Issuu on Google+

The Magazine For San Joaquin County

NOT YOUR MOTHER'S WEDDING BREAKING ALL THE RULES Page 43

ROOTS & BRANCHES

THE CULTURE OF AGRICULTURE IN SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY Page 34

April/May 2013 ■ sanjoaquinlifestyles.com


Bank of Stockton 146 Years and Going Strong. Our customers’ Satisfaction is Our Greatest Reward!

We are proud to continue to serve generations of families and businesses with quality products and personalized service. When you need someone to count on for your bank, look to us. Strong, safe and secure since 1867.

www.bankofstockton.com

Personal Banking • Business Banking • Wealth Management Member FDIC


L E T T E R

F R O M

T H E

E D I T O R

PUBLISHER Roger Coover

PUBLICATION DIRECTOR Deitra R. Kenoly

EDITOR

XXXXXXXXXXXX

Carrie Sass

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

The Magazine For San Joaquin County

O

Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

nce again I am reminded why I love being editor of Lifestyles magazine. It’s the

great people in this community that I get to re-connect with, as well as those that I meet for the first time. It’s affirmation that the culture and core of our region is rich and deep. Not with “stuff,” but with interesting and innovative people. One such person is Kelli Welsh, daughter of Don and the late Carole Ford. On behalf of her father, Kelli has graciously welcomed us into their home, not only for a beautiful story – it’s really more about her lovely mother than the gorgeous estate – but to capture through photographs a stunning landscape. (see page 8). I’m anxious to personally meet Kelli in May at the

Sue Daugherty Laurie Eager Charleen Earley Judi Hachman Dennis Hall Dani Hovatter Jason Jones John McClimans Mary Raffetto Jennifer Torres-Siders

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Judi Hachman Amy Phipps Helen Ripken Aaron Sass David Sowers

Children’s Home Garden Fair being held at the Ford estate. As editor, I am also careful to not “step over the line” and take advantage of this very public voice through Lifestyles. However, this time I did – I just couldn’t help myself! For years I had envisioned a summer wedding for our daughter Andi. Being a professional event planner and all, each detail had been designed and orchestrated in my head – down to the steel die-engraved invitations, the four-tiered wedding cake, and the white roses on the table. That didn’t happen. What did happen was so much fun, so entertaining and so unique that I just had to share with you! Andi and Nate (he’s very cool) planned it all, and were married this past January. And now I can relax, and so can Emily Post. (see page 43). Have a wonderful springtime! Carrie Sass XOXO

?

Please continue to forward story ideas to: SASS! Public Relations 2972 W. Swain Road #228, Stockton 95219; or call: 209-957-7277; or email: cmsass@comcast.net

To advertise in Lifestyles magazine, call 209-546-8200 Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

4

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3

On the cover: MR. AND MRS. SCHLOSS PHOTO BY RED CARPET STUDIOS REDCARPET-STUDIOS.COM


LIVING WITH STYLE The Ford Estate

8 ..........................................................................................

WINE & SPIRITS

CONTENTS 13

Wine Wizards

13 ..........................................................................................

THE ARTS David’s Chalk Art

18 That’s Show Biz

20 ..........................................................................................

34

WINE CRITIC Wines for Springtime Picnics

22 ..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT Two Brothers Duncan Press

26 ..........................................................................................

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT One Child at a Time Child Abuse Prevention Council

30 ..........................................................................................

OUR CULTURE Roots and Branches

39

34 ..........................................................................................

lifestyles

5


LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

56

Rainbow School Celebrating 35 years

39 ..........................................................................................

WEDDING BELLS Not Your Mother's Wedding

43 ..........................................................................................

WAG TALES Sophia

53 ..........................................................................................

8

SPORTING LIFE Hike Up Mount Whitney

56 ..........................................................................................

MARK THE DATE

64 ..........................................................................................

SCENE AND BE SEEN Junior League 85th Anniversary Gala

24 Empowering Young Women Dinner

25 Charterhouse for Families Brunch

32 Community Center for the Blind

33 Omega Nu 40th Annual Crab Feed

26

50 Stockton Beautiful–Lunch with Mimi

51 Stockton Chorale Masked Ball

54 Susan B. Anthony Awards Dinner

55


L I V I N G

W I T H

The

S T Y L E

Ford Estate

8

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

Don and Carole Ford

BY MARY RAFFETTO PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS & ALEX SANDAVOL

T

he Ford Estate in Acampo will host this

year’s Garden Fair, a benefit for the Children’s Home of Stockton. The house and grounds are the inspired legacy of their creator, Carole Ford, who envisioned a family home of not only beauty and warm welcome, but also a place which would be of service to others, and to the community. Carole was initially drawn to the property because she wanted more room to raise miniature horses, a hobby-turned-business which she named Windcrest Farm. The fortyacre plot, though essentially treeless pastures, was already in use as a thoroughbred farm, and lent itself well to her vision of a lake, horses, and grassy flowing hills crowned by a Cape-Cod style residence. ➤

lifestyles

9


Carole and her husband, Don, moved into what is now known as the Garden House, where they lived for many years raising their three girls. While Don worked tirelessly at his business, Ford Construction, Carole applied herself just as doggedly decorating the Garden House, caring for their family and overseeing Windcrest Farm. All the while, she was designing their future dream home. When they were finally ready to begin building, the couple turned to their son-in-law, Don Welsh (contractor D&G Construction), with the knowledge that he shared Carole’s vision and had the ability and creativity to carry it out. Their daughter, Kelli Welsh, says of her mother, “She trusted him to never compromise the spirituality of the house.” Carole’s ideas and drawings for the home were full of rich symbolism and meaning, from the design of the stained glass to the flowing pattern of rock walls and stone pathways in and around the house. All of the wood details were hand-carved onsite from her drawings, and every one of them had a special meaning to her. ➤


Ultimately, Carole created a retreat for children, grandchildren, friends and family, with an eye toward accommodating large philanthropic events. Musically gifted, and an accomplished pianist, Carole taught piano and was a singer with the Stockton Chorale. Mindful of the large space needed to hold an audience for recitals, she insisted on providing ample room around her grand piano to ensure recitals could always be held there. For visitors a magical spell is cast from the moment they arrive, as they travel over a covered bridge to enter the property. The enchanting wood structure is a replica of the bridge in Don Ford’s childhood town of Windsor, Vermont. The chickens, somewhat less aware of their vintage digs, cluck about in what is no replica, but the actual coop brought all the way from Don’s boyhood home. Kelli describes the ranch as “all the grandkids’ favorite place to visit.” And from the sound of it, those visits are nothing short of kid-heaven: campouts, cookouts, a giant lakeside trampoline, canoeing, fishing and animals galore. The barn, originally used for the racehorses, is now home to chickens, pigs, horses, dogs, cats and ponies. All set among the redwoods, birch and ➤


L I V I N G

12

W I T H

S T Y L E

weeping willow trees which now abound,

elevator and the attic-turned-tree house. There

the beauty here is stunning. A favorite place

are, of course, the more predictable places

indeed, Kelli could likely add the names of a

such as laundry rooms, bathrooms and closets

few grown-ups to that list of folks who love

– but even those are proportionally bigger

it here. (One magazine-writer’s name comes to

than most mere mortals are used to… Okay,

mind…)

those areas are kind of fanciful, too, featuring

In the main house, carousel horses greet

unique hardware, special glasswork, themed

guests at the door, inviting them in to discover

wallpapers, and moldings. In short, the rumors

whimsical surprises around every corner. In

are true: care was taken, and attention indeed

honor of her grandfather and his career with

given to every detail.

the Pacific Railroad, a working train is found

Visitors might not realize that the ranch

choo-chooing its way through the house on

is still a work in progress. With plans such as

built-in tracks. Not content with just toy trains,

a movie theater to be completed off of the

the upstairs hallway is a replica of an actual

massive entertaining area, and a New England-

railroad dining car, fully equipped with built-

style barn made of rock and brick still on the

in bench seats, a real table and panoramic

to-do list, the Ford family has some exciting

window. You can practically hear a train whistle

projects still ahead.

as you stare out at miles of vineyards against

Sadly, in 2011, the family lost Carole to a

the endless sky, and feel yourself beginning to

battle with ALS. But her passion, talent, spirit

daydream.

and love are seen and felt throughout the ranch

Not everything is fanciful, of course. There

into which she poured her heart and soul. As

is plenty of practicality to be found here, though

she had desired, the property is enjoyed by

some of it is unexpected. There is the indoor

family and friends, as well as used to support

pool, sauna and steam room, the three-story

many good causes. ❑


G R A P E V I N E

WINE & DINE

B

BY JOHN McCLIMANS PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

alanced. That’s how Larry Johansen likes to live his

life. It’s also what he looks for in his wines. And as owner of Stockton’s Wine Wizards, it’s an important rule to live by. ➤

lifestyles

13


G R A P E V I N E

As you walk through the door of the wine shop and restaurant,

Price is also a concern for Larry. He believes there are a lot of

you’re transported from its storefront along Grand Canal Boulevard to

overpriced wines out there, which is why he makes sure he selects

something reminiscent of a neighborhood bistro or cafe you’d find in an

wines that not only achieve the balance he looks for, but are also value-

European village. During the winter, it takes on the feeling of a ski lodge

driven. This explains why over 70% of the wines he offers are under

with old snowshoes, skis, and vintage sleds hanging on the walls. This

$25.

only makes sense, seeing it was a six-month trip to Europe when he was younger that originally sparked Larry’s love of wine, cheese and food. Opened nearly 33 years ago by Larry and his wife Mariko, Wine Wizards continues to focus on two things: good wine and good food. It’s the wine that is the driving force for Larry. Each of the more than 125 selections available for sale are handpicked.

When it comes to the food at Wine Wizards, the highlight is its Friday-evening dinners. Each week, Larry and chef David Cook, who owned Bagatelle in Lincoln Center, create a special entree with several wine pairings. The weekly entree, priced $19 to $24, can include anything from angus beef tenderloin served with mushrooms and herbs, root vegetables and roasted red potatoes, to sautéed sea scallops and

“Every wine has to have merit, it has to have a real character to

prawns with shrimp sauce, butternut squash puree and pilaf with snap

it, and it needs to be balanced,” said Larry. “I want to find balanced

peas. Thanks to the chef’s creative combinations, you’ll never have the

wines you can enjoy with any meal. That’s one of the reasons we’ve

same dish twice.

moved more towards European wines; we’re able to find that balance more easily.” Of the current selection, just 25% of the wines are from

“We get a lot of ‘regulars’ coming in for our dinners,” said Larry. “A lot of friendships have been made here between the customers.”

California while the rest come from France, Italy and Spain.

14

The dinners are so popular, they sometimes sell out before dinner ➤

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


G R A P E V I N E

service starts. Due to the limited quantities

good wine or cheese or food; we’ll make

of entrees, you’re encouraged to call ahead

sure you find exactly what you’re looking

and reserve your meal. That way you’ll know

for.”

it’ll still be available when you arrive. Often, entrees sell out by early Friday afternoon.

Saturday from 11 to 2:30 and remains open

For Larry and his staff, these weekly

through the evening Tuesday through Friday

dinners are just one of the many ways they

for retail sales. They also offer a selection

make sure to provide a personal experience

of more than 20 cheeses and monthly

for anyone who walks through their door.

winetasting. For information, contact Wine

“It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for 16

Wine Wizards serves lunch Tuesday-to

Wizards at 209-957-7711. ❑ a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


T H E

A R T S

David’s Creative Chalk Designs BY DANI HOVATTER

M

aps of life can never be drawn out.

Sometimes our plans will leave us stranded. But most times, we just need the proper nudge. December 21st marks the day that David Severin’s map was completely erased. In an ironically clichéd morning, he found what he’d been looking for while he got lost driving to work. ➤

18

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


T H E

A R T S

Art had been a part of his life since he was a boy, but David

informed that the Army would be providing finances due to David’s

had repeatedly been told that pursuing that profession would line

time in the infantry. With an introduction of chalkboards at his

him in procession with the other “starving artists.” Practicality told

church, David learned he loved and was talented in working with the

him that he needed a career, so he put that on his map. After going

medium. And with the administration and construction of his wife,

into further schooling at Modesto Junior College and serving in the

the paperwork, details, and design of David’s Chalk Art was created.

infantry for the Army, he found a sensible job as a security guard at

Using the rare medium of chalk ink, David draws typography,

Emmanuel Hospital in Turlock. His future was soundly drawing itself

portraits, and landscapes on boards, making the designs permanent

out.

and smudge-proof with a sealer. He has done works for churches

But God had arrangements for him. David was not happy, could

and homes, but loves crafting custom pieces for clients. Every piece

not spend time with his family, and couldn’t find enough hours to do

is hand-drawn, uniquely created, and wonderfully inspired. His faith

art. So that morning when he got lost, he prayed and the next day

and testimony flows into every board.

resigned from his security job and his secure future. All he had now was faith. It took a week for David and his wife, Raschele, to see that God’s plan was abundantly better. Within a few days, the couple was

Once David crumpled up his map, he saw that God’s invisible plan revealed more gifts than he could ever achieve himself. Now, his focus is to bless others with his art and business. Experience his art at www.davidschalk.wix.com/david. ❑

David and Raschele Severin Severinschalk@yahoo.com Facebook – David’s Chalk Etsy – DavidChalk 209-840-4916 www.davidschalk.wix.com/david

19


! Z I B W O H S T H E

A R T S

that’s

STORY BY SUE DAUGHERTY PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

D

rive by the expansive store front of That’s Showbiz! on the Miracle Mile, and your

mind conjures up Hollywood memorabilia, collectibles, and movie posters. Inside, strategically placed spotlights in the ceiling grace your entrance.  Witness the familiar antics of Lucy and Ethel or the snappy dance numbers of Singin’ in the Rain on the big screen TV. Hollywood nostalgia is always playing at That’s ShowBiz! The dream child of local thespians and teachers Kevin and Elizabeth Costello, That’s ShowBiz! opened in September of 2012. The Costellos dreamed of starting a theatre company since they met and fell in love performing Summer Stock at The Barne Theatre in Augusta, MI in 1985. After completing college, Kevin and Elizabeth married, pursued acting careers in New York, and for 11 years operated a traveling education theatre for children. Settling in Stockton while raising four boys, both worked at Annunciation School, Kevin as a pastoral minister and Elizabeth as a teacher and after-school drama program instructor. During all that time, their dream of owning a theater company remained constant in their minds. Finally, after twenty-five years of planning, performing, and teaching, it was time to take the plunge. The Costellos’ vision was to create a place where actors could come to share in a nurturing environment without fear or intimidation. “When you are acting, you develop trust with one another, and a camaraderie you do not find in most places,” said Elizabeth.

20

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


T H E

A R T S

at Christmas time with singing, improv and comedy sketches. Over 400 tickets were sold for several shows over two weekends. “That really gave us a boost with the realization that there is a local audience that appreciates live theatre,” said Kevin. People are hungry for something positive and fresh in the community,” said Elizabeth, and added, smiling, “And we are so grateful for the positive community support we have received.” To attract a broader audience, they

Coming attractions include murder mystery

and Stockton-Con)

decided to combine the theatre company

Thanks in part to resident tech-support,

dinners, cabaret, small-scale musicals, intense

with a retail setting, offering Hollywood

set designer and scenic artist Brian Johnson,

workshops for serious actors, and a theatre

memorabilia, novelty items, costume rentals,

the non-profit That’s ShowBiz! Theatre

group for individuals with special needs. Stay

and purchases.  Including the specialty make-

Company operates in a small space in the back

tuned for Act II. ❑

up brand, Kroylan has been a real plus. “Local

of the shop. Designed for intimate interactive

actors typically had to buy this high-quality

theater presentations, with workshops for kids

THAT’S SHOWBIZ!

theatre make-up on line or in San Francisco.

and adults, and an emphasis on improv, it’s a

1744 Pacific Avenue

We have become a great resource for local

welcoming place for local actors to gather and

Stockton, CA 95204

actors or anyone looking for special effects

practice for auditions, or present monologues

209-938-0447

to enhance their look,” said Kevin. (Think Day

and get group feedback.

of the Dead, zombie enthusiasts, transvestites

shopshowbiz.com

The company presented their first live show

lifestyles

21


G R A P E V I N E

W

22

Picnic Wine

STORY BY DENNIS HALL PHOTOS BY AARON SASS

ines from the Lodi Appellation make for welcome

Erin and Rick Taylor, owners of Riaza Wines with their tasting room

companions for your lifestyles of outdoor picnics and patio evening

in Lodi, poured for Dana and me their white 2011 Torrontes smiling with

meals. Sipping three chilled varieties of wines from Lodi Appellation

anticipation that we would agree that it's perfect for picnics or patio

wineries cultivates adventurous fun, laid-back intrigue for you and a

feast. Their Torrontes bottle’s display entirely lights up a picnic or patio

companion or party while pairing exquisitely with appetizers, entrees,

spread with its festive golden hue. The label’s bluish and yellow colors

and desserts. Two white wines followed up with a white, sweet, dessert

and graphics alone resemble a festive hand-delivered invitation. Chill

wine exhilarate your curious palate with bouquet scents and quenching

to cold, and then uncork and pour into chilled glasses. Along with the

tastes. Opening one chilled bottle of wine is fine, of course, but opening

Torrontes, also open a cold, white Oak Farm Vineyards Verdelho, a rare

two adds exploration dimensions to the social-occasion, and you get

Portuguese-style varietal wine. Enjoy sipping them on their own, initially

to be your own accidental sommelier. Daylight savings time gives us

awakening your palate and enjoy their unique sophisticated complexities

winter’s departing gift of an extra hour of warm, romantic, invigorating

along with cheese and crackers. Then enjoy your main course, sipping

sunlight each afternoon and into the golden evening. You can picnic

them with breads dipped in olive oils along with munches of seafood

in the afternoon, and still have evening light later to enjoy yet again

salads, light chicken sandwiches, or vegetarian or vegan fare.

an alfresco meal with wines on the patio. Tasting rooms abound

Cheese Central on School Street in Lodi is an excellent source for

,matchmaking wines with delightful, springtime cheeses, olive oils,

recommendations of cheeses to pair with these two wines, and Olive

foods, and desserts.

Heaven across the street is an olive oil connoisseur’s dream. ➤

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


G R A P E V I N E

Topping off your feast, celebrate the picnic

with barbeque. Sorelle Winery near Stockton

steak, and grilled vegetables. We uncorked

with a chilled Sorelle Winery 2012 Muscat

on State Route 88 exemplifies majestic

the bottle and poured a glass to set for a half

Canelli, pairing it with creamy, light New York-

ambiance, and includes the historic, grand

hour before sipping, to allow it some breathing

style or ricotta cheesecake.

Dodge House dating back to 1866. Jonathan

time to bring out the full flavors. The dark

Location, location, location makes a huge

Dodge originally built the his home during

cherry scent of the bouquet made our mouths

difference in how much you enjoy your picnic

the heady days of the California Gold Rush

water even before tasting it, and sipping it

setting, wine, and feast. Oak Farm Vineyards

and is just a few yards away from their quaint

with the sirloin and sautéed mushrooms and

and Sorelle Winery each have exquisite,

building housing both the Sorelle Tasting

grilled vegetables evoked elated smiles. This

historic, fanciful grounds dating back into

Room and storage for racks of barrels filled

Barbera has crisp acidity and gentle fruit and

the 1800s, fostering unforgettable romantic

with aging wines. The white-paneled Dodge

oak tannins blending wonderfully with the

picnics. Arriving at Oak Farm Vineyards on

House sits elegantly among the vines, with

Savory flavors of the steak, mushrooms and

Devries Road north of Peltier Road, you

walnut and cherry orchards on each side, and

vegetables. Another wonderful wine to chill,

could easily believe you are on the set of the

large shade trees near the tasting room. Paths

open, and enjoy following a half hour of

vintage movie Gone with the Wind, or in the

under canopies of trees allow you to enjoy

breathing time for this meal is the red Estate

Deep South of the United States back in the

shade while taking in views of the Dodge

Crush 2011 Sangiovese. Its smooth texture and

1870s. The stately house dates back to the

House and vineyards. Ron Justice poured Dana

plum accent are perfect with barbecued beef

middle 1800s, with grassy knolls overlooking

and me their rich red 2010 Sorelle, Belleza Fra

or grilled chicken dishes. For after-dinner dark

soothing bodies of water surrounded with

Barbera in their tasting room. Belleza fra is

red dessert wine, the Toasted Toad Cellars

shade-draping trees.

Italian for “beauty within.” We love it, and

2010 Toadilly Lickable Wine produced with

When evening patio dining suits you, it is a

bought some to chill for our evening barbeque

grapes sourced from the Lodi Appellation is

wonderful occasion to enjoy red wines paired

pairing with marinated, juicy, tri-tip sirloin

a Portuguese varietal. Toadilly Lickable serves up deliciously with berry desserts, chocolates,

Dennis Hall is a freelance writer, author, entrepreneur, and San

including gooey chocolate cake and frosting,

Joaquin County advocate. Dennis and his wife Dana founded Sip

brownies, or raspberry cheesecake.

California, a wine industry business. Dennis.SipCalifornia@gmail.com 916-541-1992

Warm weather and spring fever are upon us. Go out and enjoy wines with your picnics and barbeques! ❑

lifestyles

23


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Junior League 85th Anniversary Gala PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

C

D

E

F

G A Elizabeth Alvarez and BJ Stewart

B Jenny Cook, Max Copella and Diane Malcoun C Lesta Stevens and Heidi Altamirano

D Karen Garrett and Tara Eastwood

E Mario Ramirez and Tami Gardea

F Chris and Georgette Hunefeld, Jen and Frank Lagomarsino G Pat DeLucchi, Pam Lee, Monica Harman and Daisey Plovnick

24

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Empowering Young Women PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

D

C

E

F

G A Bobby and Sonia Maathfallu

B Debbie Johnson and Sarah Head

C Cyril and Sidney Seligman

D Joe and Dorothy Serra

E Diane Malcoun, Rima Barkett, Tori Verber-Salazar, Janelle Nelson, Kathy Salady, Angela Brusa, Kathy Smith, Casey Chatfield and Barbara Daly F Barbara McCandless, Roz Hansen and Meredith McCormack G Erin Rishwain, Gina Rishwain and Susan Traverso

lifestyles

25


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

Like father, like sons Dad’s business left an imprint on their future BY CHARLEEN EARLEY PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

26

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

B

rothers Mike and Steve Bedford know their way around a

printing press, because it’s what their dad Don Duncan Bedford did for a living. They said he started his small business in the garage in 1955, and at the same time, sold tractors. “His boss told him that he should either sell tractors or do the printing press, one or the other,” said Mike, the firstborn, age 58. He chose his ink hobby over tractors, and named his company Duncan Press, after his middle name. The family business has moved a couple times over the years, with the last move in 1978 at their current location on W. Lockeford Street, at the north end of School Street in downtown Lodi. It turned out to be the perfect spot for them. ➤

lifestyles

27


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

“We got great exposure once we moved to this location,” said Steve, 53. But beyond exposure, the brothers, who took over the reins in 1978, said what keeps their customers coming back has everything to do with their dedication to customer service. “We bend over backwards for our customers. We do lots of custom orders, and we’re very hands-on,” said Mike. “Many people go to the internet for their work, but they don’t understand that they’re not getting attention to detail. If we see something’s not right with an order, we let them know, to make sure the job is done right. We also meet deadlines, which is very important.” The brothers offer an array of services including business forms, stationery packages, business cards and forms, graphic designing, brochures, direct mailers, catalogs and more – all printed on recycled paper, in order to keep their biggest client, Mother Earth, happy too. They specialize in high quality, four-color printing, and can print from their customers’ uploaded files – customers ranging from walk-ins to local businesses, wineries and ad agencies. “We strive to be quality-oriented with competitive prices,” said Mike, who plays golf with his brother when they’re not working. ❑

www.duncanpress.com quotes@duncanpress.com 209-334-6000


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

STORY AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAPC

G

iving every child an opportunity to

grow up in a loving, safe home, and setting them on their path to success and fulfillment is the vision of the Child Abuse Prevention Council (CAPC). But the reality is that not all children are afforded what many of us embrace as the “norm.” In fact, no less than 4 children a day in San Joaquin County are removed from their homes because of abuse or severe neglect. This is a vast improvement from several years ago, but the CAPC is committed to making that vision a reality for every San Joaquin child – one child at a time.

The children of the pre

school room thank Jul

ie Arismendi and Da

meron Hospital for the

ir Santa pictures.

I WISH YOU COULD MEET MALCOM… His grandmother brought Malcom to the CAPC crisis childcare center, having been expelled from his preschool (yes, that really happens). Malcom had significant behavioral challenges that neither the school nor his grandmother could manage. It turns out that Malcom’s mom abused him ruthlessly before the authorities stepped in to rescue him and place him in the care of his grandmother. Traumatized and scared, Malcom’s behaviors were a result of his exposure to violence, abuse, and neglect. Over time, and through the CAPC’s Behavior Modification program, both Malcom and his grandmother were given the necessary tools and skills to better manage those stressful times. ➤ volunteer in the Rima Barkett and her mom and niece ’s crisis center. CAPC Infant Room at the

30

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

For over 35 years, the Child Abuse

AND JULIA ... Julie entered the foster care system after living on the streets with her mom, who was

Prevention Council has worked to keep

jailed for drug use. Her father was also in jail, and Julia had fallen far behind in school

children safe, strengthen families and raise

because of her non-attendance. At 13, there was no one to care for her.  After bouncing

our community’s awareness about this issue.

around 7 different foster care placements, the Courts assigned a Court-Appointed Special

Part of that awareness is convincing us that

Advocate (CASA) to her. The CAPC operates the local CASA program.

that we all play a part in preventing child

The CASA visited with the child weekly, spoke to her teachers, assisted with getting

abuse. But understanding what that role is

her tested for learning disabilities and in getting an individual learning plan in place. She is

can sometimes be overwhelming. Where to

now getting all Cs and Bs in her classes!  But with the goal of finding a permanent home

start? What to do? How can we really all make

for Julia, the CASA worked closely with the social worker to find her a new placement

a difference in that tragic issue?

they hoped would be a perfect fit.  She is in that home now, with a family who will be her forever family by the end of this summer when the adoption into their family is finalized. 

The truth is that anything you do to support kids and parents can help reduce the

AND THE JOHNSON FAMILY...

stress that often leads to abuse and neglect.

The Johnson family was referred to the CAPC by Child Protective Services. The referral

Here are some practical ideas:

suggested that the mom would benefit from parent coaching, and needed assistance with

Be a friend to a parent you know. Ask

service coordination. When the CAPC Family Advocate arrived at the Johnson home, it

how his or hers children are doing. Draw on

became apparent that these issues were just the tip of the iceberg.

your own experiences to provide reassurance

Mom was clearly overwhelmed by her circumstances, and the safety of her family

and support. If a parent seems to be

was threatened by her inability to cope. The 5 children, ages 5 to 14 (one of them

struggling, offer to baby-sit or run errands, or

developmentally delayed), were constantly fighting, increasing mom’s stress level. With no

just lend a friendly ear. Show you understand.

other family or support system to turn to, mom had given up, and the family was in crisis.

Be a friend to children you know. Remember

There was very little food in the house, no toilet paper, no soap – and plenty of tears

their names. Smile when you talk with them.

and anger. And while the basic needs are easily remedied, it was clear to the Family

Ask them about their day at school. Send them

Advocate that what this family needed was a change in their way of life. In short, the

a card in the mail. Show you care. Talk to your

immediate needs were met by accessing resources provided by the CAPC and our partner

neighbors about looking out for one another’s

non-profits.

children. Encourage a supportive spirit

BUT THEN THE REAL WORK BEGAN.

among parents in your apartment building

The Family Advocate worked with the mom to strengthen her family by guiding the

or on your block. Show that you are involved.

mom to develop a goal-driven plan to better manage her money, and her household.

Give your used clothing, furniture and toys for

Additionally, our Family Advocate provided tools on improved parenting, and dealing with

use by another family. This can help relieve

stress.

the stress of financial burdens that parents

The Johnson family is not yet completely out of the woods, but with the coaching of the Family Advocate, the mom is on the road to providing a safe and nurturing home for

sometimes take out on their kids. Volunteer your time and money for programs in your community that support

her children. Preventing child abuse is not just the job of the Child Abuse Prevention Council. We all play a role in keeping our children safe. For more information on how you can be part of the child abuse prevention movement, contact the CAPC at 464-4524 or visit their

children and families, like parent support groups or day care centers. With these easy-to-implement ideas, you are playing an important role in protecting

website at www.nochildabuse.org ❑

children.

lifestyles

31


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Charterhouse Sweetheart Brunch PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

C

E

D

F

G

A Heidi Altamirano and Bakul Patel

B Renee’Hall, Moses Zapien, Gary Long and Les Fong

C Eno Uto-Uko, Tasha and Racole Dixon D Dennis Merrill, Susan Eggman and Byron Roberts E Ronda Sanders and Jon De-Ak

32

F Zulema Gomez and Betty Sanchez G Carlos and Edith Villapudua

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Community Center for the Blind 6th Annual Crab Feed

A

B

C

D

E

F

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

G

A Judy Korsgaden, Ryan Pico and Shelly Moreira

B Amy, Bill and Cheryl Travaille

C Elaine Stetler, Valerie Cecchetti and Juanita Karim D Judy Howell, board president, Olivea and Amber Castillo E Marcella and Joseph Munoz

F Dena Rupert and Kaelei Chapa G Scott Duburg and Lisa Himes

lifestyles

33


O U R

C U L T U R E

Roots and Branches The culture of agriculture in San Joaquin County BY JENNIFER TORRES SIDERS PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE RECORD

I

n 1852, according to records from the San Joaquin County

Agricultural Commissioner’s Office, ex-gold miner George West used grapes imported from his native Massachusetts and cuttings borrowed from friend – and Stockton founder – Captain Charles Weber to launch the first major vineyard in the Stockton-Lodi area. ➤

Captain Charles Weber PHOTO COURTESY OF THE STOCKTON - SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

34

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


O U R

C U L T U R E

West’s venture succeeded, and in 1858, he established El Pinal, the county’s first commercial winery.

large part to its agricultural heritage: Chinese immigrants began to

In many ways, before and since then, the story of agriculture and the story of San Joaquin County have long been tightly entwined.

raise potato and garden crops when the Gold Rush ended. Later, their work on reclamation and irrigation projects would make acres of Delta

And the connection remains a strong one. Today, local agriculture is a $2 billion industry, employing thousands and linking the region to countries around the world.

marsh suitable for farming. Italian immigrant families found success in growing cherries and tomatoes, and in the south county, Portuguese and Dutch immigrants

More than that, it is a way of life – a sort of culture – that many are committed to promoting and preserving.

opened large dairy operations. At the San Joaquin Historical Museum, the efforts of these early

“It’s extremely important on all sorts of levels,” says Bruce Blodgett, executive director of the San Joaquin Farm Bureau, “that people understand the impact of agriculture on our county.”

communities are traced and preserved. “We started out as an agricultural area,” says Julie Blood, collections and exhibits manager. “It’s important to us. It’s what our

While many of Stockton’s earliest settlers were drawn to the region on the promise of the Gold Rush, still others found their futures – and sometimes their fortunes – in the county’s rich soil.

Indeed, much of San Joaquin County’s enduring diversity owes in

economy was based on.” The museum, located at Micke Grove Regional Park in Lodi, houses an extensive collection of agricultural artifacts. ➤

lifestyles

35


O U R

C U L T U R E

In the Micke Building, find tools related to ranching, grain-growing and dairying. The Rosen Exhibition Building houses tractors and other agricultural equipment, including a Holt sidehill combine. Still in progress, the Cortopassi-Avansino Building will host exhibits on intensive agriculture: tomatoes, asparagus, dry beans and walnuts. But agriculture and agricultural heritage are not just remnants of the past, Blodgett says. In addition to advocating on issues such as rural crime, water supply and land use, the San Joaquin Farm Bureau actively promotes agricultural education, striving to tell the story of agriculture to those who, though they may live and work near farms, remain somewhat detached from them. “Someone might say, ‘My mom or dad worked for the processing plant, and they retired there,’” Blodgett says, “Or, ‘My grandfather owned a farm, but we had to sell it off.’ … Everybody has a relationship with agriculture, but the further and further removed you are from the operation, the harder it is to really understand.” ➤

36

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


O U R

C U L T U R E

For more than 20 years, the Farm Bureau’s Ag in the Classroom program has taught local teachers about farm operations and given them assistance in developing lesson plans on agricultural themes. Farm Bureau members also serve as volunteers during the county’s Ag Venture events, during which some 11,000 local third-graders learn about locally-grown food, interact with farm animals, and handle farm equipment. “Programs like Ag Venture are so important in giving youth a basic understanding of where our food comes from,” Blodgett explains. Throughout San Joaquin County are other opportunities, not just to observe the day-to-day processes of farm life, but to experience some of the values that our community’s agricultural heritage has nurtured. At Countryside Farms on East Main Street in Stockton, for example, the Cutter family, fourth-generation farmers, invite children and their parents to explore their grounds and try out seed planting and light picking. ➤ Photo courtesy of the Stockton Visitors Bureau

lifestyles

37


O U R

C U L T U R E

“Farming has changed considerably … but the core values remain the

“That night they had a happy supper with their friends who had helped.

same,” according to the family. “Caring for the land, appreciating the

They had no idea that putting up that table and a few signs would change

bounty it provides and realizing where our food comes from.”

their future summers.”

Elsewhere, on East Waterloo Road, the Fruit Bowl offers yet another glimpse of the county’s agricultural heritage. Since 1947, the operation, run

Ever since then, the operation has had a family feel, says Ralph Lucchetti, who now runs The Fruit Bowl with wife, Denene.

by the Lucchetti family, has offered fresh produce, baked goods, jams and

“I was out there in a baby buggy, and my kids were out there in theirs,”

honey. And according to family history, the business has its roots in the

he remembers. “We have third- and fourth-generation customers, even

spirit of neighborliness and camaraderie still associated with agricultural

third-generation employees.”

life: Frank and Ina Lucchetti, who had purchased a ranch on East Waterloo

That family-mindedness, so characteristic of agriculture, remains alive at

Road, saw their first crop of peaches ripen in July of 1947. On the advice of a

the Farm Bureau as well, Blodgett says. The organization has a scholarship

worker, they put up highway signs, hoping to sell peaches to passing drivers.

program dedicated to the children of farm workers, and designed to help

Then, one Sunday, the Lucchettis were inundated with so many peach

them pursue a higher education. (The application period has closed for

buyers that their friends had to step in to help meet demand. “The men were

2013, but interested students can find more information on next year’s

picking fruit, and the ladies were busy packing,” according to the family.

program by visiting sjfb.org). ❑

“It’s families working with families,” Blodgett says. “Agriculture isn’t just the owner of the farm. Agriculture is all the people who are related to that farm, all the people who rely on that farm.”


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

Somewhere Under the STORY BY LAURIE EAGER PHOTOS COURTESY OF RAINBOW SCHOOL

N

estled on a quiet side street in Stockton, there is a place

Rainbow school is grounded on established theories of child

where childhood dreams do come true. This year marks the 35th

development and dedicated to developing each child’s intellectual and

anniversary of Rainbow School – an independent, non-profit pre-school

creative potential. Their methods were so successful, they published a

still run by its founders, Pam Cook and Rita Schuckman. This magical

book entitled R is for Rainbow, which has sold thousands of copies and

place began when these women were young mothers themselves,

become a valuable resource for educators.

seeking quality early-childhood education for their own children. Both

Rainbow school bursts with color and creativity! Using rooms full of

were highly trained in theories of childhood development and wanted

materials lovingly collected over the past three decades, the dedicated

to apply their knowledge to very young children, where it could have

staff at Rainbow engages students ages 3 to 5 in rich learning

the greatest impact.

experiences. Art, science, multicultural social studies, literature, ➤

lifestyles

39


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

35th Anniversary Celebration May 5, 2013 Bare Ranch, Lodi

math and Spanish are all part of the curriculum. Each is taught with authentic hands-on materials in an environment that invites even adults to want to stay and play and learn. During a recent unit on the Rainforest, paper vines hung from the ceiling, students sorted plush animals into their proper environment, heard stories relating to this biome, and gained extensive knowledge about this part of their world through meaningful interaction with all the resources Rainbow offers. Lessons are geared to each student’s level of development and understanding. They are also lots of fun! ➤

40

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

Rainbow is a loving, nurturing environment which values and supports all of its families. pajama day. They host tea parties, put on a

The school grounds are “lived in and loved

stuffed animal pet show, visit the museum,

in,” according to Pam. Parents and families

make models, paint murals and sing songs.

are a big part of Rainbow. Parents have

But most important to the directors at

hosted fund-raisers to purchase playground

Rainbow is that students learn to respect

equipment, volunteer to transport students on

themselves and others.

field trips, and are actively involved in dozens

Currently there are over a dozen children

of other ways.

at Rainbow whose parents were students

Rainbow school has a library of over 2500

there years ago. Clearly, young lives

titles of quality children’s literature on every

continue blossom under this rainbow! ❑

theme imaginable. Each day, students listen to stories which relate to their current lessons. They enjoy theme days like pirate day and

lifestyles

41


W E D D I N G

B E L L S

Tradition Breaking

lifestyles

43


W E D D I N G

B E L L S

NOT YOUR MOTHER’S WEDDING CRAB FEED TATTOO BAR PHOTO BOOTH NO CAKE! (THEY BROKE ALL THE RULES)

O

PHOTOS BY RED CARPET STUDIOS Wedding dresses on display: Mother of the groom and mother of the bride (circa 1970)

n her way to meet an intriguing young man, she exited

her seat called as the winning ticket! As she approached the front of the

the freeway, and embarrassingly ran out of gas. Sitting on the side of

plane to collect her prize (still a little sappy from her boyfriend’s gift),

the road, with cell phone in hand, she reluctantly called him with her

Nate was waiting on bended knee as a flight attendant presented the

dilemma. He rescued her, the rest is history, and their lives continued on

last page of the scrapbook that read, “Will you marry me?” She said yes

the unprecedented and non-traditional path.

– everyone cheered – and two perfect strangers arose, insisting Andi

Nine months later the couple, Nate Schloss and Andi Sass, were flying to Florida to visit friends. Four hours into the flight, Nate surprised

and Nate enjoy their first-class seats. The newly engaged couple sipped champagne all the way to Florida.

Andi with a 9-month anniversary scrapbook. As she flipped through the

Thus the planning began. The rules? Break them. “If you’ve seen

pages, the captain announced an "on-board contest.” Andi then heard

it before, we won’t do it!” proclaimed Andi when friends and family

Engagement photo session: five locations, five wardrobe changes

44

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


W E D D I N G

B E L L S te comple

Save th

e date a

.

und card

with so

nnoucem

ent

would approach her with wedding ideas. Other than a traditional, Christian wedding ceremony, the goal of this couple was to have a day filled with fun and energy, shared with family and friends. No tuxedos, lots of great dancing music, and a crab feed. Yes, a crab feed. In addition to the five-venue (one of which included a skate park), five-costume

A N

change engagement photos, the tone for this Jan ua r y

19 , 20 13

wedding was set with the custom-designed Save the Date announcement – a fun, colorful

{GET OUT

and entertaining card that played "Everybody Dance Now" when opened. Soon to follow was a fun, information-packed 12-page

YOUR D

ANCIN’ S

HOES}

Below: Crab bibs for everyone

invitation. The River Mill in French Camp became the perfect place to host the wedding and reception. This beautiful venue continued to Google-eyed crab table assignment cards

surprise. The grounds, even in the dead of winter, were meticulously maintained. The

acemats

Interactive pl

building was unique, warm and inviting. And

WHERE ARE

THEY?

the staff, from the first meeting, until the last guest left, was gracious, accommodating and

ON GET YOUR GAME

MULTIPLE CH

efficient.

A

OICE

{3}

{2}

{1}

S

A

N

L

for marriage est aspiration 6. Andi’s bigg i meet for is to: Nate and And 1. Where did {6} Have 2 children on? a) pers show in es time gam best {5} the first b) Become the of the Opera” N {4} world a) At “Phantom couple in the of the road O S R involved b) On the side K c) Travel to Paris after Nate was ital hosp a In c) E d) Skydive G crab in a bar fight or ing o parl rground tatto Andi weren’t serv ing: d) At an unde 7. If Nate and gett most likely be rite tv tonight, you’d N D and Andi’s favo S H C 2. What is Nate O O L a) In-n-Out h together? D E P F show to watc A k-FilT I Chic N G K b) s I a) Storage War O W L and Chicken k B Stea T c) C U I R L b) Hoarders Guacamole A R C d) Chips and k E F B ys. c) Prison Brea R D E S taking mini-vaca O d K love i O C Gree And A d) American to visit 8. Nate and T S N ve favorite place R U I L What was their e) All of the abo S V F A M I i’s first date? K S F in 2012? Nate and And H A R io S stud 3. Where was ino E king L doc E L a) Men plate-ma C R E a) At a ceramic S A O nt park b) Florida R E T E S b) At an amuseme K Lake A er c) Shav E R L c) At Bikram yoga s H A V d) Boston clas H N S D O C d) At a cooking M E N e) New York and Andi’s E E E meal is: dates until Nate D C E K A S 4. How many rite Andi-cooked B O O 9. Nate’s favo P ch? A wich smoo R first sand S C P I a) French dip D I toes H pota 1 C a) and R E N b) Skirt steak soup F to E toma E and 3 se b) P T U N c) Grilled chee i makes F O R whatever And c) 8 E L O d) Nate will eat A W H E O B d) 10 A T E for him ymooning in: B S K i will be hone g dance T L K S Andi tried takin 5. Nate and And U R S 10. Nate and A T W the outcome? a) Hawaii A B R ses. What was A P clas and I m P R fantastic rhyth b) Tahiti O S I s. a) Nate had R B N d for the clas until c) Africa K A E G A will not know felt too advance es and was i N And I rise! F mov R d) It’s a surp E S U Andi nailed the airport s b) E the clas at V e elite C the they arriv transferred into FUN without Nate humiliated TAHOE BOWLING and Andi were SKATEBOARD mpt c) Both Nate SCRAPBOOK to never atte PRISON BREAK BRATWURST and promised again ever CRAB FEED cing POOLS KIA professional dan be featured on OASTERS TIDE LERC ROL will i And MENDOCINO FRENCH DIP d) Nate and Think You You ES “So ROS WHEEL OF FO the hit tv show SURFING RKS ER LAKE SHA Can Dance”

River Mill’s gorgeous, newly remodeled

WORD SEARCH

River Room was the perfect backdrop for the winter wedding, held in January 2013. With candles glowing in the fireplace, twenty members of the wedding party flanked each side of the altar – “Sassmaids” were dressed in Victoria’s Secret multi-way dresses while “Schlossmen” stood in J.Crew suits with Vans sneakers. Aaron Sass – accompanied by the

SHAV

Gangnam Style father-daughter dance

lifestyles

10) c Barbara b 8) c 9) d ster 6) Santa 5) d 6) b 7) George 5) Glou e 3) b 4) c Tahoe 4) Lake ERS: 1) b 2) 2) Boston 3) ragus Festival ERS: 1) Aspa

The grand entrance – running through the banner

45


W E D D I N G

B E L L S

What is a crab feed reception without raffle prizes?

Patrick Langham Quartet – played “Isn’t She Lovely” on the harmonica

and daughter Gangnam Style dance – to the tattoo bar – to wedding

as his sister was escorted to the altar by father Tim Sass. The Christian

party costume changes – to the dessert bar featuring Oreo cookies

ceremony was performed by Pastor Ricky Ryan, a longtime friend of the

and ice-cold milk – to a handmade photo booth (where even the most

groom’s family.

sophisticated guests got a little silly) – this reception was, according to

Then the fun began. As one family friend stated, “I have never been

photographer Stephanie Briggs, “epic.”

to a wedding where there was so much activity for the guests.” Another

When the evening was over, the couple escaped to Monterey

said, “Everywhere we turned, there was another surprise!” From the

for two days, followed by a two-week stay throughout the French

guestbook cards that were also your entry to win one of two Andi/

Polynesian Islands. The bride, Andi Sass, is a native of Stockton who

Nate-inspired raffle baskets – to the bride and groom running through

attended Lincoln High School and CSU Northridge, and has her degree

a “Just Married” banner – to the placemats with Andi- and Nate-

in journalism and public relations. She is a sales representative for

themed multiple-choice questions and a word search – to the father

Zimmer, Inc. The groom, Nate Schloss, grew up in Santa Barbara and

Custom photo booth backdrop and serious props made everyone get a little silly.


W E D D I N G

E I SD CAK RRATE P le a se

a ts OVm eEo f N a te a n d A n d i ’s fa v o ri te tr e

e n jo y so

DESSERT BAR OREOS AND ICE-COLD MILK ICE CREAM DRUMSTICKS GRANDMA EMMY’S HOT CHOCOLATE PUDDING OVER VANILLA ICE CREAM VARIOUS CANDY SELECTIONS

A couples favorite candy selections and the tattoo bar. Tattoos? Really?

graduated from Gordon University in Boston, Massachusetts with a degree in economics. He is a sales manager for 360 Payment Solutions. The couple currently resides in Walnut Creek, yet efforts by the family for them to move to San Joaquin County are in the works. How much fun would that be? ❑

B E L L S


W E D D I N G

B E L L S

IT WAS A BLAST! FIREWORKS! ONE OF FIVE ENGAGEMENT PHOTO SESSIONS

STAYING LOCAL FOR THE WEDDING The Perfect Venue The River Mill French Camp Gorgeous Flowers Silveria’s Flowers & Gifts Lincoln Center Stockton The Amazing Dress Bliss Bridal Salon Lincoln Center Stockton Attire for the Handsome Men Men’s Warehouse Stockton

48

Very Fun Rehearsal Dinner The Waterloo Inn Creative Photographers Red Carpet Studios Stockton Comfortable Accommodations

The Talented Musicians Patrick Langham Simon Rowe Brian Kendrick Gerry Pineda Aaron Sass Laura Wilkinson

(complete with shuttle service to The River Mill)

The Hampton Inn Lathrop & University Plaza Stockton Make-Up Chelsea Ramsey Hair Rachelle Kroll Stained Salon

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3

The Rockin’ DJ D. Ferreria Manteca Graphic Design & Printing Mari Tripp Layne Imada Cesar Larios SASS! Public Relations Duncan Press, Lodi


I am

San Joaquin PHOTO BY MICHELLE MILLS

Traci E. Miller Age: 47 Occupation: Principal of Health Careers Academy High School How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: I have worked in San Joaquin County for 17 years The people who mean the most to me: my family, now that I am a grandma, my grandbabies, Liam and Logan. Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: The Ave or the Abbey on the Miracle Mile. A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: An educator when I was in high school who told me I would not be capable of going to college… not sure if it was reverse psychology, but it lit my fire and I am on my last class away from completing my doctorate in Educational Leadership. My Bucket List includes: Visit the birth place of William Wallace, Ireland and Australia, sky diving, attend college and an NFL championship football games, own a beachfront property in Santa Cruz Favorite sports team: Oklahoma Sooners What I’m reading now: Critical Pedagogy by Joan Wink Favorite vacation destination: A quiet beach with lots of sun Hobbies: Sunbathing, reading, sipping wine with friends Sports I enjoy: College football and NFL Favorite Sports Team: Oklahoma Sooners Pet: Boomer, my Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Favorite food/dessert: Fishy crackers and green olives I “give back” by volunteering with: Health Careers Academy – it is not just my work, but my second home. Other information you would like to share: I love working in the city of Stockton, and am very excited about the things happening in our city, especially with the youth of our community.


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Omega Nu 40th Annual Crab Feed PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

D

C

E

F

G A Alan and Jane Cook

H

B Dan Rankin and Shari Lange C Roy Gaebel and Debbi Tedsen

D Luis Corominas, Bob Mau, Cheryl Meeker, Laura Corominas and Beverly Dierking E Isabella Thompson, Ariana Rishwain and Leah O’Leary

50

F Tom and Joanie Schwartz G Tom and Maria Sanguinetti H Maureen and Don Oliver

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Stockton Beautiful – Lunch with Mimi PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

C

D

E

F

G A Cissy Hilken and Liz Haines

B Carole and John Patridge, Eleanor Vogel

D Judy Chambers and Jim Darrah

C Joanne Thompson and Lynn Lyon

E Ann Hildebrand and Marian Jacobs

F Sandi DeGuire, Bill and Susan Filios G Mary Ann Poletti, Ellen Schuler and Jean Werner

lifestyles

51


Wag Tales

Joaquin Dogs PHOTO BY JUDI HACHMAN

SOPHIA – TRESOR’S SOPHIA OF SUMMER I am a: Standard Poodle Where I’m from: Temecula, CA Favorite place to hang out: My mom’s office at Ace Tomato Most amazing trick: I can sit up. OK, it doesn’t sound like much, but really, look at my beautiful posture… Most recent accomplishment: just being my most beautiful self Favorite place to play: I love strolling around my Brookside neighborhood. Guilty pleasure: raw bones (it’s sort of like sushi for dogs) Naughtiest deed: Not me; I’m perfect. Favorite treat: PupCorn Obsession: playing fetch – for days, and days Where I go to get beautiful: Kathy Laport Snell Any other interesting info about me: I really love to play with my nephew, Bode, a Portugese water dog Human Parents: Dean and Kathy Janssen


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Stockton Chorale Masked Ball PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

C

D

E

F A Antoinette and Dennis Fay

G B Joyce Bush, Grant Bowen, Doris and Del Batch, Julie Beck Bowen

C Irene Muster, Elizabeth Alvarez, Linda Levine and Clara Kaiser D Jeff Gamboni, Michelle Mills, Keneth Brewer, Lucinda Soule and David Robert E Katie Sonser and Roman Brown

54

F Kerry and Betsy Keithcart G Vincent Bricka and Caron Davidson

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Susan B. Anthony Awards Dinner PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

A Shirley Orndorff, Linda Tregle, Jimi Choice, Doris Edwards and Willamina Henry B Della Richardson, Janie Reddish and Marilyn Draheim C Norma Johnson, Charmine Lazzaresche, Occeletta Briggs, Sheriff Steve Moore, Susan Van Ruiten and Addie Smith D Barbara St. Urbain, Kathleen Tachella, Barbara Nash and Gail Brooks E Barbara Presley and Stan Rapada

F Jack and Gwen Fioni G Kevin and Linda Kelso

lifestyles

55


S P O R T I N G

56

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3

L I F E


S P O R T I N G

L I F E

Highest summit in the contiguous United States

E

BY JASON JONES PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

ach year, thousands of hikers and climbers

flock to California’s Sierra Nevada to summit the highest point in the United States (save Alaska). At 14,505 feet, Mount Whitney is the most frequently climbed peak in the Sierra Nevada. The good news is that this jagged, monolithic tooth in the Sierra Crest is accessible to anyone willing to hike an unrelenting 11-mile trail straight up the side of a mountain, via the Main Whitney Trail (MWT). ➤

lifestyles

57


S P O R T I N G

L I F E

National Park Service website: http://www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit/whitney.htm In 1864, Whitney was named after Josiah Whitney, the chief California Geologic Surveyor, though it was once proposed to rename it after Winston Churchill.

58

The MWT, though non-technical, is not for

find a hanging spring scale where your group

the timid. The altitude and overall mileage rank

can weigh and compare backpacks. The trek

this hike as strenuous at best. Backcountry

begins below the tree line but soon ascends to

experience and a proper fitness level are highly

a non-stop panoramic view of the valley below.

recommended. Day hikers can tackle the MWT,

Further up you will discover an amazing array

but given the up and down 22-mile roundtrip,

of crisp alpine lakes contrasted with a surreal

it is a demanding full day, sometimes hiked

Martian-like landscape. The trail includes

from midnight to midnight. It is generally done

markers like the seemingly endless zigzag of

more comfortably as a two- or three-day trip.

the “90-plus switchbacks,” the persistently

The MWT begins and ends at the Whitney

frozen and infamous “cables” section and,

Portal (8360'), 13 miles west of Lone Pine,

more quietly, at an altitude of 13,000', the

CA. At the Portal, there is a spot-on perfect

merger with the John Muir Trail. At the summit,

restaurant/store for pre-hike supplies or a

the Smithsonian Hut Shelter is the only thing

post-hike meal. The MWT starts ceremoniously

reminiscent of Earth below. Pen your name

with a veranda-like gateway. Here you will

in the Summit Register, celebrate your ➤

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S P O R T I N G

L I F E

Due to geologic shifting coupled with technological advances, the summit of Mount Whitney has fluctuated between 14,494 and 14,505 feet above sea level.

accomplishment by catching your breath and

Westerns since the 1920s. This craggy and rocky

head down.

area perfectly represents the iconic American

With the sightseeing done, descending 11

West, though they mirror any rugged terrain in

miles may be the toughest part of the journey.

the world – in the film Gladiator, Russell Crowe

Upon finishing the MWT, the Portal’s parking lot

is seen riding a horse here, with Mt. Whitney as

will look like Shangri-la. The Portal is also the

the backdrop. On your way up or down from

finish line of “the world’s toughest footrace,”

the Portal, driving through these hills at night is

the 135-mile Badwater ultra-marathon, starting

silent and eerie.

from Death Valley. With Whitney behind you,

A trip to this region poses more than your

leave the Portal and head back down to Lone

standard hiking destination. And though the

Pine.

MWT may seem like a simple hike on paper,

The town of Lone Pine and the surrounding

it offers a surprisingly rugged and demanding

area is its own destination, situated in the idyllic

challenge, and is for anyone seeking a

Owens Valley. Just outside of Lone Pine are the

remarkable adventure while earning the badge

Alabama Hills, a frequent filming locale for

of climbing the highest peak in the lower 48. ➤

lifestyles

59


S P O R T I N G

60

L I F E

Between May 1 and November 1, permits are

Getting there: From San Joaquin County, take SR

required to hike in the “Whitney Zone” and are offered

120 east through Yosemite via Tioga Pass, to I-395,

through both a lottery system and on a first-come, first-

near Mono Lake. Head south on I-395, 122 miles to

served basis. For more information, contact the Eastern

Lone Pine, CA. The Whitney Portal is 13 miles west of

Sierra Interagency Visitor Center 760-876-6222.

Lone Pine, on Whitney Portal Road. Head another 11

Due to curious bears, the national park service

miles up to the highest point in the contiguous United

requires overnight hikers to carry a bear canister –

States and enjoy a beautiful, hard-earned view of

these can be rented at the local ranger station.

California. ❑

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3


S P O R T I N G

L I F E

Mt. Whitney is viewable live from anywhere in the world at whitneyportalstore.com lifestyles

61


April ~ Mark the date

HAGGIN MUSEUM

Now through May 5, the Haggin Museum will feature the work of student artists from kindergarten through 12th grade. Beginning May 25, Pro Football and The American Spirit: The NFL and the U.S. Armed Forces will be on display through September 22. This inspirational exhibit chronicles the many ways in which the National Football League and its players have responded to America’s call during military conflicts. For more information, call 209-940-6300.

3

VICENTE FERNANDEZ

Vicente Fernandez will perform at the Stockton Arena on April 13. The King of Ranchera Music will bid farewell to his legions of fans with his performance at the arena. His career has spanned over four decades, and he has sold over 65 million copies worldwide. For tickets, visit the Stockton Arena Box office or www.stocktonlive.com.

Restore the Delta in conjunction with Friends of the Fox will be playing the documentary Over Troubled Waters, followed by speakers/panel discussion, then a long intermission, and finishing with a showing of Chinatown. The viewing will be on April 14 beginning at 11:00 a.m. Tickets range between $4 and $8 and can be purchased at www.stocktonlive.com or at the Bob Hope Theatre Box Office window.

14

19

SPRING OF THE VINE

ANNUAL SPRING ART SHOW

The Lodi Community Art Center will produce its 53rd Annual Spring Art Show at the Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi Winery. The theme of the Friday Night Benefit on April 19 will be “Cabaret.” Artists and other attendees in period costumes will enjoy art, music, food and wine, as prizes for the best art pieces will be awarded to the winning artists. Tickets to the benefit are 2 for $75. The show is free to the public on April 20 and 21, and is open from 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. each day.

64

28

a p r i l /ma y 2 0 1 3

Get a special look at Lodi on April 28 at the 2nd Spring of The Vine event held at Wine & Roses Hotel, Restaurant & Spa. This afternoon event features wine tasting with the winemakers. Tickets are $35 in advance for the wine tasting event, and $85 for the Spring of The Vine dinner, or $105 for both. To purchase tickets, call 209-371-6117.


May ~ Mark the date 3

ANNUAL LATINA LUNCHEON

El Concilio’s Annual Latina Luncheon will be held Friday, May 3, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Stockton Golf and Country Club. For more information on sponsorships or table reservations, contact Annette Sanchez at 209-644-2627 or asan@elconcilio.org.

RON WHITE

Ron White will perform at the Bob Hope Theatre on May 4 at 7:00 p.m. Don’t miss this hilarious funnyman from the “Blue Collar Comedy” tour as he returns to Stockton. The tickets are $46.75 and $56.75 and are available at www.stocktonlive.com or at the Bob Hope Theatre Box Office window.

4

8

The Children’s Home of Stockton Auxiliary will host their 42nd Annual Valley Garden Fair on Wednesday, May 8 at Iron Diamond Ford Estate. Guests will enjoy drinks and appetizers, a fashion show, shopping and a gourmet lunch. All proceeds benefit the Children’s Home of Stockton.

11 The Olive Oil Festival will be held on Saturday, May 11 at St. Mary’s High School. A community event celebrating agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, the event will include a 5K run and 1-mile walk, olive oil tasting, cooking, winetasting, and so much more. For more information, call 209-957-3340 or smhsoliveoilffestival.com

15

FESTA DELLA DONA

An Italian celebration takes place in Acampo on Wednesday, May 15. The VM Foundation and Watts Equipment Company will host Festa Della Donna, a luncheon event featuring shopping, winetasting, art and music. All proceeds benefit Lodi House and Hope Harbor.

VALLEY GARDEN FAIR

17

June

ZINFEST

The annual ZinFest Wine Festival will be held in Lodi May 17 through 19. On Friday, enjoy the Vintner’s Grille at the Lake. On Saturday enjoy a selection of 250 wines from 50 Lodi wineries at Lodi Lake from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. Finally on Sunday, certain Lodi wineries will have tours and open houses throughout the day. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.zinfest.com or call 209-365-0621.

THE PACIFIC ITALIAN ALLIANCE

30

Liguri Nel Mondo and the Central California School of Italian Language & Culture along with the Waterloo Gun & Bocci Club announce Festa ItalianaGiorno della Famiglia at the Waterloo Gun & Bocci Club at 4343 N. Ashley Lane in Stockton from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 30.

lifestyles

65


A lot happens in just one minute - especially on the Internet. 2,000,000+

2,000,000

SEARCH QUERIES

PEOPLE VIEWING

48

HOURS

217

NEW MOBILE WEB USERS

571

347

NEW BLOG POSTS

WEBSITES CREATED

OF VIDEO UPLOADED

1,058

700,000

PEOPLE LOG ON

MESSAGES SENT

684,478 PIECES OF CONTENT SHARED

2,083

CHECK-INS

100,000 TWEETS SENT

INFOGRAPHIC BY DOWJONES LOCAL MEDIA GROUP

27,778

34,722 47,000

LIKES

APP DOWNLOADS

NEW BLOG POSTS

7,600

SEARCHES

2,132

NEW PHOTOS

3,600

NEW PHOTOS

BRANDS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Make every minute count for your business. San Joaquin Media Group & Marketing Blacksmith – our digital agency division – provide a comprehensive suite of essential digital services to help you harness the power of the Web and connect your business with your customers.

We’ll show you how. Schedule a free assessment of your digital presence. Contact Tara Manners today. tmanners@recordnet.com 209-546-8353

The Record

Recordnet.com

SOURCES: http: news.investors.com/.royal.pingdom.com, blog.grovo.com, blog.hubspot.com, simplyzesty.com, pcworld.com, biztechmagazone.com, digby.com http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/communications/internet-minute-infographic.html, http://www.visualnews.com/2012/06/19/how-much-data-created-every-minute/


The Right Choice

BRANNON TIRE Family owned business for over 32 years Search for Brands, Categories, Products & Vehicles

www.brannontire.com Tires • Alignments • Brakes • Suspension • Custom Suspension • Car And Truck Accessories • Tune-Up • Smog • Star Smog • Diagnostic • Exhaust • Free Pick-Up And Delivery and Much More

Automotive Service Center

4905 Claremont Avenue • Stockton, CA

(209) 477-9000

Join us on Facebook

We are proud to say that we are now serving the children and grandchildren of our original customer base.

Truck RV Auto Service Center

3730 N. Wilson Way • Stockton, CA

(209) 467-0154


San Joaquin Lifestyles April 2013