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L E T T E R

F R O M

T H E

E D I T O R

MY MOST CHERISHED MENTOR PUBLISHER

Roger Coover

The Magazine For San Joaquin County

I

PUBLICATION DIRECTOR Deitra R. Kenoly

EDITOR

Carrie Sass

n the early 1980s, while at one of my very first jobs after moving to Stockton, I met

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

Anne Esau. Chatting it up at the counter of St. Joseph’s Fitness Center, she introduced me to her sweet husband, Frank, and then went on to tell me all about Stockton, about growing up here and her extended family. Then she said, “Well, of course, you must know my sister, Marian.” I’d only been living here a year, and had to say I didn’t know Marian. From her smile, I knew Anne was extremely proud of her sister. Within a few short months, I realized why. Even thought I still hadn’t met Marian, I kept hearing her name. She was named Stocktonian of the Year. I saw her picture gracing the wall of the Civic Theatre, and I kept reading her “letters to the editor” – of which there were many. Then I entered the world of community and public relations. Whoa! Not only did I meet Marian – I realized this woman was a whirlwind. She had (and still has) the ability with one phone call to set everyone and everything in motion. Her breadth of

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jennifer Langham Jennifer Torres Laurie Eager John McClimans

Charleen Earley Judi Hachman Lori Gilbert Jay Michael Rivera

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Amy Phipps Helen Ripken Lindsay Ortez

David Sowers Kristen Eager Judi Hachman Tim Hachman

influence has crossed all cultures, ages and social circles. She tirelessly works on behalf of others, raising millions of dollars over her lifetime. Marian has opened so many doors for so many people (including myself) in this community. She is not only my friend, she is my most cherished mentor. Marian Jacobs’ heart is bigger than life itself! I love her. (page 48) At the very core of our community, you will always find amazing people. This issue of Lifestyles, once again, highlights many of these generous, gracious and hardworking folks of San Joaquin County! Even in tough times, we can be confident that we are blessed because of those who are committed to our community. ­— Carrie Sass

Please continue to forward story ideas to: SASS! Public Relations 2972 W. Swain Road #228, Stockton 95219; or call: 209-957-7277; or email: cmsass@comcast.net

To advertise in Lifestyles magazine, call 209-546-8200 Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

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On the cover: Jeff Bolognini PHOTO BY AMY PHIPPS


CONTENTS 7

THE ARTS The new jazz hot spot – Take 5 at Valley Brew

7 ..........................................................................................

OUR CULTURE Our historic Italian heritage

12 ..........................................................................................

LIVING WITH STYLE The good country life

16

35

..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT Podesto’s grocery, deli & bakery An anniversary celebration

23 ..........................................................................................

SAVOR Italian foodies, take note! Angelinas • Gian’s Deli Genova Bakery • Bimba's Biscotti

16

35 ..........................................................................................

I AM SAN JOAQUIN Angela Rosenquist

42 ..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT Microgreens The organic beauty of microgreens

44 ..........................................................................................

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT The helping hands of Stockton’s Marian Jacobs

48

23

..........................................................................................


53 ESCAPES The beauty of Morocco and the Stockton connection

53 ..........................................................................................

WAG TALES The life and luxury

60 ..........................................................................................

ELITE FLEET Ferraris – Italian beauties

62 ..........................................................................................

MARK THE DATE

64 ..........................................................................................

SCENE AND BE SEEN • Pacific Athletic Assocation • Red Rhino Orphanage Project

62

32 • Restore the Delta • Hospice

33 • San Joaquin Historical Society

46

60

• Haggin Museum • Mary Graham Golf Tournament

47

19 6

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T H E

A R T S

Jazzed Stockton in

New jazz club creates space for food, drink, good listening STORY BY JENNIFER LANGHAM PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS


W

hen Simon Rowe, director of the University of the

Pacific’s Brubeck Institute, took over his job a year ago, he discovered in Stockton a mixture of talented musicians and educators, students ready to learn more, and an enthusiastic community of jazz listeners – with limited local performance venues. Then Rowe met Kellie Craig-Jacobs, owner of Valley Brewing Company, and someone who was ready for a new business venture, and Take 5, the jazz club at Valley Brew, was created. “I had never been to a jazz club before,” remembers CraigJacobs, “and we went to Yoshi’s (famous Bay Area jazz club in Oakland and San Francisco), and I said, ‘We can do this.’” “I had confidence in my staff to take our restaurant to the next level,” says Craig-Jacobs. In preparation for the opening of the club in February 2012, she oversaw extensive renovations to the Valley Brew banquet room, which became Take 5, as well as the development of a new drink and food menu specifically for the club. Named after one of the jazz tunes most associated with Pacific alumnus and jazz legend Dave Brubeck, Take 5 invites guests to come in and take time out of their busy schedules to enjoy great music. Rowe speaks passionately about the power of live jazz: “When this music was being formed in the early 20th century, it was always in intimate spaces, not in concert halls, and people came for the full experience: to hear the music, to interact with each other, to interact with musicians after the performance, to observe the human journey that happens when musicians play their music.” Take 5 weekly performances have attracted what Rowe calls “hardcore regulars” who are there almost every time, as well as people who are checking out the music for the first time. In addition to regular performances by local professional musicians and educators, internationally-known artists such as Lewis Nash, who come to Pacific as part of the curriculum, have also performed at the club. Take 5 has student jam sessions one night a week, when students in the Brubeck Institute’s Fellowship program play with other local college and high school students, all working to hone their jazz performance skills.


T H E

Also learning on the job are Music Management students from the University of the Pacific, who can intern at Take 5. They work the door, sell merchandise, learn to run the sound system and learn about the overall management of a jazz club. The result, says Kellie Craig-Jacobs, is a place and an experience that customers love. “From the beginning, the word has gotten out,” she says. “People are delighted that they can stay in Stockton and listen to great jazz in a beautiful atmosphere and hear artists that they would normally have to drive to the Bay area to see.”

A R T S


T H E

A R T S

Thursdays, 7:00-9:30 p.m., October 4 through December 6 (check BrubeckInstitute.org for scheduling information, as well as to get on a mailing list for updates); student jam sessions (free and open to the public) are on Tuesday nights during the same times. New for this semester: The Take 5 Big Band performs on the last Monday of each month (October 29, November 26)

157 W. Adams Street, Stockton $10 cover; $5 students For more information see: BrubeckInstitute.org ValleyBrew.com

2013 Brubeck Festival March 22, 2013

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis University of The Pacific Faye Spanos Auditorium 3511 Pacific Avenue • Stockton For more information 209-946-3970 www.brubeckinstitute.org 10

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O U R

Trentino Alto Adige

Valle d’ Aosta

Lombardia

Friuli Venezia Giulia

Veneto

Piemonte Emilia - Romagna Liguria

C U L T U R E

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY San Joaquin County continues to be enriched by its Italian Marche families and traditions

Toscana Umbria

STORY BY JENNIFER TORRES PHOTOS COURTESY OF PACIFIC ITALIAN ALLIANCE

Abruzzo Lazio Molise

Puglia

Campania Basilicata Sardegna

Calabria

COVER OF THE PACIFIC ITALIAN ALLIANCE SPRING 2012 NEWSLETTER

Sicilia 12

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O U R

C U L T U R E

WWII Barracks in Lathrop

D

uring the Second World War, more

than 150 Italian soldiers – captured in North Africa – were held in Lathrop as prisoners of war at what is now Sharpe Army Depot. Having agreed to aid in the American war effort as part of the Italian Service Corps, the soldiers, though closely supervised, were allowed what today might seem unlikely freedoms: They regularly dined with the Valley’s Italian-American families. They attended dances and festivals. Enduring friendships – even romance – developed. “Not many people know about this fascinating part of our local history,” says Andrea Songey-Neff, executive director of the Pacific Italian Alliance. The organization was founded in 1991, in part, to promote and preserve the San Joaquin Valley’s Italian heritage. “We’re continuing to pass on the stories and the appreciation of Italian culture,” says Songey-Neff, “And this is always flavored with the fact that we have a unique Italian culture in the Central Valley.” Indeed, the arrival of Italian prisoners of war to San Joaquin County

Luigi Manccini and Mario Speroni

in the 1940s brought a new dimension to what was already a wellestablished Italian-American community, one whose influence and civic-mindedness continues to resonate. According to research from the Western Regional Chapter of the Italian American Studies Association, the first major wave of Italian immigrants – most of them from Northern Italy – arrived in California during the Steve and Mike Trucco

late 19th and early 20th century, at a time of deep unrest in their homeland. “There were a lot of reasons to immigrate,” explains Songey-Neff.

lifestyles

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O U R

C U L T U R E

In Stockton, these new arrivals found a young city with promising

of Stockton City Councilwoman Diana Maccini Lowery, was a teenager

opportunities in the region’s fields, orchards and vineyards. Their

in 1942 when her father brought prisoner Luigi Maccini home from the

families – with now-familiar names, such as Cortopassi, Lagorio, Solari

Lathrop camp. Maccini was from Parma, a city near to the Bacigalupi

and Lucchetti, among others – helped build a rich agricultural tradition

family’s hometown, and Alma’s father hoped the young soldier could

that endures in the Valley even today. “Despite the fact that we have

share news from Italy.

people from many different areas of Italy, they really do all identify as Italian,” Songey-Neff says. “There is that pride in agriculture and

Eventually, Alma and Luigi fell in love and were married. They made their home in Stockton.

pride in community. Considering that most of these folks came from

“Dad spoke very little of his time in the camp,” Lowery recalls of

families who made it on their own, they really do give back generously.”

her late father. “Except that the Stocktonians were very good to him.”

Not long after arriving, immigrant families began to organize social

For more than a decade, Lowery has been working to strengthen and

organizations – such as the Italian Gardener’s Society, founded in 1902

explore the bond between Stockton and Italy, of which her family is

– to foster stronger connections and provide mutual support.

such a unique manifestation. In 1998, she helped lead the effort to

That community spirit extended even to the Italian prisoners who

establish Parma as one of Stockton’s sister cities, and since then, she

were sent to the Valley during World War II. Alma Bacigalupi, mother

has been quietly collecting stories about life in the Lathrop prisoner-ofwar camp. The Pacific Italian Alliance, too, has made it a priority to preserve stories and artifacts of Italian-American life in the Valley. The organization is currently at work on a pictorial history book. Its working title is “Italians in San Joaquin County.” To be published next year, the book will include stories and photos collected from families throughout the region. “We are actively searching for pictures, stories, immigration stories, marriage stories,” Songey-Neff says. “Anything that speaks to that experience, and what it was like to be the first, second or even third generation. We want to pass these things on.”

A LASTING CONNECTION This summer, a delegation from Stockton’s Sister City of Parma, Italy, visited California. During their weeklong stay, the Italians helped dedicate Parma Sister City Park, located at 9127 Chianti Circle, and participated in a ceremony honoring the Italian Service Corps members who were held in Lathrop during World War II.

PRESERVING HISTORY To contribute stories or photos to the local history book being developed by the Pacific Italian Alliance, contact author Ralph Clark at 818-4343599, or email ralphallenclark@yahoo.com. For more information on the Pacific Italian Alliance and upcoming events, including the October 6 Passport to Italy Gala, visit pacificitalianalliance.com. ❑

David Canclini

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L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

F E A T U R E D

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H O M E


L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

At Home

In The Country A

BY LAURIE EAGER PHOTOS BY LINDSAY ORTEZ

visit to the home of Ben and Madelyn

Kolber is a breath of fresh air – literally. On a sunny summer morning, the floor-to-ceiling windows and doors are open wide to catch the cool breeze that flows through the recently remodeled space. Their three young children play happily while Mom and Dad are able to combine work and play with vineyard views. Ben operates a custom farming company, specializing in vineyard management and other agriculture-related services. The couple also farms their own land. Farming is a huge part of Madelyn’s family tradition. Her grandfather, Arthur Ripken, emigrated from Germany as a teenager in the 1920s, and along with his brother, began farming the Delta with mules until they could save up enough money for a tractor. He married his wife, Margaret, and the couple built a ranch house at the corner of DeVries Road and Highway 12 in Lodi. Years later, Caltrans widened the highway, and the Ripkens rebuilt further off the road. In 2009 Madelyn and Ben purchased the family property, and began dreaming of transforming the traditional house into a unique home that reflected their tastes and sensibilities, and was suited for their modern farming lifestyle and growing family. After spending a year tearing ideas from magazines and working with local architect Tim Mathias, the couple was ready to embark on a major remodel that would add a great room, a master suite and update the remainder of the home in a contemporary industrialmeets-warm-and-welcoming style.

lifestyles

17


The Kolber home is full of personal touches that reflect the passions of its owners. Doors throughout the home showcase Ben’s love of metalwork. Rather than swinging open, they slide on custom-made barn door tracks that he fabricated from old sprayer parts. He also turned acetylene tank lids into pendant lights for the kitchen bar, old well casing into exterior sconce lights, and a rescued tinwork table into a headboard for their bed. Madelyn’s college stint as a rafting guide influenced the choice of granite in the kitchen, which reminds her of stone river-bottoms. ➤

lifestyles

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L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

The sea glass tile in the children’s bath recalls her happy childhood summers spent in Carmel. Master bedroom walls are covered in salvaged barn wood, complete with owl holes, and the whimsical pantry door is clad in Caltrans signs that hold special meaning for Ben and Madelyn. Madelyn describes her decorating style as “simple.” She prefers clean lines to excess ➤

Tim Mathias – architect together with Sam Harper, WMB Architects Inc. Tim Munson Construction – Woodbridge Shannon Cabebe – Cabebe Construction Inc, Acampo Jason Martinez, custom woodwork – J&L Barrel designs Scott Toschi, cabinetmaker – Toschi & Sons, Lodi

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L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

ornamentation, and finds asymmetry more

and given a place of honor on a high ledge in the

table from a local fallen redwood tree. Ben

interesting than predictable lines. Rather than

family-friendly hub.

designed the base, and the table has room for 18

artwork, the great room walls are home to Ben’s

Just steps outside the back door, a raised-bed

collection of musical instruments (he was a music

vegetable garden provides fresh produce, which

major in college). Guitars, horns, drums and a

Madelyn uses to whip up “working lunches” for

The Kolber home is an extension of their

baby grand piano feel like sculpture in the soaring

farm clients and employees, and create wholesome

philosophy of truly enjoying life. They love living

space. Miniature tractors, originally purchased by

and delicious meals for family and friends. The

in Lodi and raising their family where they

Madelyn’s grandparents for their grandchildren,

Kolbers love to entertain, and asked friend Jason

feel “grounded,” and take pride in living off

were discovered in the barn during the remodel

Martinez of J & L Barrel designs to craft a dining

the land. ❑

lifestyles

guests to gather and dine. The fireplace mantle was fashioned from the same tree.

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

MARKET & DELI THE GO-TO-SPECIALTY STORE

F

rom artichokes to zucchini and everything in between, for the

To celebrate this special occasion, Podesto’s is increasing its popular

past 30 years Podesto’s Market and Deli has become the valley’s go-to

in-store demos in every department, and having specials throughout

specialty grocery store. Known for its helpful employees and selection

the store in October, November and December.

STORY BY JOHN McCLIMANS PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

of everyday and unique items, October marks its 30th anniversary celebration.

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Owned by Bernie Morgenstern and his wife Deborah, Podesto's opened in 1982 after a 1981 fire destroyed a Don Quicks Supermarket

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

operated by Deborah’s family. Podesto’s took over the space, and filled a need for a specialty Italian grocery store in the San Joaquin Valley. Before Podesto’s opened its doors, customers looking for imported olive oils, meats or other authentic Italian foods had to drive to Sacramento or the Bay Area to find what they were looking for. Since opening, Podesto's has experienced continued success – so successful that it has expanded twice, and carries more than 30,000 items. It’s often the specialty items that bring customers back; imported cheeses and vinegars, fine wines and hard-to-find cooking ingredients are commonplace on the shelves. “Customers know if they can’t find something elsewhere, Podesto’s will have it,” said Bernie. “You can come here for all of your regular shopping and pick up your (hard-to-find) goodies at the same time.” And chances are some of those goodies might come from one of their old-fashioned counters. The deli staff methodically navigate yards of cheeses and meats, and create made-to-order sandwiches during the busy lunch rush. Meanwhile, over at the meat counter, butchers help customers choose the perfect steak, and share family recipes for the best marinade or rub. But it’s more than just these items that keep customers coming back. Walking through the aisles, you’re hard pressed not to find one of the friendly employees asking if you need help. Known for its customer service, Podesto’s is consistently ranked top supermarket and deli in The Record’s Best of San Joaquin. It’s the employees, including department heads Harold Van Airsdale, Mario Andeola and Mark Podesto, who distinguish Podesto’s from the rest. “We have employees that have been with us in excess of 20 years. They know our customers by first name, know their shopping habits, and know our products,” said Bernie. And in true Italian fashion, everyone is family at Podesto’s. “I know I’m speaking for all of my employees,” said Bernie, speaking about his customers. “They’re more like family to us than customers. We’ve watched their kids and their grandkids grow up, and we’ve gotten to be a part of their lives for the past 30 years. We’re grateful to have that opportunity.” ❑ lifestyles

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S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Pacific Athletic Foundation Orange & Black Ball PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Gary and Wendy Frush, Pam Eibeck and Bill Jeffery

A Leanne Yu, Radora Goold

and Marisa Godi A

B

Jamie Dillon, Claudia Pruett, Kristen Dyke and Dina Bibb

C

Jordan Ferrell and Amy Van Hollebeke

B

D Ross and Marilyn Bewley E C

D

Kathy and Gary Dei Rossi

E

Red Rhino Orphange Project “One under the stars” PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Lynette, John and Carol Zeiter

A Jorge and Leticia Robles

and Damian Gutierrez B

Denise Guntert, Kelli Carter and Shelly Moreira

C

John Zeiter, Ed and Dottie Richardson

A

B

D Marcia Crockett, Diane Malcoun

and Cherie Gibson E

Lisa and Peter Pijl, Chris McCaffery C

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D

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E


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Restore the Delta Grand food and wine classic PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Bob Gutierrez, Triana and Bill Berryhill

A Grant and Janyce Fletcher, Lisa Herrick

and Mark Croce B

Karen Zehnder, Kathy and Brad Pappalardo

C

Tori Quinn and Mark Wisbar

A

B

D Vicki and Rick Wright E

Wendy Stokes and John Herrick

C

D

E

Hospice Sip N’ Stroll PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Reg Carter, Charly Douglas and Clarence Carter

A Don Lenz, Jo Ann Henderon, Alice Lenz,

Elizabeth and Michael Kinney

A

B

B

Lodi Chief of Police Mark Helms, Debbie Helms, Katherine and Mel Young

C

Richelle and Mark Woo

D Joy Daugherty and Linda Nugent E

C

D

James and Mary Lou Takahashi

E

lifestyles

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S A V O R

GET YOUR FILL OF

ITALIAN FOOD

BY CHARLEEN EARLEY PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS lifestyles

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S A V O R

W

hen it comes to authentic Italian food, look no further

than your own backyard in San Joaquin County. From the main course

thing when it comes to quality, taste and authentic Italian food.

to fabulous catering options, mouth-watering deli sandwiches, breads,

“We have customers who have been eating here since we’ve

meats, cheeses and biscottis like you’ve never had before, check out

opened. Some of our customers are third generation,” said co-owner

this spread below on where to go to get your taste of Italy on!

Steve Copello. “Our food is consistent. We always strive to give

Wowing us with their original family recipes for the last 36 years,

PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS 36

Angelina’s Spaghetti House on East Fremont Street has not changed a

everyone great service and food at reasonable prices.”


S A V O R

PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS

Steve Copello

The restaurant’s humble beginnings started

With a full bar called ‘The Hanger,’ catering

out with four family members. The late Angelina,

services, wedding and special events services,

whom the restaurant was named after, was

and a little store inside the restaurant to your left

never an owner, but was Copello’s aunt, and the

at the entrance, Angelina’s offers steak, chicken

oldest member of the family. He said most of the

and seafood entrées, and a salad bar as well.

recipes came from Angelina, who hailed from Genoveze, Northern Italy.

“We are locally owned, and have had the same management team for years. Our general

“We make our own traditional pesto sauce and our meat sauce is on the hearty side; in some

manager has been here for 25 years,” said Copello.

parts of Italy, they call it gravy,” said Copello,

Since 1976, Copello has been purchasing

who lives in Stockton with his family. “We serve

breads for his restaurant from Tim Canevari,

Northern Italian cuisine, and we are known for

owner of Genova Bakery, located on N. Sierra

our raviolis and pesto.”

Nevada Street in Stockton.

Angelinas Spaghetti House 1563 E. Fremont Street • Stockton, CA 209-948-6609 www.angelinas.com


PHOTO BY AMY PHIPPS Tim Canevari

This is where you’ll find the best bread in the county. “It’s what our customers say all the time,” said Canevari, a baker for the last 20 years, 18 of them at Genova. “We bake our bread fresh every night with genuine Italian ingredients. Our bakers are here all night, so when the drivers come in at 3:30 a.m., the bread is done and loaded up, and deliveries are made.” Established in 1918 by Angelo Rolleri, the bakery is known for its fresh-baked bread, hard-to-find deli meats and cheeses, pasta, tomato sauces and Italian goods. “We don’t use preservatives in any of our breads, and we do most of the work by hand, the way they made it originally,” said Canevari, a full-blood Italian with family from Genova and Lucca. “I love feeding people! Going over to my grandma’s as a kid, you could never leave empty-handed; she always sent you home with something,” said Canevari. “I like baking different things, and I just want my customers to enjoy what they eat.” Baked in the original brick oven, some of his signature breads include French (sweet bread), ciabatta, jalapeño cheddar chipotle (baked every Friday) and grain olive rosemary Parmesan. You can also find Canevari’s breads at Angelina’s Spaghetti House, El Rancho Steakhouse and Gian’s Deli on the Miracle Mile, where owner Jeff Bolognini turns those breads into delicious sandwiches – but not just any sandwich.

Genova Bakery 749 N. Sierra Nevada Street Stockton, CA 209-466-6145

38

PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS


S A V O R

“My dad Gian started this business in 1972. He came over from Italy, and truly believed a good sandwich was made with good cheese, meat and bread on a French roll, and that’s it!” said Bolognini. “He had his sandwich shop in downtown Stockton across from the courthouse, this little hole-in-the-wall with no seating. He just had sandwiches and some groceries against the wall, and he made the sausages in the basement!” His dad passed away four years ago, but the tradition of making great sandwiches continues, now on Miracle Mile and with a little more room for tables and chairs. “I’ve worked here my whole life, grating cheeses and running around in the basement (at the downtown location),” said Bolognini, who said all the recipes were passed down from his dad’s side of the family. Also on the menu includes soups, salads, pizza, lasagna, homemade sausages, pesto and their signature raviolis. “We have the best customers in Stockton. The families are great, supportive and loyal,” said Bolognini. “Some of our customers have moved to Washington and North Carolina, and they still order our raviolis during the holidays!”

Jeff Bolognini

Gian’s Deli 2112 Pacific Avenue Stockton, CA 209-469-0108

PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS lifestyles

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S A V O R

One of the sweet Italian treats Bolognini sells in his deli is biscotti from Bimba’s Biscotti, made fresh by owner Linda Ratto. Born and raised in Stockton, Ratto has been selling her biscotti for the last 20 years, but has been making them since she was a kid. “My grandmother Pia Celli taught me. I made them for friends and family members and everyone told me I should sell them, because there’s nothing out there that tastes like them,” said Ratto, who also sells her biscotti to Podesto’s in Lincoln Center. Born a farmer’s daughter, then later a farmer’s wife, Ratto began her business using a KitchenAid mixer while holding a cold rag on top to keep it from heating up. She said the name Bimba was her mother’s nickname growing up. “On the box I have her passport picture when she left Lucca, Italy in 1924,” said Ratto. “Both my mom and dad were born there. I love the fact that I’ve carried on my grandmother and mother’s tradition of creating these, because it’s not a simple cookie to make.” Her scrumptious biscotti flavors include Amaretto Almond,

Cranberry

Almond,

Apricot

Almond,

Cinnamon Walnut (custom-made for Diamond Walnut in Stockton), Lemon Vanilla with fresh lemon peel and juice, and Mocha Chocolate Chip. “They’re all homemade with fresh ingredients,” said Ratto, who bakes about 400 cookies a week. “Italian women create their own biscotti, and they’re wonderful. But on the market, you won’t find one that compares to mine.” When it comes to counting calories with her cookies, Ratto’s advice is – don’t! “It’s better to eat one naturally made cookie with no preservatives than to eat a low-calorie biscotti filled with artificial ingredients!” she said.

Bimba’s Biscotti For special orders, call: 209-466-8919 PHOTO BY AMY PHIPPS 40

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Angela Rosenquist Age: 34 Occupation: Vice President, Sales and Marketing at Boboli International, LLC The people who mean the most to me: My family, first and always! My favorite life moment has been watching my little brother, Nick, grow up, get married, and have a wonderful family. Jenn, Kaylie, and Layla are the best! My extended family at Boboli International! Also, professors, mentors and coaches – who changed my life with their influence – mean the world to me. Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: Mezzo, of course! Another is to take them to our cream puff manufacturing facility. Who doesn’t want to eat cream puffs hot off the line, and see a chocolate waterfall? A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: I was planning for my last year of volleyball to be at Delta College, and then to take my savings and head to UCLA for law school, when John Dunning asked me to accept a scholarship to Pacific. Can you say “game changer?” My bucket list includes: • A trip to Alaska to see the northern lights (the last state I have to visit!) • Cranberry bogging in Maine (with an Ocean Spray bottle and waders, of course). • Plant a vineyard next year! • Take a bicycle tour through Italy with a guide that can handle three bikes – road, mountain, and cruiser – different bikes for different adventures! • Finish my doctorate. Favorite sports team: Pacific Tigers, of course! I also love college football and Formula One racing. What I’m reading now: I am currently reading two books – Jimmy Buffett’s A Pirate Looks at Fifty, and Statecraft by Margaret Thatcher. They make quite an entertaining couple on my nightstand! Favorite vacation destinations: Boston’s North End; Prague, Czech Republic; downtown Paris; day trips to San Francisco; Vancouver for hiking; the Bahamas; and most of all… home! Sports I enjoy: My true sports passions lie in baseball and volleyball. I love live sporting events from football to hockey and everything in between. I also run two annual fishing tournaments. Favorite food/dessert: Mmmmm… I love Grandma Clara’s lazy daisy cake and Grandma Loetta’s chocolate gravy and biscuits; mom’s deviled eggs and brussel sprouts, my little brother’s pesto (sorry, Dad), any soup my Dad makes, and everything our company bakes! I “give back” by volunteering with the following organizations: University of the Pacific – Pacific Alumni Association, PAF; Financial Center Credit Union; Saint Mary’s Dining Room; and the Stockton Symphony. My favorite quote: “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t – you’re right.” — Henry Ford (my birthday buddy) Favorite childhood memories: Some of my favorite times were playing T-ball in the backyard with my little brother, and our fun family vacations. Walking downtown to the old Segarini grocery store with my grandma.

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I am

San Joaquin PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS

Angela Rosenquist


MICROGREENS A GROWING CONCERN

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STORY BY LAURIE EAGER PHOTOS BY KRISTEN EAGER


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

P

erhaps smaller is better… at least

according to local entrepreneur Nick Guidi. In direct contrast to the genetically modified mega crops produced by giant firms like Monsanto, Nick launched San Joaquin Microgreens, a small-scale producer of edible microgreens which are gaining popularity at the finest restaurants in the country. Microgreens are not to be confused with sprouts, which are grown in water and consumed in their entirety. Instead, microgreens are planted in soil with less seed density and are harvested by cutting at the soil level when the plants are 1-2" tall. These miniature plants bring a sense of freshness

“thrilled to discover a local source for beautiful microgreens” Richard Hyman, executive chef at Mezzo

to your meal. They add visual appeal, dense nutrition and a burst of flavor to soups,

community and the world. His microgreens

neighborhoods, and consequently raising

appetizers, sandwiches and any other dish.

business is a model for having a low carbon

academic performance. Nick feels strongly

Nick’s burgeoning business has attracted

footprint. Nick can walk his product to his

that local people with fresh ideas can similarly

customers such as Richard Hyman, the

restaurant clients on the Miracle Mile from his

improve Stockton. And that is a Big Idea worth

executive chef at Mezzo in Stockton. Richard’s

production facility housed in the former Alpine

embracing. ❑

philosophy is that the ONLY way to offer

Nursery. (Nursery founder Virgil Azzaro was

superlative food is to start with superlative

Nick’s great-grandfather.) Unsold product is

produce and he was “thrilled to discover a

recycled to become growing medium for the

local source for beautiful microgreens” to

next batch.

enhance plates at his popular eatery.

Nick also hopes to motivate a new

Nick grows favorites such as micro

generation of kids to understand where their

basil, micro fennel and micro arugula, and

food comes from, and to care about what they

is continually experimenting with new ideas

put into their bodies. He’d like to partner with

such as micro beet bull’s blood, and colorful

schools and kids’ camps, and to explore the

microgreens mixes. The flats of seeds are

possibility of creating a food co-op.

germinated in the dark, and then brought into

Nick is inspired by visionaries such

the filtered sunlight to grow for 7 to 14 days

as Stephen Ritz, a South Bronx educator

until they are ready to harvest.

who is responsible for empowering school

A self-proclaimed “foodie,” Nick is

children from impoverished areas to create

passionate about finding ways to improve our

sustainable green spaces in their blighted

lifestyles

Owner Nick Guidi

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S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

San Joaquin County Historical Society Sparks in the Park PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Collette and Robert Monie and Andrew Smith

A Frank Edwards, Sheriff

A

Steve Moore, Bob Schulenberg, Ted Leventini, Kent Steinwert, Dennis Haser and Claude Brown

B B

Elise and Ron Forbes, Dee Anne Gillick

C

Matthew Tippets and Sonja Phipps

D Jan and Jim Bell, Ruth Kessel E C

D

E

Debbie and Joe Sangimino


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

Haggin Museum Teddy Bear Picnic PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Izaak, Katie and Caroline Hill

A Ariadne and Samantha Sola,

Tatiana Corchon B

Alexandre, Joanne and Isabella Waters

C

Back row: Madelyn Kolber and Lisa Conway. Front row: Sadie Kolber and Kate Conway

A

B

D George and Margo Tzikas E

Caroline, Marcie and Catherine Blower

F

Catey and Lillian Campora

C

D

E

F

Mary Graham Children’s Shelter Golf Tournament Bob Kavanaugh, Don Wiley and Jerry McDonald

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

A Jack, Jessica, Joel and Gail McAuley

A

B

B

Brad Clark, Time Oliveri, Rich Sarris, Marv Vargagliotti and Ed Lewis

C

Greg Delucchi and Angela Rosenquist

D Tom Sousa, Lisa and Steve Dougherty E

C

D

Victor Fong and Tony Rocha

E

lifestyles

47


C O M M U N I T Y

S P O T L I G H T

The Helping Hands of

Marian Jacobs I

STORY BY LORI GILBERT PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARIAN JACOBS

t started when she was in grammar school, serving as president

of the Junior Red Cross.

Marian Jacobs hasn’t stopped helping others since. Whether starting Sunflower Presents so people in care and nursing facilities could enjoy live entertainment, or promoting the arts with the creation of the Stockton Arts Commission, Jacobs spent as much of her time seeing to the welfare of her beloved hometown as she did running her successful advertising/public relations agency. The 85-year-old dynamo will have to clear some room in the scrapbooks, because Goodwill Industries’ Foundation Board is recognizing her continued contributions to Stockton with the 2012 Goodwill Helping Hands Award on October 11. What a collection those scrapbooks already hold. There are photos of Marian with actress Janet Leigh, her friend from childhood, and with Telly Savalas, at an event she attended as a stringer for The Stockton Record society page. There are photos of actor Jamie Farr, whom she talked into attending a party for the broadcast of the last episode of “M*A*S*H,” a fundraiser for the Stockton Police Youth Activities League.

Telly Savalas

48

Jamie Farr

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Janet Leigh


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

There’s no picture of Vincent Price, but he’s the first celebrity who accepted an invitation from her to appear in Stockton at a benefit for the Community Chest, the forerunner of the United Way. Dick Haymes, The Andrews Sisters, Pat O’Brien and Xavier Cugat followed as headliners. “My life isn’t about movie stars and celebrities, but that’s kind of a perk,” Jacobs said. Her family and countless friends are the center of her life, along with working for others. That she’s being recognized by Goodwill Industries is an honor, but she’s a reluctant recipient. “I’ve been honored before,” she said. “There are other people who should be Ronald Reagan, Marian, Reed Robbins and Norman Shumway

recognized.”

Stockton High School Student Body Council 1945. Marian, second from top left, editor and chairman of publications.

lifestyles

49


C O M M U N I T Y

S P O T L I G H T

Goodwill will no doubt get to the others, but it, or any organization, would be hard-pressed to find anyone to match Jacob’s accomplishments. The daughter of Lebanese immigrants, she didn’t leave her family’s home until she was in her 30s. Single Lebanese women didn’t do that, her mother insisted. Still, Jacobs was a pioneer in the workforce, buying an advertising agency from her employer, Charles Bottarini, in 1949 at the age of 22. She paid $300 and built the business into a huge success, writing advertising copy and producing events for clients. Being a newspaper reporter had been her dream job. Well, after wanting to be a singer. As a child, she’d put an empty can on top of a broomstick, stand on a wooden porch in the yard and present “The Marian Jacobs Hour,” singing her heart out to no one. She didn’t think anyone who wore glasses could be a singer, though, so she turned to more studious pursuits. Dedication of Janet Leigh Plaza. Jamie Lee Curtis, Marian, and Kelly Curtis

She was always curious, and when a newspaper reporter told the children at Weber Grammar School that “When a dog bites a man, that’s not news. When a man bites a dog, that’s news,” Jacobs was hooked. When she and her three siblings witnessed a crash of fire trucks in front of their home, she dashed inside and called the newspaper. She became editor of the Stockton High newspaper, and dreamed of working at her hometown paper. When an offer from The Stockton Record finally came, she turned it down. By then she was running her own company, and loved spending her days out in the community. She became a fixture there and remains so today. Although Sunflower Presents and the Stockton Arts Commission “are my two loves,” she continues to offer support where she can. “I want to be known as a good person, and I want to be a good person,” she said. “To me that’s the most important thing. I hope my epitaph says, ‘She tried to be a good person.’” Goodwill Industries would argue she did more than try. ❑

GOODWILL HELPING HANDS Thursday, October 11, 2012 • 6:00 pm 209-466-2311 ext. 214 Brother Paul, Marian, late sister Shirley Larsen and sister Anne Esau at Marians’s 70th birthday party

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Marian’s 80th birthday party at the home of Thelma Stewart raised $90,000 for Sunflower.


ON THE ROAD TO

MOROCCO STORY BY JUDI HACHMAN PHOTOS BY JUDI AND TIM HACHMAN

A

pril 2012 ten local “travelers of a certain age”

set off on a grand adventure. After discussions with Peggy Ward Engh, we booked with Morocco Custom Travel and started packing. Have it your way – any way you want. That’s the CUSTOM part of Morocco Custom Travel. Peggy Engh’s sixyear-old company brings custom adventure travel to a new level. MCT’s clientele ranges from mountain climbers and trekkers to horticulturists and gardeners to travelers whose interests encompass cuisine and gastronomy, history and culture. Available accommodations run the gamut, but each hotel and restaurant has been personally tested by Peggy and her Berber partner, Rachid Izemreten. Nothing is left to chance. Trips and prices are tailored to the interests and pocketbooks of each client.

53


E S C A P E S

54

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E S C A P E S

Within the past decade, the country of Morocco has become more accessible to tourism. In fact, Moroccans love tourists, and most especially welcome Americans. The country lies in the northwestern corner of the African continent, snuggled up between Algeria, Western Sahara and Mauritania. Go on, Google it. A country of many climates, it has a long and luscious western coastline, with Californiaesque temperatures, and an arid interior desert – the Sahara. Between those extremes lie four major mountain ranges, the Rif, Middle Atlas, High Atlas and Anti-Atlas, all of which are in the neighborhood of 9,000 feet, and boast extensive alpine skiing! How did a nice Lockeford girl like Peggy get into business in Morocco? In 2006 she and her Stockton attorney husband Chris set off for a little adventure in Morocco. Unfortunately, Chris took ill, so their guide Rachid Izemreten showed Peggy the country’s wonders while Chris stayed in bed. By the time Chris felt better, Peggy and Rachid had become great friends, and the idea of forming a tourism company was coming to life. What did they know about running a travel company? Chris and Peggy – who is a published historian – are experienced travelers, and Rachid is a university-educated tourist guide. Actually, I’d call him a cultural philosopher. They all know quality, and they all know value.

55


E S C A P E S

Riad Amirat Al Jamal

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E S C A P E S

Explaining their culture and customs, Rachid introduced Peggy and Chris to the peoples of Morocco, the French and Arabs, as well as the many fascinating nomadic Berber tribes. During our travels in a 17-seat Mercedes bus, Peggy expounded on the past and current history of Morocco, while Rachid explained tribal culture and practices in his Muslim country. For twelve days we journeyed across Morocco, enjoying the cuisine, a blend of French, Arab and tribal dishes. The scenery was breathtaking, featuring sharp contrasts between arid desert sands with their hundred-mile-long date palm oases, to lush alpine meadows with snow-covered peaks. All the while, the colorfully costumed native peoples were warm and welcoming.

➤

lifestyles

57


We traveled north to Tangiers, then inland to Fes, and southeast to Erfoud and Ouarzazate, a Saharan desert city which hosts large movie studios. Most cities have an old, walled medina with souks, in which we bargained for Moroccan treasures, including weavings, leather products, lovely woodworkings, exquisite clothing and, of course, rugs! The last three days of our trip we spent at Peggy’s charming riad in Marrakech, which she has renovated into a boutique hotel. The four-story Riad Amirat Al Jamal, in the historic medina, is built around a garden courtyard with a small pool. Each of the five rooms has a view of its lush interior garden, is furnished with tribal antiques, and has every luxury of a five-star hotel. What a treat to return “home” after an exhausting day of sightseeing and shopping to a glass of wine on the roof terrace. There is plenty left for us to explore in Morocco, and we plan to return for another visit. And Morocco Custom Travel is the perfect company. Adventure travel in five-star luxury. ❑

Yallah! Let’s go. Moroccocustomtravel.com

Adventure travelers, back: Liz Haines, Laura Wharton, Sheila Mathews, George Bensch, Tim Hachman, Bonnie Vistica and Judi Hachman. Seated: Catey Campora, Sharon Bensch and Marji Dunn.

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WagTales Joaquin Dogs

PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

Patrick and Petey We are: Maltipoos Where we are from: Our Aunt Amy Favorite place to hang out: On the couch Most amazing trick: Catching the pool sweep in our mouths Most recent accomplishment: Sneaking through the fence Favorite place to play: With our Welsh Highland Terrier cousins, Tucker and Preston Guilty pleasure: Getting on Mom’s bed Naughtiest deed: Anything we can get away with Obsession: Mom and any of her friends Where we go to get beautiful: Sycamore Lane Groomers – they love us! Any other interesting info about us: We love going to the beach Human parent: Lynne Davis

60

“I can’t believe they’re making me sit through this!”


61


E L I T E

F L E E T

1960 Ferrari California 250 GT LWB Spider Competizione

Italian Beauties

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E L I T E

F L E E T

BY J. MICHAEL RIVERA

E

ven at a car weekend as storied as the 62nd Pebble

Beach Concours d’Elegance, the Ferrari franchise managed to turn heads. A 1960 Ferrari California 250 GT LWB Spider Competizione sold for $11.275 million at the RM Auctions car sale during the Concours d’Elegance weekend in Monterey on August 17. The Ferrari was the second-highest selling car, in a record-setting weekend that netted more than $260 million in sales. 1947 166 Spyder Corsa

Jim Glickenhaus, from Pebble Beach, California, unveiled the world’s oldest Ferrari, a 1947 166 Spyder Corsa, at the Concours weekend. Glickenhaus purchased the Spyder Corsa, built by Enzo Ferrari himself, at an auction in 2004 for $770,000, and spent $500,000 restoring it. The torpedoshaped car is valued at $8 million. And Ferrari used the Concours weekend to unveil its new F12 Berlinetta, the carmaker’s fastest production car to date. Ferrari’s latest entry in the supercar class features a 6.3-liter, V-12 engine that pumps out 731 hp with 509 pound-feet of torque – a rare display of power and handling for a production car. The F12 Berlinetta is a step or two behind the fastest of the supercars, the Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport, which for a hefty $1.7 million propels passengers at speeds up to 253 miles per hour. The F12 Berlinetta falls short of the Veyron’s top speed. But driving a Ferrari is like sipping an espresso at Rome’s Café Paris – immortalized by Federico Fellini in “La Dolce Vita,” it’s all about the experience. Those who want to experience the latest Ferrari V-12 will have to wait a few months. The F12 Berlinetta is expected to hit the showrooms in late 2012 or early 2013 for $300,000, with luggage that matches the interior. Ferrari Silicon Valley and Ferrari of San Francisco are currently fielding inquiries and accepting applications for the 2013 models. ❑

F12 Berlinetta

lifestyles

63


Mark the date

CHARRERÍA: THE ARTISANSHIP OF MEXICAN EQUESTRIAN CULTURE

On display at the Haggin Museum until December 6, Charrería illustrates the embedded traditions of Mexico and the Mexican cowboy. More than 150 examples of craftsmanship and design will be on display at the Haggin Museum. For more information, call 209-940-6300.

5

EL CONCILIO’S GALA DINNER

October

The Friends of El Concilio will be holding the Stockton Gala Dinner Friday, October 5 at 5:30 p.m. at Hutchins Street Square in Lodi. For more information, please call 209-644-2627 or email asan@elconcilio.org.

17-21 CIRQUE DU SOLEIL

Lodi’s 22nd Annual Semi-Annual School Street Wine Stroll will be held Friday, October 19 from 6:00 to 9:00 pm in downtown Lodi. The evening showcases wines of the Lodi Appellation, and local businesses and restaurants. Tickets are $30 in advance, and $40 at the event. For more information, please call 209-367-7840 ext. 100 or visit www.lodichamber.com.

21

From October 17 to 21, Cirque Du Soleil will present Dralion at the Stockton Arena. Dralion draws inspiration from Eastern philosophy and the harmony between humans and nature. Tickets range from $28 to $75, and can be purchased at www.cirquedusoleil.com/dralion or by calling 1-800-373-1700.

64

19

SCHOOL STREET WINE STROLL

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 2

ST. JOSEPH’S HALF MARATHON & 5K

On Sunday, October 21, Fleet Feet Sports will partner with St. Joseph’s Hospital for the 2nd Annual St. Joseph’s Half Marathon & 5K. The event will begin and finish at the Stockton Hilton, and showcase the best that the city of Stockton has to offer. For more information, contact Fleet Fleet Sports at 209-952-1446 or email staff@fleetfeetstockton.com.


Mark the date 26

26

JOSH TURNER AT THE BOB HOPE

Josh Turner will be performing at the Bob Hope Theatre on Friday, October 26 at 8:00 pm. The country superstar has sold over 5 million albums and had numerous number-one hits. Tickets are on sale at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 800-745-3000.

FESTIVAL OF INTERNATIONAL CUISINE

The 26th Annual Festival of International Cuisine benefitting the Stockton Shelter for the Homeless will be held on Saturday, October 27 at 6:30 pm. The event will be held at Presentation Hall, and features cuisine from around the world prepared and donated by local restaurants and vintners. For more information, call John Reynolds at 209-465-3612.

November

HOUSING EXPO 2012 REBUILDING OUR COMMUNITY

11

27

THE SWINGIN’ BLUE STARS

“EVERYTHING UNDER ONE ROOF”

17

NEED HELP? GET ANSWERS!

The Swingin’ Blue Stars of the USS Hornet will be at Hutchins Street Square in Lodi on Sunday, November 11 at 3:00 p.m. Five singers from the East Bay Area perform in close harmony, singing swing-style music of the 1940s. For more information or tickets, call 209-333-6782.

The 2012 Rebuilding our Community “Everything Under One Roof” will be held at the Hilton Hotel in Stockton on Saturday, October 27. Visionary Home Builders, Inc. and The Record will host the ‘home expo.’ It is open to the general public at no charge, and will offer current and potential homeowners opportunities to attend educational workshops, meet with financial lenders, as well as visit vendor exhibits from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more information, please call Visionary Home Builders at 209-466-6811.

LA GIRA DEL ADIOS VICENTE FERNANDEZ

The Vicnete Fernandez Farewell Tour is set to make a stop at the Stockton Arena on Saturday, November 17 at 7:00 pm. Tickets priced from $49 to $176 are now on sale. For more information, visit ticketmaster.com or the Stockton Arena box office.

lifestyles

65


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San Joaquin Lifestyles Oct 2012  

The October 2012 issue of San Joaquin Lifestyles from the Stockton Record.

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