dour nature of the modern urban Scots youth that doesn’t translate well to the kind of sexy-yet-smooth soul-searching of the sun-drenched LA chart-toppers we see emblazoned across our fallen MTV. In any case, it doesn’t matter - Motherwell quintet The LaFontaines demolish such cultural stereotypes effortlessly, and combine articulate rap with layers of guitar hooks and hands-in-the-air euphoria-pop. A promising debut. [Ewen Millar] THE LAFONTAINES PLAY STUDIO 24, EDINBURGH ON 26 FEB AND ABC2, GLASGOW ON 28 FEB. WWW.LAFONTAINES.CO.UK

42 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

Those Swedes have got it together. Apart from weathering economic armageddon quite comfortably, they’re also pumping out spine-tingling pop (The Knife), phenomenally bleak ambient music (The Library Tapes, Jasper TX), and nostalgic indie (Peter, Bjorn and John, Jens Lenkman). The latest genre for them to master is alt-country, as illustrated by the hideously talented First Aid Kit. With a combined age of just 33, Klara and Johanna Sorderberg, on first impressions, seem to be mining the same vein of music as Joanna Newsom. Newsom, though, tends to bat her eyelids and play on her impishness; these two have world-weary voices far beyond their years, in the same way that Dylan did when he was 21 and pumping out A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall. An understated acoustic gem. [Ewen Millar]

rrr If The Presidents were a one-note joke band from the dim and distant ‘90s, then no one told them. It’s possible that, had Dr. Seuss written lyrics for a band, his musings might only just make more sense than this lot, who seem to revel in childlike absurdism to the point of turning it into a Zen-poetry art form. Opening track Bad Times mourns a life gone right, wishing for more despair, while Ballad of the Unstoppable Female celebrates the life of Anna Nicole Smith, as if re-told by Terry Gilliam. The Presidents are like tuberculosis - you thought that they had vanished, but they were always lurking out there somewhere; you might not want them anywhere near you, but they’re pretty infectious. [Ewen Millar] DOWNLOAD ONLY: WWW.COOKINGVINYL.COM


www.tentracks.co.uk

Roger kisby

Aberfeldy Reloads Dropped by Rough Trade, ripped-off by an unscrupulous TV ad company and enduring the horror of supporting James Blunt on tour: you can’t help but feel Edinburgh pop quintet Aberfeldy deserve better. Now with a new line-up, a comeback single on TenTracks and a third album in the pipeline, can singer Riley Briggs see a silver lining? Matt Meade buys the hungover songwriter a fortifying Guinness in a Leith pub…

Trail of Dead

Get Selfish

…And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead return this month with The Century of Self, inspired by what frontman Conrad Keely calls “a sense of renewal”. Here he gives Dave Kerr an exclusive track-by-track insight… Giant’s Causeway was originally called The Betrayal of Roger Casement & the Irish Brigade - the title of a book my great grandfather wrote. I decided to shorten the title so as not to inflame anyone politically. Every record we’ve done has had some sort of instrumental introduction; it goes back to the overture of the orchestra or a symphony in the opera. We wanted something that opened it up to feel like a singular work and not just a collection of tracks. Far Pavilions is the name of a book by MM Kaye about the power struggle between Russia and Great Britain during the time of the British Empire in India. I saw a lot of parallels between what’s going on in Afghanistan now and the way that the Khyber Pass has always been a playground for war, ever since the time of Alexander the Great. Isis Unveiled is a heady topic: it’s a summary of the whole Biblical story from an agnostic Christian point of view but also from the point of view of an early Christian sect that believed there were two great Gods in the Bible. It was difficult to come up with lyrics for that because the music was so intense, they had to be appropriately apoplectic. Halcyon Days is pretty personal. It’s specifically about my experience of moving away from Austin, Texas. I lived in Austin for 13 years and recently moved to New York City. This is about saying goodbye to the wonderful time I had there while facing the future with fortitude. Bells of Creation is about Theophany – heavenly music. It was inspired by a documentary I was watching on TV about Mormons, and a book I read called Under the Banner of Heaven - a crazy story. Basically, the founder of the church had a vision which he described as hearing the song of angels. And I’ve always wondered - what would music sound like that was made by aliens? Fields of Coal is the only song I’ve ever written on tour. We were just about to go on stage and I wrote this pretty spontaneously in the back of the bus. It’s about the feelings I have sometimes about not wanting to get on stage, not always wanting to be in the limelight and be scrutinised.

Inland Sea was also pretty spontaneous. I was working on the artwork in my apartment, looking out of the window and on to the streets of Brooklyn – getting inspiration from the ambient noise. It just hit me, so I moved over to the piano and worked it out – it was as simple as that. Luna Park is Jason Reece’s [drummer/guitarist/ co-vocalist] song, he was the one who decided to write about this theme park in Coney Island that had been burned down in arson numerous times. I think he used that as a metaphor for burning down something that he loved, destroying something that was close to him. Pictures of an Only Child is an old song, I wrote this about 14 years ago – before we started the band. It’s about as personal a song as I’ve ever written. It’s about my photo album and looking through pictures of my parents and of our travels. Insatiable One was written for a film soundtrack that never came together. They never called me back, but I had this song that I’d written for it. When I wrote the lyrics it became a lot more metaphorical, but I guess it’s about what the title of the record’s about – The Century of Self. We've all become like vampires! Jason started the work on Ascending and I co-wrote the lyrics. It’s about growing up in Hawaii and how difficult and angsty our teen years were, just the sense we had of needing to get out – the old cliché of island fever. Finally, Insatiable Two – with its chorus of “I’m a Monster…” – is about the Orang Pendek: the Bigfoot of South-East Asia. It’s the idea that there’s this very close relative of the human race living in the forest observing us, seeing our dominance of nature and feeling similar to us but in a sad way seeing how destructive we are. I think it’ll show up within the next decade or so, some intrepid adventurer is definitely gonna nail it. The Century of Self is released via Richter Scale / Justice on 23 Feb. ...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead play Òran Mór, Glasgow on 17 Apr.

How’s the new album coming along? “The album is going to be fairly depressing, with break-up songs and things like that....ideally it will be out sometime this year, but I’m never happy with the lyrics.” You have a fairly new line-up as well… “When Ruth and Sarah left they were hard to replace. Luckily we met Vicky (Gray), our fiddle player who found her way to us, who has been absolutely brilliant. So now we have a Shetlander instead of an Orcadian (Sarah).” Your song Summer’s Gone [from the Young Forever album] was used on a TV advert for bingo recently. What’s that all about? “They asked our manager if they could use it and he said yeah, but they tried to get it for nothing. I’m not having that, and I don’t particularly approve of online gambling. The first I knew about it was when my brother called me up and said the song was on a bingo advert on the telly.” It was used to promote other products too, wasn’t it? “That’s now five adverts it’s been on – Diet Coke [in America], online bingo, a Pampers advert in Spain and Portugal – I don’t disapprove of nappies – a beer advert in Argentina and the latest one is an anti-smoking campaign in Flanders, Belgium. But I’m glad the Diet Coke one wasn’t shown here. That song [he sings The Caesars’ Jerk it out, used to painful effect on iPod TV adverts] was on all the time and people got sick of it. And there’s that other one too, [sings] ‘At the link it’s eeeasy’ [Shed Seven’s Speakeasy, infamously re-recorded by Rick Witter for a 1999 advert for a certain mobile phone firm].”

I suppose he had mouths to feed... “Yeah. The only reason I wrote that song is because I bought this amazing sounding 60s kids’ organ at a car boot sale. It turned into a nightmare because it never stayed in tune. I drilled a hole in the bottom so I could reach it and ten minutes before every Aberfeldy gig I was crouching underneath this organ. It was like trying to artificially inseminate a gerbil.” Are you working at the moment? “No, I just live off my Diet Coke fortune [laughs].” You’ve toured with James Blunt. Tell us something about the great man. “I’m not gonna slag him off… [pauses] he was alright and didn’t do anything terrible… [longer pause] but he wore a Ramones T-shirt and I looked on his iPod and he had no Ramones on it! I did slag him off a wee bit afterwards but then I saw the PRS [Performing Right Society] cheque we received after the tour and felt he did us a bit of a favour.” You also toured with The Beautiful South, which seems a more likely pairing. “That was the first tour we did and it was amazing. They’re true to their socialist principles and run the band like a workers’ collective. And they’ve got nutter fans. Compare that to James Blunt – they just wanted You’re Beautiful. It was hard to win them over because his audience is like a massive hen party.” Come on Claire by Aberfeldy is available on tentracks.co.uk alongside contributions by the likes of Conflict Diamonds, Your Loyal Subjects and Eagleowl. Read the full interview attheskinny.co.uk

Read the full article online at theskinny.co.uk

February 2009

THE SKINNY 43

Records

The Back Room:


RECORDS

Album of the month ...AND YOU WILL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD THE CENTURY OF SELF

rrrr RELEASED 23 FEB, SUPERBALL Things haven’t gone so well for experimental Texan rockers ...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead. Their last album So Divided was leaked a month before its release; they parted company with label Interscope; and if Wikipedia is to be believed, guitarist Kevin Allen was arrested on New Year’s Eve for destroying a Guitar Hero set-up in a bar after “failing to achieve a perfect score”. But some artists thrive on misfortune, and Trail of Dead are no exceptions. They've always been known for pushing further in one song than some bands do in a career, and sure enough The Century of Self is a work of

Himalayan scale. Far Pavilions takes us back to punky Madonna territory before slowing to a stately chorus and scatterbomb drums, while Isis Unveiled, a caterwauling Celtic reel, pays heed to singer Conrad Keely’s Irish roots. Throw in a few heartrending piano ballads of Inland Sea’s calibre and you have an album that may not get a perfect score, but reaffirms Trail of Dead’s role as rock’s dark trailblazers. [Nick Mitchell] TRAIL OF DEAD PLAY ÒRAN MÓR, GLASGOW ON 17 APR. WWW.TRAILOFDEAD.COM

Album Reviews AIDAN MOFFAT & THE BEST-OFS

HOW TO GET TO HEAVEN FROM SCOTLAND 14 FEB, CHEMIKAL UNDERGROUND

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ASOBI SEKSU

M. WARD

HUSH

HOLD TIME

16 FEB, ONE LITTLE INDIAN

16 FEB, 4AD

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Anyone vaguely aware of Aidan Moffat will clock this Valentine’s Day release as the sardonic, tongue-in-cheek Hallmark moment it is. “Lift up your skirt and I’ll fill you with babies”, slurs the former Arab Strap frontman on The Isle Of Ewe, making it clear that, despite the deluxe box-set with a personally signed Valentine’s card, How To Get To Heaven should not be intended as a gift to your loved one. Oh Men! begins as a jovial paean to men’s indiscriminate ogling of women; - “we’re all slaves to our erections”, apparently - but ends as an unlikely championing of feminism, albeit with a wry footnote: “give the ladies some respect, but there’s still no harm in looking”. Moffat is certainly the star here, but The Best-Ofs provide inventive backing, including human beatboxing, a skiffle knees-up and a bar-room singalong saluting the bittersweet end of a relationship. Yes, we’re certainly growing up with the bearded bard, but some things never change. [Darren Carle]

The Brooklyn-based duo of Yuki Chikudate and James Hanna caught our attention in 2006 with Citrus, their sumptuous second album. While the obvious reference point for that album was My Bloody Valentine, the sweet aftertaste left by their follow-up Hush is more akin to The Cocteau Twins’ glistening soundscapes. But Asobi Seksu deserve to be listened to without the ghosts of the 1980s lurking in your earlobes, because this third EP is even better than the last, a stirring work of pop classicism that knows exactly when to surge forcefully skyward and when to play it cool. Chikudate’s pristine voice leaves you weak at the knees when it soars on Familiar Light, while Hanna has widened his range on guitar, from the erstwhile shoegaze loops on Glacially to the unobtrusive arpeggios of Layers. The pre-release fear was that they would forgo the tune in favour of the noise, but Asobi Seksu have replied to the doubters with a simple message: Hush. [Nick Mitchell]

Hold Time stands at 5’ 8”. She has tumbling auburn hair, wears a frail sash emblazoned with her country of origin, and stands on the catwalk with a grin as wide as M. Ward’s fretboard. Much like a hard-body contender for a beauty pageant du jour, competent folk albums strut with the assurance that they are the prettiest and the most deserving of your flirtations. However, M. Ward’s sixth album is more than a pretty face: a deftly romantic style of lyricism that meets whimsy with a mature world view supplements Hold Time’s snappy percussion and rich acoustic tugs. Despite a nod to Buddy Holly on Rave On (a misnomer if ever there was one), there are flecks of modernity, most evident in the cloudy violins of the title track and the starlit keyboard plonks of Stars of Leo. Hold Time is the rarest of things; a beauty queen with heart. [Ray Philp]

WWW.AIDANMOFFAT.CO.UK

ASOBI SEKSU PLAY ABC2, GLASGOW ON 14 FEB.

WWW.MWARDMUSIC.COM

UNDER ONE SKY

THE VIEW

A CAMP

UNDER ONE SKY

WHICH BITCH?

COLONIA

2 FEB, NAVIGATOR RECORDS

2 FEB, 1965 RECORDS

2 FEB , REVEAL RECORDS

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To the average punter having just listened to Sportsound on Radio Scotland in its entirety only to find themselves inadvertently caught in the midst of some fiddle-soaked hootenanny afterwards, this album might well come across as stereotypical Scottish folk fare. Masterminded by Scottish composer John McCusker, its stab at alternative credibility comes with the inclusion of some prominent UK indie rock figures, including Roddy Woomble and Graham Coxon. There are hints of unconventionality throughout, but the general impression is that this music is still very much targeted at folk fans and seems unlikely to convert many to its ceilidh-driven ways. Woomble’s cameo on Long Time Past/ Lavender Hill provides the album’s highlight. Its slower pace is seductive and the Idlewild frontman’s vocal lines are well-considered and engaging. It seems a shame that the mixing of genres wasn’t a little more even-handed, making this feel like something of a missed opportunity. [Austin Tasseltine] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/UNDERONESKY1

WAVVES

It doesn’t bode well for the second View album from the outset, arse-clenchingly awful title apart. Supermarket-indie bands are finding it difficult across the board to avoid the dreaded sophomore slump, so it’s a pleasant surprise to find instead that The View are using their limited palette of resources - Kyle Falconer’s reedy Dundonian yelp, the traditional guitars-bass-drums set-up and a flourish of extra instrumentation - to make a record which, while it isn’t going to change the face of music, is diverse enough to hold our attention. 5 Rebeccas is an enjoyably basic Pixies-by-numbers rocker and Distant Doubloon provides an agreeable orchestral (yep, you read right) interlude, although One Off Pretender’s detour into rapping is one which should have been avoided. All in all, Which Bitch?’s eclecticism appears to be borne of throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks, and if you’re seeking major innovation, it’d be best to look elsewhere. [Gillian Watson] THE VIEW PLAY THE PICTURE HOUSE, EDINBURGH ON 12 FEB; CAIRD HALL, DUNDEE ON 13 FEB; IRONWORKS, INVERNESS ON 15 FEB AND MUSIC HALL, ABERDEEN ON 16 FEB.

ENFANT BASTARD

Nina Persson has come a long way since the blonde pigtails she sported for The Cardigans’ 1995 hit Lovefool. The sophomore album from the Swede’s latter-day side project, A Camp, is a melodic festival with a European feel and plenty of hooks. Recorded with Persson’s soundtrack composer husband, ex-Smashing Pumpkins guitarist James Iha, and Joan As Police Woman, Colonia is a wellorchestrated, uplifting record with many a made-for-film-soundtrack chorus. From opening pop waltz The Crowning, it’s clear her lilting coo is reserved almost exclusively for her work with The Cardigans, though it casually rears its head on Here Are Many Wild Animals amongst a flurry of handclaps and bundles of extra percussion. Closing track The Weed Had Got There First is a noticeable gem - sensitive, soulful and gentle. The result is a fine album, by turns understated and theatrical: with layered choral backing vocals, lilting and floating melody line, the odd touch of sliding strings, and chiming guitars. [Lauren Mayberry] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ACAMPTHEBAND

MV+EE

WAVVVES

THE BEST OF ENFANT BASTARD

DRONE TRAILER

2 FEB, DE STIJL

OUT NOW, SELF-RELEASED

2 FEB, DICRISTINA STAIR BUILDERS

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As one man bands go, Wavves is up there with the loudest. San Diego slacker Nathan Williams’ almost-eponymously titled (check the extra ‘v’) sophomore LP may hold no allure for those of sensitive eardrums, but for everyone else it’s half an hour of rapacious, temple-pounding sonics. By swilling together fuzzy clutters of guitar and percussion with swooshing melody, Williams annexes depth and dimension to Times New Viking’s 2-D blueprint of N-O-I-S-E; adding sensitive, humane flushes to the trash-punk decibels and skeletal riffs of Get In The Sun and So Bored. Record highlight is the chronic dirtbox scuzz of No Hope Kids, yet more chasmal cuts like the coruscating Killr Punx, Scary Dem or the drum-fest that is Sun Opens My Eyes suggest Williams has both the scope and range to escalate beyond these myopic throes. Not quite a masterpiece then, but pretty soon these Wavves will come crashing in. [Billy Hamilton]

Everyone needs a bit of Enfant Bastard in their lives. Artists like Ariel Pink have managed to push lo-fi to its creative limits, but Enfant Bastard, with songs like Joanna Newsom 666 and You Are My Fucking Sunshine is less about technique and more about the irreverence. This Best of compilation isn’t trying to impress the pants off anyone with its clever recording or judicious sampling, nor does Mr Bastard hide behind the distortion pedal as a means of filling in the spaces between semi-melodic song sketches. Rather, tape crackle hisses away in the background, instruments slop about all over the place, and everyone sounds wasted - like they just rolled in from the pub and decided to write and record an entire album in five minutes, resulting in the odd flaring up of relationship-killing drunken honesty. Making things seem effortless is a skill in itself; sounding this exquisitely rough is enthralling. [Ewen Millar]

If Sonic Youth ever decided to jam with Neil Young, then they might end up in similar territory to MV+EE. Matt Valentine and Erika Elder (the MV+EE of their band name) manage the neat trick of employing meandering jazz improvisation and drone over surprisingly linear country tunes, all the while erring on the right side of self-indulgence. Opening track Anyway could be a Crazy Horse out-take if they had decided to give vocal duties to Kim Deal, while The Hungry Stones is like Wayne Coyne doing his best to sound like Old Shakey (but still managing to slip a few references to astral planes in there). When Valentine and Elder sing together they conjure up images of Mormon indie darlings Low, and the depth of sincerity they manage to add to the material helps to inject real beauty into the genre-bending experimentation bubbling underneath the surface. [Ewen Millar]

WAVVES PLAYS NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, GLASGOW ON 1 MAR.

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE VIA WWW.MYSPACE.COM/CAMMYJJUNIOR

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MVEEBUMMERROAD

44 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009


FRANZ FERDINAND

TONIGHT

OUT NOW, DOMINO

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BEIRUT

MARCH OF THE ZAPOTEC/ REALPEOPLE: HOLLAND 16 FEB, POMPEII RECORDINGS

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TITUS ANDRONICUS

THE AIRING OF GRIEVANCES 2 FEB, XL

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Despite their own denials, Franz Ferdinand make much more sense as a pop group than a rock band. With pop, they don’t have to ‘progress their sound’ or ‘add emotion’ so long as the singles still hit the spot. Tonight is a potentially pivotal record for a band whose goodwill well - overflowing four years ago - is quickly running dry. It offers tiny glimpses of both those rockist concessions, but they’re trivial moves in the light of the obvious and exuberant quality of the potential singles here. Songs like Twilight Omens, which borrows its irresistible suave futurism from Roxy Music, or the Moroder-referencing Live Alone, prove that Franz haven’t yet hit a drought. Tonight’s elongated ending a three-minute-long acid trance outro to Lucid Dreams followed by two sleepy ballads - seems to mirror the end of a night out; and like a good night out Tonight can be momentarily riveting while still leaving you with little to recall in the morning. [Ally Brown]

Up until now, Zachary Condon’s never been one to do things by halves. Abounding with voluptuous mariachi sways and waltzing European melodies, previous Beirut releases were unrepentant stomps that left no doubt as to their creator’s stoic intentions. March Of The Zapotec/Realpeople:Holland is an entirely different proposition. Part one of this dichotomous affair finds Condon mounting the uncultivated, if familiar, climes of Mexicana folk; where triumphant, parping brass exhales over rippling percussion and mandolin while he warbles staunchly against these gales of instrumentation. By part two he’s crept into the unknown: the synthesised world of glitchy electronica. Disappointingly this new domain fails to fan his creative sensibilities, with No Dice and My Night With The Prostitute From Marseille resembling tiresome Hot Chip cast-offs - less dancefloor filler, more lughole chiller. He may have got halfway there, but Monsieur Condon’s forays into electronica appear ill-advised. [Billy Hamilton]

On the first or second listen to The Airing of Grievances, the debut album by New Jersey’s Titus Andronicus, it’s easy to zone out - to come to the abrupt conclusion that they’re just another young, male band making rough, simplistic punk. But listen again and you’ll start to hear the wide range of narrative and musical paths being explored; singer Patrick Stickles’ larynx-stretching vocals are not only bearable but the album’s surging life-blood. As if to prove they’re no meat-headed noisemongers, Titus Andronicus take their name from Shakespeare’s ridiculously violent Roman tragedy, and their songs pay homage to Brueghel and Camus. But pretentiousness doesn’t figure here: they come from Springsteen country and burn with a similar passion for life in all its raw hope and blunt frustration. The Airing is a shattering breakthrough: more than mere Arcade Fire sound-a-likes, Titus Andronicus are the latest and best band to take the existentialist who-gives-a-fuck baton and run with it. [Nick Mitchell]

FRANZ FERDINAND PLAY THE BARROWLANDS ON 4-5 MAR.

WWW.BEIRUTBAND.COM

TITUS ANDRONICUS PLAY KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 25 FEB

THE HUNCHES

PHOSPHORESCENT

SERGEANT BUZFUZ

EXIT DREAMS

TO WILLIE

HIGH SLANG

OUT NOW , IN THE RED

2 FEB, DEAD OCEANS

9 FEB, BLANG RECORDS

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These guys are definitely one of the closest remaining testaments to the influence of ‘70s US punk and garage. This album is a fuzzy, visceral racket indeed, doubtlessly the cause of countless broken sticks and strings. Exit Dreams pushes meters all over the place, with deliberate patches of distortion seeing the desk overload and the songs degenerate into a crunching, faltering mess of broken noise. Not Invited is the first real respite and slouches its sneering way across Iggy Pop and some of the early ‘90s Sub Pop scene’s better moments. Though less concerned with eccentricity, the mania at times touches on that of US contemporaries HEALTH, who share a similar fondness for turning everything way the hell up and reminding you what tinnitus was meant to feel like. With rumours persisting that this could be The Hunches’ swan-song, it’s worth investigating the prospect of them touring your locale as Exit Dreams sounds destined for a brutal live airing. [Chris Cusack]

In an echo of Willie Nelson’s own To Lefty From Willie where he paid homage to one of his idols, Lefty Frizell, by reinterpreting a collection of his favourite Frizell songs, so too has Matthew Houck (Phosphorescent) paid tribute to Nelson. 11 solid renditions make for an enjoyable listen. Houck already has a considerable reputation as an alt-country artist and this project will do him no harm. There’s enough of a contemporary twist on the material to make this seem worthwhile, though the songs are decades old and thus it does sound unavoidably dated at times despite Phosphorescent’s best efforts. Stand-out track is almost certainly Walkin’, where some sublime slide-guitar comes closest to raising goosebumps. I Gotta Get Drunk is also a rambunctious burst of bar-room fighting music as guys in plaid shirts slide along the bar and topless dancers crack empty bottles over truckers’ heads. [Chris Cusack]

I’m sure at some point in your life you’ll have wanted to learn the history of the papacy but have decided against it: unless, of course, it was delivered with an accordion and dulcimer as accompaniment... Sergeant Buzfuz have jumbled this hilarious four-part history lesson into their psychedelic folk album. ‘Jumble’ is definitely the right word since Buzfuz throw in gunslinging country rhythms, anti-folk and subtle electronics alongside their cardinal storytelling. The result is a mash-up which works surprisingly well. Closer Go Hoot, Owl Lady is a perfect example, where fiddle samples soar over Aphex Twin fractured beats. However, this routine is less effective on In The Back Of My Cab, which recalls the Levellers’ worst attempts at punk-folk crossovers. That said, you’ll be hard pressed to find an album that broadens your smile more than the efforts of Buzfuz, without putting quite putting themselves in the ‘comedy band’ pigeonhole. [Gordon Bruce]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/THEHUNCHES

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/PHOSPHORESCENT

WWW.SERGEANTBUZFUZ.COM

VARIOUS PRODUCTION AND GERRY MITCHELL

THE INVISIBLE LODGER 9 FEB, FIRE RECORDS

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THE TYRANT LIZARD KINGS

PETIT FOURS

9 FEB, WASTED STATE

16 FEB, COOKING VINYL

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To refer to Gerry Mitchell as ‘Old Misery Guts’ wouldn’t do his recording persona justice. The man is as dour as they come. Last year’s Ragged Garden release with lush orchestral outfit Little Sparta served up an interesting proposition: his spoken word vitriolic bile spouted forth upon Sparta’s warm, welcoming musical arrangements. It was a chalk and cheese marriage that worked a treat. His latest effort, with dubstep artists Various Production, is lighter on juxtaposition, generally heavier on doom and resultantly isn’t much fun at all. It’s one thing to suggest all music should be injected with B-52s levels of Prozac-flavoured vivacity, but listening to The Invisible Lodger on your tod is enough to give anyone the heebie-jeebies; and when played in company it’s a sure-fire way to clear the room. Sinister, dark and morose, but not in a good way: I would call it graveyard grime, but that sounds much too interesting. [Finbarr Bermingham]

If you like your JD straight, your moustaches handle-barred and your music with a heavy dose of brutality, The Tyrant Lizard Kings need your number. Their blend of Motörhead violence with the musical influence of copious “jazz” cigarettes means that Six Shooter doesn’t take itself too seriously. This gives rise to incredible song titles such as opener Yippee-Ki-Yay Motherfucker, a viciously heavy statement of intent with what sounds like a growling bear on vocals. It’s a refreshing sound that puts two fingers up to anything that moves while still managing a convincing harmonica section in one song (Gentleman’s Measure). This said, though the sludgy stoner tracks like Don’t Blame Me, Blame the Funk are a quality beanbag rockout, distinguishing them is about as easy as telling those identical twins you barely know apart. With a bit more variety, the Kings are onto a stone cold winner. For now, rely on their blistering live show. [Gordon Bruce]

WWW.VARIOUS.CO.UK

THE TYRANT LIZARD KINGS PLAY STUDIO 24, EDINBURGH ON 7 FEB AND THE LEMON TREE, ABERDEEN ON 13 FEB.

ST DELUXE

GRAND DUCHY

SIX SHOOTER

OBERMAN KNOCKS

ST DELUXE

13TH SMALLEST

9 FEB, POPPYDISC

16 FEB, APERTURE

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Having played their own small part in the 20-year-long shape-shifting story of Glasgow indie darlings BMX Bandits, Jamie Cameron and Martin Kirwan decided it was time they took centre stage, and so here we have St Deluxe, now a quartet with added drummer and bassist. They’re not a band to disavow the obvious influence of their low-slung guitar wielding predecessors, and although it’s Sonic Youth who sit atop their MySpace list, the more immediate impression is the scuzzy lo-fi of Pavement. OK, so we’re in the ‘90s grunge-rock ballpark, and St Deluxe seem happy enough to stay there, thrashing out simple songs of skewed pop sentiment like Can’t Change and Stupid Ideas. And just when their debut album seems in danger of becoming too homogeneous, the penultimate track Distant Light unveils another facet to St Deluxe with its sweeping FX and forlorn lyrics, steering them clear of the BMX Bandits’ shadow. [Nick Mitchell]

This is a very strange body of work. If you’re into those ‘file under’ comparisons, you’d better make a new category, unless you’ve already got an ‘avant-garde post-music electronica’ section. Rejecting any traditional notion of time signature, harmony or song structure, 13th Smallest is a collection of ominous synth moans, irregular beats and scattered clicks and bumps, building and emerging from the darkness like an evil robot. The result, though, is a rewarding and interesting album, worth a listen if you yearn for something different. Listening to it is an unsettling and occasionally frightening experience: it doesn’t sound like it was made by a human. It’s like the creakings and clunkings of the hull of a massive spacecraft, a Phillip Glass symphony played in a scrapyard, an android Aphex Twin on 33 instead of 45. You’ve probably realised by now, but there will never be an Oberman Knocks Week on X Factor. [Euan Ferguson]

ST DELUXE LAUNCH THE ALBUM WITH A FREE GIG AT CAPTAIN’S REST, GLASGOW ON 12 FEB.

WWW.OBERMANKNOCKS.COM

The Frank Black of 2009 is a domesticated creature: a proud father and a devoted husband. That in mind, Grand Duchy - consisting of he and his wife Violet Clark - shouldn’t be too surprising. But far from a polite family outing, Petit Fours is an exceptionally tight and accomplished album, fused with a chemistry and sense of playfulness perhaps normally akin to fledgling lovers rather than the bearers of a five-strong litter. It’s laden with booming basslines and Black’s trademark sneer even makes the odd appearance (Come On Over To My House), but the dominant forces of this fine record are sweeping 80s synths, hooky AM-friendly melodies and the sassy, mischievous vocal contributions of Black’s better half (Lovesick). With Petit Fours, Black & Clark join Ike & Tina, Win & Regine, and Johnny & June in adding another string to the already tuneful bow of matrimonial musical history. [Finbarr Bermingham]

WWW.BLACKFRANCIS.NET

Top 5 Albums 1. ...AND YOU WILL KNOW

US BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD THE CENTURY OF SELF

2. ASOBI SEKSU - HUSH 3. MV+EE - DRONE TRAILER 4. GRAND DUCHY - PETIT FOURS 5. M. WARD - HOLD TIME FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 45

RECORDS

Album Reviews


Music

Live Reviews The Local Tour Captain’s Rest, 23 Jan

unremarkable intermission, he merely acts as a melting pot of the lesser ideas of his fellow performers. Contrasting this, the beguiling David Thomas Broughton (*****) pursues a confusing contrast of ironic posing with genuine, draining emotion. He strides into the audience counting the change from his pockets and handing it out, singing all the while. Every moment feels improvised, entirely unpredictable, and, consequently, completely absorbing. Despite creating dextrous and imaginative loops, he is never bracketed by them, each pattern only fortifying that unstoppable voice. A naturally gripping performer. [Jamie Scott]

david thomas broughton - heidi kuisma

It’s clear that Sam Amidon (****) plays from a folk tradition: not just in the banjos and guitars that pepper his set, or in the continual thread of storytelling that runs across it, but in his constant references to the folklore of North America. Country, bluegrass and gospel are all united through Amidon’s bookish, Paul Gambaccini-esque voice, singing songs from the heart of a continent. His love for music deafens any polarities of genre, an enthusiasm that links love songs and hymns. Unfortunately, Doveman (**) does not create quite so much atmosphere, limited by an overly hushed voice and a determination to disguise what songs he may have beneath layers of bubbling piano and flat feedback. An

www.myspace.com/thelocaluk Debut album The Golden Spike is released this month.

Animal Collective

Little Joy

Glasgow School of Art, 13 Jan

Stereo, 17 Jan

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If you’ve steadfastly purchased Merriweather Post Pavilion or invested in the unamimous proclamations of the music press in recent weeks, you might well believe there’s a real chance that Animal Collective’s latest opus could become a mandatory supplement for tap water before the year is out. It seems a crime that they aren’t headlining the Barrowlands tonight. Regardless, the trio (‘Deakin’ is off on sabbatical) shrug off the indecision of a crowd that doesn’t know whether to shake its ass or gaze back in dumfounded wonder, seizing the room with belly-rumbling bass and neo-Beach Boys harmonies. Åvey Tare takes the mic for much of the duration, his vocal delivery by turns echoing Why? man Yoni Wolf and Jonas Bjerre from Mew. An emerging incline towards instrumental self-indulgence is thankfully curtailed by My Girls - Panda Bear’s euphoric and endearingly nerve wracked ode to domestic bliss – steering the show home to a modest victory, rather than the assumed crowning moment it should have been. [Dave Kerr]

Although Fabrizio Moretti’s name alone is undoubtedly a ticket seller, Little Joy are, in their own right, a good-time experience. Lead vocalist Rodrigo Amorante opens the set with a delicate Banhart-esque solo piece that the majority of the audience sadly talks over. Their banter ends when the whole band arrive, their sunny, retro sound - complete with luxurious harmonies and handclaps - welcomely washing over the rain-dampened crowd. Moretti remains effortlessly cool outwith his usual role, baiting the audience between songs as well as rounding off the casual 60s harmonies. Yet it’s impish multi-instrumentalist Binki Shapiro who emerges as the secret weapon. Her self-deprecating gentle narrative voice and Supremes-style dancing complete the love-in vibe, transporting Stereo’s basement to some cocktail-lounge era, with members of support band The Dead Trees lending a hand and an instrument along the way. With their enjoyable debut album brought to life in tonight’s live setting, Little Joy are proof that Strokes side-projects are looking increasingly like a good idea. [Lauren Mayberry]

www.myspace.com/animalcollectivetheband

www.myspace.com/littlejoymusic

Sky Larkin King Tut’s, 26 Jan

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Celtic Connections: The Burns Unit ABC, 16 Jan

rrrr Few bands making their official debut could hope for a rapt full-house in the cavernous ABC, but The Burns Unit aren’t some wet-behind-the-ears whippersnappers. Starting as a collaborative Burnsong project, the musicians involved decided that their creative chemistry was worth keeping alive beyond their last Burnsong paycheque. Making the ‘leap of faith’ by placing their solo careers on hold - no minor gesture for such Jock rock royalty as Emma Pollock, King Creosote and Future Pilot AKA - the eight-piece decided a public unveiling was in order, with Celtic Connections doing the honours. Support from Drever, McCusker and Woomble (****) more than fulfils the “Celtic” part of the festival’s remit, with none-more-Scottish banter about tight-fistedness, Edinburgh/Glasgow rivalries and the inadequacy of First Scotrail, as well as a conventional sonic palette of traditional rootsy folk. The trio’s note-perfect renditions

46 THE SKINNY February 2009

David McGowan

Ash wrote back when they were young ‘uns. But too many songs fall flat, until a bouncy/creepy encore of Keepsake’s merry-go-round melody ends things on a fantastically, but somewhat aptly, awkward note. [Chris Buckle) of debut album Before the Ruin’s best moments leave the teeming crowd in silent reverence; until, that is, fiddleplayer McCusker turns a gentle ballad into an up-tempo barnstormer that gives everybody under the ABC’s roof plenty to whoop and stomp about. If the support embodies “Celtic” then The Burns Unit (****) - with a line-up completed by Karine Polwart, Kim Edgar, pint-sized “resident Weegie” MC Soom T and Canadians Michael Johnstone and Mattie Foulds - are the perfect example of cross-cultural “Connections”. Aside from their multinational membership, they demonstrate a canny ability to blend disparate styles: from tender odes to serendipity (the Pollock-penned House on the Hill) to jacked-up carnival rock; from Soom T’s MIA-esque melodica-backed protest song to a sinister, bloody ballad - the band fuse their contrasting talents and leave no signs of suture or ego. The Burns Unit due to enter the studio this week, meaning that tonight’s gig gives us the privilege of a preview of that rare beast: a ‘supergroup’ that manages to be more than the sum of its parts. [Chris Buckle] www.celticconnections.com

Jenny Anderson

After appearing in just about every ‘Tips for 2009’ feature, now Sky Larkin have to show the newly-intrigued that they’re worthy of such early accolades. With a hook-laden debut album to show off, it seems a simple remit, but tonight the Leeds indie-rockers can’t do enough to move a crowd thinned by rival big-profile gigs (Of Montreal and Bloc Party are both in town) and by deserting fans of support acts Copy Haho and Pulled Apart By Horses. That said, it’s clearly an unusually average gig by a band capable of better, rather than chancers punching above their weight. One of Two is still a taut rock highlight, while Beeline is the kind of exhilarating three-minute pop that

of Montreal Òran Mór, 26 Jan

rrrr Pinning down an of Montreal gig isn’t as easy as telling your mates: “Yeah, I went to see a band tonight.” The costumed troupe plays their set against a backdrop of cracked animation (tigers, wolves, a giant mouth lip-synching on Christ’s chest), and the stage show incorporates some community-grade theatrics (men in gold masks brandishing whips; red-faced ‘ninjas’ lifting a crooning Kevin Barnes). In this setting, the music almost takes a backseat, with oM’s electronic beats and decadent arrangements faltering in places. But for every rendition

found lacking (an unenthused She’s a Rejector, for example), there's a stunning comeback (the slow soul of St Exquisite’s Confessions or bombastic pop of An Eluardian Instance). And, to the band’s credit, the few lulls can easily be spent in awe (or confusion) of costumed minions and esoteric stage games. But when you recount this experience at the pub, expect more head-scratching than understanding. [Jason Morton] www.myspace.com/ofmontreal


Le Reno Amps As they prepare to strut their stuff at February's Mill, Finbarr Bermingham caught up with Le Reno Amps henchmen Maple and Nero to discover that, sometimes, the simpler things in life are better

head off to the bright lights of Glasgow Point 3– Gifted Songwriter #1 in catastrophic event at – you guessed it, an industry showcase, and is out of the game for a few months. Gifted Songwriter #2 uses free time to finish writing songs for album. Point 4 – Gifted Songwriters have a crazy left-field idea of adding bass and drums to their live performance. Point 5 – Le Reno Amps write and record Tear it Open. Available March 23rd on Drift records!

“They used to say ‘learn three chords and form a band’. We thought, why bother learning any chords at all?” Now, we’re by no means comparing Aberdeen indie-pop outfit Le Reno Amps to industrial noiseniks Throbbing Gristle (for a start, they all seem to have figured out a guitar’s arse from its elbow pretty adeptly), but there’s a refreshing simplicity to their music, and their attitudes towards it, that proves Genesis P-Orridge’s famous adage still rings true in the 21st Century. Why overcomplicate things when you have the talent to make fine, melodic music at your disposal? So who are Le Reno Amps? Hey you, put that French dictionary down! An anagram of ‘Maple’ and ‘Nero’ (told you it was simple), Le Reno Amps are an Aberdonian quartet, comprised of the aforementioned and marvellously monikered Maple and Nero (joint lead vocalists and guitarists), joined by drummer Jason Sinclair, with Lindsey Scott on bass and backing vocals. The band’s official biog is laced with satire and lampoon, so being the highbrow rag that we are, The Skinny asked Maple and Nero to wise up slightly, and give us a brief and utterly serious rundown of how they got to where they are now. Take it from the top, fellas: Point 1 – Gifted Songwriter meets Gifted Songwriter, they form a duo for one-off performance at ‘Industry’ showcase. Point 2 – Gifted Songwriters record the songs what they wrote, put knapsacks on their backs and

Okay, so perhaps that didn’t go wholly to plan, but you get the gist. Once a duo, now a blossoming four-piece, united by a love of… well, what exactly? Who do they sound like and where do they fit in? As already discussed, the band’s penchant for a spot of avant-garde noodling is nonexistent. Some people confuse songwriting with jamming, others seem to think odd timing or song structures = ‘clever’ or ‘interesting’. “There’s an ethos we have – whatever we write should be a robust song. And it shouldn’t outstay its welcome,” explains Mr Maple. So are we looking at the latest in a long line of FM-friendly Scottish indie pop acts? Perhaps; and when quizzed on that particular subject, Maple devises a theory of his own: “A lot of Scotland is made up of small, insular places. In our formative years our exposure to music is primarily radio and TV, so we grow up listening to pop music, which is all about melody. When we get a bit older we venture out into the world of ‘alternative’ music but we already have our solid grounding”. There’s a lot of love for their peers and countrymen amongst their ranks, with polite nods going in the direction of the likes of Jesus H. Foxx, The Elvis Suicide, The Hazey Janes, De Rosa, Sparrow In The Workshop and Foxface. But what of the band themselves? Alt-folk, power-pop: they’ve been squished into all those boxes. “Deliberately tumbledown,” was how their second LP was described between these very sheets back in ’07, and it sounds about as good a description as any.

When questioned about influences, the simplicity slightly dissolves, replaced instead by a multitude of bands and musicians that have combined to infuse the rather exciting sonic cocktail that is Le Reno Amps. We have Nero’s love of Prince, Randy Newman and Elvis Costello (he confesses to devouring whole back catalogues), drummer Jason’s unexplainable love for all things big and, er, drummy, bassist Lindsey’s affinity for anything ‘Nu’ (it’s unclear whether this stems to the Anglicization of the Yiddish term for ‘so’, but given what’s gone before, we severely doubt it) and Maple’s partiality to the Gordon Lightfoots and Cat Stevenses of this world. Where can we hear Le Reno Amps? The aforementioned Tear It Open is released in March, timed to nicely usher in the springtime sunshine (perhaps wishful thinking) and soothe the lumbersome April showers. But this shall be album number three (not to mention a number of lauded single and EP releases). With Vanity Project Scotland, they put out the LRA LP in 2004, and So For Your Thrills hit the shelves via Pet Piranha in 2007. Le Reno Amps will, of course, be playing The Mill this month; a fact that, when combined with their admirable back catalogue, leaves you scarce on excuses not to have bent your lugs around the dulcet tones of this lot at least once. So, what does the future hold for a band with the anagrammed name? This is not, of course, a reference to axe-man

extraordinaire Death Cube K (answers on a postcard, lexicon lovers); but with the release of their third LP imminent, what does 2009 hold for Le Reno Amps? Maple, the band’s delegated realist, is touting for a gradual ascendancy. “We hope to achieve global domination in 2009 by selling 40 million records/ downloads. Failing that, we hope to finish album 4.” But should the former come true… envisage, if you will, a quartet of Aberdonians not only on the cusp of, but embracing, superstardom. Hollywood, logically, beckons. And there’s really only one question worth posing. Who would star in Le Reno Amps: The Movie? After much deliberation, Maple and Nero turn film caster and graciously nominate Al Murray to portray Sinclair, “for selfish reasons, that girl from Transformers (Megan Fox)” is cast as Ms Scott, and as for our two protagonists? “I seem to have the same traits as Larry David,” ‘fesses Maple, while Nero, not so modestly, fancies himself as a bit of McNulty off The Wire. You never know, stranger things have happened… Le Reno Amps play The Mill @ Oran Mor, Glasgow on 4 Feb. They also play a Sunny Govan Radio Session on 26 Feb in Glasgow, from 10pm-midnight. Tear It Open is available on 23 Mar via Drift Records. www.lerenoamps.com

Sign up to The Mill’s website (www.themill-live.com) to enter for an opportunity to score tickets to their upcoming events The Mill Glasgow – open every Wednesday

11TH Feb – Broken Records, Endrick Brothers 18th Feb – First We Take Manhattan, Intervals 25th Feb – Sonny Marvello, Pixie Cato The Mill Edinburgh – open every Thursday

12th Feb - Endrick Brothers, Broken Records 19th Feb – Kiddo, The 10:04’s 26th Feb – Epic26, Tokyoblu the mill glasgow takes place at oran mor, and the mill edinburgh at the caves. for more info see venue listings at www.theskinny.co.uk


MUSIC

Previews THE SPINTO BAND

TRICKY

THE TUNNELS, 21 FEB

THE ARCHES, 19 FEB

Armed with a fresh slab of wax in the form of 2008’s Moonwink – a rollercoaster ride exhibiting twee shades of psychedelic pop – Delaware’s The Spinto Band will make a pair of stops in Scotland this month. The Spintos strike first in Aberdeen at The Tunnels on 21 February before heading down the A90 to Auld Reekie for a date with Cabaret Voltaire the following night. Following the notable single Oh Mandy, and 2005’s well-received Nice and Nicely Done, last year’s LP provides more up-tempo ditties conducive to a live performance. In Edinburgh, exquisitely monikered indie-popsters We Were Promised Jetpacks support. [Jason Morton]

Emerging amidst the lads-and-lager brawl of mid-nineties Britpop, Tricky’s multifarious debut, Maxinquaye, flew in the face of the simplified collective identity widely embraced in British music culture at the time. Under the now bruised, beaten and somewhat belittled label of trip-hop, this debut release brushed aside any notion of pre-defined genre, fearlessly meshing straight up hip-hop with dub, funk, punk and rock. From that seminal moment, Tricky’s modus operandi has been the evocation of a darker, increasingly challenging sound, and the provocation of this newer material alongside his classic earlier work make his appearance at the Arches a must see. [Paul Neeson]

ALSO PLAYING CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 22 FEB. 7.30PM, £8 (BOTH DATES)

7PM, £17.72 WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TRICKOLATRICKY

SHRED YR FACE 2

FIFE KILLS TOUR

THE GARAGE, 27 FEB

CAPTAIN’S REST, 15 FEB

This month, the ominous dark hall that is The Garage will play host to three of the most notorious players in the realm of punk/alternative noise today for the second installment of the Shred Yr Face tour. The imaginativelytitled Shred Yr Face 2 will see LA’s The Bronx join forces with Canadian stalwarts Fucked Up and Sheffield scamps Rolo Tomassi for what will surely be aural punishment of the finest order. True to the formula of last year’s inaugural outing, there’s an online hub which boasts regular blogs from the bands and access to limited edition split singles. [Ryan Drever]

From a punter’s perspective, close-knit musician communities that favour mutual support over ruthless ambition are welcome. Obviously it’s beneficial to the local scene, with Edinburgh’s alt-folk crowd growing in both size and quality; then there’s the shared bills (gig line-ups that is, not gas and electric) which offer exciting two-for-one opportunities like this: Eagleowl headlining with sleepy dirges (a compliment, by the way) picked from their excellent For The Thoughts You Never Had EP, with Rob St. John’s strange and beautiful dream-folk in support. Plus electro-troubadour My Kappa Roots in Edinburgh and Lucksmiths-esque indie-poppers State Broadcasters in Glasgow. [Chris Buckle]

7PM, £12 WWW.SHREDYRFACE.COM

8PM, £4

IMELDA MAY THE VOODOO ROOMS, 17 FEB

Winner of “Best Music Pub” award in 2008, the Voodoo Rooms has rapidly earned a reputation for hosting firstclass gigs. Its dark, would-be smoky event room is perfect for sultry songstress Imelda May and her rockabilly blues band. Combining 1950s style with Generation X cynicism, Imelda’s infectious sound has been labelled “jazzabilly” (shudder), but her burlesque-inspired looks and soulful voice mean she’s a treat for the eyes and ears. The cool-cat double bass, bouncing beats and proto-rock ‘n’ roll guitar should get you boogying. Tipped for stardom by Jeff Beck of all folk, May promises to deliver something sublime. [Georgina Merry] 8PM, £10 WWW.IMELDAMAY.COM

LITTLE DEATH SNEAKY PETE’S, 27 FEB

Little Death’s members are so laid back, they make The Fonz look like Frank Spencer. This is quite a contrast to their post-punk groove, where they marry frequent, unusual harmonies with composite melodies. Their sound is like an unlikely collision between Interpol and The Strokes. They combine weeping, wailing guitar sounds and scratchy riffs with tight, punching bass-lines of the sort that The Cure produce. Plus, they’re an attractive bunch, comprising of a gorgeous female bassist, a cute drummer, a tousle-haired guitarist and a brooding singer - so if you don’t find yourself bouncing to the bass, there’ll probably be somebody to swoon over. [Georgina Merry] 7PM, £6. ALSO PLAYING KING TUT’S ON 25 FEB. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/LOVELITTLEDEATH

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THE FIFE KILLS TOUR ALSO HITS THE BOWERY, EDINBURGH ON 14 FEB, FOR A FREE EVENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE SKINNY,TEN TRACKS AND THE COLLECTIVE GALLERY WWW.EAGLEOWLATTACK.CO.UK

LATE OF THE PIER ÒRAN MÓR, 8 FEB

Having shaken off suggestions that they were nothing more than Klaxon-loving bandwagon jumpers, Nottingham’s synth-straddling indie stormers Late of the Pier spent the latter half of 2008 basking in the success of their debut album, Fantasy Black Channel, which was released off the back of six months of frothy anticipation. Opting to keep things real, their first outing of 2009 finds them threatening to light their potentially explosive fuse within the fairly modest walls of Glasgow’s Òran Mor. Given their reputation for kicking off live, it could be akin to locking yourself in the cupboard with a box of bangers. [Paul Neeson] 7PM, £8.50

Highlights by Ted Maul Spread the word: Edinburgh’s filthiest glam/punk sons The Vivians play their homecoming gig on 6 February at Cabaret Voltaire and it’s free entry, so this one is gonna go off for sure! Having decamped to the Big Smoke in order to test their mettle with the big boys, the Vivians return, harder, faster and stronger than ever. Discount the hyperbole at your peril: this band have massive tunes, limitless energy and they will entertain you. Exciting shit, y’all. Shiny Dundee four-piece The Hazy Janes will doubtless put a spring into the step of those who venture down to Fat Sam’s (Dundee) on 6 February - their relentlessly upbeat rhythms and sweet boy/ girl harmonies are reminiscent of dozens of classic sunshine bands, but remain uniquely Scottish in flavour. Foot-stomping, hand-clapping goodness... sign us up! This Town Needs Guns are a band that really should be better known than they are. With beautiful, intricate guitar lines that recall both the precision of Don Caballero and the euphoric outlandishness of The Meat Puppets, there’s not many bands around right now that have the chops to marry such virtuosity with such strong, melodic vocal work. Definitely bold, unusual and worthy of your time. Glasgow Barfly on 13 February (with hometown support from Endor) and Aberdeen Moshulu on 14 February. Fusing eerie melodies, snappy pop hooks, noise and thumping percussion is no mean feat, but Women (Google that, motherfucker!) are already making a name for themselves with their engagingly intense live performances, despite the fact that their debut album has only just been released on these shores. This is definitely one gig you should try to make it to - we have a feeling Women will go on to great things. Captain’s Rest (Glasgow) on 14 February. Honey-voiced singer/songwriters ain’t thin on the ground, but Emmy the Great stands out from the crop due to her charisma and witty, thoughtful lyrics. Plus, her band are more than just hired hands and actually play an important role in shaping her sound, which attains a surprising lushness on occasion. Aberdeen Moshulu on 15 Feb and Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire on 16 Feb.

BLACK LIPS: FREAKY, PSYCHEDELIC ROCK ‘N ROLLERS DON’T GET MUCH BETTER THAN THIS LOT. THEY SWING, THEY STOMP, THEY BURN... This isn’t the first time we’ve bigged-up Parts & Labor in this column, and with good reason: they’re a frickin’ great live band (not to mention darn impressive on record to boot). Brutal, pounding rhythms, killer bass and synth interplay and mesmerising vocal lines all add up to a seriously impressive package from these hard-hitting Brooklyn types. It’s going down at Glasgow Captain’s Rest on 16 February. Brace thyselves Glasgow, Black Lips are coming to town and they ain’t taking no fuckin’ prisoners. Freaky, psychedelic rock ‘n rollers don’t get much better than this lot. They swing, they stomp, they burn... Rolling Stone has called them “one of the best live bands in America” and you know what? For once, they might actually be right. Glasgow ABC 2 on 17 February. Legendary performance poet and super-articulate acolyte of your favourite bands, John Cooper Clarke gets verbal at Glasgow Arches on 1 March. Expect comedy, tragedy and everything in between at this one, which will most likely walk the line between full-on punk poetry and stand-up comedy.

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/LATEOFTHEPIER

STRICKEN CITY CAPTAIN’S REST, 25 FEB

The cosy Captain’s Rest seems an ideal venue to catch the critically acclaimed Stricken City. Hyped to the hilt, this indie-pop brigade sound quite unlike any of their peers. Sure, there are echoes of The Slits and The Sugarcubes but this London quartet are an altogether more sedate and huggable assemblage, evoking birds and neutral colours. Their floaty melodies combine catchy synth, uplifting bass, strident drums and gritty, jangling guitar. Rebekah Raa sings with hiccups and quavers, reminiscent of vocalists from the halcyon days of punk, only softer. Catch them now for an intimate gig before their popularity soars. [Georgina Merry] 8PM, £5. ALSO PLAYING CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 26 FEB AND THE TUNNELS, ABERDEEN ON 27 FEB. WWW.STRICKENCITY.COM

THESKINNY.CO.UK 48 THE SKINNY FEBRUARY 2009

Live Music

WOMEN LINDSEY BAKER


Music

Metal

up your

ASS By Austin Tasseltine

Fucked Up, The Garage, 27 Feb

Let’s be honest, February this year has an easy act to follow. After 31 days of what tabloid academics assert was statistically and empirically the most depressing month in living memory, February could probably get away with nothing but cheap carry-out meals and re-runs of Magnum PI and still waltz home with the title of ‘Best Month of 2009 Thus Far’. In terms of metal and rock gigs – the matter at hand – it has also thankfully pulled its finger out and delivered considerably more than its predecessor. Chiodos (2 Feb) shake up King Tut’s with what the venue calls post-hardcore - capable as it is, though it might well veer a little too close to emo for some tastes. ABC enjoys the gruff bellowings of a certain Max Cavalera (6 Feb) as Soulfly do that samba-nu-metal thing they virtually patented. As usual, Edinburgh is found lacking in terms of quality

heavyweight noise this month, but native Clutch enthusiasts, The Tyrant Lizard Kings, make a nice mess of Studio 24 (7 Feb). Despite packing the usual festival of romance in the form of Valentines Day, this month also thoughtfully provides us with a Friday 13th, just in time for the miserable loners and misanthropes amongst us to see scores of amorous teens brutally slaughtered in increasingly more inventive and occasionally hilarious ways. As further consolation, those same loveless souls might be happy to know they can savour the less-than-subtle shock-rock of Cannibal Corpse(not to mention Children of Bodom) while the survivors of the previous night gaze longingly into each other’s eyes betwixt candle flames and wilting flowers. But one day later, as the fog of love clears and domestic boredom once more sets in, distractions

must be sought. Look no further than the newly pronounced ‘O2’ Academy in Glasgow as Dimmu Borgir and Lamb of God head up the Defenders of Faith tour. For the purist, some ‘true metal’ can be found that same night in the form of little-known beat combos Judas Priest and Megadeth at the SECC (16 Feb). Cephalic Carnage make an appearance at Ivory Blacks (18 Feb) with The Black Dahlia Murder. The latter might enjoy favour with the American press and Ozzfest but, honestly, nobody does death-grind like Cephalic Carnage. Well, not many do death-grind anyway, but these guys have it pretty much cornered. The Captain’s Rest will very likely be levelled (20 Feb) when Young Widows try to cram their huge, Isis-inspired thunder into that small, black space in the West End. Edinburgh gets a glimmer of hope

that same date when Chickenhawk and Errander are joined by locals Secta Rouge at Henry’s Cellar Bar. Again, the confined space could make for some unholy tinnitus. The same two touring acts make a Glasgow appearance at new venue Cassette on Sauchiehall Street the next evening (21 Feb). The rock and roll quotient is represented (27 Feb) when The Bronx raise hell with Fucked Up and Rolo Tomassi at The Garage. Albeit via the medium of balls-out punk, the Californians still cram in one hell of a lot of swagger and riffage, this time in support of recent album – their third eponymous effort – released last month. Anyone currently suffering from a surplus of sleeveless denim will get a chance to make some use of it (28 Feb) as February surrenders its chilly grip on us with a Nazareth gig at Studio 24 in Edinburgh.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 49


Clubs

Cab Vol Heard It (Through The Grapevine) Turns Four There used to be a club in Edinburgh called the Peppermint Lounge. Then along came Cab Vol (same location, different ethos) and the capital's nightlife got better. And better. And better. Happy birthday!

Lots of bars play music, but too few take it really seriously - particularly to the extent of putting on individual, high quality nights. Hats off, then, to the Ivy... Last month Glasgow's Ivy bar moved to its new home on the west end of Argyle Street, occupying the space formerly held by 54 Below. Over the past two years Ivy has become one of the most celebrated bars in the city, boasting an impressive music policy and the biggest selection of rum of any bar in Scotland. In 2007 Ivy received the Best New Bar award from Theme Bar & Restaurant magazine and has increased in popularity among Glasgow’s crowd of discerning drinkers ever since. Ivy’s regular nights include OOFT Music’s Black Magic Rum Club and Stuberry Jam, where pub visitors are invited to jam with the in-house band. Ivy has attracted a lot of musical talent during its time on North Street, with both local acts and artists from further afield performing in the upstairs bar. The bar’s music policy also has close ties to the house, hip-hop and electronica record label Five20East, home to The Revenge, Deportivo Street Team, Ruff

Jamz and others. As well as providing some excellent DJ sets from local artists such as Record Playerz, Freakmenoovers, Harri and Boom Monk Ben, Ivy has also been the venue for some of the most intimate gigs to grace Glasgow in 2008. Canada’s finest export and national treasure, Cadence Weapon, performed to a crowd of around 150 people on his Afterparty Babies tour last year. Glasgow’s Numbers crew also put on artists at the Ivy, including Hudson Mohawke, with great success. Following the launch night on 31 January, Ivy looks set to continue its stellar music line-up each month. The Black Magic Rum Club returns on 5 February and The Revenge appear on 20 February with a big, fat Skinny seal of approval. Highly recommended. [Chris Duncan] www.ivybar.co.uk

The other side Chris Duncan: Watch out for the abyss... Congratulations, you’ve made it to February: the other side of January, or in industry terms, the clubbing abyss. Except this isn’t the case. The idea that the first month of the new year is a black hole for club nights is something of a myth. Yes, everyone is a bit skint and there isn’t always a great selection of events to choose from, but

50 THE SKINNY February 2009

there are still plenty of people determined to brace the chill and continue business as normal. Death Disco operated as normal, EQd enjoyed a very successful opening night and Cheap ‘n’ Nasty packed people into the basement of Sleazy’s until the sweat ran down the walls. Also, the student population returned to Glasgow, turning the West End into a quivering mass of bass-filled tenements. A special mention to the residents of Rupert St who unleashed all manner of hell on an otherwise silent road...

Erol Alkan, cab vol, 27 feb

Edinburgh’s Cabaret Voltaire celebrates its fourth birthday this month with a series of special guests. It begins on 25 February with a slot from DJ T at We Are Electric, and continues the following evening with a live performance from the muchhyped Little Boots at Sick Note on 26 February. The festivities are brought to a suitable climax with the arrival of Erol Alkan and Boy 8-Bit from South London. For over twenty years DJ T has been a key player in the techno and house music scene and the Dusseldorf-born DJ will be making a rare appearance at Cabaret Voltaire. Being both a pioneering musician and co-founder of the excellent Get Physical label, his headline gig is sure to be a stand-out night for Edinburgh’s club scene. Get Physical’s popularity and fame has spread well beyond its Berlin base over the past few years, reaching number four in the annual Groove magazine readers’ poll of best labels in 2004. Get Physical also claimed the coveted Label of the Year 2005 slot within the pages DJ Mag. The label’s appeal is wide-ranging and boasts a loyal fan-base for good reason. Little Boots has been announced as THE NEXT BIG THING by pretty much every publication that

decides what THE NEXT BIG THING is these days. And you wouldn’t want to miss out on THE NEXT BIG THING would you? Otherwise your former friends will laugh at you, your partner will leave you and your home will become repossessed, if the aforementioned members of the associated press are to be believed. And when were they ever wrong? Artists such as Sandi Thom and The Twang instantly became national treasures, didn’t they? The scathing pessimism of the last paragraph aside, Little Boots’ music falls into category of italo pop, a genre that 90 per cent of people incorrectly believe was invented by the NME in August. See her perform her Glass Candy-lite works at Sick Note on 26 Feb. Finally, Sugarbeat pull a top level guest out of the bag in the form of Erol Alkan, who returns to Scotland for what is certain to be a sold out night. At Erol’s last Scottish appearance he filled The Arches to capacity and broke Death Disco’s attendance record, so catching him in the confides of the Cab Vol will be a real treat for fans. Joining him is Boy 8Bit, dropping all manner of Amiga made sounds in support of the fringed one on Feb 27. [Chris Duncan]x www.thecabaretvoltaire.com


Ballers Social Club feat. Lazersword

Dirty Hearts Club present The Filthy Dukes

Glasgow School of Art, 13 Feb

Snafu, Feb 19

Friday the 13th may be unlucky for some, but certainly not for the Ballers Social Club. Super producers Lazersword (B.E.A.R Recordings) will be playing live in a completely original style of “a moulded techno, hip hop and electro-charged medium”, incorporating sounds from commercial R ‘n’ B with innovative synth-work and ecstatic screeching drums. A fine mix I’m sure you’ll agree. The duo’s superb live show is one of the most hard-hitting around; driven by improvisation and crowd-rocking physicality, they cause complete chaos on the dancefloor with mind-bending remixes and an inherent love for driving their audience wild. Support comes in the form of Fox Gutt Data (live) and LuckyMe, who both promise to warm up the crowd to epic levels.[Karen Taggart]

Former DJs The Filthy Dukes have metamorphosed into a band and a production team, while mainstays Olly and Tim are now joined by Mark, with whom they’ve created their new album Nonsense in the Dark. Like most personal art forms it is a result of their influences, which range from Tangerine Dream to Hot Chip, Can to SMD, Roxy Music to Soulwax, hip-hop to Krautrock. Due for release this month, the album features a collection of artists, most of whom have played Filthy Dukes’ Kill Em All club night. In their live performances they combine mixing desk with a tonne of old synths, pedals, distortion units and a load of other geeky stuff. Their live shows have an excellent reputation and this night looks set to further cement Snafu as the premier club in Aberdeen.[Chris Duncan]

www.myspace.com/ballerssocialclub

10pm-2am, £3/£4

Alternative present Riton

Mixed Bizness feat. Hint & Boom Monk Ben

The V Club, Feb 6

Glasgow School of Art, FEB 12

Alternative’s monthly airing at the V Club promises some impressive line-ups for its coming events, including Format B and French techno upstart Popof. February sees Alt celebrate its second birthday, boasting a headline set from London-based Riton, whose recent activity includes recording mixes for Radio 1 and Mixmag. Riton, who has pledged to introduce a harsher techno sound to his recent productions, looks set to push V Club’s newly installed soundsystem to its very limits. Also on the bill for this month are Glasgow’s very own Killer Kitsch, bringing a flavour of their successful Tuesday nights at Buff Club to the V Club’s Velvet Lounge, and Alt residents Derrick Burns and Jose. With one of the most exciting line-ups on offer this month, February’s Alt looks set to be, as all birthdays should be, a night to remember. [Joe A D]

Mixed Bizness rocks Glasgow School of Art every Thursday night, but on the 12th of this month regular special guest Hint (Tru Thoughts, Ninja Tune) makes the trip up North once again to delight clubbers with his bassy wonks and dancefloor dynamics. A master of all trades, Hint’s set will intermingle a selection of genres including hip hop, house, drum and bass, breakbeat, dancehall, garage and funk, proving exactly why he’s one of Mixed Bizness’ all-time favourite DJs. He never fails to energise and revitalise the crowd. With support from one of Scotland’s favourites, Boom Monk Ben, who is also no stranger to providing a mixture of music to entice your eardrums, this is certain to be one banging night. Be there or be seriously square.[Karen Taggart] 11pm-3am, £4 (£3 students, £1 G.S.A. students)

www.myspace.com/altuk

www.mixedbizness.co.uk/ www.subclub.co.uk/ www.myspace.com/welovefakeblood www.mixedbizness.co.uk/

HYP? present Fake Blood

The Arches, Feb 6

11pm-3am, £10

Sub Club, 27 Feb

How’s Your Party? kick off their 2009 with a bang as special guest Fake Blood (Cheap Thrills) comes to town. He'll be supported by resident DJ A La Fu (Radio Skool). Once known as Touche from the Wiseguys, Fake Blood has remodelled, rebranded and rejogged himself into one of the hottest and in-demand acts around. This will be Fake Blood’s Scottish debut, where he is sure to prove himself as one of the most exciting and refreshing artists in the current scene, playing a selection of unique electro, house and bass-heavy club cuts. As well as releasing one of 2008’s biggest club tracks, Mars, Fake Blood has also turned his hand to remixing the likes of Underworld, The Kills, Bonde Do Role and South Rakkas Crew, proving his ability to reach and appeal to a diverse range of genres. This is not to be missed, so get down and get involved. Put simply, in his own words, Fake Blood “will sound spectacular”.[Karen Taggart]

Clubs

Club Previews

Friday Night Takeaway Gorge yourself on an all-you-can-hear buffet this month as The Arches serves up a healthy portion of full-fat musical delights. From some of the team behind Death Disco and Octopussy comes Friday Night Takeaway, a mix of some of Scotland’s best DJ talent. The February launch night features Dress 2 Sweat’s Pro-Vinylist Karim, who will dish out a blistering Detroit techno set, Noodle resident Tricky, and Dan Monox, the mind behind Monox at the Soundhaus. Also appearing are Michael Paterson from Colours, AUK from Inside Out, Affi Koman of Sunday Circus fame and Sebrof Divad. All proceeds go straight into the pocket of the wonderful Oxjam charity, so everyone can go home safe in the knowledge that all the carnage of the night will be in aid of a good, nay, great cause. There are also goodie bags available to the first 50 visitors.[Chris Duncan] £8 plus b.f.11pm-3am www.myspace.com/fridaynighttakeaway

11pm-3am, £10 (£8) www.subclub.co.uk/ www.myspace.com/welovefakeblood www.mixedbizness.co.uk/

Jam The Box Launch Night GRV, 7 Feb

Named after an old Carl Craig track, Jam The Box has arrived to bring the fun back into clubbing. Focusing on great music rather than big names, the Jam The Box DJs (Jammiwam, Jimmy Jammin’ Thomas, Marmalade Maslin and Sinnerman) promise “delights to feed your heads and electrify your feet… with the finest blend of electro, house, boogie and disco”. The GRV is the perfect venue for this new monthly club night, with the front bar filled with funk, soul and hip hop, and the main room playing an array of dance tracks from electro, disco and boogie to dubstep, ghetto, and anything else that’ll make you move your feet. So for a great party, and even better music, head down to the launch night of what may yet become one of Edinburgh’s premier nights out. [Karen Taggart] www.myspace.com/jamtheboxclub

Get full clubbing listings oN page 57

even more club reviews and previews available online: theskinny.co.uk

skinny ad february.indd 1

26/1/09 7:41:07 pm

February 2009

THE SKINNY 51


Clubs

Cutting a rug

on the cutting room floor Not content with projecting moving images onto every single flat surface in Glasgow, Chris Duncan finds that this year the Glasgow Film Festival promises to infiltrate the underbelly of the town, with events taking place in the Sub Club and The Arches.

unforgettable experience. Through at The Arches various events are taking place throughout the festival. Monthly super club Death Disco gets its glad rags on and gets truly tarted up with extra visuals from Pointless Creations. Taking place on 21 February it also features guest performances from Brodinski, Jokers of the Scene and The Filthy Dukes, who are performing live in The Playroom. Before Death Disco arrives there is a screening of Who Killed Nancy? and a short film entitled I Love You More. The former is a documentary focusing on Sex Pistol’s bassist Sid Vicious and the circumstances surrounding his girlfriend, Nancy Spungen’s death. The film is preceded by the fifteen minute short I Love You More, a tale of two teenagers drawn together by the Buzzcock’s single of the same name during the summer of ‘78. On 20February Numbers hijack The Arches to present their good friends and exceptional music talent Modeselektor. The Berlin based duo are considered to be true trailblazers within the electronic music scene and recently supported Radiohead on their international tour. Visuals come from Retina Glitch and the Berlin VJ collective Pfadfinderei. Earlier in the evening local boys Union of Knives perform live to what will almost certainly be a sell out crowd. The three piece have enjoyed great sucess following the release of their debut album, Violence and Birdsong, and are just about ready to reveal their second album to fans. The show promises to be an intimate affair and, like all live music shows taking part during the film festival, will be accompanied by live visuals.

Return to Mono, Subculture and Optimo will all host short film screenings as well as inviting visual artists to create installations to go alongside the usual musical journeys Above: ControlMaster

Glasgow’s fifth annual film festival promises to spread itself over every cinema, art house and multiplex in the city. Not content with projecting moving images onto every single flat surface in Glasgow, this year the GFF will infiltrate the underbelly of the town, with events taking place in the Sub Club and The Arches. Return to Mono, Subculture and Optimo will all host short film screenings as well as inviting visual artists to create installations to go alongside the usual musical journeys. Underground scene veterans Slam host Return to Mono and on 13 February invite local video artist and lighting designer Scott McDonald to dress up the Subby with his unique visuals. Subculture opens its doors on 14 February with a DJ set from the Godfather of House that is Harri. Following Harri is a very special guest slot from Hacienda DJ Greg Wilson, all set against the backdrop of the well known visual art installations of Pointless Creations. 15 February is the closing night of the Short Films Festival and Optimo see off this year in style with a David Lynch themed evening. One section of the club will be cut off with Twin Peaks style red drapes and a screen showing Lynch’s short films throughout the night. Music will be provided by resident JD Twitch and JG Wilkes, along with guests Jackmaster and Desmond and the Tutus. The David Lynch room will show the films Six Men Getting Sick, The Alphabet, The Grandmother, both versions of The Amputee, The Cowboy and the Frenchman, and finally Premonitions Following An Evil Deed. Elsewhere in the club the team at Magic Lantern will present the French films Un Chien Andalou, L’Etoile de Mer and Entr’acte. German offering Ghosts Before Breakfast and the Irish short simply entitled Film will also make an appearance. All this alongside art installations and projections onto the dancefloor roof, expect a very surreal and

52 THE SKINNY February 2009

Below: rat

Last, but by no means least, comes SHHHH! An Evening Of (Not So) Silent Movies on 22 February. Rounding off the music programme of the Glasgow Film Festival, The Arches will be transformed into a 1920’s cinema for the evening, complete with themed decor and ushers selling popcorn. There will also be a troupe of burlesque performers, which may break away from the 1920’s theme but who are we to argue? The aim of the night is to explore the link between live music and cinema, with musicians given free reign to come up with an original piece of music to accompany a piece of film. There's a lot of scope for some imagination at what is sure to be an unforgettable event. Guests confirmed so far include My Latest Novel, Remember Remember, Zoey Van Goey and Dolby Anol. More acts are set to be announced within the coming weeks to add the finishing touches to this interesting event. www.glasgowfilmfestival.org.uk

Terminus


Dundee Music Wed 04 Feb Stepping Stones Charity Gig with Fauves, Dave?, Quiver and the Lady Snatchers The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Thu 05 Feb The Xcerts, Copy Haho

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Pop and rock

Fri 06 Feb HAZEY JANES

Sorren Maclean, Sarah Coloso, Alex Wayt The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Indie acoustic

Sat 07 Feb

One Night of Queen

FOUR DEAD IN OHIO

Caird Hall, 19:30–22:30, £18.50/16.50

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Tribute

Progressively psychedelic-ish rock

Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Scottish Ensemble (Quicksilver)

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Mozart’s Divertimento, Stravinsky’s Apollon Musagète and a new composition by Kurt Schwertsik.

Caird Hall, 19:30–22:30, £15/28

Rob Kingsley’s tribute to the king.

A Vision of Elvis

Bathgate Live Presents: The Apple Scruffs

Marryat Hall, 19:30–22:30, £14.50

Ellen Kent & Amphitheatre Productions present: Bizet Carmen Traditional production, with a range of international soloists performing alongside the full Chisinau National Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus.

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £6

Indie pop

Sun 08 Feb

Mon 09 Feb

Single launch

Deaf Havana, allstationsdown

saturdays

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Progressive screamo and southern rock

Dance, trance, pop, rock and cheese

Thu 12 Feb

Thu 19 Feb

Badke Quartet

Wounded Knee

A performance of Haydn’s String Quartet in G op 76.1, Schumann’s String Quartet in A op 41.3 and Beethoven’s String Quartet in C op 59.3

Experimental vocalist

Marryat Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10/5

Fri 13 Feb The Ray Summers, Dave?

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Psychedelic pop

Sat 14 Feb

Fri 27 Feb Halcyon presents Chicane

DCA , 19:00–20:00, Free

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–00:00, £14

Dance

Sat 21 Feb The Snapping Turtles

The Doghouse, 15:00–17:00, Free

Blues and rock covers

The Snapping Turtles

The Doghouse, 15:00–17:00, Free

Blues and rock covers

The Cavern Beatles

Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Skaville UK The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Ska ensemble

Sat 28 Feb FAIRPORT CONVENTION

This is Soul (Geno Washington, The Ram Jam Band, Jimmy James, PP Arnold)

Bowl cuts ahoy

We’ll take their word for it.

Babel, Fauves, Quiver and The Lady Snatchers

The Daze, The Twist

saturdays

Dance, trance, pop, rock and cheese

Progressive rock and indie

Indie rock

Ra Ra Riot

Barfly & Big Scary Monsters presents THIS TOWN NEEDS GUNS

Caird Hall, 19:30–22:30, £19.50/17.50

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Thu 26 Feb

British folk rock

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

The Doghouse, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Glasgow music Tue 03 Feb

Fri 06 Feb

Mike Bones

Playtone

New Yawk pop

Rock/ indie/ pop band.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:00–22:30, £5

Ross Clark, Open Mic Òran Mór, 20:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic session followed by a free for all.

Box, 18:30–19:30, Free

A-Side Events Presents: ACDC Volts and Led Astray The Ferry, 19:00–00:00, £12/14

Eclectiv

A double header feat. ACDC and Led Zeppelin tribute acts.

See what they did there? The weekly portmanteau night from the Eclectic Collective proffers up some of the best genre defying trappings of this indecisive age

Original Fires Night: The Apple Scruffs, Black Alley Screens, Eightball, Richy McKay

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £0-5

Wreckin’ Pit: BOMB THE MUSIC INDUSTRY!, MIKE SCOTT, DAVE HUGHES 13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

Acousmatic and Tape

Wed 04 Feb DF Concerts present: The Cribs (The Thermals, Jack Lewis and The Fisherman 3.) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £14

Indie

Live at The Mill (The AD’s, Le Reno Amps) The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 19:30–22:00, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Mono Jazz

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Revelations

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £0-5

Weekly indie night

Telegraphs, Alkotron, Das Filth

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Anthemic alt. rock, experimental garage and seaside sounds.

Thu 05 Feb

Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

DF Concerts present: Soulfly

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Alt. indie

butterhook, paper few, annie stevenson Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–00:00, £5

Alt. rock and pop

The Down & Outs Box, 20:00–21:00, Free

Fresh from the TBreak stage at TitP 08, The Down and Outs play a regular slot every Friday, performing a mix of their own rocky and inspiring tunes - with some covers thrown in for good measure.

Mongrel, Mpho, The Lafontaines

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7.83

Gaggle of musos from Babyshambles, Reverend and The Makers and The Arctic Monkeys promote the new collaborative albu.

SPARROW AND THE WORKSHOP, BLUEFLINT 13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

Garage, psych, freakbeat, rock n roll.

Animal Kingdom

Midnight Sessions

Alt. indie

Weekly post-gig hangout

The Flying Duck, 21:00–02:00, £4 (£3)

Live show from Weenliz & theapplesofenergy followed by a live open experimental jam. Bring an instrument and join in.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–22:30, £5

Alt. rock

ABC, 19:00–23:00, sold out

Punk trio

Eclectiv

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £0-5

See what they did there? The weekly portmanteau night from the Eclectic Collective proffers up some of the best genre defying trappings of this indecisive age

The Blow Monkeys

13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

PM Music present Psycho Candy

Comedy acoustic with a gothic edge

Blood Club

hooks‘n’crooks

Triple G present: Alkaline Trio

Indie rock

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

The Twisted Wheel, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Dapperly thespian alt. pop quartet

The sound of voodoo and santería is mixed with raw electricity in an evening of eclectic experimental African sounds.

Rock

Ross Clark, Open Mic

Òran Mór, 19:30–00:00, £5

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

CCA, 19:30–00:00, £5 (door)/£4 advance

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alt. indie

Eyes Wide Open

The Days, The Debuts, Carnivores

CUT HANDS III (Defibrillators, Heather Leigh Murray, William Bennett)

HEROS FOR A DAY, ZAUN, PROVOCATEURS, OSLO, NINE CIRCLES

Metal and punk

Indie pop and rock

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

aka Dennis Coles, American rapper from the Wu-Tang Clan.

Tue 10 Feb Deaf Havana

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £11.75

Folk surf, folkish-surf. Or maybe folk who surf.

Beerjacket

The Arches, 19:00–23:00, £16.50

Glissando, The French Quarter

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £14

The Aeroplanes

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £6

GHOSTFACE KILLAH

Pivo Pivo, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Sat 07 Feb Robyn Hitchcock (and friends) ABC, 19:00–00:00, £13.50

Stow Away Blues, De Jour, Wrongnote, Jousting with Dracula Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £5

Soft rock

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–03:00, £tbc

THE PRAYERS, LEAN TALES, HALYCYON DAYS, BLESSED ORDER OF FALLEN STARS Alt., indie

Vegas

The Ferry, 21:30–02:00, £10

Sun 08 Feb Bloc Sunday (My Old Blue Terraplane) Bloc, 17:00–01:00, Free

Weekly music love-in with resident bands, open mics and happy happy times.

1993eatsdoublesidedtape Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–22:30, £5

Live electronics

Haunts, The Vivians, Boycotts

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

Synth-heavy noir and hyped-up rock

Pop veterans

Òran Mór, 20:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic session followed by a free for all.

Wed 11 Feb National Review of Live Art (Various)

The Arches, 10:00–00:00, See online for details

Let the fun commence

NORTH GLASGOW COLLEGE BAND NIGHT Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Live at The Mill (Broken Records, Endrick Brothers) The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 20:00–22:30, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Mono Jazz

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

No Tribe

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Weekly alt. rock and metal night

Revelations

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £0-5

Mon 09 Feb MISERY INDEX, SEE YOU NEXT TUESDAY, BURNING SKIES, DEAD BEYOND BURIED Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £10

Death metal.

Ray LaMontagne

Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 19:00–23:00, various

American folk singer/songwriter.

Essie Jain

Stereo, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £0-5

Weekly indie night

Secret Machines, Filthy Dukes

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £9.79

Apocolyptic and muscly. The thinki man’s rock.

Thu 12 Feb National Review of Live Art (Various)

The Arches, 10:00–00:00, See online for details

New York-based acoustic singer/ songwriter doing her UK duties for the promotion of her second album, The Inbetween.

Let the fun commence

The Hip Parade

Regular Music present: Nell Bryden

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Trippy neon indie

Forever The Sickest Kids The Garage, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Rock and powerpop

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £7

Acoustic americana and blues

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6.50

American indie strung through with pop melodies and post-punk rhythms.

St Deluxe

Barfly, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alt. indie

Paper Planes

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Fuck ups, The Babysitters, Poverty Scum, Dip Dap

Power punk surf pop

Indie with a capital ‘I’

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £4

EDDY AND THE T-BOLTS, EL BASTARDOS, SENZAFINE, DENIS LAW JR

INDAFUSION

13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

Progressive indie powerpop

BALKANARAMA

Rock

13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

Mutant Music (Alkotron, Convoi Exceptionnel & Not In This Town, DJ sets from Splendid Dead and Dirty Marc.) The Flying Duck, 21:00–02:00, £4

Fri 13 Feb National Review of Live Art (Various)

The Arches, 10:00–00:00, See online for details

Let the fun commence

Powerpop and rock Stereo, 21:00–03:00, £tbc

Balkan, gypsy, klezmer and East European music.

Ballers Social Club present: Lazersword (Fox Gutt Data, LuckyMe Residents) Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £5/7

San Francisco based electronic duo

Sat 14 Feb National Review of Live Art (Various)

Playtone

Box, 18:30–19:30, Free

Rock/ indie/ pop band.

Pierced’n pINK Present The St. Valentines Day Massacre Classic Grand, 19:00–00:00, £6

2 floors, ten bands. Leave your crumbled tissues and Bridget Jones rental at home children.

Dirty Angel, Junkyard Dawgs, JMC Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £5

Rock ‘n’ roll

ABC DIY present: The Black Hand Gang ABC, 19:00–23:00, £5

Alt. acoustiic and blues

Shockwaves NME Awards Show: Ida Maria, Flashguns, Middle Class Rut The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £10.38

You like me so much better when I’m what? How very forward.

THE SCHEME EXPERIENCE, BREAK GLASS EMERGENCY, GET GONE, ALBURN, SINKING CITIES Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

Variations on indie rock

The Arches, 10:00–00:00, See online for details

Let the fun commence

DF Concerts present: Asobi Seksu (Wintersleep) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £7.50

Psychedelic trance pop.

Triple G present: Children of Bodom ABC, 19:00–23:00, £16.50

Metal

Barfly Presents (The King Blues) Barfly, 19:30–22:30

Punk folk rockers The King Blues perform at the Barfly as part of their Big Issue Tour. Entry is free when you present a copy of The Big Issue at the door. Thereafter, MC Trusty of Twin Atlantic and DJ:CD of Flood of Red take you into Mixtape into the small hours with a jam of electro, punk, indie, emo, and house floor fillers.

Emmy The Great, The Salon Society, Julia Doogan

The Down & Outs Box, 20:00–21:00, Free

Fresh from the TBreak stage at TitP 08, The Down and Outs play a regular slot every Friday, performing a mix of their own rocky and inspiring tunes - with some covers thrown in for good measure.

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7.35

Rodan, The Nancy Wha

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £5

Rock and pop

Hong Kong born, London-based female singer/songwriter.

Women Another faint stab at 60’s pop perhaps.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 53


Glasgow music Regular Music present: Hue And Cry ABC, 19:00–23:00, £20

Pop duo

The Jigawotts, The Black Rats, Shimmer, Spearbrave Maggie Mays, 19:30–23:00, £5/4

Indie rock

Crystal Stilts

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Psychedelic minimalist punk

THE SLEEPWALKERS, Scunner, The Verdict Barfly, 20:00–23:00, £6

Alt. rock

WITHERED HAND, MOUNT ANALOGUE, 1

Punk Rock Rammy presents MIKE TV, Four Past Midnight, JB Conspiracy, Rebel City Radio, The Murderburgers, Outl4w, The Lie Detectotors, The Atoms, More Than Normal. Barfly, 14:00–23:00, £10

Bloc Sunday (Sunday Affair feat: Lou Hickey) Bloc, 17:00–01:00, Free

Òran Mór, 20:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic session followed by a free for all.

Wed 18 Feb THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER, CEPHALIC CARNAGE, PSYCROPTIC, SYLOSIS Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £10

Hardcore

Weekly music love-in with resident bands, open mics and happy happy times.

Live at The Mill (Intervals, First We Take Manhattan)

Eagleowl (Eagleowl, Rob St. John, State Broadcasters)

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–11:30, £5

Imelda May, Lou Hickey, The Lynsey Dolan Band

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £9.79

Glammed-up rockabilly, blues and jazz.

Mon 16 Feb

The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 20:00–22:30, Free

Firestorm Events presents: Mexico Falls, Maycomb, Verona, When Lights Flash

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £4

Rock and pop

Mono Jazz

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

THE WHISKY WORKS, GDANSK, HEY VAMPIRES, SCARLETTA

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Alt. rock

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, sold out

Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Sabrepulse, Casiokid, Henry Home Sweet Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £5

Electro

A Day To Remember, For The Fallen Dreams, Azriel, 2 Thirds Of Youth

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–00:00, sold out

High energy rock

Parts & Labor

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7 Anthemic noise-punk quartet from Brooklyn

Tue 17 Feb Glasgow Live Events Present: The Eyes Of A Traitor, Your Fears Classic Grand, 19:00–23:00, £5

Progressive metal and hardcore.

KMR Promotions present: Black Lips ABC, 19:00–23:00, £8

Das Pop, Absent Elk

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7.83

Guitar pop

The Dykeenies, Healthy Minds Collapse Indie boys from Cumbernauld

Thu 19 Feb Shockwaves NME Awards Show: Iglu & Hartly QMU, 19:00–23:00, £9.60

Barfly, 20:00–23:00, £6

Rock

Fri 20 Feb Playtone

Box, 18:30–19:30, Free

Rock/ indie/ pop band.

daemonolith, dragged into sunlight, cnocantursa, the eschaton creed Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Alt. rock and indie

To Catch a Thief, My Actions Your Exit, 2/3 Youth, Up For The Letdown Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £10

Pop punk.

Richard Alston (Richard Alston)

Theatre Royal, 19:30–21:30, various

Hot Love, Tigers on Vaseline Òran Mór, 20:00–00:00, £7

Glam rock

The Down & Outs Box, 20:00–21:00, Free

Fresh from the TBreak stage at TitP 08, The Down and Outs play a regular slot every Friday, performing a mix of their own rocky and inspiring tunes - with some covers thrown in for good measure.

Aerials Presents: Woodenbox with a Fistfull of Fivers, Sparrow & The Workshop and Mitchell Museum

Young Widows

3 Glasgow up-n-comers

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

The Twisted Wheel, 19:30–00:00, £5

DF CONCERTS PRESENT: NME AWARDS TOUR 2009 WITH TRICKY The Arches, 20:00–23:00, £18

Rock and hip hop

Jersey Budd, Jeye T, Iain Mckinnon

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

Acoustic singer/ songwriter

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Three checkered shirted boys from Louisville

Modeselektor (Spencer, Jackmaster) German techno

Sat 21 Feb 4 Day Weekend, Castaway, One Man Town Classic Grand, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Catcher

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6/4

Glasgow based indie

Super Adventure Club

PM Music present: Would Be Kings (Days of Days)

Soop’d up super.

Alt. rock

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Get yer listings

online

theskinny.co.uk

54 THE SKINNY February 2009

Snow Patrol

SECC, 19:00–23:00, £29.37

Indie alt. rock

The Ting Tings, Ladyhawke o2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £16.15

All of your synthtastic electro-pop dreams have just come true

The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £12

Rock

The Bronx The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £18

Tropical rock.

Masculine and Feminine (Companhia Paulo Ribeiro)

Live at The Mill (Sonny Marvello, Pixie Cato)

Barfly, 20:00–23:00, £6

Tramway, 19:30–21:30, 9

The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 20:00–22:30, Free

Bloc Sunday (The Hit Parade)

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Weekly music love-in with resident bands, open mics and happy happy times.

Glasgow Live Events presents: Never Back Down, Through Solace & 2

Bloc, 17:00–01:00, Free

Malcolm Holcombe (Haight-Ashbury, Jim McAteer) The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £7

Acoustic folk, blues and rock

Vagabond, The Mode, Shimmer

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Four-piece indie ensemble

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rock and pop

MARTIN TURNER’S WISHBONE ASH The Arches, 20:00–23:00, £12.50

A performance of the complete Argus album

Mono Jazz

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

Tramway, 19:30–21:00, 9

Metal, hardcore and screamo

Wild Beasts, Napoleon IIIrd, How To Swim King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6.86

Pop

Sat 28 Feb Tam White & The Serman Organ Trio Classic Grand, 19:00–23:00, £12

The LaFontaines, Illegitimate Sons of the King ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Hip hop, rock and pop

Jill Jackson

Woodpigeon

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Òran Mór, 19:30–00:00, £6

Alt. indie pop

Stricken City

Masculine and Feminine (Companhia Paulo Ribeiro)

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

SPY MOVIE, DUMB INSTRUMENT, THE EX MEN 13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

Spy Movie EP Launch

Mon 23 Feb The Young Sensations, The Boycotts Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Pop

Tue 24 Feb Shockwaves NME Awards Show: Pete Doherty

Indie alt. rock

Lyrical soul pop

Rock

Shred Yr Face 2 Tour: The Bronx, Fucked Up, Rolo Tomassi

A selection of talent from Lofi’s roster of bands and artists.

Skint & Demoralised, Playtone, The Ex Men

New wave pop

The Garage, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Indie pop

Mean fiddler presents FEI COMODO, Bury Tomorrow

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £18.60

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5.88

Nazareth

Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Lofi Studio Presents…..

BISMARK, The Zips, Coba Fynn, Ready2Fall Barfly, 20:00–23:00, £6

Wed 25 Feb

Fri 27 Feb Liechtenstein, Dorotea, Peter Parker

Part of New Territories. What is it like to be mindless?

Sun 22 Feb THE NOVELTIES, The Toi, The I D Parade

Acoustic session followed by a free for all.

13th Note, 21:00–00:00, £tbc

The Twisted Wheel, 21:00–01:00, £5

Ross Clark, Open Mic

Òran Mór, 20:00–00:00, Free

Mind Out (Station House Opera)

Death metal with a dusting of folk

Sun 15 Feb

Ross Clark, Open Mic

Snow Patrol

SECC, 19:00–23:00, £29.37

Babel, Opportunity Club, Spanish Boys Name

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Pop

Titus Andronicus, The Elvis Suicide, Empires

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Rock ‘n’ roll

Thu 26 Feb VETIVER, trembling bells

Manchester 6 piece; with stains of folk, country, psyche and rock on their shiny pop faces.

Little Death Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Wreckin’ Pit Promotions presents: 4 Past Midnight (Hateful & The Terrors)

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £17.60

Indie pop punk

winning sperm party presents: ACTION BEAT, DON VITO, GROZNY, ULTIMATE THRUSH The Twisted Wheel, 19:30–01:00, £4

International array of punk.

Soul pop and U.S indie.

Rock and pop

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–22:30, £7

The Wombats

School of Seven Bells

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £4

The Travelling Band

A little bit cool, a little bit creepy, Chinese pop

Thrash and black metal

Tamborines and dancing men.

The Muscle Club & 2

Tramway, 19:30–21:00, 9

Stereo, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Hockey, Passion Pit, Bear Hands

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc Surreal, psychedelic Brooklyn outfit.

Alt. americana

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Phantom Band, Call To Mind

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

Britpop

The Twisted Wheel, 20:00–23:00, £4/5

Album launch night for ‘Guilty As Charged’

Sun 01 Mar Bloc Sunday Bloc, 17:00–01:00, Free

Weekly music love-in with resident bands, open mics and happy happy times.

rise against ABC, 19:00–00:00, £15


Edinburgh music Tue 03 Feb

Fri 06 Feb

Music from current students

Kosmos Kollectif, The Alibis, Polar Haze, The Caponas, Windlestray

Alisdair White (Aaron Jones, Ewan MacPherson)

A lovely jubbly Friday of experimental rocking and rolling

Jewel and Esk Showcase The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

The Village, 19:30–22:30, £6

A fiddle, a bouzouki and a geetar

CEILIDH CLUB (FREE RANGE) The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £6

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Trampoline presents Glissando, French Quarter and the Japanese War Effort

TUESDAY JAM

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, £5

The House Trio backs drop-in guests

Athens, The Flavours

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–00:00, Free

LATE n’ LIVE (SOUL SOCIETY) The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Wed 04 Feb TEATIME ACOUSTIC (Toby ‘Jack of Diamonds’) The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Bluesy rock

The High Lines

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Indie rock

CORNER SESSIONS (JOHN DEARY, MACHRE GRANITE, THE 48 BAND) The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £4

An evening of live performances, first Wednesday of every month.

OPEN MIC with STRETCH DAWRSON

The Jam House, 20:00–23:00, Free

Western swing from Stretch’s duo plus open mic slots for the bold, the beautiful and the drunk.

Bomb The Music Industry (Taking Chase, The Hijacks) The GRV, 20:30–00:00, £6

One-man skacore from the U.S.

LATE n’ LIVE (THE FREAKY FAMILY) The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Thu 05 Feb The Vinyl Countdown The Ark, 19:00–00:00, £4

Will things ever be the same again?

Live at The Mill (Solar Eye, RBRBR) The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, 19:30–22:00, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Scottish Ensemble (Quicksilver) Queen’s Hall, 19:45–22:30, £14.50/12

Mozart’s Divertimento, Stravinsky’s Apollon Musagète and a new composition by Kurt Schwertsik.

THE OFFENDERS

The Jam House, 20:00–22:30, Free

Edinburgh based blues

Progressive pop

The Jam House, 20:00–00:00, Free

Dragonfly, 21:00–01:00, Free

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Mon 09 Feb The Circus of Horrors Apocalypse in the Asylum Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £20-10

Gruesomely ironic cult circus show fronted by Doktor Haze.

The Vivians

LATE n’ LIVE

Punk rock

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Cabaret Voltaire, 20:00–22:00, £tbc

Black Tape

Sneaky Pete’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie electro

BALKANARAMA (JANI LANG BAND, Mr KALMAN BALOGH and dj DD) Studio 24, 21:00–03:00, £7 before 11pm/ £9

All things Balkan, incl. an early live music session, film, belly dancing and free rakija (fruity Balkan brandy apparently).

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sat 07 Feb Tyrant Lizard Kings Studio 24, 19:00–22:00, £6

Rock

Sad Society, Can Anyone Fly This Plane The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Scene regulars with their usual dose of feel good punk, followed by Edbased emo quartet.

TOMMY SMITH YOUTH JAZZ ORCHESTRA The Lot, 19:30–00:00, £8

Juan Martin Flamenco Ensemble

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Tue 10 Feb FIRESTORM EVENTS : And So Watch From Afar, Lefaro, support The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Alt. rock

Maeve Mackinnon

The Village, 19:30–22:30, £6

Gaelic singer

The Circus of Horrors Apocalypse in the Asylum Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £20-10

Gruesomely ironic cult circus show fronted by Doktor Haze.

TUESDAY JAM

The Top Cats 6 piece jazz outfit

The Bedlam Survivors Club, Salute Mary

LATE n’ LIVE

The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £6

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–00:00, Free

The House Trio backs drop-in guests

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Wed 11 Feb

OPEN MIC with STRETCH DAWRSON

Cryptik

Sneaky Pete’s, 22:30–03:00, Free

An evening of house, minimal techno, and electro with resident DJ’s Scott Donachie and Kristian Elliot.

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sun 08 Feb Caroline Gilmour, Fourteenhour, Belcappa

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–22:30, £6

Album launch

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

The Jazz Bar, 20:30–00:00, £4/3

SUNDAY SINGERS NIGHT Weekly showcase

Glammed-up rockabilly, blues and jazz.

Vegas (Frankie Sumatra, Bugsy Seagull, Dino Martini, Sam Jose, Nikki Nevada, The Vegas Showgirls and The Fabulous Scott Brothers)

The Negatives Rock

Eagleowl (Eagleowl, Rob St. John, My Kappa Roots)

The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £9

Smoked Glass

Alt. pop and indie

Mike Kearney, The Flavours Bannerman’s, 21:00–00:00, £4

The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, 19:00–22:30, Free

Regular Music presents: Imelda May

CEILIDH CLUB (NORMAN MACKAY)

Sneaky Pete’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indafusion, Bo Deadly

The Jam House, 20:30–00:00, £tbc

Live at The Mill (Broken Records, Endrick Brothers)

STU BROWN’S RAYMOND SCOTT PROJECT

The Bowery, 20:00–11:30, £5

Une Fiori

Flamenco guitarist

Thu 12 Feb

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

THE COAST

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £15

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

RUB-A-DUB STYLE (I-TAL FAYA SOUND meets FRONTLINE SELECTA)

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, £4 The GRV, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Alt. pop

The Jam House, 20:00–22:30, Free

Western swing from Stretch’s duo plus open mic slots for the bold, the beautiful and the drunk.

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Rock

The Jam House, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4

Indie rock

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Fri 13 Feb Gallus Cooper, Vantage point, The Engines Vengence The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Alice Cooper tribute, followed by some hardcore metal and thrash

Mike Kearney, The Flavours

The Jam House, 20:30–00:00, £tbc

Cabaret Voltaire, 22:30–03:00, £9 The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sun 15 Feb Music, the Food of Love: Romantic Valentine’s Classics (RSNO) Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 18:00–20:00, £10 - £28

An evening of classical music from the RSNO, featuring Tchaikovsky’s ‘Fantasy Overture’ and mercurial Sunwook Kim performing Grieg’s ‘Piano Concerto’.

Gand-Eye, The Pineapple Chunks

An evening of music, comedy and spoken word.

Funk, hip hop and some fruity Edinburgh pop

ecat, the University of Edinburgh & the RSAMD presents: Stockhausen serious to Sirius

The Blow Monkeys, The Manikees

The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £14

Idiosyncratic pop

The epic four-piece celebrates it’s 55th anniversary with a charity concert in aid of The Chesney Trust.

Simon Smith performs a selection from Stockhausen’s Piano Pieces Nos 1-IV, V, VII, IX, XIII

Athens, The Flavours

SUNDAY SINGERS NIGHT

Queen’s Hall, 20:15–22:30, £10

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, Free

Brakglass Emergency The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Stewart’s Melville College, 19:30–22:30, £22/18

The Jazz Bar, 20:30–00:00, £4/3

TMJ PRESENTS: THORN’S MAGICAL JOURNEY, NORMAN LAMONT, PAUL GILBODY

Tomb Crew at Coalition

This Is Music: Mersault, How To Swim, Broken Records DJ Set Sneaky Pete’s, 20:00–03:00, £tbc

Sketchy, scratchy indie lyricists and the Weggie jazz-pop eleven-piece.

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sat 14 Feb Injuns, Claes Cem

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Lyrical pop from Skye and a singer/ songwriter from Denver.

MAYA29, The Starry Wisdom Cult, Threshold Sicks, Hell is Harmony

Weekly showcase

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

TUESDAY JAM

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–00:00, Free

The House Trio backs drop-in guests

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Wed 18 Feb Reel Big Fish (+ Guests)

The Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £14

On the Brink (Hebrides Ensemble) Includes visual of 1939 Europe teetering on the edge of war.

OPEN MIC with STRETCH DAWRSON

The Jam House, 20:00–22:30, Free

Western swing from Stretch’s duo plus open mic slots for the bold, the beautiful and the drunk.

Citizen Charlie

Bannerman’s, 21:00–00:00, £4

Classic rock

LATE n’ LIVE

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Thu 19 Feb Live at The Mill (Kiddo, 10:04’s)

The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, 19:00–22:30, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

To Catch A Thief

The Hive, 19:00–23:00, £5

Alt. rock

Thorns Musical Journey, Honeybug

Mon 16 Feb EMMY THE GREAT (EXLOVERS, YOUNG HUSBAND) Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:30, £7.50

Female singer/songwriter

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Folk rock

iCanto Vivo! (Simon Thacker & Claire Debono) Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £12

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Maltese soprano and Scottish guitarist.

TOMMY SMITH AND JACOB KARLZON The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £12

Tue 17 Feb

Dino Baptist

Jewel and Esk Showcase The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

The Jam House, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Blues and funk keyboard player

LATE n’ LIVE

Current students perform

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Peter Case

Todd Gordon

Grammy nominated folk rocker.

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:00, £16

The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £6

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

The Drifters

The Jam House, 20:00–00:00, Free

The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £4

CEILIDH CLUB (HEELIEGOLEERIE)

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £12

Playback: The Best of Edinburgh Open Mics The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–00:00, £3/2

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £10

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

The Village, 19:30–22:30, £8

Fri 20 Feb

Jazz and swing singer celebrates the work of Johnny Mercer.

Basement Jaxx

The Gussets and friends

Abbamania

A TORN MIND, THE STRANDS, WE ARE EMPIRE

Punk

Another tribute, good lord.

Progressive rock

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, £5

Corn Exchange, 20:00–00:00, £20 Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £17.50

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £4

February 2009

THE SKINNY 55


Edinburgh music Chickenhawk, Errander, Secta Rouge Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Faithful Narrator

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, £5

Female fronted indie collective

Thrashy metal

Dino Baptist (The Flavours)

Regular Music presents HUE AND CRY

Blues and funk keyboard player

The Picture House, 19:00–23:00, £20

Scottish pop duo. Original tickets from Liquid Rooms still valid.

Black International, Come In Tokyo Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, Free

Rock and alt. indie

Jenn Grant and Kevin Hearn The Village, 19:30–22:30, £6

A Canadian double bill feat. Hearn of Barenaked Ladies fame.

Tam White & The Sermon Organ 3rio

The Jam House, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sun 22 Feb Strictly Strauss

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 14:30–16:00, £17.50 - £28

A show that recreates a 19th century Vienna ballroom in all its pomp. Featuring a host of Strauss classics, including ‘Blue Danube Waltz’.

Blues

Crystal Stilts, Jesus H Foxx, //FAST DJS//

THE ANTI-NOWHERE LEAGUE

Psychedelic minimalist punk

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £15

Citrus Club, 19:30–22:30, £10

Punk rock

Dino Baptist (The Flavours) The Jam House, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Blues and funk keyboard player

THE EDINBURGH JAZZ CLUB The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Telefunken presents HECTOR MORALEZ (Alan Gray, Mikey Inglis) Cabaret Voltaire, 20:00–22:00, £7/5

Sanfranciscan house

Man at the Window, I-tal Faya Sound The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, Free

Reggae

Emergency Red

Bannerman’s, 21:00–00:00, £4

Indie rock

Departure Lounge (Nostalgia 77 (Tru Thoughts/ DJ Set), Das Contras (Live), Mr Zimbabwe & Jimenez (DJ Set), Cammy & Friends (Percussion))

The Caves, 22:00–03:00, £8, £6 b4 12am

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–03:00, £tbc

Slow Motion Replay, Februus The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Metal and punk

Get In The Mood (Glen Miller Orchestra) Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–21:00, £17.50 - £28

A showcase of Glen Miller’s wartime big band hits, with support from Jan Messeder, Colin Anthony, The Swing Cats, The Moonlight Serenaders, and The Uptown Hall Gang. A special surprise await those who stick around for the show’s second half.

THE SPINTO BAND, WE WERE PROMISED JET PACKS Cabaret Voltaire, 19:30–22:30, £8

Indie sextet from Delaware and poppers of the Franz school, underlined for ‘guid’ things this year.

Meadows Chamber Orchestra Queen’s Hall, 19:45–22:30, £10

Premiere of Fantasy Variations by Lliam Paterson.

Ska Dance Craze (Dirty Revolution, DJ Miggy, This ‘R’ 2-Tone)

SUNDAY SINGERS NIGHT

Twelve-piece ska band THIS R 2-TONE will be performing the classics made famous by The Specials, Madness and Bad Manners with 2-Tone originator and guitarist/songwriter from the legendary band The Specials, RODDY RADIATION. Roddy is also bringing his own original band up from Coventry, The SKABILLY REBELS with further support from the cuddly cube Big Andy and his pals in Embra band BIG FAT PANDA and sounds from DJ MIGGY.www.skadancecraze.comwww.myspace.com/ skadancecrazewww.roddyradiation. comwww.myspace.com/skabillyrebels1www.myspace.com/bigfatpanda

RUB-A-DUB STYLE (I-TAL FAYA SOUND meets RIDDIM TUFFA SOUND)

The Bongo Club, 22:00–03:00, £8

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sat 21 Feb Constant State Of Terror, Burning The Prospect, Gusto Mastivo Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5

Hardcore punk

ETM presents: Left Side Brain, Laymanites The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Rock

The Jazz Bar, 20:30–00:00, £4/3

Weekly showcase

Dragonfly, 21:00–01:00, Free

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Mon 23 Feb LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Tue 24 Feb Jewel and Esk Showcase The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Current students perform

Ewan Robertson

The Village, 19:30–22:30, £6

Acoustic singer

Aberdeen Music OPEN MIC with STRETCH DAWRSON

The Jam House, 20:00–22:30, Free

Western swing from Stretch’s duo plus open mic slots for the bold, the beautiful and the drunk.

Launch party for Bombskare’s debut album, A Fistful of Dynamite.

“I believe in miracles. Where you from? You sexy thing”

Midge Ure

Studio 24, 19:30–03:00, £7/ 8

Experimental noise

Indie indie indie

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, Free

Playback: The Best of Edinburgh Open Mics

Fairport Convention

An evening of music, comedy and spoken word.

Flowers Of Hell

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Thu 26 Feb Live at The Mill (Epic 26, Tokyoblu)

The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, 19:00–23:00, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com

Max Raptor

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie, rocky, jungly duo.

Mendelssohn & Italy

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £26-£8

The final concert in the Mendelssohn 200 series.

Kaiser Chiefs

Corn Exchange, 20:00–00:00, £26

ANDREA GLASS

The Village, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Singer/ songwriter, accompanied by Wesley Bradd on mandolin, performing her debut album ‘Stood Under Stars’.

Hannah O’Reilly, Machar Granite, Susanna Macdonald

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £19

British folk-rock

Wee Red Bar, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

London-based ten man collective.

Kabarett

The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £6

The underworld of cabaret.

Athens, The Flavours

The Jam House, 20:00–00:00, Free

Xmas Lights

Bannerman’s, 21:00–00:00, £4

Indie rock

Club For Heroes (Maelstrom) Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sat 28 Feb JOHN COOPER CLARK

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:30, £15

The Mancunian punk poet

Nazareth

Studio 24, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Rock

Amadou & Mariam

The Picture House, 19:00–23:00, £14

Celebrated African blues and jazz couple from Mali

The Lemon Tree, 20:30–22:30, £15

Songwriting trio fronted by the lead man from Idlewild

IMP presents (Drever, McCusker, Woomble + Boo Hewerdine with Heidi Talbot) The Lemon Tree, 20:30–23:30, £15 (stbf)

Supergroup comes together featuring Idlewild’s Roddie Woomble. http://www.myspace.com/interestingmusic

Thu 05 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club (DHC DJs) Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 06 Feb Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

The first of a new monthly club night, pitched to promote a vast range of local talent.

Scot rockers promote their new 4-track EP.

The BIG freak

Medina, 22:00–03:00, £3/5 (fancy dress encouraged for cheap entry)

A ‘mongrel arts night’, including a mix of music, cabaret, art, film, vaudeville, fashion and madcap circus inspired fun.

Random (Mr.Ix (Neutronix) plus djs: Dark el kante + Mushrom Jim (Random), Rowan (Planet monkey) & Dharma (Project Meltdown)) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3 b4 12am)

Psy-trance http://www.myspace.com/psyrandom

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Fri 27 Feb

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Die Schneiders, Latitude 56, Under The Dogwood Tree

Sat 07 Feb

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Hazy Janes

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s epic sea voyage retold through image and sound in a collaboration between Music in the Community, University of Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art Animation.

The Vivians

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–22:00, £tbc

Punk rock

Mike Kearney, The Flavours

The Jam House, 20:30–00:00, £tbc

LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Sun 01 Mar SUNDAY SINGERS NIGHT

The Picture House & Glenn Povey Management presents IN THE FLESH: PINK FLOYD

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

The Bongo Club, 19:00–23:00, £6/7

The Picture House, 19:00–23:00, £17.50

Chocyamo

The Deloreans

Folk, jazz and pop

Indie grunge

Edinburgh-based indie rock and pop.

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

The Lemon Tree, 21:00–01:00, £4

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

LATE n’ LIVE

The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Wed 04 Feb Drever, McCusker & Woomble (Boo Hewerdine and Heidi Talbot)

Various markers on the scale of punk

Heriot-Watt University Union, 21:00–23:00, Free

Unsigned indie rock

Wed 25 Feb

Bands, DJs, raffles + morre in this midweek social. www.myspace.com/teenagelustparty

Rieser

LATE n’ LIVE

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Café Drummonds, 20:00–02:00, tbc

Acoustic folk rock

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Apple Scruffs (Dead Good Villains, The Hot Lips)

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Teenage Lust Club (Copy Haho, The Xcerts, Cast of the Capital)

Exposure (Lady Mercedes, Rescue Party, Fivefifteen, Velvet Audio)

CEILIDH CLUB (BREELIN) The Lot, 20:00–00:00, £6

Music Hall, 19:30–22:00, £25

Gin Gobblins, Sellotape, The Nukes, Norman Silver, The Gold

Nick Rowell and Band, Richard Cook, Adam McKenzie The Ark, 19:30–00:00, £4

Belhaven Sunday Jazz

After Me, the Flood

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–00:00, £3/2

The Jazz Bar, 20:30–00:00, £4/3

Weekly showcase

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Mon 02 Mar LATE n’ LIVE

The Jazz Bar, 00:00–03:00, Free

Nightly sessions of live jazz, funk, soul and blues.

Woodend Barn, 20:00–22:30, £8/7/5

Catch this performance before the Dundonian outfit head on tour with Snow Patrol.

Sun 08 Feb Belhaven Sunday Jazz

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Essie Jain

The Tunnels, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

The New Yorker kicks off her European tour to promote her second Album, The Inbetween.

Mon 09 Feb Let it Bleed presents (Late of the Pier, Micachu) Moshulu, 19:30–23:00, £9

Glammed up synth-rock youngsters who will tear those them walls down with one foul swoop. http://www.myspace.com/lateofthepier

Thu 12 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 13 Feb Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Sat 14 Feb THIS TOWN NEEDS GUNS Moshulu, 19:30–22:00, £5

the best gig listings

online theskinny.co.uk 56 THE SKINNY February 2009

Sun 15 Feb

Errol Brown

Don Vito, Action Beat

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 20:00–23:00, £5/4

Tue 03 Feb

Bombskare, Amphetameanies, Big Hand, Root System, Ska DJs

Indie and alternative from Oxfrod outfit. (14+) www.myspace.com/thistownneedsguns

Paul Lamb & the King Snakes

The Lemon Tree, 20:30–22:00, £10

Blues harmonica legend

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free The Lemon Tree, 19:00–22:00, £15

Acoustic singer/ songwriter.

EMMY THE GREAT

Moshulu, 19:30–22:30, £7 Big sounding folk + vocal sound from an eight piece currently hitting the touring circuit hard, but ina nice way. www.myspace.com/emmythegreat

Mon 16 Feb The View

Music Hall, 19:30–22:00, £13

National tour promoting the band’s sophmore album, Which Bitch?

Thu 19 Feb ABBAMANIA

Music Hall, 19:30–22:00, £15.50-17.50

Abba tribute

The Dirty Hearts Club (Filthy Dukes LIVE (Fabric / Kill ‘em All)) Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 20 Feb Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra Concert IV Music Hall, 19:30–22:00, £9-20

Playing John Adam’s Slonimsky’s Earbox, Ravel’s Concerto for Piano Left Hand and Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique.

IGLU AND HARTLY

Moshulu, 19:30–22:30, £9

Vanilla Ice X 2. (14+)

Sun 22 Feb Belhaven Sunday Jazz

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Aberdeen Sinfonietta Music Hall, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Aberdeen’s own orchestra play Sibelius’ 6th Symphony, Hayden’s D major Cello Concerto and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1.

Thu 26 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club (HEARTBREAK (live) + A+E LINE (live)) Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £tbc

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 27 Feb Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Adventures Close To Home (Stricken City, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Van Damn) The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £5/6

Live acts and DJs for this ACTH showcase. Wonky indie collides with a glitshed grime fest.

Sat 28 Feb Scottish Chamber Orchestra Music Hall, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Playing Schubert’s Overture in C ‘In the Italian Style’, Respighi’s Il Tramonto, Ancient Airs and Dances: Suite III and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 ‘Italian’.

Let it Bleed presents (Little Boots, Dolby Anol) Moshulu, 22:00–03:00, £5 adv

Having recently earned the accolade of BBC’s Sound of 2009, we recommned you go and check out what the hype is all about. http://www.myspace.com/littlebootsmusic


GLASGOW clubs Tue 03 Feb EUREKA tuesdays (Robin B) Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, Free

Dance, RnB, HipHop, House, Indie, Rock, Festival, Bassline and Electopop.

3 SOME TUESDAY

Common, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Audioculture (Shazza Halliwell) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Wed 04 Feb DYSFUNCTIONAL (CHRIS MC MANUS)

Sound Museum (DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian)) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Fridays (Tam Coyle & Stevie)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Classic and new indie

Alternative (Derrick Burns + Jose, Killer Kitsch, Riton)

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Electro, Deep House, Techno, Minimal Dubstep.

Bamboo Fridays (Gavin Sommerville & Sose)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

Vegas

The Ferry, 21:30–02:00, £10

Homegrown (Big Al, Dominic Martin & Robin B)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Velvet (DROiDO ‘live’ (SEINAN)) The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £6

Minimal Tech/house.

Colours 14th Birthday (JOHN DIGWEED, TOM BUDDEN) The Arches, 22:00–04:00, £23.50

R&b, hip hop and indie

INFILTRATION (matrix, halman, bucky, gary-mc, hobbs, ollie-b & double-d)

Room 1 BEDROCK: JOHN DIGWEED TOM BUDDEN Room 2 TOOLROOM NIGHTS: MARK KNIGHT D RAMIREZ GIOVANNI FERRI Room 3 COLOURS CLASSICS: JEREMY HEALY GRAEME PARK JON MANCINI IAIN BONEY CLARK + MUCH MORE

Octopussy

Hardcore and Old Skool Hardcore.

Absolution (DJ Barry and DJ Dec)

Common, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

HIP HOP, HOUSE, RnB, POP & ROCK.

TONGUE IN CHEEK (Gavin Sommerville, Andy Willson & Toast) Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Easy (Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio) The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Smashed Hits (Dirty Marc) The Flying Duck, 23:01–03:00, £3, £2 with cinema ticket

Thu 05 Feb COMMON ROOM (CRAIG KELMAN & CRAIG MCHUGH)

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Cheesy Pop (DJ Toast) QMU, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Chart Classics & Student Anthems.

Maggie Mays, 22:00–03:00, £8

ABC Fridays (Euan Neilson) ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Back Tae Mine (Gavin Dunbar) The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Friday night house party with DJ Lisa Littlewoo.

Bob’s Full House (Bobby Bluebell)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Blood Club

Euphoric (Martin Craynor & Michael Hutcheson)

Live show from Weenliz & theapplesofenergy followed by a live open experimental jam. Bring an instrument and join in.

Hi-Fi (Dave Sinclair)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Indie and rock

EQD

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, First 100 free, £3 after

A blend of disco, funk, house and techno.

Alternative Nation (BARRY & HARVEY KARTEL)

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm & 12 with matric

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

CATHOUSE THURSDAYS (Billy & Colin) The Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Anthemic rock, metal, emo, extreme metal.

Clatty Pats (Mark Robb)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £4, free for NHS workers

Kaleidoscope Live

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Mixed Bizzness (Boom Monk Ben)

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), £1 students free b4 12am

Hip hop, house, drum & bass, funk, dance hall, electro, garage, break beat and disco.

RPZ

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3/2/1)

Rubbermensch (ANDY WILSON)

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Fri 06 Feb AUDIO FILTH (BIG AL & ROSS MCMILLAN)

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Tunnel, 23:00–03:00, £5

Trance Classics.

Eyes Wide Open

The Twisted Wheel, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Garage, psych, freakbeat, rock n roll.

Friday Night Takeaway (Jim Hutchison (Hum+Haw), A.U.K (Inside Out), Dan Monox (Monox), Affi Koman (Noodle/Sunday Circus), Sebrof Divad (Teknika), Tricky (Noodle), Pro Vinylist Karim (Dress 2 Sweat), Michael Paterson (Colours/Cream)) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £8

Playroom Jim Hutchison (Hum+Haw) A.U.K (Inside Out) Dan Monox (Monox) Affi Koman (Noodle/Sunday Circus) Middle Bar Sebrof Divad (Teknika) Tricky (Noodle) Pro Vinylist Karim (Dress 2 Sweat) Michael Paterson (Colours/Cream) All profits go to OXJAM.

Bobby Bluebell spins the best dance, pop and cheesy tunes.

Divine! (Mr. Divine) Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club (Tokyo Knife Attack (Pest Control Records), T. Keeler (Discos Capablanca), Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club) Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5

Melting Pot (THE IDJUT BOYS (U-Star, Noid), JACKMASTER (Numbers) & JAMIE THOMSON (Traxx)) The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £10

O///D (punk vs. hippies theme)

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, Free (all money will go to the Gaza appeal)

House, electro, techno, punk, ska, drum and bass, reggae.

Slabs Of The Tabernacle (passEnger + xluve) The Twisted Wheel, 23:00–03:00, £5

Midnight Sessions Weekly post-gig hangout

SOLUTe (Rab Hendo)

Pivo Pivo, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Numbers (Sound Stream)

The Club (69), 23:00–03:00, £5

Eclectic electronic.

Subculture

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Pangea

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Drum & bass.

Rehab (MANUEL LE SAUX) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £10

Solar Disco (DICKY TRISCO) Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £7, £5 b4 12am

Nu-disco, house.

The Basement

Soundhaus, 23:00–04:00, £8 (£7)

Techno, electro & house.

Sat 07 Feb This is... (JAMES LITHGOW & MAX ASANTE)

Countach Macho Music (Jonny Wins (Slabs of the Tabernacle), The Niallist presents House Machine (Little Rock/Dissident), passEnger and xluve (Eclipse/Turin))

ELECTRO, HOUSE, RnB & HIP HOP.

Disco, house, italo, techno, dutch styles.

indie bits, rock picks and student anthems

The Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Detroit techno, disco, electro, italo, house, space, basement party.

Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

FILTHY HOUSE, ELECTRO, HIP HOP & RnB.

ABC Saturdays

ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Damnation (DJ Barry & Dec)

The Flying Duck, 21:00–02:00, £4 (£3)

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved.

Casa (DJ Lisa Littlewood)

Common, 19:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Chart.

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

The Hip Drop (Robbie Rolex) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Reggae, funk and tekfunk.

Saturdays (Toast)

The Bunker Bar, 21:01–02:00, Free

House & techno.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Off The Record and Animal Farm Soundhaus, 23:00–04:00, £tbc

House, techno.

Sabado Saturdays (Miss Nine, Iain Thomson, Stuart McCorrisken, Paul Rea) Byblos, 23:00–04:00, £10

Sun 08 Feb Disco Badger (Domsko, Kash & Mash)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Sunday Session (Craig Loosejoints)

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with flyer

Soul, Ska, Deep Funk, R&B, Latin & Jazz.

Distortion (DJ MUPPET) ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Alternative rock.

Mon 09 Feb Junk (Marky Mark)

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

OPEN HOUSE

Common, 23:00–03:00, Free

Passionality (Shawn Roberts) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Tue 10 Feb

RPZ

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3/2/1)

Rubbermensch (ANDY WILSON)

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Fri 13 Feb AUDIO FILTH (BIG AL & ROSS MCMILLAN) Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

Shapes presents... (HARVEY MCKAY, Unique)

Basura Blanca, 21:30–02:00, £5, free b4 11pm

MOIST ELECTRO AND TECHNO.

‘Gram Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 22:00–03:00, £3, £2 GSA

New monthly club night for new GSA magazine. Deep/Dark/Disco/Dub.

DEBAUCHED (Alan Hostage) The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £8

EUREKA tuesdays (Robin B)

FILTHY HOUSE, ELECTRO, HIP HOP & RnB.

Techno, Baltimore Club, Electro, Dubstep, Rave.

Dance, RnB, HipHop, House, Indie, Rock, Festival, Bassline and Electopop.

Sound Museum (DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian))

Fake (CHARLIE FANCLUB)

Fridays (Tam Coyle & Stevie)

Homegrown (Big Al, Dominic Martin & Robin B)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, Free

3 SOME TUESDAY

Common, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Audioculture (Shazza Halliwell) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Wed 11 Feb DYSFUNCTIONAL (CHRIS MC MANUS) Common, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

HIP HOP, HOUSE, RnB, POP & ROCK.

TONGUE IN CHEEK (Gavin Sommerville, Andy Willson & Toast)

Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Classic and new indie

BALKANARAMA

Absolution (DJ Barry and DJ Dec)

Bamboo Fridays (Gavin Sommerville & Sose)

ABC Saturdays

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Cheesy Pop (DJ Toast) QMU, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Chart Classics & Student Anthems.

Octopussy

Sleazy rock and roll with a big helping of electro and techno.

Easy (Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio) The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Smashed Hits (Dirty Marc) The Flying Duck, 23:01–03:00, £3, £2 with cinema ticket

Thu 12 Feb COMMON ROOM (CRAIG KELMAN & CRAIG MCHUGH) Common, 19:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Chart.

Hi-Fi (Dave Sinclair)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Indie and rock

Mutant Music (Alkotron, Convoi Exceptionnel & Not In This Town, DJ sets from Splendid Dead and Dirty Marc.) The Flying Duck, 21:00–02:00, £4

SideShow (Ooft (The Revenge & Ali Herron), BICEP & RealLiveClive) Hetherington Research Club, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Techno & disco.

EQD

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, First 100 free, £3 after

A blend of disco, funk, house and techno.

Alternative Nation (BARRY & HARVEY KARTEL)

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm & 12 with matric

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

CATHOUSE THURSDAYS (Billy & Colin) The Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Anthemic rock, metal, emo, extreme metal.

Clatty Pats (Mark Robb)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £4, free for NHS workers

Kaleidoscope Live

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Mixed Bizzness (Hint (Tru Thoughts)) Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), £1 students free b4 12am

Hip hop, house, drum & bass, funk, dance hall, electro, garage, break beat and disco.

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

Balkan, gypsy, klezmer and East European music.

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Techno, electro, bassline, house, rave

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Stereo, 21:00–03:00, £tbc

Hybrid Moments (Snail Cooper & His ELECTROFYING Guests)

R&b, hip hop and indie

The Twisted Wheel, 22:00–03:00, Free

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Sleaze (Misc., perc)

Soundhaus, 22:30–04:00, £12, £10 b4 12am

House, electro, techno.

Ballers Social Club present: Lazersword (Fox Gutt Data, LuckyMe Residents) Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £5/7

San Francisco based electronic duo

ABC Fridays (Euan Neilson) ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Back Tae Mine (Gavin Dunbar) The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4) ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Bob’s Full House (Bobby Bluebell) Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Bobby Bluebell spins the best dance, pop and cheesy tunes.

El Rancho Picante

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £4

Garage, punk and rock’n’roll.

Half My Heart Beats

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £4

Playing current and classic indiepop, ‘60s, girl groups, B-sides and album gems.

Pretty Ugly

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Indie, rock ‘n’ roll, electro beats and 60s girl groups.

Sabado Saturdays (Iain Thomson, Stuart McCorrisken, Paul Rea) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Subculture

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Casa (DJ Lisa Littlewood)

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Friday night house party with DJ Lisa Littlewoo.

Kitchen Sessions

Contrast (Mac & Taylor)

Pest Control (Redshape, Stephen Brown, Scott Theory, The Wasp)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £8

Tech-Trance & Hard-Dance.

Damnation (DJ Barry & Dec) Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

MiNiMaLiShIoUs

Maggie Mays, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Techno, minimal and tech-house.

Tapped!

The Twisted Wheel, 23:00–03:00, £3

Indie.

Sat 14 Feb This is... (JAMES LITHGOW & MAX ASANTE) Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

ELECTRO, HOUSE, RnB & HIP HOP.

Soundhaus, 23:00–04:00, £7 (£5)

Pivo Pivo, 23:59–05:00, £10

Live electronics.

Sun 15 Feb Disco Badger (Domsko, Kash & Mash)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Sunday Session (Craig Loosejoints)

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with flyer

Soul, Ska, Deep Funk, R&B, Latin & Jazz.

FANTAZIA VALENTINES SPECTACULAR (GURU JOSH - LIVE LASGO - LIVE BIZARRE INC - LIVE MENTAL THEO’S BAZZHEADZ - LIVE (NL) THE RHYTHMIC STATE - LIVE CHILL FM - LIVE, CHARLY LOWNOISE + MENTAL THEO (NL) JOE INFERNO (IT) * Tribal Church Exclusive - First Ever UK Appearance* DARREN STYLES SLIPMAT)

Distortion (DJ MUPPET)

4 Arenas, 60 Artists, 10 Hours.

Passionality (Shawn Roberts)

Braehead Arena, 19:00–04:00, £30

The Hip Drop (Robbie Rolex) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Reggae, funk and tekfunk.

ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Alternative rock.

Mon 16 Feb Junk (Marky Mark)

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

OPEN HOUSE

Common, 23:00–03:00, Free

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Tue 17 Feb

Club Noir

o2 Academy, 21:00–03:00, £14.50

EUREKA tuesdays (Robin B) Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, Free

Saturdays (Toast)

The Bunker Bar, 21:01–02:00, Free

indie bits, rock picks and student anthems

Dance, RnB, HipHop, House, Indie, Rock, Festival, Bassline and Electopop.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 57


GLASGOW clubs 3 SOME TUESDAY

Common, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Audioculture (Shazza Halliwell) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Wed 18 Feb DYSFUNCTIONAL (CHRIS MC MANUS) Common, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Sound Museum (DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian)) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Fridays (Tam Coyle & Stevie)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Classic and new indie

Bamboo Fridays (Gavin Sommerville & Sose)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Easy (Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio) The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Smashed Hits (Dirty Marc) The Flying Duck, 23:01–03:00, £3, £2 with cinema ticket

Thu 19 Feb

Mount Heart Attack (The Dangerist, Dave Shades, Cutter’s Choice)

Sound the Alarm (Lerosa (live) (Millions of Moments, Real Soon, Uzuri))

Audioculture (Shazza Halliwell)

Disco, electro, wonky techno and booty.

Basura Blanca, 23:00–02:00, £5

ABC Saturdays

ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Bob’s Full House (Bobby Bluebell) Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club Jukebox!

Death Disco (Brodinski, Jokers of the Scene, Filthy Dukes)

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £3

The Twisted Wheel, 22:00–03:00, £5

SUBCITY FM LAUNCH PARTY Glasgow School of Art, 22:00– 03:00, £tbc

Wrong Weekend

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Techno, Pop, Electronica, Italo, Electro, Afro beats.

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £14

Fortified Sessions

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Sabado Saturdays (Iain Thomson, Stuart McCorrisken, Paul Rea) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

House & techno.

Subculture

Hi-Fi (Dave Sinclair)

ABC Fridays (Euan Neilson)

Soundhaus, 22:30–04:00, £7 (£5)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Look Who I Know

Back Tae Mine (Gavin Dunbar)

The Flying Duck, 22:00–03:00, £3

Indie based night.

EQD

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, First 100 free, £3 after

A blend of disco, funk, house and techno.

Alternative Nation (BARRY & HARVEY KARTEL)

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm & 12 with matric

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

CATHOUSE THURSDAYS (Billy & Colin) The Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Anthemic rock, metal, emo, extreme metal.

Clatty Pats (Mark Robb)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £4, free for NHS workers

Kaleidoscope Live

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Mixed Bizzness (Boom Monk Ben) Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), £1 students free b4 12am

Hip hop, house, drum & bass, funk, dance hall, electro, garage, break beat and disco.

RPZ Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3/2/1)

Rubbermensch (ANDY WILSON)

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Fri 20 Feb AUDIO FILTH (BIG AL & ROSS MCMILLAN) Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

FILTHY HOUSE, ELECTRO, HIP HOP & RnB.

Common, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Smart indie, cuddle-core, bouncy shoegaze, heartbreak, and sparks of pleasure.

Chart Classics & Student Anthems.

Chart.

Indie and rock

DYSFUNCTIONAL (CHRIS MC MANUS)

TONGUE IN CHEEK (Gavin Sommerville, Andy Willson & Toast)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:00–03:00, £3

Singles Night (Andrew Divine & Chris Geddes)

Common, 19:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Wed 25 Feb

Bottle Rocket

Cheesy Pop (DJ Toast)

Rectify (Marc Doc, Colin Bell with Dave Kierney and Grant Clayton)

COMMON ROOM (CRAIG KELMAN & CRAIG MCHUGH)

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

QMU, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

TONGUE IN CHEEK (Gavin Sommerville, Andy Willson & Toast) Octopussy

Common, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

HIP HOP, HOUSE, RnB, POP & ROCK.

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

R&b, hip hop and indie

3 SOME TUESDAY

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Bobby Bluebell spins the best dance, pop and cheesy tunes.

HIP HOP, HOUSE, RnB, POP & ROCK.

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Absolution (DJ Barry and DJ Dec)

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Casa (DJ Lisa Littlewood) Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Damnation (DJ Barry & Dec)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free before 11:30pm/ £3 after

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Numbers (Modeselektor (live)) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £14.50

Eclectic electronic.

prime evil

Maggie Mays, 23:00–03:00, £2

STOMPIN TECHNO.

Sat 21 Feb This is... (JAMES LITHGOW & MAX ASANTE) Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

ELECTRO, HOUSE, RnB & HIP HOP.

The Hip Drop (Robbie Rolex) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Reggae, funk and tekfunk.

Saturdays (Toast)

The Bunker Bar, 21:01–02:00, Free

indie bits, rock picks and student anthems

Homegrown (Big Al, Dominic Martin & Robin B)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Tronicsole (Jimpster) The Admiral, 22:00–03:00, £5

Deep house grooves.

Velvet (Jim Hutchison (HUM+HAW) & Paddy Mac (the V Club)) The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £5

Minimal Tech/house.

A night for dancing to indie-pop, post-punk, motown, twee and anything else that gets feet tapping.

Sun 22 Feb Manifesto (Tam Dean Burn) Tron Theatre ? Changing House, 20:00–23:00, £5

Disco Badger (Domsko, Kash & Mash)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Sunday Session (Craig Loosejoints)

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with flyer

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Smashed Hits (Dirty Marc) The Flying Duck, 23:01–03:00, £3, £2 with cinema ticket

Thu 26 Feb COMMON ROOM (CRAIG KELMAN & CRAIG MCHUGH) Common, 19:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm

Chart.

Hi-Fi (Dave Sinclair) Indie and rock

The Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, £4

EQD

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, First 100 free, £3 after

A blend of disco, funk, house and techno.

Alternative Nation (BARRY & HARVEY KARTEL)

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11pm & 12 with matric

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

CATHOUSE THURSDAYS (Billy & Colin) The Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Anthemic rock, metal, emo, extreme metal.

Clatty Pats (Mark Robb)

Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £4, free for NHS workers

Kaleidoscope Live

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Distortion (DJ MUPPET)

Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), £1 students free b4 12am

Mon 23 Feb Junk (Marky Mark)

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

OPEN HOUSE

Common, 23:00–03:00, Free

Passionality (Shawn Roberts) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Tue 24 Feb

Hip hop, house, drum & bass, funk, dance hall, electro, garage, break beat and disco.

RPZ Glasgow School of Art (Vic Gallery), 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3/2/1)

Rubbermensch (ANDY WILSON)

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Fri 27 Feb

EUREKA tuesdays (Robin B)

AUDIO FILTH (BIG AL & ROSS MCMILLAN)

Dance, RnB, HipHop, House, Indie, Rock, Festival, Bassline and Electopop.

FILTHY HOUSE, ELECTRO, HIP HOP & RnB.

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, Free

indie bits, rock picks and student anthems

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Classic and new indie

Pinup Nights

The Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, £5

Shaun Ryder DJ Set (Shaun Ryder)

The Bunker Bar, 21:01–02:00, Free

Homegrown (Big Al, Dominic Martin & Robin B)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Velvet (ANDREW WEATHERALL)

Mixed Bizzness (Boom Monk Ben)

Alternative rock.

Saturdays (Toast)

Fridays (Tam Coyle & Stevie)

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Soul, Ska, Deep Funk, R&B, Latin & Jazz. ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Easy (Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio)

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Croc Madame V Croc Monsieur (The Fez!, The Niallist, Tayside Mental Health)

BOTTLE ROCKET

Hardstyle, Hardcore, Old Skool Hardcore and Industrial.

Bamboo Fridays (Gavin Sommerville & Sose)

Monox (SANDWELL DISTRICT - LIVE [REGIS & FUNCTION], ADAM X, MIKE SINGLETON, SMARTIE, DEN HAAN - LIVE, JAMIE THOMSON, THE WASP, DAZ, CURRIE) Techno & electro.

Ivory Blacks, 21:00–03:00, £12

Octopussy

R&b, hip hop and indie

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Soundhaus, 23:00–05:00, £12 (£10)

Sound Museum (DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian))

Inside Out (Marco V, Richard Durand, Aly & Fila, Lisa Lashes, Headhunterz, Scot Project)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Bunker Bar, 21:00–02:00, Free

Friday night house party with DJ Lisa Littlewoo.

Black Sparrow, 21:00–01:00, Free

Reactor (HARDCORE UNDERGROUND 3 LAUNCH, BRISK & MC WOTSEE, AL STORM & EUPHONY, BASS GENERATOR & MC LOCO, SMURF & ROB DA RHYTHM)

Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

Firewater, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£7)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

Cheesy Pop (DJ Toast) QMU, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Chart Classics & Student Anthems.

Pressure (Jeff Mills, Slam, Jamie Jones, Nic Fancuilli, Mark Broom, Percy X, Edit Select (live), Gary Beck (live)) The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £19

Hoouse & techno.

Rich Kids Gang Bang (Dema & Mr Nice, BRUNOBEATS ‘Live’) The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £6

Electro, Baltimore Club, Hip Hop, Dubstep.

Sin Vs. Digital Harlot (Quzzy, Scott, Dawnimatrix) Soundhaus, 22:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Thrash metal, goth, industrial.

Wrong Weekend

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £6

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £22.50

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £12 (£10)

Minimal Tech/house.

Absolution (DJ Barry and DJ Dec) Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved.

ABC Saturdays

ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Bob’s Full House (Bobby Bluebell) Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Bobby Bluebell spins the best dance, pop and cheesy tunes.

Chakra (Live samba band KINGS OF MUCUMBA) Glasgow School of Art, 23:00– 03:00, £10 (£8), £6 GSA

Deep, hypnotic, tribal house.

Techno, Pop, Electronica, Italo, Electro, Afro beats.

Dance! Dance! Dance!

ABC Fridays (Euan Neilson)

Men And Machines (Hans Bouffmyhre & Jean Ramesse (Sleaze Records), Daragh Byrne (live))

ABC 1, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Back Tae Mine (Gavin Dunbar) The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Casa (DJ Lisa Littlewood) Òran Mór, 23:00–03:00, £8

Friday night house party with DJ Lisa Littlewoo.

Damnation (DJ Barry & Dec) Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

How’s Your Party? (Fake Blood (Cheap Thrills), A La Fu (Radio Skool)) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Huntleys and Palmers & Curious Curious presents (Heartbreak (LEX RECORDS) & David Barbarossa (Italo Set)) Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £7

Mungo’s Hi Fi

Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £5

Dub, reggae, 80’s digital.

Sat 28 Feb This is... (JAMES LITHGOW & MAX ASANTE)

The Twisted Wheel, 23:00–03:00, £5

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5

Modern Lovers (Craig Jamieson)

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

60’s pop, 70’s rock.

Sabado Saturdays (Iain Thomson, Stuart McCorrisken, Paul Rea) Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Subculture

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Footwork vs Monox (DJ Godfather) Soundhaus, 23:00–04:00, £tbc

Techno.

Inner City Acid (DMX Krew) Pivo Pivo, 23:59–05:00, £7

Sun 01 Mar Disco Badger (Domsko, Kash & Mash)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Common, 19:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free b4 11pm

Sunday Session (Craig Loosejoints)

End of the Month Club: 7th Birthday

Soul, Ska, Deep Funk, R&B, Latin & Jazz.

ELECTRO, HOUSE, RnB & HIP HOP.

13th Note, 21:00–03:00, £tbc

The Hip Drop (Robbie Rolex) Brel, 21:00–01:00, Free

Reggae, funk and tekfunk.

The V Club, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with flyer

Mon 02 Mar OPEN HOUSE

Common, 23:00–03:00, Free

more club listings

online 58 THE SKINNY February 2009

theskinny.co.uk


Edinburgh clubs Tue 03 Feb Motherfunk (Fryer & Gino) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, Free

Antics

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Split (Edinburgh locals)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wed 04 Feb Heard it Through the Bassline

The Forest Café, 22:00–02:00, Free

Dubstep, electro and bmore. Bring your own booze.

JungleDub

The Bongo Club, 23:00–00:00, Free

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

The Pit

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

We Are Electric (GARY MAC plus guest) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Thu 05 Feb Wot D Funk (Barrie W, Scott Wood, Darren C (Flaunt), Craig Fraser (Jama/Sugar)) Shanghai, 22:00–03:00, £5, £4 b4 11.30pm

House music.

Indilectro (Iain Hill & Rob Cockayne)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Indie, house, electro, breaks and drum & bass.

Kinky Indie

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 students/ £5 others

Sick Note (DJs from Clash, I Fly Spitfires, Spies In The Wires, This Is Music, Freshair.org, Dogtooth and Hobo, plus guest live bands) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nurave.

Fri 06 Feb Sugar (Craig Fraser, Scott Wood, Jamie Dunn (Flaunt)) The Newsroom, 20:00–01:00, Free

House.

BALKANARAMA (JANI LANG BAND, Mr KALMAN BALOGH and dj DD) Studio 24, 21:00–03:00, £7 before 11pm/ £9

All things Balkan, incl. an early live music session, film, belly dancing and free rakija (fruity Balkan brandy apparently).

Bubblegum Boogaloo (MODUS album launch party)

The Voodoo Rooms, 21:00–01:00, Free

Our House (TONY K and LIAM G) The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire,

The Egg (Chris & Paul)

Tokyoblu (TOKYOBLU, plus DJ sets from Tokyoblu residents JOHN & IAIN)

The Go-Go (DJs Tall Paul Robinson & Big Gus)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£6)

House night with skilled house house band

XPLICIT (CALYX (subtitles/ momentum/moving shadow)) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

Drum’n’bass evolution feat a residents special: PAUL RESET [Nerve Recordings], ENO [Parlay], TREASON [Coalition - final UK gig], MC BZ, MELDRUM + B-RAW www.myspace. com/club_xplicit

Sat 07 Feb Sanctuary Studio 24, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5)

Snapshots (Various artists) Traverse, 21:30–23:00, £6

Part of Manipulate

FLOORPLAY PRESENTS ELECTRIC PLAYGROUND (Riley & Durrant, Barrie, W Kiwi, Scott Wood) Berlin, 22:00–03:00, £10

Uplifting vocal house.

Much More (Nasty P & Currie) Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Luvely Faith, 22:30–03:00, £12/ 10 (members)

Gay friendly house; which tends to draw girls in short skirts and the boys who follow them more than anything distinctly queer.

Cryptik (Scott Donachie and Kristian Elliot) Sneaky Pete’s, 22:30–03:00, Free

Techno, House, Electro, Minimal.

Cryptik Sneaky Pete’s, 22:30–03:00, Free

An evening of house, minimal techno, and electro with resident DJ’s Scott Donachie and Kristian Elliot.

Jam The Box (Jimmy Jammin’ Thomas, Jammiwam & Marmalade Maslin) The GRV, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Hip hop, jazz, new wave, dub techno.

Luvely Ultra Violet (Tommy Kay, Dean Newton, Jon Edwards, Grum Stone, Brett King, Gregsta) Faith, 22:30–03:00, £10 (£8)

IndepenDANCE (Rosco, Jamie Drummond (Boombox), Stevie Carnie, Ross Hammond, Euan Dodds, Phil D)

Dress Code UV Reactive Face Paint, Make Up & Clothing Luminous Tops and Glow Sticks (Free UV make-up by Davie Draeger inside the club!!!!) Luvely DJ’s Tommy Kay Dean Newton Jon Edwards Grum Stone Brett King Gregsta Visuals by Maverick

Trance.

Az-Tech vs Noizteez (AzTech residents and Noizteez residents) The Caves, 22:30–03:00, £7/ £6 members

Evol

Faith, 22:30–03:00, £5

Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock

Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £5, free b4 10.30pm

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Creative Industries (dj misjah) The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £10

Techno.

Fuse (GUS ARMSTRONG, STU TODD, TIM JAMES) Berlin, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Nu wave, electronica and house.

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

23:00–03:00, £7, £6 b4 12am

French 60’s pop, psyche, retro.

Studio 24, 22:00–03:00, £5

Retribution

Tease Age Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

GRAND THEFT AUDIO The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £3

Hip hop and funk.

Jackhammer (luke slater) The Caves, 23:00–03:00, £10

Techno.

Mumbo Jumbo (DJs Trendy Wendy, Colin Millar & Steve Austin) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6, £5 b4 12am)

Funk, soul, electro & house.

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 b4 12am

The Voodoo Rooms, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4, £3 b4 12am with flyer)

Ultragroove (Gareth Sommerville, Nick Yuill, Gino) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Sun 08 Feb RUB-A-DUB STYLE (I-TAL FAYA SOUND meets FRONTLINE SELECTA) Dragonfly, 21:00–01:00, Free

Get Funk’d (Double D & Isla) Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Rise (John Hutchison) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £4

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

More (Miss Kriss, Kaupuss)

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Funky vocal house, electro and club classics.

Sections

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

Mon 09 Feb

Furburger

GHQ, 23:00–03:00, £4/ free passes at Planet

The club night for ‘girls who like girls who like music’ presents a bout of Valentines aural stimulation from the funki diva, dejaybird, boy toy and debi t. Pre-club stuff at Planet down the road.

Four Corners (Four Corners 4th Birthday) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Trouble (THE UNABOMBERS (Electric Chair, Manchester), SCOPE (Choice Cuts, Dublin), KID BEL (Good Foot, Aberdeen)) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6

Sat 14 Feb Sanctuary

Studio 24, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5)

Much More (Nasty P & Currie) Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Musika (Derek Martin, Neil Bartley, Jamie McKenzie, Stu Todd, Rab Clark & Mick MacNeil) The Liquid Room, 22:00–03:00, £5

We Love Space Ibiza party.

Substance (Surgeon, Smees (Live!), gavin Richardson) The GRV, 22:00–03:00, £10

Techno, electro.

The Latin Quarter (James Combe)

Diskokitten (Jason Cortez & Andy Opel)

Medina, 22:00–03:00, Free

Berlin, 22:30–03:00, £8 (£7), £6 b4 12am

Trade Union (DJ Beefy & WolfJazz)

House, electrohouse and bootlegs.

Tease Age

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am

Tue 10 Feb Motherfunk (Fryer & Gino) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, Free

Antics

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Split (Edinburgh locals)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wed 11 Feb JungleDub

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

Vegas (Frankie Sumatra, Bugsy Seagull, Dino Martini, Sam Jose, Nikki Nevada, The Vegas Showgirls and The Fabulous Scott Brothers) Cabaret Voltaire, 22:30–03:00, £9

Big N Bashy (David George, Beast, Deburgh & Decoy Roy) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4 b4 12am)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–00:00, Free

A 4-deck mix of dubstep, reggae, dancehall + jungle

The Pit

GRAND THEFT AUDIO

We Are Electric (GARY MAC plus guest)

Hip hop and funk.

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Thu 12 Feb Kinky Indie

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £3

Retribution

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

The Egg (Chris & Paul)

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 b4 12am

Sun 15 Feb

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 students/ £5 others

Get Funk’d (Double D & Isla)

Sick Note (DJs from Clash, I Fly Spitfires, Spies In The Wires, This Is Music, Freshair.org, Dogtooth and Hobo, plus guest live bands)

Rise (John Hutchison)

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nurave.

More (Miss Kriss, Kaupuss)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fri 13 Feb Bassix (OLIVER SMITH (ANJUNABEATS)) Berlin, 22:30–03:00, £8

House, electro & proggresive trance.

Big Toe’s Hi-Fi (Barba Poppa Choppa, C-Biscuit, New Mexican Bean and B-Dawg) Wee Red Bar, 22:30–03:00, £5

Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £4

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

Tomb Crew at Coalition Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Funky vocal house, electro and club classics.

Tue 17 Feb Motherfunk (Fryer & Gino) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, Free

Antics

Split (Edinburgh locals)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Ever since it first arrived on brighten up Tuesday nights, SPLIT has been a phenomenally successful night, packed out with contented clubbers, week after week after week after week. Shadowskills and the Edinburgh:Bassed collective run the Main Room, rinsing out the heaviest in drum & bass and breaks alongside guests from hip-hop labels like Local Product, while the back room is run by Split founder Pyz, who favours an eclectic mix of slinky electro and upfront techno from a rotating team of residents including such familiar names as Ingen, The Retard Playboy and Fresh Air. Despite being an event that could easily transfer to a weekend slot and have no problem charging for entry and still filling up, Split refuses to sell out - it resists the lure of making a pile of cash, and chooses instead to say true to its principles and remain a Tuesday night affair. What’s more, it’s always free to get in, all night, for everyone. Hats off to it.

Medina, 22:00–03:00, Free

Planet Earth

MADCHESTER!

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Long-running indie, brit pop and rave night.

Faith, 22:30–03:00, £5

13-17 year olds only

Sanctuary

Much More (Nasty P & Currie) Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

Volume! (Benga (Tempa) & Break (DNAudio)) Faith, 22:30–03:00, £10 (£8)

Dubstep, bass.

GRAND THEFT AUDIO

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £3

Hip hop and funk.

Headspin (DJ Format)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

italoBLACK (Benetti & Cassavettes) Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Italo disco, space disco.

Retribution

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

Gesamtkunstwerk

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 b4 12am

Come Collective exhibition opening - expect painting, sculpture, film, DJs + poetry. Gesamtkuntswerk is a term coined by Richard Wagner in his ‘Art and Revolution’ essay to describe the merging of all the arts.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

The Bongo Club, 21:00–03:00, Free

JungleDub

The Bongo Club, 23:00–00:00, Free

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

Ultragroove (Milton Jackson ++LIVE SET++ (Freerange), Gareth Sommerville, Wolfjazz & Beefy (Trade Union))

Sun 22 Feb Crystal Stilts, Jesus H Foxx, //FAST DJS//

The Pit

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

We Are Electric (GARY MAC plus guest) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Thu 19 Feb

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–03:00, £tbc

Psychedelic minimalist punk

RUB-A-DUB STYLE (I-TAL FAYA SOUND meets RIDDIM TUFFA SOUND) Dragonfly, 21:00–01:00, Free

Get Funk’d (Double D & Isla) Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Rise (John Hutchison) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £4

Kinky Indie

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 students/ £5 others

Sick Note (DJs from Clash, I Fly Spitfires, Spies In The Wires, This Is Music, Freshair.org, Dogtooth and Hobo, plus guest live bands) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nurave.

Fri 20 Feb Departure Lounge (Nostalgia 77 (Tru Thoughts/DJ Set), Das Contras (Live), Mr Zimbabwe & Jimenez (DJ Set), Cammy & Friends (Percussion)) The Caves, 22:00–03:00, £8, £6 b4 12am

Ska Dance Craze (Dirty Revolution, DJ Miggy, This ‘R’ 2-Tone) The Bongo Club, 22:00–03:00, £8

Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock

Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock

The Picture House, 17:30–21:00, £10-16.50

The Egg (Chris & Paul)

Wed 18 Feb

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

Mon 16 Feb

Sat 21 Feb Clubland presents Night of Your Life (Flip and Fill, N-Force, Frisco, NRG DJs)

Studio 24, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5)

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Evol

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Latin Quarter (James Combe)

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £5, free b4 10.30pm

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am

Sections

Faith, 22:30–03:00, £5

Evol

Trade Union (DJ Beefy & WolfJazz)

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

Booty (Dale Lush & Isla Blige) GHQ, 23:00–03:00, Free

“Booty’s annual Oscars party where we celebrate the best of the best in disco land over the last year! Editing Team Sir Dale Lush & Dame Isla Blige will be mixing the Picture. Award highlights will include: Best Red Carpet Getup Best Hair & Make Up Best Soundtrack Best Booty Boy Best Booty Girl”

ELECTROsexual (Lucky Luciano) CC Blooms, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dirty bootlegs and cheeky electro.

More (Miss Kriss, Kaupuss)

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Funky vocal house, electro and club classics.

Sections

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Faith, 22:30–03:00, £5

Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £5, free b4 10.30pm

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Introduction (Mikael Stravostand) Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £7

Techno, minimal.

Stepback (Mr. Copy)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Baltimore, ghetto-tech, electro & dubstep.

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

Mon 23 Feb The Latin Quarter (James Combe) Medina, 22:00–03:00, Free

Xplicit (ED RUSH, RANDALL, HAZARD) Potterrow, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Drum & bass.

February 2009

THE SKINNY 59


Edinburgh clubs Trade Union (DJ Beefy & WolfJazz)

The Pit

Kinky Indie

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 stu-

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1),

We Are Electric (GARY MAC plus guest)

dents/ £5 others

free b4 12am

Tue 24 Feb Motherfunk (Fryer & Gino) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, Free

Antics The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Split (Edinburgh locals) Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wed 25 Feb JungleDub The Bongo Club, 23:00–00:00, Free

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Thu 26 Feb The BIG freak

Random (Mr.Ix (Neutronix) plus djs: Dark el kante + Mushrom Jim (Random), Rowan (Planet monkey) & Dharma (Project Meltdown)) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3

Fri 27 Feb Bombskare, Amphetameanies, Big Hand, Root System, Ska DJs Studio 24, 19:30–03:00, £7/ 8

Launch party for Bombskare’s debut album, A Fistful of Dynamite.

Musika (JAMES ZABIELA & Matt Tolfrey)

b4 12am)

Potterrow, 21:00–03:00, £15

Psy-trance http://www.myspace.com/psyrandom

Evol

We Love Space Ibiza party.

Medina, 22:00–03:00, £3/5 (fancy dress encouraged for cheap entry)

Sick Note (LITTLE BOOTS, STRICKEN CITY)

A ‘mongrel arts night’, including a mix of music, cabaret, art, film, vaudeville, fashion and madcap circus inspired fun.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Planet Earth

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nurave.

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £5, free b4

Faith, 22:30–03:00, £5

Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock

10.30pm

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Sugarbeat (EROL ALKAN, BOY 8-BIT, UTAH SAINTS, B-SIDES & THE BANDIT)

Sanctuary

Breaks, beats, bootlegs.

The Voodoo Rooms, 21:00–01:00, Free

Cabaret Voltaire, 22:30–03:00, £18

Studio 24, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5)

Soul Spectrum (Fryer & Jason Stirland)

Bass Syndicate (Aquasky, MC (The Ragga Twins))

Much More (Nasty P & Currie)

Club For Heroes (Maelstrom)

Tease Age

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

GRAND THEFT AUDIO

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sat 28 Feb Jackhammer Vs Creative Industries (dave angel, slam, stephen brown, wolfjazz, gavin richardson, gee dubs, keytes & 4DTS)

Medina, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £3

Hip hop and funk.

Messenger Sound System (Bob Marley Birthday Special from start to finish)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £6.50 (£5 b4 12am)

Techno.

Sweet reggae rocking with Scotland’s original roots & culture sound system, feat MC Ras Echo.

HALCYON (Nick Wilson, Jono Fyda, Damian Pedrick, live percussion from Vaala)

G-Room

The GRV, 14:00–03:00, £15

DUNDEE CLUBS Tue 03 Feb Discoteca

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pop, indie and r’n’b

Wed 04 Feb Student Wednesdays Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Foam parties, bucking bronko’s and the occasional 90’s rave

Thu 05 Feb fatty thursdays

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

G-Room London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

Presents Hip-Hop & RnB with £1 drinks all night.

Sat 07 Feb Fat Sam’s (DJ Ricky Harrison) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30

Current chart, hip hop and r&b anthems mixed with the usual ‘Saturday night favourites’ by resident DJ Ricky Harrison.

Anthems, classics and chart hits

Fri 06 Feb Fridays

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

House and chart

Sun 08 Feb Tongue in Cheek Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

A lazy night of requests

Mon 09 Feb I do like Mondays! (DJ Joe Brodie) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pop, rock, indie and r’n’b

Tue 10 Feb Discoteca

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pop, indie and r’n’b

Wed 11 Feb Student Wednesdays Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Foam parties, bucking bronko’s and the occasional 90’s rave

Thu 12 Feb fatty thursdays

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Anthems, classics and chart hits

Fri 13 Feb Fridays

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

House and chart

OKUPA!, 22:30–03:00, £5

Sun 15 Feb

Ctrl-Alt-Defeat (Van Damn, Carpal Discount house, Ado!)

Tongue in Cheek

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £6

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

G-Room

A lazy night of requests

London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

Presents Hip-Hop & RnB with £1 drinks all night.

Sat 14 Feb Fat Sam’s (DJ Ricky Harrison) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30

Current chart, hip hop and r&b anthems mixed with the usual ‘Saturday night favourites’ by resident DJ Ricky Harrison.

Mon 16 Feb I do like Mondays! (DJ Joe Brodie) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pop, rock, indie and r’n’b

Tue 17 Feb Discoteca Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pop, indie and r’n’b

Fri 20 Feb London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

Presents Hip-Hop & RnB with £1 drinks all night.

Sat 21 Feb Fat Sam’s (DJ Ricky Harrison) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30

Current chart, hip hop and r&b anthems mixed with the usual ‘Saturday night favourites’ by resident DJ Ricky Harrison.

Sat 28 Feb Fat Sam’s (DJ Ricky Harrison) Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30

Current chart, hip hop and r&b anthems mixed with the usual ‘Saturday night favourites’ by resident DJ Ricky Harrison.

ABERDEEN CLUBS Wed 04 Feb Zombie Disco

Snafu, 21:00–02:00, free

Martin Jay hosts the a midweek session where the finest of overground and underground gets mixed into one big eclectic pot. Student night but for the more discerning listener.

Got Got Need (Them DJs)

Dundee University Students Union, 22:00–02:00, Free

Electro, filth, you ken.

Thu 05 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club (DHC DJs) Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 06 Feb Mixtape (residents) Snafu, 22:00–03:00, varies

Twisted Dirty Electronica hosted, on rotation, by Giles Walker, A LA FU and Kid Proquo.

Sat 07 Feb The Deep End

Snafu, 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Weekend house fix from Funky Transport with new resident Iain G plus local/national/international guests stopping by. http://www.myspace.com/funkytransport

Jungle Nation 12th Birthday (SHY FX, Tez) Origin, 23:00–00:00, £10

SHY FX join the ‘eternal’ residents for more of what the title suggests.

Everything Else Sucks (Djamba, Giles Walker) The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £3

Giles Walker joins the residents at a club doing strange things to the coolcats in town. Big sounds. http://www.myspace.com/everythingelsesucks

Mon 09 Feb Black Tooth Rock Lounge Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3/2

As well as dancefloor gems from the Fudge DJs, expect touring bands, local barnyard rockstars, groupies, dark cabaret and burlesque. http://www.myspace.com/blacktoothrock

Wed 11 Feb Zombie Disco

Snafu, 21:00–02:00, free

Martin Jay hosts the a midweek session where the finest of overground and underground gets mixed into one big eclectic pot. Student night but for the more discerning listener.

Thu 12 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

60 THE SKINNY February 2009

Fri 13 Feb DO IT! (Riddim, White Chocolate) Cellar 35 , 21:00–02:00, £tbc (no much)

Cutting edge visuals + eclecticism through-out as the hippest party in town comes out from the depths. www.myspace.com/ethicsofaristotle

Mixtape (residents) Snafu, 22:00–03:00, varies

Twisted Dirty Electronica hosted, on rotation, by Giles Walker, A LA FU and Kid Proquo.

Axis (FREESTYLE MONKEY MUSIC) Origin, 23:00–03:00, £5

Electo + Techno in legendary location.

Sat 14 Feb The Deep End

Snafu, 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Weekend house fix from Funky Transport with new resident Iain G plus local/national/international guests stopping by. http://www.myspace.com/funkytransport

Mon 16 Feb Black Tooth Rock Lounge Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3/2

As well as dancefloor gems from the Fudge DJs, expect touring bands, local barnyard rockstars, groupies, dark cabaret and burlesque. http://www.myspace.com/blacktoothrock

Wed 18 Feb Zombie Disco

Snafu, 21:00–02:00, free

Martin Jay hosts the a midweek session where the finest of overground and underground gets mixed into one big eclectic pot. Student night but for the more discerning listener.

Thu 19 Feb The Dirty Hearts Club (Filthy Dukes LIVE (Fabric / Kill ‘em All)) Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Fri 20 Feb Mixtape (Edit Select, Damian Schwartz) Snafu, 22:00–03:00, varies

Twisted Dirty Electronica hosted, on rotation, by Giles Walker, A LA FU and Kid Proquo.

Full Spektrum

Origin, 23:00–03:00, £5

Drum ‘n’ Bass and Dubstep.

Regression (DJ TEZ) Origin, 23:00–03:00, £5

Old school rave hosted by Aberdeen’s answer to Pete Waterman.

Mon 23 Feb Black Tooth Rock Lounge Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3/2

As well as dancefloor gems from the Fudge DJs, expect touring bands, local barnyard rockstars, groupies, dark cabaret and burlesque. http://www.myspace.com/blacktoothrock

Wed 25 Feb Zombie Disco Snafu, 21:00–02:00, free

Martin Jay hosts the a midweek session where the finest of overground and underground gets mixed into one big eclectic pot. Student night but for the more discerning listener.

Thu 26 Feb

The Deep End

The Dirty Hearts Club (HEARTBREAK (live) + A+E LINE (live))

Weekend house fix from Funky Transport with new resident Iain G plus local/national/international guests stopping by. http://www.myspace.com/funkytransport

Steven Milne hosts this electroindisocial that keeps the tight jeans than wee bit tighter. DJs + Live performances http://www.myspace.com/dirtyheartsclubsnafu

Sat 21 Feb Snafu, 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £tbc

Fri 27 Feb Mixtape (Japanese Popstars) Snafu, 22:00–03:00, varies

Twisted Dirty Electronica hosted, on rotation, by Giles Walker, A LA FU and Kid Proquo.

Sat 28 Feb The Deep End

Snafu, 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Weekend house fix from Funky Transport with new resident Iain G plus local/national/international guests stopping by. http://www.myspace.com/funkytransport

Hush Hush (Boy 8-Bit, Giles Walker) Origin, 23:00–03:00, £7

Fabric resident and remix guru brings the Amiga to the plate. Bass at the core but with a dynamism through genres that’ll out do the chin strokers and leave the dance-floor broken. www.myspace.com/boy8bit

Mon 02 Mar Black Tooth Rock Lounge Snafu, 21:00–02:00, £3/2

As well as dancefloor gems from the Fudge DJs, expect touring bands, local barnyard rockstars, groupies, dark cabaret and burlesque. http://www.myspace.com/blacktoothrock


Edinburgh THEATRE Changing House Baby Baby 19:30, 04 Feb—07 Feb, £8

Do I Mean Anything To You or Am I Just Passing By? 19:30, 12 Feb—14 Feb, £8

Year of the Horse 21:00, 19 Feb—28 Feb, not 22nd, 23rd, £8

Manifesto 20:00, 22 Feb, £5

Theatre Royal

The Arches Alien Wars

Multiple times, 03 Feb—01 Mar, £10/8/5

Citizens Theatre Educating Rita

19:30, 11 Feb—28 Feb, not 15th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, various

Willy Russell classic comedy of mutual education

My Clydeside Valentine 19:30, 11 Feb—14 Feb, 7

Educating Rita

La Traviata

19:30, 11 Feb—28 Feb, not 15th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, various

19:15, 06 Feb—14 Feb, not 7th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 13th, Various

Paperweight

19:30, 17 Feb—21 Feb, various

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Romeo and Juliet

19:30, 18 Feb—21 Feb, various

Richard Alston 19:30, 20 Feb, various

An Inspector Calls 19:30, 24 Feb—28 Feb, various

Tron Theatre

19:30, 24 Feb—28 Feb, 8

Ramshorn Albert’s Bridge

19:30, 11 Feb—14 Feb, £8

G12 Query

Defender of the Faith

19:30, 17 Feb—21 Feb, not 19th, 20th, £9

19:30, 06 Feb—28 Feb, not 8th, 9th, 15th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, £10

Mind Out

by Stuart Carolan

Part of New Territories.

19:30, 25 Feb, 9

Glasgow comedy Tue 03 Feb

Festival Theatre Blood Brothers

19:30, 03 Feb—14 Feb, £8.50 - £30

Poemes Visuales 19:30, 05 Feb, £13

Part of Manipulate

Willy Russell’s ‘Blood Brothers’ musical extravaganza tells the tale of two twins separated at birth, only to be reunited years later with far reaching consequences.

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

Mission Possible: Dads and Lads Move!

19:30, 07 Feb, £13

20:00, 11 Feb, £12

Music, the Food of Love: Romantic Valentine’s Classics 18:00, 15 Feb, £10 - £28

An evening of classical music from the RSNO, featuring Tchaikovsky’s ‘Fantasy Overture’ and mercurial Sunwook Kim performing Grieg’s ‘Piano Concerto’.

Les Ballets Trockaderos de Monte Carlo 19:30, 20 Feb—21 Feb, £14 - £25.50

An entertaining yet respectful parody of traditional ballet, this male troupe are sure to keep you on your toes as they keep on theirs.

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo 19:30, 18 Feb—21 Feb, not 19th, various

19:30, 06 Feb, £13

Part of Manipulate

The Miser

Part of manipulate

Snapshots 21:30, 07 Feb, £6

Part of Manipulate

Class Act

19:30, 10 Feb—11 Feb, £5

Brunton Theatre The Bible: The Complete Word of God (abridged) 19:30, 14 Feb, £10.50

Reduced Shakespeare Company

Private Peaceful 19:30, 19 Feb, £10.50

Queen’s Hall The Circus of Horrors Apocalypse in the Asylum 20:00, 09 Feb—10 Feb, £20-10

Strictly Strauss

Gruesomely ironic cult circus show fronted by Doktor Haze.

A show that recreates a 19th century Vienna ballroom in all its pomp. Featuring a host of Strauss classics, including ‘Blue Danube Waltz’.

On the Brink

14:30, 22 Feb, £17.50 - £28

King’s Theatre Tons Of Money

19:30, 03 Feb—07 Feb, various

Buddy

19:30, 03 Feb—07 Feb, Various

Sunshine on Leith

19:30, 10 Feb—21 Feb, not 15th, various

Lloyd George Knew My Father 19:30, 16 Feb—21 Feb, various

Russian State Ballet

19:30, 23 Feb—28 Feb, various

Coppelia

19:30, 24 Feb, various

Jolson and Co

19:30, 27 Feb—28 Feb, various

Traverse Twin Houses 19:30, 04 Feb, £13

part of Manipulate

19:30, 18 Feb, £12

Includes visual of 1939 Europe teetering on the edge of war.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner 19:30, 28 Feb, £10

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s epic sea voyage retold through image and sound in a collaboration between Music in the Community, University of Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art Animation.

Assembly Rooms Query

19:30, 17 Feb—21 Feb, £9

Royal Lyceum The Man Who Had All The Luck

19:45, 03 Feb—14 Feb, not 9th, various

The Mysteryof Irma Vep

19:45, 20 Feb—28 Feb, not 22nd, 23rd, various prices

It’s a terrible thing to marry an Egyptologist and find he’s hung up on his mummy...

Tue 17 Feb

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Albert’s Bridge (Radio Theatre Group)

Wed 04 Feb Wicked Wenches (Susan Morrison, AL Kennedy, Diane Morgan and Eilidh MacAskill. Hosted by Susan Calman) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6/£5

That time of the month when the acts are all funny girls.

GO Laugh (Patrick Rolink, Rob Kane Derek Miller Phil O’Shea John Gavin Niall Hamish McNeil Obie & Peter. Hosted by Billy Kirkwood) Trader Joe’s, 20:30–23:00, tbc

For more details see www.thegobutton.co.uk

Thu 05 Feb The Thursday Show (Wayne Deakin, Neil McFarlane and Chris Cairns. Hosted by Susan Calman) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8/£7

Glasgow Theatre

Wed 11 Feb My Clydeside Valentine (Citizens Community Company)

Red Raw (Jay Lafferty and Patrick Rolink)

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 06 Feb The Friday Show (With Wayne Deakin, Neil McFarlane and Chris Cairns. Hosted by Susan Calman.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Sat 07 Feb Half Price Comedy Club (Karen Bayley, Mark Nelson with Alan Anderson) Uisge Beatha, 20:30–23:00, £6/£4

Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:00, 7

Ramshorn Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £8

GO Laugh

Trader Joe’s, 20:30–23:00, tbc

For more details see www.thegobutton.co.uk

Rough Cuts

The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £5/£4

Thu 12 Feb My Clydeside Valentine (Citizens Community Company) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:00, 7

Albert’s Bridge (Radio Theatre Group)

Ramshorn Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £8

The Thursday Show (Ian Moore, Darrin Rose and Woody. Hosted by Raymond Mearns) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 13 Feb My Clydeside Valentine (Citizens Community Company) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:00, 7

Albert’s Bridge (Radio Theatre Group)

Ramshorn Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £8

The Friday Show (With Ian Moore, Darrin Rose and Woody. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

My Clydeside Valentine (Citizens Community Company) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:00, 7

Albert’s Bridge (Radio Theatre Group)

Comedy@The State (MC The Ram, Mikey Adams, David Barr, Rick Molland. Headliner Mark Nelson)

Uisge Beatha, 20:30–23:00, £6/£4

The State Bar, 21:30–23:30, £5

Mixed bill comedy show with regular compere

Sun 08 Feb Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (David Kay, Chris Cairns and Austin Low.) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £5/£4

The Ivory (Karen Bayley, Mark Nelson, Scott Agnew) Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New acts, new material

Mon 09 Feb Raymond Mearns: Shaggy Dog Stories The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £8/6

Tue 10 Feb Red Raw (Ro Campbell and Kevin Bridges) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Ramshorn Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £8

Half Price Comedy Club (Paul Pirie, Alan Anderson) The Saturday Show (With Ian Moore, Darrin Rose and Woody. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Comedy@The State (MC The Ram, Siân Bevan, Gordon Alexander, Graham Mackie. Headliner Charlie Ross) The State Bar, 21:30–23:30, £5

Mixed bill comedy show with regular compere

Sun 15 Feb

Red Raw (Charlie Ross and Andy Sir) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Maggie Mays, 20:15–21:15, £8/ £6

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (Darrin Rose and Jay Lafferty.) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £5/£4

The Ivory (Paul Pirie, Alan Anderson)

Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New acts, new material

Mon 16 Feb Dance Monkey Boy Dance Monthly show featuring a mix of topical stand-up, filmed sketches and improvised games and songs.

Manifesto (Tam Dean Burn) Tron Theatre ? Changing House, 20:00–23:00, £5

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (Jarred Christmas, Michael Manley and Garry Dobson) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £5/£4

The Ivory (Chris Oksenbury, Alan Anderson) Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New acts, new material

Wed 18 Feb Paperweight (Top of the World) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Benefit in aid of Barnados Scotland (Kevin Bridges, Vladimir McTavish, Ro Campbell, Stu & Garry and Derek Johnston.) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10/8

All proceeds to Barnados

GO Laugh Trader Joe’s, 20:30–23:00, tbc

For more details see www.thegobutton.co.uk

Thu 19 Feb Paperweight (Top of the World) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Thursday Show (Alistair Barrie, Jarred Christmas and Michael Manley. Hosted by Susan Morrison) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8/£7

Mon 23 Feb The Al Pitcher Picture Show The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7/£6

Tue 24 Feb Red Raw (Scott Agnew and Teddy) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Wed 25 Feb Best of Irish Comedy (Neil Dougan, Kevin Hayes, Rory O’Hanlon and Keith Anderson. With host Michael Redmond) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7/£6

GO Laugh

Trader Joe’s, 20:30–23:00, tbc

For more details see www.thegobutton.co.uk

Thu 26 Feb The Thursday Show (Neil Dougan and Rory O’Hanlon. With host Sandy Nelson.) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 27 Feb

Fri 20 Feb Paperweight (Top of the World) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Friday Show (With Alistair Barrie, Jarred Christmas and Michael Manley. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Masculine and Feminine (Companhia Paulo Ribeiro) Tramway, 19:30–21:00, 9

The Friday Show (With Neil Dougan and Rory O’Hanlon. With host Sandy Nelson.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Sat 28 Feb Masculine and Feminine (Companhia Paulo Ribeiro) Tramway, 19:30–21:00, 9

Sat 21 Feb Paperweight (Top of the World) Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Half Price Comedy Club (Chris Oksenbury) Uisge Beatha, 20:30–23:00, £6/£4

Raymond Mearns: Shaggy Dog Stories

The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £4

Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Sat 14 Feb

The Saturday Show (With Wayne Deakin, Neil McFarlane and Chris Cairns. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Sun 22 Feb

Paperweight (Top of the World)

SnoJoke (M.C Rob Kane, Graham Mackie, John Gavin, Andy Vaughn, Derek Miller, Jay Lafferty, Mark Nelson) Xscape Braehead, 21:00–22:59, £tbc

The Saturday Show (With Alistair Barrie, Jarred Christmas and Michael Manley. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Comedy@The State (MC The Ram, Jim Park, Paul Stewart, Barry McDonald. Headliner Gary Little) The State Bar, 21:30–23:30, £5

Mixed bill comedy show with regular compere

Half Price Comedy Club (Vladimir McTavish) Uisge Beatha, 20:30–23:00, £6/£4

The Saturday Show (With Neil Dougan and Rory O’Hanlon. With host Sandy Nelson.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Comedy@The State (MC the Ram, Jeff O’Boyle, Andy Gallagher, Dave Heffron. Headliner Esmond Toni) The State Bar, 21:30–23:30, £5

Mixed bill comedy show with regular compere

Sun 01 Mar Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (Kevin Bridges, Jim Park, Phil Differ and Austin Low) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £5/£4

The Ivory (Host Alan Anderson) Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New acts, new material

Get yer listings

online

theskinny.co.uk February 2009

THE SKINNY 61


Edinburgh comedy Tue 03 Feb Wicked Wenches (Susan Morrison, AL Kennedy, Diane Morgan and Eilidh MacAskill. Hosted by Susan Calman) The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £6/£5

That time of the month when the acts are all funny girls.

Comedy Showcase Agenda, 20:30–23:00, Free

Comedy showcase night for the students of comedy course at Strathclyde Uni. 12 acts plus guest.

Wed 04 Feb The Stand Improv

The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £5/£2.50

An evening of improvised comedy with Stu & Garry.

Thu 05 Feb Last of the Red Hot Lovers Brunton Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £10.50

Neil Simon Comedy

The Thursday Show (Carey Marx, Josh Howie and Niall Browne. Hosted by Billy Kirkwood) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Heresy

Jekyll and Hyde , 21:00–23:20, £3

Night of dark and depraved comedy

Fri 06 Feb Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (1927) Traverse, 19:30–21:00, £13

Part of Manipulate

Last of the Red Hot Lovers Brunton Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £10.50

Neil Simon Comedy

The Stand (Carey Marx, Josh Howie and Niall Browne. Hosted by Susan Morrison) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out

Sat 07 Feb The Saturday Show (Carey Marx, Josh Howie and Niall Browne. Hosted by Susan Morrison) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Snapshots (Various artists) Traverse, 21:30–23:00, £6

Part of Manipulate

Sun 08 Feb Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry. Hot coffee, delicious food...the nation’s top hangover cure

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Josh Howie, Niall Browne and Nick Morrow. Hosted by JoJo Sutherland.) The Stand, 20:30–22:50, £5/£4

Mon 09 Feb Red Raw (Siân Bevan and Phil Differ) The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Tue 10 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Midweek Comedy Cabaret The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £4/2

Wed 11 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Playback: The Best of Edinburgh Open Mics The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–00:00, £3/2

An evening of music, comedy and spoken word.

Melting Pot

The Stand, 20:30–23:00

Watch a series of short comedy sketches, presented by top actors and comedians. Vote for your favourite, and see a longer version next month.

Thu 12 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Thursday Show (Tom Stade, Mark Bratchpiece, Dan Nightingale and Andrew Learmonth. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Heresy

Jekyll and Hyde , 21:00–23:20, £3

Night of dark and depraved comedy

Fri 13 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep) King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Stand (Tom Stade, Mark Bratchpiece, Dan Nightingale and Andrew learmonth. Hosted by Bruce Devlin) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out

Sat 14 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep) King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Bible: The Complete Word of God (abridged) (Reduced Shakespeare Company) Brunton Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £10.50

Reduced Shakespeare Company

The Saturday Show (Tom Stade, Mark Bratchpiece, Dan Nightingale and Andrew learmonth. Hosted by Bruce Devlin) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 15 Feb Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry. Hot coffee, delicious food...the nation’s top hangover cure

Tue 17 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Midweek Comedy Cabaret The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £4/2

Wed 18 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Benefit in aid of First Step Community Project The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £7/£5

Thu 19 Feb Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Thursday Show (Dave Johns, Terry Saunders, Kim Macaskill and Dave Strong. Hosted by Scott Agnew) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Heresy

Jekyll and Hyde , 21:00–23:20, £3

Night of dark and depraved comedy

Fri 20 Feb Les Ballets Trockaderos de Monte Carlo Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–21:00, £14 - £25.50

An entertaining yet respectful parody of traditional ballet, this male troupe are sure to keep you on your toes as they keep on theirs.

Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

Jolson and Co

The Saturday Show (Dave Johns, Terry Saunders, Kim Macaskill and Dave Strong. Hosted by Bruce Morton)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Sun 22 Feb Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry. Hot coffee, delicious food...the nation’s top hangover cure

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Terry Saunders and Ricky Callan. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 20:30–22:50, £5/£4

Mon 23 Feb

Tue 24 Feb The Al Pitcher Picture Show The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £7/£6

Wed 25 Feb Playback: The Best of Edinburgh Open Mics The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–00:00, £3/2

Best of Scottish (With Sandy Nelson, Jim Park and Mark Nelson. Hosted by Vladimir McTavish)

The Stand, 20:30–22:50, £5/£4

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

Red Raw (Billy Kirkwood and Bruce Fummey) The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

Les Ballets Trockaderos de Monte Carlo Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–21:00, £14 - £25.50

An entertaining yet respectful parody of traditional ballet, this male troupe are sure to keep you on your toes as they keep on theirs.

Meadow Bar, 22:00–23:59, £5/£4

14 new acts with an experiences compere to guide you through the night.

Sat 28 Feb Laughing Horse New Act of the Year Competition (Compere Keara Murphy) Meadow Bar, 19:30–21:30, £5/£4

Laughing Horse New Act of the Year Competition (Compere JoJo Sutherland)

The Sunday Night LaughIn (Dan Nightingale, Phil Differ and Gus Lymburn. Hosted by Jill Peacock.)

Sat 21 Feb

Laughing Horse New Act of the Year Competition (Compere JoJo Sutherland)

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic pick and mix of comedy, costing mere pennies.

The Stand, 20:30–22:45, £2/£1

The Stand (Dave Johns, Terry Saunders, Kim Macaskill and Dave Strong. Hosted by Bruce Morton)

Sunshine on Leith (Dundee Rep)

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out

14 new acts with an experiences compere to guide you through the night.

An evening of music, comedy and spoken word.

Mon 16 Feb

The Stand (Gavin Webster, Kevin Hayes, Bruce Fummey and Keith Anderson. Hosted by Susan Calman)

Red Raw (Jeff O’Boyle and Terry Saunders.)

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Fri 27 Feb

King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £6/5

Thu 26 Feb The Thursday Show (Gavin Webster, Kevin Hayes, Bruce Fummey and Keith Anderson. Hosted by Susan Calman.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Heresy

Jekyll and Hyde , 21:00–23:20, £3

Night of dark and depraved comedy

Meadow Bar, 19:30–21:30, £5/£4

14 new acts with an experiences compere to guide you through the night.

Laughing Horse New Act of the Year Competition (Compere Keara Murphy) Meadow Bar, 19:30–21:30, £5/£4

14 new acts with an experiences compere to guide you through the night.

Jolson and Co King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, various

The Saturday Show (Gavin Webster, Kevin Hayes, Bruce Fummey and . Hosted by Susan Calman) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 01 Mar Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry. Hot coffee, delicious food...the nation’s top hangover cure

ABERDEEN comedy Tue 03 Feb Calendar Girls (with Elaine C Smith) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Wed 04 Feb Calendar Girls (with Elaine C Smith) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Thu 05 Feb Calendar Girls (with Elaine C Smith) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Fri 06 Feb Calendar Girls (with Elaine C Smith) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Sat 07 Feb Calendar Girls (with Elaine C Smith) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Tue 10 Feb The Pajama Game

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £14

Wed 11 Feb The Pajama Game

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £14

Witches of Eastwick (with Mr Pellow) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Thu 12 Feb The Pajama Game

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £14

Witches of Eastwick (with Mr Pellow) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Fri 13 Feb The Pajama Game

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £14

Witches of Eastwick (with Mr Pellow)

62 THE SKINNY February 2009

His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Sat 14 Feb The Pajama Game

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £14

Witches of Eastwick (with Mr Pellow) His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £12.50

Wed 18 Feb Ruddigore (Gilbert and Sullivan Society)

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £10

Thu 19 Feb Ruddigore (Gilbert and Sullivan Society)

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £10

Fri 20 Feb Ruddigore (Gilbert and Sullivan Society)

Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £10

Sat 21 Feb Ruddigore (Gilbert and Sullivan Society) Aberdeen Arts Centre, 19:30–21:30, £10

The Al Pitcher Picture Show The Lemon Tree, 19:30–22:00, £8

Irish comedian

Sun 22 Feb Breakneck Comedy Open Mic Night The Blue Lamp, 20:30–23:00, £3/£2

www.breakneckcomedy.com

Tue 24 Feb Ed Byrne Music Hall, 20:00–22:00, £17.50

Byrne, of Mock the Week fame, has a well structured jibe at class stereotypes.

Get your events listed here listings@

Theskinny.co.uk


GOMA ECHO AND TRANSCEND

MULTIPLE TIMES, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, FREE

A wide-ranging selection of abstract art. Some of the works on display echo reality, while others transcend it

MODERN INSTITUTE OUT OF SPACE OUT OF TIME

MULTIPLE TIMES, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;21 FEB, NOT 8TH, 15TH, FREE

Abstracted painting, drawing and sculpture.

EVER GROWING NEVER OLD 12:00, 28 FEB, FREE

Beckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Futures winner whose work in painting, drawing and sculpture derives from architectural forms

SCHOOL OF ART AWAKEN

10:30, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;27 FEB, NOT 7TH, 8TH, 14TH, 15TH, 21ST, 22ND, FREE

This exhibition showcases a significant body of new work produced from the collaboration between Textileâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff and the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world-class Archive and demonstrates the diverse range of approaches in contemporary textile design.

CCA PROJECT2891

11:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;13 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, FREE

Interactive technology-based art involving â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nodesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

THE DIRTY HANDS

11:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, 15TH, 16TH, 22ND, 23RD, FREE

Excess beyond utility, dandified amorality and ritualistic gesture

CUT HANDS III

19:30, 07 FEB, ÂŁ5 (DOOR)/ÂŁ4 ADVANCE

The sound of voodoo and santerĂ­a is mixed with raw electricity in an evening of eclectic experimental African sounds.

TRAMWAY JAMES YAMADA - OUR STARRY NIGHT 12:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, NOT 9TH, 16TH, 23RD, FREE

An interactive aluminium sculpture studded with 1,900 lights marks the passageway to the Tramwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hidden Gardens.

two seminal works by the Hackneybased collective; Handsworth Songs (1996) and Seven Songs for Malcolm X (1993).

MIND OUT 19:30, 25 FEB, 9

Part of New Territories. What is it like to be mindless?

MASCULINE AND FEMININE 19:30, 27 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, 9

SCULPTURE STUDIO GOOD TEETH

LEVI HANES

12:00, 05 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, 10TH, 11TH, 15TH, 16TH, 17TH, 18TH, 22ND, 23RD, 24TH, 25TH, FREE

A mixed media installation informed by the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MFA residency, drawing on notions of performance, authorship and production within the public gaze.

A new, large-scale sculptural installation created by Beagles & Ramsay during their three-month Production Residency at GSS

12:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;08 FEB, FREE

SEBASTIAN BUERKNER

12:00, 06 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, NOT 9TH, 16TH, 23RD, FREE

The German artist/ animatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first exhibition of work in Scotland. A surrealist meandering into the voids between perception and memory, repetition and rearrangement.

SEBASTIAN BUERKNER: ARTISTS TALK AND SCREENING 19:30, 19 FEB, ÂŁ3/2

German artist Buerkner sheds some light on the surreal visual narratives of his multi-faceted animation work. Screening includes work by Mary Ellen Bute, Tony & Beverley Conrad and Robert Breer.

MARY MARY KARLA BLACK 12:00, 05 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;14 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, 10TH, 11TH, FREE

For her second solo exhibition at the gallery, Glasgow based artist Karla Black spends six days working on-site to produce a group of sculptures made from materials such as body moisturising creams, chalk dust, cotton wool, sellotape, vaseline, paint and egg shells.

THE ARCHES

THE BLACK AUDIO FILM COLLECTIVE

NATIONAL REVIEW OF LIVE ART

The Tramway presents - as part of the Glasgow Film Festival -

Let the fun commence

19:30, 20 FEB, ÂŁ3/2

10:00, 11 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;14 FEB, SEE ONLINE FOR DETAILS

EDINBURGH ART MODERN ART CONTEMPORARY ART IN SCOTLAND: NEW LOANS AND ACCQUISITIONS 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 FEB, FREE

Featuring the work of Karla Black, Duncan Campbell, Douglas Gordon, Scott Myles and Cathy Wilke

CONTEMPORARY ART IN SCOTLAND: NEW LOANS AND ACCQUISITIONS 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 FEB, FREE

Featuring the work of Karla Black, Duncan Campbell, Douglas Gordon, Scott Myles and Cathy Wilke

QUEEN AND COUNTRY 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 FEB, FREE

A collaboration between the Turner Prize winning artist and 136 families of the deceased

THE ISLANDERS: AN INTRODUCTION 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 FEB, FREE

Sculpture, drawing, taxidermy and good old fashioned storytelling combine to form an entrancing show, magical realism made flesh.

NATIONAL GALLERIES DUTCH MANNERISM: GOLTZIUS AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;08 FEB, FREE

CITY ART CENTRE THE DRAWN BLANK SERIES MULTIPLE TIMES, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, FREE

Paintings based on drawings and sketches made by Dylan while on the road during the period of 1989 to 1992

PRINTMAKERS BODILY TRACES

10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, 15TH, 16TH, 22ND, 23RD

Bodily Traces is an exhibition of etchings and drawings reflecting the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascination with all sentient life, whether it be literary figures or crows.

FEELS LIKE FOREVER

10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, NOT 8TH, 9TH, 15TH, 16TH, 22ND, 23RD, FREE

An exhibition exploring the cognitive processing of memories and the unconscious re-writing of personal histories.

MODERN ART JOHN WATSON PRIZE 2008 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 FEB, FREE

THE DRILL HALL PARALLEL LIVES 2 10:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;21 FEB, NOT 8TH, 15TH, FREE

A citywide collaboration between the National Galleries Scotland, OOTB, North Edinburgh Arts and WHALE arts organisations.

DIGITAL EVOLUTION: WHAT CAN GAMING TELL US ABOUT WHERE LIFE CAME FROM AND WHERE ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEADING? 19:00, 07 FEB, FREE, TICKETED

From the Game of Life to Spore to Second Life, computer games reflect our fascination with evolution. This is a FREE, ticketed event. For your ticket please call 0131 467 4630 or email evolution@theskinny.co.uk.

PEACEMAKERS OF ISRAEL AND PALESTINE 09:00, 23 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, FREE

Photography exhibition documenting the work of peaceworkers on both sides of the conflict, completed in December 2008.

STILLS URBAN REFLECTIONS 11:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, FREE

Responses to the urban experience.

COLLECTIVE ECHO RESIDENCY: PUDDING 12:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;07 FEB, FREE

A selection of video works by emergent artists displayed in the pseudo kitsch surrounds of the Collectiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiny Guest Room.

SANDY SMITH & ALEX GROSS @ COLLECTIVE 12:00, 03 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;07 FEB, FREE

The final show from 2008â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Work Scotland programme brings together two Glasgow-based artists to recount their experiences of the great North American road trip.

DOGGERFISHER 10:00, 06 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;27 FEB, NOT 7TH, 8TH, 9TH, 14TH, 15TH, 16TH, 21ST, 22ND, 23RD, FREE

Unusual material, collage and sculptural intervention in 2 and 3D

INVERLEITH HOUSE SUBLIMATE 10:00, 07 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;08 FEB, FREE

An exhibition by artists, architects and landscape architects from ECAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art, Space and Nature course.

ZINE-O-RAMA 10:00, 07 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;08 FEB, FREE

FRUITMARKET OPENWIDE 11:00, 07 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;01 MAR, FREE

Multimedia installations, materials propped suspended and balanced around central structures responding to the space of the gallery

SIERRA METRO ELIEL 13:00, 07 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;21 FEB, NOT 9TH, 10TH, 11TH, 12TH, 13TH, 16TH, 17TH, 18TH, 19TH, 20TH, FREE

Installation exploring the wonder inherent in material objects, inspired by the BjurbĂśle Meteor, the centrpiece of the Finnish pavilion at the 1900 Pries World Exposition

TALBOT RICE DESIRE LINES 10:00, 14 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;28 FEB, NOT 15TH, 16TH, 22ND, 23RD, FREE

Site specific works by a variety of artists across the Edinburgh University campus while the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closed.

RSA NEW CONTEMPORARIES MULTIPLE TIMES, 14 FEBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;25 FEB, ÂŁ2 (ÂŁ1)

New format for the annual student show, with selected artists from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree show invited to submit new work.

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK MORE LISTINGS THAN YOU CAN SHAKE A STICK AT

GLASGOW ART

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FEBRUARY 2009

THE SKINNY 63


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Take it easy. Please enjoy responsibly. DRINKAWARE.CO.UK

The Skinny February 2009  

The Skinny is Scotland's leading culture and listings magazine

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