Page 1

The Magazine For San Joaquin

THE

ABBEY Trappist Pub

october/november 2013 â–  sanjoaquinlifestyles.com


l e t t e r

f r o m

t h e

e d i t o r

Publisher Roger Coover

Publication Director Deitra R. Kenoly The Magazine For San Joaquin

Editor Carrie Sass

I Love Autumn! R ich deep colors. Farmers harvesting.

most memorable typos was an article for a coat

Children at the door in spooky costumes. Crisp

drive where the headline was to be Bundle

mornings. Moonlit evenings. Pumpkins. Family

Up. Oops. Missed the “B.” So “undle up” is a

gatherings. Thankfulness for our bounty. Falling

legitimate word in the office. Now you can help

leaves in orange, brown and gold.

children and adults in need “undle up” and stay

It’s autumn in the Central Valley. Love it!

warm this fall and winter by donating a coat,

Octoberfests. Football games. Beer.

blanket and socks. The warm clothing drive is

Meet Kevin Hernandez, owner of the Abbey

being organized by The Arena, The Record and

Trappist Pub on the Miracle Mile, a place to

United Way. See the ad on page 55 for drop-off

meet up with friends, enjoy a brew or two, and a

locations.

little football. It has been fun to watch Kevin, an

And in the beautification department...

energetic and delightful young visionary build

kudos to the University of the Pacific and all the

his business over the past few years. And he’s a

community partners who did such a lovely job on

handsome addition as our cover feature. Story

the landscaping project at the south and north

on page 30.

entrances of the Miracle Mile. So welcoming.

Undle up! Yes, I said undle up. One of my

Fall. Pumpkin pie. Sweet potatoes. Yum.

MANAGING Editor Karen Bakhtegan

Graphic Designers Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

Contributing Writers Katie Donahue Charleen Earley Eunice Green Dennis Hall Carson Kautz Nanci Lesley Tara Manners Heather Mompean Leah Myers Mary Raffetto Jennifer Torres Siders Susan Michener Spracher Christopher Van Schenk, MD

Contributing Photographers Ashlee Blackard Lindsay Ortez Helen Ripken David Sowers

Carrie xoxo

Please continue to forward story ideas to: The Record/Lifestyles Magazine, 530 E. Market Street, Stockton 95202 or call: 209-546-8351; or email: kbakhtegan@recordnet.com

To advertise in Lifestyles magazine, call 209-546-8200 Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

On the cover: THE ABBEY TRAPPIST PUB PHOTO BY LINDSAY ORTEZ


contents our culture 11 Local pumpkin patches FOOD 14 HAlloween recipe Our culture 18 DELTA SIGMA THETA

100-year anniversary

FASHION 22 FALL WARM UP savor 30 the abbey trappist pub

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

9 35

Dea and Ron Berberian laura mcintosh

new in town

41

45

48 50

52

56 92

la strada 88

remember this pardini's toy box

health & wellness STIGMA OF MENTAL HEALTH COLD AND FLU prevention

mom about the town SOMETHING BORROWED

business spotlight stone bros. MANAGEMENT FROSTED FLOUR


59

66

TRAVEL FLORIDA KEYS

business spotlight

stockton dodge SETS THE PACE

70

73

four o'clock martini COME AS YOU ARE

Winery profile VINEDOS AURORA WINERY

WINE CRITIC

TWO WINES THAT NEVER GIVE UP THE GHOST

78

tot culture 86 LOCAL KIDS PHOTO GALLERY

88

90

94

sweet charity sculling

peek a boutique mud mill

MARK THE DATE LOCAL ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS

SCENE AND BE SEEN

39

Festa Italiana

46

STOCKTON ROTARY CLUB 100th anniversary celebration

76

SISTAHS IN CONVERSATION

82

orange and black ball

Correction to August 2013 Lifestyles Magazine: Page 18 of the August Edition of Lifestyles magazine featured a photo of local musician Darien Fields. The photo was taken by local photographer Kelsey McNickle of K.McNickle Photography. The photo credit was unintentionally omitted from the feature.


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Dea and Ron Berberian receive Goodwill Helping Hands Award

L

ifelong Stocktonians Dea and Ron

Berberian are the recipients of the 2013 Goodwill Helping Hands Award. More than 400 community and business leaders attended an

evening of good will, held Thursday, September 19, at Villa Angelica, the estate of Faye and Alex Spanos. Dea is executive vice president of A.G. Spanos Companies. Ron is chairman-owner of Bank of Agriculture and Commerce (BAC) and a dealer-partner in Berberian European Motors. Together they oversee Spanos-Berberian Wine Company and Bell Winery. They are known for their generous support of the arts, education, youth programs, health care and environmental initiatives. Proceeds from Evening of Good Will benefit the Goodwill Foundation to support job services for people with employment barriers. â– 

lifestyles

9


GREAT Pumpkins

Visit patches in and around San Joaquin County for fall family fun

By Jennifer Torres Siders

P

umpkins grew on more than

3,000 acres in San Joaquin County last year, producing almost 55,000 tons of squash. It’s a harvest that yields millions of dollars for local growers – and plenty of fall adventures for local families. Read on for your guide to hay rides and corn mazes, jack o’lanterns and scarecrows, vines and tractors.

lifestyles

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A

■ Countryside Farms family farm in operation since the 1930s, Countryside

Farms also opens its east Stockton gates to provide agricultural education and experiences for local children and families. And fall, says owner Joann Cutter, is a particularly busy time. “We really emphasize the fall season – the fall harvest and all of that,” she says. While most weekdays are reserved for school field trips, Countryside is open to the public from 2 to 5:30 p.m. on Fridays, and from 10

a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays. The farm is best suited for children in preschool to third grade, Cutter advises. At stations throughout the farm, they can plant seeds, glean walnuts, take hayrides, explore a corn maze, visit with farm animals – and of course, choose a pumpkin. “Watching the children wander through the patch to pick out their pumpkin is my favorite part of the season,” Cutter says. Bring a camera, she suggests – “The backdrop is really pretty for pictures.” And you can bring your lunch as well – the farm has a playground and picnic area, and is located at 6666 E. Main Street in Stockton.Admission is $9 for children (including all farm experiences) and $4.50 for parents. For more information, call 209-943-1632 or visit countryside-farms.com

■ Manteca Pumpkin Fair

H

osted by the Manteca Sunrise Kiwanis, the Pumpkin

Fair’s annual fall celebration draws tens of thousands of visitors to downtown Manteca. This year’s fair, scheduled for October 5 and 6, will include Spooky Spunky Pumpkin’s Haunted House, inside the J&J Printing building at 129 W. Yosemite Avenue. Meanwhile, in Pumpkin Alley – along Maple Street, in front of the post office – find vendors offering pumpkin treats and games. A variety of entertainers also will be performing on the fair’s community stage. Find the Manteca Pumpkin Fair downtown between West Center Street and Yosemite Avenue, west of Main Street and east of the railroad tracks. For more information, call 800-592-7419 or visit mantecapumpkinfair.org

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O U R

C U LT U RE

■ Phillips Farms

T

he Phillips Farms pumpkin patch has been a Lodi tradition for nearly 50 years.

In recent years, the farm has welcomed thousands of guests to the grounds outside Michael David Winery for a corn maze, games, pumpkin ice cream, and a wide variety of pumpkins and gourds. This year, though, Phillips Farms is contemplating a return to the scaled-down roots of its pumpkin patch, forgoing many of the attractions, but still offering pumpkins for sale during the month of October. Have lunch at the Farm Café before picking out yours. Call ahead for more information: 209-368-7384.

F

■ Dell’Osso Family Farm

ounded in the 1920s by Italian immigrants, Dell’Osso farm hosted

its first corn maze in 1997. A decade and a half later, the farm’s annual October celebration has grown into one of the country’s largest Halloween destinations, drawing close to 125,000 visitors to Lathrop each season. The 16th-annual Pumpkin Maze event runs from October. 5 to 31. Attractions include corn mazes, a haunted castle, pony rides, pumpkin blasters, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and more. Parking is free, and prices for various attractions vary. For more information, call 209-982-0833, or visit pumpkinmaze.com

■ Dutch Hollow Farms

D

uring the late winter and early spring, Dutch Hollow Farms is awash in tulip

blooms. “It is a sight to be seen,” owner John Bos says of his flower-growing operation. But for the month of October, the farm – located in Modesto, about 40 minutes south of Stockton – transforms into a fall extravaganza. “It’s getting bigger and bigger every year,” Bos says. At the heart of the Dutch Hollow Farms experience is a u-pick area. “You can bring the family, take one of our wagons, go out into the field and actually pick your pumpkin off the vine,” Bos explains. Buy three carving-size pumpkins for $20. The farm also features a corn maze – this year’s will have a baseball theme – as well as hayrides, tractor displays and an interactive cow-milking exhibit. For younger kids, there’s a box – similar to a sand box – filled with corn kernels. “It’s been pretty great to teach kids about farming,” says Bos. “As recently as 20 years ago, most kids around here had at least some farming background. It isn’t that way anymore.” The Farms are open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. during the month of October. For more information, visit dutchhollowfarms.com

lifestyles

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RE C I P E S

Scare

! m u Y e up som ! e r o m r o f g n i m a Scre hey will be T ‌ ts a e tr n e e w ese easy Hallo th g in k a m to k There is no tric

Ingredients:

Any sliced bread of your choice (One slice for each mummy) Mozzerella cheese slices (Approx. One slice per mummy) Pizza sauce Sliced olives (Two per mummy)

Mummy Pizza Bread

Lightly toast the bread Place toast in a single layer on a nonstick baking sheet. Spread pizza sauce on the toasted bread. Cut the cheese slices in thin strips and arrange them on the toast to look like bandages. Place two olives for the eyes (one should be partially covered in cheese for the peeking effect). Place cookie sheet under broiler just long enough to melt the cheese.

Serve and enjoy! 14

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Delta Sig

BY KATIE DONAHUE PHOTO BY ASHLEE BLACKARD

M

any Stocktonians may not have

heard of Delta Sigma Theta, but the Stockton alumnae chapter of this national sorority gives back to our community in important and meaningful ways. Delta Sigma Theta was founded in 1913 by 22 women on the campus of Howard University, and is currently celebrating its 100th anniversary. Members try to live up to the mission statement

“Service,

Sisterhood,

and

Scholarship,” says Stockton chapter president Shanelle House. Their chapter not only serves Stockton, but their service area extends to Lodi, Galt, Ripon, and Salida – all the way to Modesto.

“People think sororities are for college students only. Some are that way, but we’re not,” House says. “Our goal is to constantly give back to our community.” The sorority has four programmatic thrusts that serve as the umbrella categories for the Delta Sigma Theta takes the girls to

work that they do. Educational

Washington D.C. when they can, but in order

The Stockton chapter also gives out

Development, the sorority offers the Delta

to qualify for the trip, the girls must attend

food baskets during the Thanksgiving and

Academy. They work with two main age

the Saturday meetings and be doing well in

Christmas season, which falls under the

groups of girls – ages 11 to 14 and 14 to 18.

school.

Economic Development thrust. People refer

For

18

their voice,” House says.

the

first

thrust,

“We teach them how to be successful

“I think it’s a big eye-opener. They get to

families in need to the chapter, and what

in life,” House says. “We teach them basic

tour the Capitol and see other girls in their age

they are able to distribute depends on how

etiquette. We help them through school and try

groups. They have meetings about issues that

many applications the chapter receives in a

to get them involved in community service.”

pertain to them, and it teaches them to use

given year. “Last year, we gave gift cards to

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O U R

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ma Theta

nursing sorority, to make the clinic possible. “Chi Eta Phi sets up a circuit of churches that we visit on Sundays. In the most recent flu season, we visited between 8 to 10 churches and gave more than 1,000 flu shots,” House says. Delta Sigma Theta also partners with the American Cancer Society and annually participates in the Relay for Life event. The sorority is also active when it comes to voting rights and making sure that everyone who is eligible registers to vote, and this falls under the Political Awareness and Involvement thrust. “Our national president has encouraged us to go out and speak to Congresspeople about gun violence and gun control,” House says. In addition to the Washington, D.C. trip in early March, the group also visits the State Capitol in the fall to speak to elected representatives about important issues. Delta Sigma Theta has come a long way since its inception, and there are now 981 chapters internationally. The members of the Stockton chapter are made up of a crosssection of women in the community, says member Linda Patrick, and include educators

Target or Walmart because not all versions of

chapter pays $40 per month to cover all of

from elementary school through university,

a Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner are the

the child’s medical expenses. The chapter also

physicians, nurses, counselors, public servants

same,” she says

writes to the child and sends boxes.

(at the federal, state, and local levels), one former city councilwoman, and homemakers.

The Stockton chapter also supports a

Under the Physical and Mental Health

child through its International Awareness

thrust, the Stockton chapter runs a free flu

“We’re so excited about our 100th

and Involvement thrust. Starting in April of

clinic beginning in October. The clinic is offered

anniversary, and we feel here locally that we

this year, they sponsored a child from Africa

until it runs out of flu shots or reach the end of

certainly encompass the effort and vision of

through Red Rhino Orphanage. This support

flu season, and typically the former happens

the 22 original college women who founded

will continue through April 2014, and the

first. The chapter partners with Chi Eta Phi, a

the organization,” says Patrick. ■

lifestyles

19


F A S HIO N

lifestyles

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F A S HIO N

London Fog Hooded Clip Front Raincoat with Hood Available at

photos by david sowers

Macy’s

22

Fall Warm-Up! Combat the cold in style – this season’s coats are all about glamour mixed with comfort and function.

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


F A S HIO N

Kenneth Cole Double Closure Coat with Knit Bib Available at

Burlington Coat Factory

lifestyles

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F A S HIO N

Steve Madden High Low Skirted Trench Coat Available at

Burlington Coat Factory

24

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


F A S HIO N

JCP Men’s Military Jacket Available at

JCPenney

lifestyles

25


F A S HIO N

Worthington Cut Out Military Coat Available at

JCPenney

26

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


F A S HIO N

DKNY Double Breasted Belted Trench Available

at Macy’s

lifestyles

27


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sav o r

y e b b A

b u P t s i p p a r K T The

STORY BY katie donahue PHOTOS BY LINDSAY ORTEZ

evin Hernandez has always had

a soft spot for Stockton’s Miracle Mile – he

was raised in the area and has fond memories

of walking the Mile with his grandparents as a child. So it should come as no surprise that he would end up opening not one, but twobusinesses in that very same area. He had an especially clear vision for what would become his second endeavor, The Abbey Trappist Pub.

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sav o r

sav o r

“I believed in that area, in the Miracle Mile district, and the quaintness of the neighborhood,” Hernandez says. “Coming back from Chico State, I went to University of the Pacific for graduate school. I heard a lot of people say, ‘It’s too bad we don’t have a Midtown area like Chico.’ I always thought Stockton was missing out on an area.” He opened Ave on the Mile in spring 2010, and The Abbey Trappist Pub followed in spring 2011. Combining the perfect location with the fact that beer and breweries were an up-and-coming industry, Hernandez first tested the market at The Ave. He started offering Chimay and Trappist beers and found that patrons would engage in conversations about other types of beer. “In the back of my mind, I’m thinking, ‘There’s a need for this; I need to pursue it,’ ” he says. With some friends in tow, he took field trips to The Monk’s Kettle in San Francisco and The Trappist in Oakland for inspiration. ➤

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sav o r

The Abbey’s atmosphere is what sets it apart from other choices in

Trappist Pub to enjoy a couple beers, enjoy the taste, and discuss it.”

Stockton. “The people that frequent

Annually, The Abbey participates

The Abbey love talking beer and

in Beer Week, which is typically held

philosophy,” Hernandez says. “If

in mid-August. Oktoberfest will be

you’re a wine connoisseur who likes

held on October 5th this year and is

winetasting, it’s become very similar

being sponsored by both The Ave and

to a winetasting venue. We also do

The Abbey. All of the businesses in the

beer tastings and pairings.”

surrounding area will be incorporated

Hernandez says that a portion

into Oktoberfest, Hernandez says.

of the money raised from the sale

In addition to running The Ave

of certain Trappist beers goes back

and The Abbey, Hernandez also has

into the monasteries – this is true

a full-time “day job” working in the

with Chimay and other varietals. The

Stockton Unified School District as a

monks don’t sell large quantities

speech and language pathologist.

of their beers, so it’s not a mass-

Hernandez says he recognizes

produced product. “In Stockton, we

how difficult it is for local businesses

have a niche in an almost contracted

to keep their doors open, and he is

area,” Hernandez says. “That’s the

grateful for the way the community

exclusivity of it. People appreciate the

has supported him as a native

exclusive beers.”

Stocktonian.

Trappist beer also has a higher

“I love Stockton. I’m born and

alcohol content, Hernandez says, at

raised in it, and I really hope I made

about 12 to 13 percent. “The Abbey is

my community proud,” he says.

not a place you will go to slam down a

“That’s the most important to me –

beer,” he says. “You go to the Abbey

making my community shine.” ■


M I R A C L E

W. ALPINE AVE.

M I L E

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P A C I F I W. MONTEREY AVE. C A V E N U E

SMITH LN.

BRISTOL AVE.

REGENT CT.

C

D SHOPPING CASTLE ST. HOME

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DINING FLORAL JEWELRY

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P A C I F I C A V E N U E

W. ADAMS ST.

C

PINE ST.

E

W. CLEVELAND ST.

E.WYANDOTTE ST.

D

BEDFORD RD. MAPLE ST.

BP

A C I WALNUT ST. F I C

W. ALDER ST.

W. WALNUT ST.

A V E N U E E. ELM ST.

stocktonmiraclemile.com W. HARDING WAY

A

Where WhereStockton Stockton Gets GetsEngaged Engaged KEVIN SCHIMKE EWELERS

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973323 DRAGONFAIRY


L o ca l

S p o t l i g h t

Bringing it Home with

Laura McIntosh

T

BY MARY Raffetto PHOTOS BY LAURA Mcintosh

his may come as a surprise, but the

host of Bringing It Home isn’t really home much these days. Laura McIntosh is not just the much-travelled host but the creator of the agriculturally-oriented cooking show, which has found mass appeal among foodies, chefs and produce purists everywhere. Now carried by PBS, Bringing It Home is seen by over half the country and readying itself for web broadcast via well-known carriers such as Netflix and Hulu, and previously aired on Ion Network. You could say viewership is growing like a weed in an organic vegetable garden. Or you could just watch the show and be enchanted like the rest of us.

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L o ca l

S p o t l i g h t

McIntosh points out that growing food is the same, in many ways,

36

Holtz and “Secret Millionaire” and best-selling author, Steve Kaplan.

around the world, saying, “Getting food to the table is the end result

Whether serving our troops or serving locals at a farmer’s market,

of taking care of your labor force, meeting the needs of their families,

McIntosh has plenty of projects going in addition to her show’s exciting

nurturing the crops, and building a community which unites us all.”

on-site shoots. In response to viewers’ inquiries about cookbooks, DVDs

Around the world indeed, McIntosh recently took part in Operation

and where to find the best ingredients, McIntosh has an entire brand

Hot, a program which serves special meals to the men and women

line currently in development. Hopeful to hear from the public, she has

deployed in Afghanistan. “It was such a privilege to feed the people

made herself accessible via social media, saying, “I want to hear from

who fight for our freedom,” says McIntosh. This sentiment was shared

people, and for them to let me know what they would like to learn and

by other celebrity participants including chef Robert Irvine, coach Lou

see and know about on our upcoming shows and in our product line.”

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


L o ca l

S p o t l i g h t

Laura’s heritage stems from generations of farming in and around Linden, California. The daughter of a fifth-generation Linden farmer, McIntosh grew up in agriculture. It was only after traveling far and wide that she came to a realization.

“We are so blessed and lucky to have the best and the freshest produce. Nowhere else in the world do they have what we have right here in the San Joaquin Valley: the absolute best, top-of-theline, most flavorful ingredients, and people who value that are paying attention. Heaven is in your own backyard, and all you have to do is sit down and appreciate it.” Laura McIntosh can be found on Twitter, Facebook, and BringingItHome.com. ■

Laura McIntosh is the Emmy - and James Beard Award-nominated host/producer/co-creator of Bringing It Home, a syndicated PBS television series.

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S c e n e

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2 013 Festa Italiana

Pacific Italian Alliance

A A

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EA A D

A B

Catherine Burkhart, Karina Febres-Duk, Emma-Baglietto, Tana, Julie and Steve Stayrook

Back row: Joe and Tim Bonuccelli, David Pullen, Maria Martinez. Front row: Demitri-Natasha Pullen C

Aiden and Annette Ballew

D

Lorene Freggiaro

E

Cheryl Dorman

A B

Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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N E W

I N

TO W N

Discover

AuthenticItalianCuisine S

By TARA MANNERS PHOTOS BY LINDSAY ORTEZ

ituated just off of Highway 88

destination. Johnson spent seven months

in Clements, the former Farmers Mutual

personally renovating the building. When you

Warehouse building was a bank-owned

enter her restaurant and glimpse the hand-

eyesore. That is, until La Strada 88 owner,

stained wood beams, reclaimed windows and

Jan Johnson, purchased the deteriorating

iron patio fences, one can immediately see the

building and began creating the space

attention to detail that makes this venue a

that is now a highly sought after culinary

newly sought-after hot spot. ➤

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N E W

42

I N

TO W N

In creating and conceptualizing La Strada

La Strada 88 is a farm-to-table restaurant,

olive oil and other antipasto pleasures. “They

88, Johnson knew that the food had to be

and while they purchase some produce from

(our patrons) even love to wait now,” Johnson

memorable. “I knew exactly who I wanted

local farmers, much of their seasonal produce

states when modestly speaking about the

to come and work with me,” she says of her

is grown in-house and in Chef Lucia’s home

success of her restaurant.

decision to hire Italian-born chef Attilio Siena.

garden. “Passion and simplicity and good

On La Strada 88’s soft opening day,

Given the popularity of the restaurant, one

ingredients. That’s the key,” Johnson states

May 18, 2013, Johnson simply posted on

chef was not enough, and Lucia Cello-Rogers

when asked about her food philosophy. Her

Facebook, “limited seating, reservations highly

(also Italian born) was recruited to create her

restaurant has been open for less than three

recommended,” and the people at La Strada

own Italian cuisine to compliment Chef Siena’s.

months, and already patrons are waiting

88 sat back and waited for patrons to arrive…

“Together, they are a force to be reckoned

for tables on weekend evenings. On busy

and they did. The restaurant went through

with!” Johnson exclaims as she describes the

evenings, a large table is set in the bar area

50 wood fired pizzas and over 40 pounds of

two chefs bantering in the kitchen, and reaching

where waiting customers can nibble on

hand-breaded calamari. ➤

over each other to grab fresh ingredients.

homemade focaccia, cured meats, extra-virgin

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N E W

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TO W N

Today customers can dine on pillowy, hand-

and hand-stuffed with fresh, seasonal ingredients.

made gnocchi in a four-cheese sauce constructed

The flaky salmon is fresh and traditionally made,

daily by Chef Siena. On special occasions, Chef

linguine and clams are perfectly al dente and they

Cello-Rogers creates a scrumptious burratta

even serve Mama’s Spicy Meatballs. “I like them

(hand-made Italian cheese made with mozzarella

spicy” Chef Lucia exclaims.

and cream) complemented with an heirloom

wood-fired Nutella calzone.

tomato caprese salad.

BRICK oven pizzaS

For dessert? Rich, handmade tiramisu or a

La Strata 88 offers specialty pizzas that

Desserts complement their sweet, homemade

include ingredients like pancetta and fresh egg (a

limoncello liquor or Chef Siena’s homemade

surprisingly wonderful pizza ingredient), and also

“punch” that is like a light, coffee liquor.

serves more traditional margherita or pepperoni

La Strada 88 is the rare combination of

pizzas. The aged pizza oven adds the layering of

wonderful food and eclectic atmosphere that

smokey flavors to the handmade, thin-crusted pies

makes dining memorable. It is not just a restaurant;

that is only acquired over time and a multitude of

it is a destination. The staff, chefs and owner are

baked pizzas.

lighthearted and professional, and the food is

At this restaurant, one amazing dish follows

outstanding. The restaurant is are open for lunch

another. Tortelloni and ravioli are both handmade

and dinner seven days per week. Reservations are recommended. ■

La Strada 88 18938 E. Highway 88 • Clements, CA 209-603-9451 lifestyles

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Special Dining Adver tising section


emember this

Pardini’s Toy Box 1976 Hammer Lane and Thornton Road

Go to our Facebook page (Lifestyles magazine) and tell us what you remember about the Dutch Pride Dairy.

lifestyles

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S c e n e

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2 013 100th Anniversary Celebration Stockton Rotary Club

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EA A C

Marvin and Judy Williamson, Maria and Waqar Rizvi Lu Anne Lewis, Dave Souza and Bob Lewis E

Barb and Frank Whitney

F

D

Tod and Bobbie Anton

Laura Pinkerton and Shari Garibaldi

Doray Johnson and Mary Rogers

Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN 46

B

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


HE A LTH

&

W ELL N E S S

The ‘stigma’ of Mental Health By Christopher Van Schenck, MD

However, placing this stigma on others or yourself can have a number of harmful effects, including:

I

t is common for people to say there is “stigma” surrounding mental

health. What is different about mental health? Why are people generally not ashamed of having a general “medical” condition like high blood pressure? What is this “stigma” of mental health all about?

Lack of understanding by family, friends, colleagues or others you know

Discrimination at work or school

Bullying, physical violence, or harassment

Feeling lost or a belief that you’re incapable of overcoming an illness

Don’t be a victim of this stigma. If you or a loved one is suffering from a mental illness, consider the following to avoid these harmful effects: •

Don’t isolate yourself. If you or a loved one has a mental illness, you may be reluctant to tell anyone about it. Talk to your spouse, family members, friends, or someone else you trust for the compassion, support, and understanding you need.

Don’t equate yourself with your illness. You are not an illness. So instead of saying “I’m bipolar,” say, “I have bipolar disorder.” Instead of saying you “are depressed,” say you “have clinical depression.”

Don’t let stigma create self-doubt and shame. Stigma doesn’t just come from others. You may hold the mistaken belief that your condition is a sign of personal weakness, or that you should be able to control it without help. Seeking psychological counseling, educating yourself about your condition and connecting with others with mental illness can help you gain self-esteem and overcome destructive self-judgment.

We all know that the storms of our lives (don’t we all have them?) affect us directly in the deepest part of ourselves. We inherently understand that a broken arm is about my arm but depression (or whatever mental/emotional issue we suffer from) is about me. We all have personal mental/emotional lives that we would like to keep private. Is that wrong? In general I don’t believe that it is. I don’t believe our personal problems should be everyone’s business. Part of our dignity as human beings comes because we were created personal and relational – and this includes respect for others and our own privacy and boundaries. It is good to keep personal issues, well – personal. It is good and healthy that we should have clear personal boundaries that allow us to choose who we share our inner personal lives with. Ironically, it is precisely our relational nature that we choose to ignore when we fear what others will think about us. We choose to fear

If you are suffering silently, please don’t allow any “stigma” affect your decision to get help. ■

others and what others will think about us (stigma) instead of doing what is best for our own health. We feel shame about mental health issues because we exalt what others think about us above what is best for us. We choose to keep things private that would be better to share

or to make an appointment with

with someone we can trust to listen with respect. People chose to brand others (“stigma” originally meant “sign” or “branding mark”) abnormal because it allows us to feel as if we are the normal ones. It’s in our nature to point the finger.

48

To learn more about mental illness,

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3

Dr. Van Schenck call 209-946-6868.


HE A LTH

&

W ELL N E S S

Colds Flu and

Prevention and Treatment

I

By Eunice Green, NHD

t is that time of year and being proactive in prevention is a wise

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate – water will assist in cleaning out toxins

choice to make and can save you time and money. Feeling miserable, missing work and missing our on upcoming

and keep your kidneys functioning at top performance. A whole-body cleanse is ideal for eliminating toxins, and I strongly

holiday functions are all things we would like to avoid. Keeping your immune system strong, eliminating toxins and relieving

recommend this in the fall when we are going in to the “cootie” season.

stress are the 3 main areas of prevention. Taking the time and using the

Prepackaged cleansing programs are ideal as they are easy to use, very

resources available to prevent colds and flu can be an easy path to take.

complete and all you do is follow the directions.

A daily walk can rev up your immune response by putting cleansing oxygen into your lungs. It can also boost your mood and alleviate stress.

50

immune system and combats infection.

So, what if you do succumb to the infection? And how do you tell if it is a cold or the flu?

A good quality multivitamin will give you a balance of the nutrition

Generally a cold has a slow onset. You can continue to function but

you need. Add to that 2-3 grams of vitamin C and you have the

you feel tired and weak. You might start with as sore throat, runny nose

foundation for immune system health. A garlic supplement supports the

and some sneezing.

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


With the flu, there is a very fast onset and it is more severe. You feel so sore eyes and achy muscles. During the initial stage of a cold, a homeopathic remedy such as Cold Calm can be effective, especially if it is taken at the immediate onset. A natural antibiotic, such as echinacea and goldenseal can be very helpful. Taking 5000 mg of Vitamin C in divided doses throughout the day can in initiate an immune response. Herbal teas specific to symptoms are also very helpful. They can often shorten the duration, and in the meantime help alleviate symptoms. Cleansing congestion is key to preventing the cold from escalating into pneumonia or bronchitis. Conges-tea, an herbal combination, is extremely effective in clearing the lungs of mucus and making breathing easier. Zinc, Astragalus, oregano oil, silver and elderberry have all been found to be effective in shortening the duration of colds. For the flu, the number-one selling product in the world is Oscillococcinum. This homeopathic product can produce excellent results if taken immediately at the onset. Keeping a box of this on hand is the key; you don’t want to run out and purchase this after you are feeling bad – you want it right when you experience the first symptoms. Elderberry inhibits influenza viral replication and reduces coughing. In a double-blind study it was found that 90% of the people taking this herbal extract were completely well in 2-3 days, compared to double the time for people taking a placebo. Many of the treatments for colds can be used for flu as well, including vitamin C, garlic, echinacea/goldenseal, herbal teas and other homeopathic remedies. Olive leaf has been shown to create an immune response for both colds and flu. Diet can play a significant part as well; avoid sugar and dairy, and take lots of hot tonics and broths; drinking them hot will stimulate mucus release. Vegetable juices and green drinks can rebuild the blood and immune system. For children, elderberry extract is one of the best natural medicines for colds and flu. There are no side effects, and the taste is pleasant. Hand washing is important, and taking the time to rest in the beginning stages can shorten the time it takes to get well. Our bodies need rest to heal. ■

The Magazine For San Joaquin

bad you just want to go to bed. There is usually a high fever, headaches,


MomAboutTheTown

LIFE S T Y LE

52

C OL U M N

Something Borrowed By HEATHER mompean

O

ftentimes when we have the urge

to shop local we think we need to get dressed, climb in the car and head out and about the streets to the brick-and-mortar shops.  But you know what? We don’t! You can shop local without leaving your house or your jammies. Let’s face it, some days we really (really) don’t feel like doing much more than rolling out of bed and shuffling to a coffeepot. On those days you can still shop local to your heart’s content – right from your computer or tablet! Recently I happened upon a local girl online via Etsy! Her store is Something Borrowed, and her forte is vintage clothing. It would ➤

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


LIFE S T Y LE

C OL U M N

be more accurate to say gorgeous, eclectic,

are unsure of which pieces of vintage clothing

stylish, classic, and feminine vintage clothing. 

pair together nicely, or if you are intimidated

Beautiful stuff, really! Not just clothes, either.

by vintage sizing, no worries! Amy offers look-

While she has tons of dresses, skirts, shirts, and

books, tips, tricks and links to be sure you look

caftans, she also has purses, shoes, belts, and

and feel your best!

jewelry! She had me at jewelry.

Oh, and a side note... not only is Amy a

How wonderful to be able to lounge in your

local business, she supports local business

jammies, sippin’ your coffee and shop! Her Etsy

– the images showcasing her inventory are

site has everything you need for a complete

made possible by local women models and

outfit, head to toe! Save gas, relax, and enjoy the

photographers! Keepin’ it local, who doesn’t

online shopping experience. She has everything

appreciate that?

to make you look even more stunning than you already are. And you are stunning!

Go ahead, visit Amy! Check her out on Facebook and tell her Mom About The Town sent

The gal behind the store is Amy.  Amy lives in

you! Even if you don’t buy today, take the time

Stockton and runs her business from her home.

and give her page a like, a share and a “hello.”

Her love for vintage clothing came about as a

A little encouragement and kindness can go a

teenager when she would go clothes shopping at

long way!

thrift stores due to lack of funds. Ah, those rough

Here’s an idea, check them out for a possible

teen years! However, her passion for fashion

vintage Halloween outfit. Who knows, maybe

and clothing – vintage clothing specifically –

what starts out as a costume will turn into a full-

blossomed at those thrift stores! Even as her

time desire for vintage style!

income grew, her style stayed true to vintage.  She got a job as a clothing buyer, visual

Where you can find Something Borrowed: www.somethingborrowedvtg.com 

merchandiser and retail manager, and found

www.somethingborrowedvtg.etsy.com 

that she was in her element. Loving her work,

www.facebook.com/somethingborrowedvtg 

she decided to take it a step further. Now with

www.instagram.com/somethingborrowedvtg 

a decade of experience, degrees in fashion

www.pinterest.com/borrowedvintage ■

merchandising and retail management (shout out to San Joaquin Delta College’s fashion program), she opened her own store – online store. She has been on Etsy since 2010. She’s not stopping there! A woman with aspirations, Amy still has her eye on a traditional storefront that will specialize in women’s

Clickity on over to the bloggity:

clothing from the 1950s-1990s with a splash of

www.momaboutthetown.com

pre-1950s. If you are a vintage clothing fashionista

Join in on Facebook: www.facebook.com/momaboutthetown

or even have a slight curiosity for that era of clothing, stop by and check her collection! If you

lifestyles


STOCKTON

WE NEED YOUR HELP! 2013 COAT, BLANKET & SOCK DRIVE

OUR GOAL

S T O C K T O N

IS TO GIVE AWAY

COAT ★ BLAN KET ★ SO C K DRIV E &C AR SHF OARROIUNR G C O M M U ING

NITY

6,000 ITEMS

NOVEMBER 23, 2013

The following items are needed: ■ Clean, gently used coats ■ Clean, gently used blankets ■ New socks

Women, Men and Children-all sizes are needed.

Please drop off your items no later than November 15, 2013 at one of these participating locations: The Record ■ 530 E. Market Street

Central State Credit Union ■ 919 N. Center Street ■ 5242 El Dorado Street

Stockton Arena ■ 248 W. Fremont Street Stockton Thunder ■ 248 W. Fremont Street

Bank of Stockton ■ 4515 Quail Lakes Drive ■ 301 E. Miner Avenue

Bank of Agriculture & Commerce ■ 517 E. Weber Street ■ 2021 W. March Lane Oak Park Ice Arena ■ 3545 Alvarado Avenue St. Mary’s Dining Room ■ 545 W. Sonora Street

■ 6808 Pacific Avenue Big Valley Ford ■ 3282 Auto Center Circle

■ 120 W. Walnut • Lodi

UOP – Athletic Dept. ■ 3601 Pacific Avenue

■ 1175 Tracy Boulevard • Tracy

■ 660 N. Main • Manteca ■ 234 W. Main Street • Ripon

United Way ■ 401 E. Main Street Stockton Ports ■ 404 W. Fremont Street

Distribution Date: Saturday, November 23, 2013 • Stockton Arena • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. ORGANIZING SPONSORS:

PREMIUM LOCAL BUSINESS SPONSORS:

LOCAL BUSINESS SPONSORS:


N

STORY BY JENNIFER TORRES SIDERS PHOTOS BY ASHLEE BLACKARD

ow in its third generation of family ownership, Stockton-

based Stone Bros. Management remains committed to the values of its founders while planning ahead for ongoing success in the future. The company was started by brothers Max and Merrill Stone in 1948. Born in Aberdeen, Idaho, the brothers moved to Stockton where they worked, for a time, in real estate. Eventually, they expanded into community development, building homes and buying undeveloped property in and around Stockton. Since then, Stone Bros. has built more than 16,000 homes and 500 apartments, and more than a dozen shopping centers and 15 office buildings in Stockton, Lodi, Sacramento and Modesto. “I attribute our success to Max and Merrill’s vision, and to the family culture of hard work,” says John Godi, general manager for Stone Bros., and a grandson of founder Max Stone.

56


A homegrown business, Stone Bros. Management takes pride in its Valley properties

GENERATIONS

IN DEVELOPMENT

Among the company’s properties are the Stonecreek Village,

“The company saw an opportunity to bring the kind of lifestyle

Robinhood Plaza and Sherwood Mall shopping centers in Stockton,

center to Stockton that we had seen in other cities,” Godi explains.

Lakewood Mall in Lodi, and Sylvan Square shopping center in

“It was a leap of faith.”

Modesto. Several have undergone extensive renovation in recent years. “We do invest in our properties,” Godi says. The company also has shown ambition in its projects. Stonecreek Village, at Pacific Avenue and Robinhood Drive, represented Stockton’s first upscale

And though it is too early to give details, Godi continues, he said shoppers should look for interesting new retail and restaurant offerings there in the future. “We have some exciting prospects for the mall and at Stonecreek,” he says. “Be watching out for that.”

lifestyle center. Anchored by Recreational Equipment Inc., the

In the meantime, Godi says he is proud of Stone Bros.

outdoor retailer commonly known as REI, Stonecreek Village also

Management’s more than 60 years in business. “I’m most proud of

houses tenants including national chains such as LOFT, and local

the family legacy and how the family has stuck together over three

shops like Baker’s Boutique. The center was built in 2008, replacing

generations,” he says. “That’s a long time… Our core values are

another shopping center that had been anchored by an aging KMart

honesty, integrity and hard work. I think, for the most part, that our

store.

reputation is that we’ve been true to those values.” ■

lifestyles

57


The Romance

of the Florida Keys Story by Ron Guntert Photos courtesy of Ron Guntert, Cheryl Tyson

B

orn and raised in California,

my only knowledge of the Florida Keys was from watching the movie Key Largo, starring Humphrey Bogart, and of course the musician Jimmy Buffett and his songs about good times in the tropics. If I had been asked at the time where the Keys were on the map, I wouldn’t have been able to point them out.

lifestyles


TR A V EL

F A R

This all changed in 1990, when I met Denise. She was a kindergarten teacher and had her entire summer off. After a few months of dating and with summer approaching, I had expectations of coordinating our summer vacation plans. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the enthusiastic response I had expected. Denise would be spending the summer in the Florida Keys and would be staying at the home of her grandparents Bob and Bonnie Devitt. The Devitts had sold their bridge and dock contracting business in Long Island, New York in the mid-1960s, retired early and moved to Marathon, Florida. Denise explained that she loved the Keys and had spent a lot of time there since she was a little girl. She loved the warm tropical waters and weather, the charming fishing village atmosphere, the scuba diving and snorkeling, but in particular the laid-back, slow pace of life. It sounded appealing enough that I dropped several, not-so-subtle hints, hoping she would invite me to join her during her stay. No invitation was forthcoming‌ so I invited myself.

60

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


TR A V EL

F A R

That June I was in Spain on a business trip

by a railroad line completed by Henry Flagler

with my father. We finished our business early,

in 1912 to bring tourists from the East Coast to

and my father was intent on being home for

his hotel in Key West.

Dining For lunch, we like to go to Keys Fisheries in Marathon on 35th Street on

the July 4th holidays. My priority was finding

When my plane taxied up to the terminal,

a way to be with Denise over the 4th. I called

it was dusk, and I was happy to spot my

Denise and said I would like to visit her in the

“girlfriend” Denise waiting for me outside

In Islamorada at mile marker 81.6 is

Keys. Her less-than-enthusiastic response was

the arrival door with a smile on her face. Her

Pierre’s Restaurant. Besides its excellent

“sure, why not.” Undeterred, I rerouted my

wet hair was tied back and she was clad in

food (“French Fusion cuisine,”) wine

tickets home via Miami with a short shuttle

“Keys” attire… a swimsuit with cover-up and

selection and service, the ambience

flight to Marathon, Florida.

flip-flops. She appeared like she was actually

and décor adds to this fantastic dining

Upon my arrival in Miami, I collected my

happy to see me… things were looking up!

experience.

luggage and found my way to the departure

The cockpit doors opened, and a blast of

The Hide-A-Way Café at mile marker

gate to Marathon. A driver in a van pulled

warm, humid air immediately enveloped me. In

58 is located at the Rainbow Bend Resort.

up and drove me to a small twin-engine

the summer, a 100% cotton shirt and shorts

The restaurant is on the second floor of an

Beechcraft. Because I was to be his only

are a must… the humidity is overwhelming.

old beach resort overlooking the Atlantic.

passenger, he invited me to sit up in the co-

Obviously Tommy Bahama, who designs men’s

Another very good restaurant is Alma

pilot’s seat for the one-hour flight to Marathon.

leisure clothing out of silk, has never been to

Restaurant at Hawk’s Kay Resort on Duck

About 15 minutes into the flight, I fell in love.

the tropics. There are two types of footwear…

Key. The food trends toward Argentinian

Looking out my window, I was mesmerized by

everyday flip-flops or black, “dress” flip-flops

or

the clarity of the blue-green water surrounding

for when you go out to a nice restaurant. Over

excellent seafood dishes are always on

these islands. As we started our approached

the next three days, Denise introduced me to

the menu.

to Marathon, the “Middle Key,” the sun was

the Keys that she had fallen in love with. It was

In Marathon at mile marker 49.5, you

setting and the beautiful water and horizon

during this first short visit that I fell in love with

will find on the bay side Barracuda Bistro

were rapidly transforming into a kaleidoscope

the Keys and the woman that I would marry.

Grill. The food is excellent and they boast

the Gulf side that always has fresh and very good seafood.

Brazilian

steakhouse;

however,

of colors. Unfolding in front of me was one of

Life in the Keys is about being in, on or

the most breathtaking sunsets I had ever seen

around water. The Keys are surrounded some

For the ultimate dining experience,

in my life.

of the most beautiful tropical, clear blue and

you must go to Little Palm Island. Little

The Florida Keys are a chain of islands

emerald-green waters in the United States.

Palm Island is located on a small island

that run from the southernmost tip of Florida

These waters became protected under federal

off of Little Torch Key at Mile Marker

peninsula, about 15 miles south of Miami, and

law in 1990 when they were designated the

28.5. Thatched roof huts, white sand and

extend in a gentle arc south-southwest to Key

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, which

coconut palms complete the picture. Little

West, which is 90 miles from Cuba. It is the

covers 2,900 square nautical miles of water

Palm Island is a world-class destination

third largest barrier reef system in the world.

along the Florida Strait. On the Atlantic side,

resort ranked in the top 100 in the world.

The Keys are connected from the U.S. mainland

just a few miles offshore, are miles of beautiful

Louie’s Backyard has been an

to Key West by a series of bridges via U.S. 1,

coral barrier reef. This amazing ecosystem offers

institution in Key West for the past 25

the “Overseas Highway,” which is a 127-mile

world-class diving, swimming, snorkeling,

years. The restaurant is situated in an

route through the Florida Straits dividing the

boating and fishing – all the amenities of the

oceanfront Victorian home which is

Atlantic Ocean to the east from the Gulf of

Caribbean but with the safety, friendliness and

famous for its back deck / outdoor dining

Mexico in the west. This route was preceded

convenience of the United States. ➤

area facing the Atlantic Ocean.

lifestyles

great customer service.

61


TR A V EL

F A R

the coast at Bahia Honda State Park Beach.

The trade winds cool temperatures down

out into the Gulf far enough where we can

to a very comfortable mid-80s. And when you

safety drift. We turn up Jimmy Buffet music,

Key West is full of fun family activities.

are on the water, the air temperature is even

grab a float and tie a water ski rope off the

You don’t want to miss people watching

cooler and very comfortable. Day or night, the

boat so we drift with the boat – and jump in.

and shopping on Duval Street. You can rent

temperatures don’t vary but a few degrees.

Add a few cold beers or your favorite tropical

bicycles, electric carts or scooters, visit the

drink… it doesn’t get much better than this!

Aquarium, and watch street performers

Our favorite sand flat, “Valhalla,” is

fishing

in Mallory Square. Enjoy touring Ernest

the boat in deeper water just off the sand

destination spot for catching bonefish, permit

Hemingway’s home, the Truman Annex

flat, then wade toward the shallower areas.

or tarpon, along with diving, spearfishing and

– President Harry S. Truman’s summer

Floating in two to three feet of clear, emerald-

snorkeling – rivaling just about anything in the

White House – or take the Conch Train for

green, 90-degree water with white sand at

Caribbean. The living reefs along the Atlantic

sightseeing through Key West.

your feet is like taking a long soak in a hot

side are beautiful, vivid coral formations.

The Florida Keys is a big part of our

bath.

Varieties of hard and soft coral, sponges and

family life together. We have many fond

sea fans as well as colorful tropical fish can be

memories of our time there, and always look

found on these reefs.

forward to our return. We highly recommend

located off Grassy Key. Typically, we anchor

The Gulf side of the island is more protected from the trade winds. You can

Marathon

is

a

world-class

motor quite a distance out into the Gulf and

Marathon’s Sombrero Beach has a

you add the Keys to your list of places to

the water depths don’t get much over seven to

beautiful white sandy beach complete with

visit. We feel fortunate to be able to call

10 feet deep. The water is clear enough that

palm trees, playground and sand volleyball

the Keys home even though it is only for

you easily see details of the bottom. We motor

courts. You will find similar amenities down

part of the year. ■


Benjamin Saffold Age: 48 Occupation: Development of Media, Special Projects, Special Events and Outreach for Gospel Center Rescue Mission. How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: Most of my life (with the exception of ’95 to ’07). Why I choose to live in San Joaquin County: I came home to serve the most underserved communities in the city where I was raised to the best of my ability. The people who mean the most to me: My sphere of close friends and family. A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: Receiving Jesus Christ as my Lord and Saviour. No other event even comes close. The impact continues… Favorite sports team: Do the Harlem Globetrotters count?

Pet: Not a “pet person.” Favorite food/dessert: A list too long to mention. For this particular inquiry let’s say Mexican food, In-N-Out, Moo Moo’s Burger Barn’s Brownie Sundae. I “give back” by volunteering with the following organizations: Stockton Arts Commission, Downtown Stockton Alliance Board Of Directors, City Of Stockton Marshall Plan On Crime Committee to name a few. My favorite quotes: “He is no fool who gives up that which he cannot keep to obtain that which cannot be taken away”. – Jim Elliot Favorite childhood memories: Play time with my best friends growing up. Various excursions with my family.

What I’m reading now: The Bible… honestly! Hobbies: Photography, driving, traveling, supporting music and arts events, wandering aimlessly around San Francisco… sometimes simultaneously.

64

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3

PHOTO BY lindsay ortez


B U S I N E S S

S p o t l i g h t

Stockton Dodge

S

66

BY NANCi LESLEY

tockton Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram

important decision. With an inventory of over

muscle” “pumped, powerful, full of swagger.”

– the official title for the expansive 18,000

200 automobiles, there are plenty of colors

Walking through the showroom, a sassy Jeep

square foot dealership at 3333 Auto Center

and models to choose from, and incentives

Cherokee tugs at your heart and you picture

Circle in Stockton – prides itself on excellence

and financing designed to meet anyone’s

yourself riding effortlessly through town or

in customer service in purchasing and

requirements.

country, looking sporty and classic at the same

maintaining the second biggest investment

From the moment you step onto the

in a customer’s life – an automobile. With so

showroom floor, the dazzling models beckon

If you are thinking “road trip,” the Dodge

many choices, how does a buyer select the

you to stroll by, to admire the sculpted lines,

minivans provide space and comfort to whisk

car that fits his or her personality, needs, or

colors, and upholstery of the automobiles in

a family and their gear to the mountain slopes

budget?

their finery. The cars are not only beautiful,

or a visit to Disneyland. The Dodge Grand

At Stockton Dodge the sales personnel

they are engineering marvels, with powerful

Caravan is the largest of the minivans, and

are highly trained and knowledgeable

engines, frames, and are mechanically precise.

despite its minivan classification, is as large as

about the vast collection represented on the

Stockton Dodge offers the new Ram trucks,

a van. And by the way, the Grand Caravan has

sales floor. From the door to the showroom

and Dodge vehicles – the Dodge Dart, Dodge

a safety rating by the Insurance Industry for

floor, and all financing steps in between the

Challenger, Dodge Caliber, and the Dodge

Highway Safety.

final transaction, a skilled salesperson will

Journey. One of the hottest muscle cars,

James Hill, the General Manager for Stockton

provide the expertise needed to make this

the Dodge Charger, is described as “classic

Dodge, cites the company’s customer ➤

time.


B U S I N E S S

S p o t l i g h t

service as one of the hallmarks of company prestige. “From the moment the customer walks in the door, they feel at home. Our responsibility is to assure that the customers have an extraordinary experience – from selection, through financing, to the moment they drive the car off the lot.”

“The absolute turnaround in sales from a flailing automobile industry to a successful rise in sales for our company,” Hill said. “The rebound was extraordinary.”

What was the most exciting moment for the dealership in the past few years? Stockton Dodge invites you to visit the showroom and explore the many possibilities and options that the company brand offers its customers. Stockton Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram is located at 3333 Auto Center Circle in Stockton, off of Hammer Lane. Their phone number is 888-860-6966. ■


The Right Choice

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(209) 477-9000

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Truck RV Auto Service Center

3730 N. Wilson Way • Stockton, CA

(209) 467-0154


LIFE S T Y LE

C OL U M N

By Susan Michener Spracher

I

’ve

70

been

successfully

ignoring

my

sure I’m not alone. In today’s world the

appearance and instead of looking at our

impending birthday by telling myself it’s

notion of “growing old gracefully” seems

stretch marks as ruining our body, see that

only a number, starting a new fitness routine

to be nothing more than a pithy metaphor.

they make us a tiger who has earned her

and relaxing my heretofore rigid standard of

Women have always measured themselves

stripes. And just so you know if you’re keeping

sprucing up. I was rolling along just fine until

unrealistically  against airbrushed magazine

up appearances for the man in your life, the

the morning I looked in the mirror too long.

models, but reality television has taken that

good ones – the ones worth having – don’t

Growing straight out of my forehead as if it

beating to a whole other level. Shows such as

care nearly as much as we think. They say they

were sticking its tongue out at me was a gray

The Real Housewives and Nip/Tuck gave us a

don’t want to hug a stick figure, like the feel

hair, and my naked face showed the lines and

front-row seat to plastic surgery perfection ad

of the real thing and don’t care what we wear

signs of the past year in review. Did anybody

nauseam. I wonder if the pursuit of physical

or whether we have make-up on. Mine has

get the license number of that bus?

flawlessness has been glamorized until it

said I could let my hair go gray and that would

I’m somewhere in the middle of the vanity

seems as simple as grocery shopping. It’s

be hot. How freeing would it be to relish in

continuum. Nothing about my body has EVER

not just  in the media that this  occurs.  It’s in

who we really are, spend less time and money

been in the neighborhood of close to perfect.

our own backyard. It’s our family, friends,

on vanity and more on outside-of-ourself

I was the fat kid in elementary school, and no

neighbors and co-workers punishing their

pursuits? I’m thinking that’s where the joie de

one let me forget it. I got to an average weight

bodies, trying to obtain the mythical eternal

vivre lies.

in high school, but nowhere near the skinny-

youth.

The saying “beauty is only skin deep”

minis that ran the place. I have gained and

It’s not for me to say what a woman needs

means to me that true beauty resides

lost the same 30 pounds 15 times in my life.

to do to feel good about herself. If it’s Botox

underneath our face and our boobs. It’s in our

I seem to have good skin, but only because

and a little work, that’s cool. I just hope that

mind, our heart and our soul. Let’s let it shine,

I often felt too fat in a swimsuit to be out

my fellow sisterhood feel like it’s okay to come

Sister!

soaking up the sun. “Natural” beauty may

as they are. Because I think today’s mantra of

come easily to some; I’ve always had to work

being organic and going green should extend

fouroclockmartini.com

at it, and I have a cabinet full of products to

outside our household and into the rest of our

facebook/thefouroclockmartini

prove it.

life. All saggy boobs, extra pounds, life’s lines

twitter@absolutelySusan

Getting comfortable in my own skin

visible, no hair and make-up – au naturel.

has been a lifelong pursuit, and I’m pretty

Let us be self-loving when considering our

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


g r ap e v i n e

L OD I WE L COMES ITS FIRST

EUROPEAN RESTAURANT/ WINERY HYBRID

N

STORY By Leah Myers PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

apa Valley is not the only region in Northern California to attract visitors with its unique wines and

gourmet food. Within San Joaquin County, Lodi is notoriously referred to as the “Zinfandel Capitol of the World.” Lodi has been a major wine grape-growing region since the 1850s. Today, the area has 100,000 acres of wine

grapes, farmed by over 750 growers. The area’s transition to premium wines earned credibility when the Lodi Appellation (American Viticulture Area) was approved in 1986. From that point on, wineries were allowed to label their wines with Lodi listed as the grapes’ origin. Lodi was no longer the wine industry’s best-kept secret, as awareness was slowly built for the distinctive quality of Lodi wines. ➤

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g r ap e v i n e

The latest addition to the list of Central Valley wineries/ restaurants is Vinedos Aurora at Pamplona Tapas – the firstever combined wine tasting room and tapas bar in downtown Lodi. The restaurant/winery hybrid is co-owned and operated by Gerardo Espinosa, winemaker and owner of Vinedos Aurora Winery, and Ruben Larrazolo, executive chef of Alibrijes Mexican Bistro. Located at 14 W. Oak Street, Espinosa said that Pamplona Tapas’ food has a hearty Spanish influence and will offer four wines to pair with each entrée. The wines include a Petite Sirah, a Cabernet Sauvignon/Tempranillo/Merlot blend called Síntesis; and a light, minerally, dry white made from the Albariño grape.

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g r ap e v i n e

Vinedos Aurora Winery is one of 70+ “boutique� wineries in Lodi that specialize in small lot, handmade wines which have earned major awards at domestic and international wine competitions. Espinosa explained that winemaking is and has been a family affair and labor of love for his family since 1998, when their first 40-acre vineyard was planted in Clements. Espinosa was born into a family of agricultural engineers, which serves them well, as the wine business has flourished for the Espinosa family over the last 15 years. Vinedos Aurora Winery offers a wine club membership and space to hold private events. To learn more about Lodi wine and its wineries, visit www.vinedosaurora.com or www.lodiwine.com. ■ For more information Pamplona Tapas 209-642-8444 informacion@pamplonatapasandwine.com Gerardo Espinosa, winemaker and owner of Vinedos Aurora Winery


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2 013 Sistahs in Conversation

10th Annual Scholarship Luncheon

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Quincy and Deitra Kenoly

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Willistine Syas and Sharon Harrison

Rickey Teems II, Christiana and Chineye Teems

Regina Donaldson, Paulette Harper Johnson, Wanda Campbell and Rita Dearion Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN

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Etta Brock and Priscilla Wyatt


Jeff Whitlock Age: 41 Occupation: Stockton Firefighter / Paramedic How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: 41 years Why I choose to live in San Joaquin County: SJ County is my home.  It’s both an honor and privilege to be afforded the opportunity to help the citizens of the community in which I live. The people who mean the most to me: My family.  I’m blessed with an amazing wife and two small boys. My coworkers are like family to me, too.  I have the utmost confidence in the people I work with to know that at any given time my life can be in their hands and theirs in mine. A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: My upbringing has provided me with positive approach to all aspects of my life.  My parents raised me to respect others and to treat people how you would want to be treated. Favorite sports team: The Chicago Cubs What I’m reading now: The Happiness Project Hobbies: My true joy is practicing sports with my kids.  They love baseball and golf.  I enjoy playing golf, softball, racquetball, and bowling. Pet: One dog – Max Favorite food/dessert: Working as a firefighter, one must have a broad taste of various types of foods.  I must say I enjoy Italian the most, though.

PHOTO BY lindsay ortez

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g r ap e v i n e

Two Wines that Never Give Up the Ghost A

By Dennis Hall

utumn vibrantly makes its mark upon

our lifestyles, ushering in opportunities for wine lovers seeking relaxing, reflective respite amid exuberant gatherings. My wife Dana and I venture

all throughout San Joaquin County witnessing the joy, smiles, and laughter that abound in celebrating wine releases, barrel tastings, tricking or treating, and recognizing good fortune at Thanksgiving. Soulful tasting settings of rural crimson-shaded vineyards adjacent to tasting rooms or courtyards deliver getaways including, among many, Oak Ridge Winery, Watts Winery, Jessie’s Grove Winery, Abundance Vineyards, Pondl Winery, and Harney Lane Winery. Tasting room staff tip several pours for flights of four to five wines, revealing delicious complexities in a diverse range of dry to fruity bold. An added bonus is that staff and vintners divulge with guests their mystical, mysterious, and possibly paranormal backstories of their wines that never give up the ghost. Oak Ridge Winery and the Watts Winery sell two wines that I find particularly fascinating in regards to both their tastes and stories.

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g r ap e v i n e

Oak Ridge Winery’s “Barrel Room” offers several wines for

Craig Watts represents the third generation of Watts owning

customers within a converted 50,000 gallon redwood tank once

and managing the vineyards. When Craig was a teenager, Martin

serving the original winery over 50 years ago. Among the standouts is

and Manuela taught him as part of their vineyard crew. In addition

the 2010 Moss Roxx Ancient Vine Zinfandel with its absorbing gold foil

to working the vineyards, Manuela was very influential on Craig. She

bear on its label and ghostly blend. What a shocking surprise hearing

was a healer, regarded locally as a doctor, originally born in Alamos

the staff’s pitch that its blend includes a touch of brandy. Amazing!

Sonora, Mexico. She migrated to the Lodi area and married Martin.

Including brandy imparts first an avant-garde bouquet when swirled

With everyone in the community, she had absolute credibility.

and sniffed, and then a very mild warming of the soul as it is tasted. The

One day, back in the 1960s, Manuela was in the vineyard working

brandy is right up front, but your taste finishes with the accompanying

with Craig’s father and they together discovered a mostly hollow

bold jammy flavor and smoky texture. Delicious!

cement box measuring ten by six feet, buried only inches underground.

Sheri and Craig Watts, owners of Watts Winery, share a tender

Of course, the impulse was to dig it up and open it, but Manuela

story regarding their family’s very first vineyard west of Lodi–with

reported to Craig’s father that she heard angelic singing emanating

vines planted in 1937–known as the Pescador Vineyard. This particular

from this box. She advised him not to unearth or open the box, as it was

vineyard honors the late Martin and Manuela Pescador, a married

apparently sacred in nature. To this day, it has never been exhumed.

couple that served as vineyard managers for Craig’s grandfather and

Craig Watts reports that when driving a tractor through that vineyard

father. The vineyard itself has a most provocative backstory giving the

row over the hollow box, he hears a “thump” sound. It definitely gets

wine inherited mystery.

his attention. ➤


Sheri and Craig Watts relish the triumphs of winning gold medals at the California State Fair for their Old Vine Zinfandel produced from grapes grown in their Pescador Vineyard with the mysterious subterranean fixture. This Zinfandel exudes an earthy tone with a feel you can taste. A portrait of the late Manuela smiling adorns the Watts Winery tasting room. Courtney Chadwell, Tasting Room Manager for Jessie’s Grove Winery shares a paranormal story. When Joseph and Anna Spenker arrived in Lodi in the late 1800s, they soon settled on their ranch now known as Jessie’s Grove, and built their beautiful little house during 1907. They raised their family there, including Jessie and her brother, Otto. The house still stands today, and indications illuminate that it may be home to the spirit Otto of himself. During early August, she and several other people heard from afar someone ringing the large and ancient dinner bell outside of the house. Legend has it that ringing this dinner bell after five o’clock in the evening disturbs the spirit of Otto, prompting weird things to happen in angst. Less than two hours during nightfall after the bell rang, Courtney saw all of the lights turned on in the house, and the ceiling fans spinning, something that never occurs in the rarely-visited home. Upon entering the locked house, Courtney and other staff found bathroom cabinet doors open and drawers slid open several inches, and yet no one was in sight. There have been many times that people hear footsteps moving up the creepy staircase, and doors being slammed unexpectedly. Staff have seen figures through the glass windows and movements throughout the day. After visiting the many enchanting wineries to hear stories, enjoy the harvest moon. ■

Dennis Hall is a freelance writer, author, entrepreneur, and San Joaquin County advocate. Dennis and his wife Dana founded Sip California, a wine industry business. Dennis.SipCalifornia@gmail.com 916-541-1992


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2 013 Orange and Black Ball

Pacific Athletic Foundation

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Paul and Julie Schneider, Jennifer and Jeff Whitlock C E

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Kady Pooler, Charlotte Scatliffe and Jamieson Cox

David Diskin, Caralee Hickey and Power Cat

Katherine Jeffery, Pam Eibeck and Bill Jeffery

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Chris Ludwig and Ashley DeVito

Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN 82

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Carole and Ron Addington


Wag Tales PHOTO BY Helen Ripken

Lulu I am a: French bulldog Where I’m from: I was originally a pet to the lace makers from England who immigrated to France and brought my ancestors with them. I’m meant to be a faithful companion to my master. Favorite place to hang out: The couch followed by anything soft and comfortable. Most recent accomplishment: Sitting still for my portrait Amazing dog tricks: Wind sprints through the house with a jump onto the couch at the conclusion Favorite place walk: I love to walk around my neighborhood, especially if I see a cat or two. Guilty pleasure: Scrambled eggs once a month with my heartworm pill Naughtiest deed: Chasing the neighbor’s cat up and over the fence Obsession: Looking for cats and dreaming about giving them a chase. Where I go to get beautiful: The shower at my Mom’s Any other interesting info about me: I’m eager to please, playful, gentle and good with children. My purpose in life is to make everyone happy. I may look athletic, but I really prefer to sit on my Mom’s lap. Human parent: Helen Ripken


t o t

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tot culture Marcus 4 years old Parent: Amanda Castillo

Maddie 4 Years old Parents: Brian and Trina Manzer

Mathias 2 Years old Grandparents: Alfonso and Yolanda Jasso

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t o t

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Vikki Marie 5 Years OLD Parents: Dr. Vinnie Blye and Tanesha Walls Blye

Kiley 7 months OLD Parents: Skylar and Brittney Jackson

Adam 5 Years old Parents: Inpong Keokounnavong & Chris Stockman

lifestyles

Maurice Jr. 9 months old Parents: Tarah Salutan and Maurice Buquid Sr.

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sw e e t

c h a r i t y

When life hands you a physical curveball:

sculling I

f you have no idea what sculling is about, it’s okay, you’re not alone.

“My long-term goal is for DSC/EBS to provide inclusive sports, so

Just think of it as paddle a kayak, except you use two oars instead of

that the lines between ‘disabled’ and ‘temporarily able-bodied’ become

one and sit on a sliding seat – and according to Pat Tirone – you’ll most

blurred,” says Tirone. “Sculling for people with disabilities is not limited

likely have more fun.

just to physical handicaps, but also addresses folks with sensory and

STORY AND PHOTOS By Charleen Earley

Founder of Delta Sculling Center/EveryBody Sculls (DSC/EBS), Tirone said her mission is about making the sport of sculling available to

to find some spirituality or to de-stress their lives.” “We are so stressed by life we sometimes forget to breathe,” adds

anyone, regardless of their ability. “It’s an inclusive sport,” says Tirone, 60, a Chicago native, who was

Tirone, who now lives in Stockton. “Being out on the water, the ability

raised in the Midwest, and holds doctorates in physical therapy and

to make the boat row on impulse, and the peace engendered by the

education.

rhythmic quality of sculling – it is so amazing and healing.”

Still in its infant stage, Tirone’s not-for-profit organization promotes

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cognitive limitations as well as those with – how do I say this – a need

Tirone explains the process of sculling.

a sport not only for able-bodied clients, but also those who need

“It’s basically the process of propelling a boat using a long oar on

rehabilitation and those with disabilities looking for a way to participate

each side of the boat, held by fixed riggers. The sculler sits on a moving

in a sport.

seat which moves up and down a slide on the boat deck. Each stroke

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


basically resembles a squat or clean in power-lifting,” she says. “Scullers generally go out alone in singles, with a partner (double scull) or with three others (quad sculls). Sculling contrasts with the other common method of rowing – sweep rowing – in which each rower may use both hands to operate a single oar on either side of the boat.” It’s a sport Amy Kaida of Lodi says anyone can do. “What’s great is that it’s for any skill level and for someone with any kind of physical capability,” says Kaida, who sculls with Tirone and friends on the Delta in Stockton. One of Tirone’s recent clients was a patrolman who suffered the loss of one leg due to an accident from a high-speed chase. He had an above-knee amputation, and before his surgical wounds were healed, Tirone said he wanted to return to sport and fitness desperately. “I taught him to land row without a prosthesis, so he could get an aerobic workout and begin to reclaim his general core strength and range of motion and strength,” recalls Tirone. “Once he had his prosthesis and was more ambulatory, we also had him rowing in a quadruple scull.” One myth Tirone loves to bust is how there’s a prejudice that scullers are loners and fiercely independent. “Not true! Since I started competing in a single sculling boat, I have

NEW & AGAIN CONSIGNMENT C

more friends than ever,” said Tirone. “We all help each other in this sport, and then we realize how much we have in common. I now have a huge network of people in my life, and I love the camaraderie.” Tirone, who also teaches yoga and tai chi, says the physical benefits are equally rewarding. “Some say it’s easier than sweep rowing. The sport can be what you want it to be: pure recreation or if you want to be one of the most fit people on earth – it will do that for you,” says Tirone. If she had to pick one sport that would make a difference in people’s lives – oars down –it would be sculling. “If everyone came out and rowed before they went to work, the world would be a better place,” she says. ■

www.deltasculling.org www.facebook.com/DeltaScullingCenter Pat Tirone, PT, DPT, Ed.D. email: ptirone@deltasculling.org 209-607-9876

FURNITURE GALLERY LLERY

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

armoires clocks recliners jewelry Thanks for all of artwork d your support and mirrors for voting us sofas glassware Best of Lodi for desks the last 4 years! chairs room dividers bedroom sets dishes The yard/garden Consignm First & Best ent St decor Specializ ore in the Area! • dressers ing in • mattresses Liquidatio Estate • dinette sets OUR INTEREST-FREE LAYAWAYns ASK ABOUT PROGRAM! • end tables

NEW & AGAIN CONSIGNMENT Furniture Gallery 210 S. School St., Downtown Lodi

368-2200

www.newandagainonline.com

OPEN MON-SAT 10-6, SUN12-5 DELIVERY & PICKUP AVAILABLE


P EE K

A

B O U TI Q U E

A Little

Creativity BY Carson kautz PHOTOS BY david sowers

M

ix a passionate person with a great idea and you’ll get

something exciting, memorable, and a whole lot of fun – something like the Mud Mill, located on School Street in downtown Lodi. With over 300 different pieces of pottery and 70 different paints to choose from, the Mud Mill holds endless possibilities sure to delight. But the true force behind the business isn’t the pottery or the paint – it’s Vicki Snell, owner of the Mud Mill, whose passion and drive have propelled an interesting idea into a triumph. Vicki opened the Mud Mill after a trip to Arizona to visit her brother. She took her daughter and niece to As You Wish, a pottery-painting studio, and was inspired by the concept. “They just had a great time,” Vicki said, “and my brother told me, ‘you should really open up one of those in Lodi.’” The concept itself is simple, fun, and straightforward, and no two trips are the same. Customers who come in can choose what they want to paint – anything from plates and mugs to animals and flowers. They’ll then sit down at a table, don an apron, and choose their paint colors. When they’ve finished painting, they’ll initial the bottom, and a few days later pick up a fired and glazed masterpiece.

Vicki’s also taken what could have been just for kids and turned it

The Mud Mill isn’t just fun, though; it’s a successful and well-run

into something that appeals to all ages. “We do ladies’ night for women

business. It’ll celebrate its tenth anniversary in January, still going strong

who want to get together but don’t want to go to a bar, or a movie,”

through a tough economy. “It’s not something a lot of people might

Vicki said. “We’ll have date nights on Friday nights where a couple can

allow in their budgets,” Vicki said, “but we always offer coupons and

come in, bring in dinner and wine and paint the night away.”

specials. We work hard to not keep somebody out of the loop because they can’t afford to come.”

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Ladies’ nights, date nights, field trips, birthday parties – the Mud Mill is a place for anyone and everyone. ■

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P EE K

A

B O U TI Q U E

MUD MILL 115 S. SCHOOL STREET • SUITE 1 • LODI, CA • 209-365-9900 THEMUDMILL.COM

“We all just need a little down time, and some creativity.” ~ Vicki

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B U S I N E S S

S potli g ht

The sweeter side of life I

By Charleen Earley

t started out as a hobby, making cakes for

friends and family, but when orders began to escalate and get a bit overwhelming, that’s when longtime friends Christine Hermansen and Lisa Hassett began helping each other out with their orders. Three years ago was decision time. That’s when they left their day jobs at Walmart, became their own bosses and started their own business of baking cakes, cupcakes and more, for pretty much any occasion. With a play on words, they called their new life Frosted Flour Bakery and Supplies. In their opinion, their new job couldn’t be any sweeter, regardless of the number of hours and labor they put into it. Customer appreciation speaks louder than sore feet. “Nothing feels better than getting an email back from a customer saying ‘we loved your cake,’” said Hermansen. “Or knowing that they put a picture of our cake for their baptism into their photo albums. We are a part of their memories,” added Hassett. The two log in close to 70 hours a week each to create custom-made wedding cakes – ask them about their reversed zebra print birthday cakes, truffles, dessert bars, brownies, French macaroons, limited glutenfree cakes, cupcakes, special orders and more.

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B U S I N E S S

S p o t l i g h t

“Our signature cupcakes are Salted Carmel and Lodi Lemon. They’re amazingly tasty and we can hardly keep the case full, they sell out so fast,” said Hassett, who just so happens to live across the street from

While they give their customers everything from quality service and fresh ingredients to great pricing, there’s one thing they won’t give

Hermansen in Lodi.

away.

Their secret to success is found in quality. “Our customers expect top-notch, so our main goal is to make

“Our recipes are our own collaboration and variations of recipes

everything high-quality and not to cut back on anything,” said Hassett,

we’ve made over the years. We find recipes and then tweak them until

mother of three with husband Neil.

we feel they’re perfect,” said Hermansen. “We do sell butter cream, but

Pricing also keeps their customers coming back for more. Custom cakes are priced through consultation; however cupcakes go for $1.75

we don’t sell our own recipe of it – we want it to be special, so everyone knows it came from us!” ■

each or $1.50 each for a dozen or more. Closed only on Sundays, the two are beyond excited about their newest opening – a second location – due to popular demand and lack

Frosted Flour Bakery and Supplies • 904 W. Lodi Avenue • Lodi

of local, affordable pricing. Located just a few doors down on the same

www.frostedflour.com

street, they’ve opened a baking supply store-chock full of goodies any

cakes@frostedflour.com facebook.com/frostedflour

professional or hobbyist would need. “The only closest stores with fair pricing are in Sacramento or

209.369.CAKE

Modesto,” said Hassett.

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October ~ Mark the date 4 COMMunITy CenTer

fOr The bLInD 14Th AnnuAL LObSTer DInner Start your evening at 6:00 p.m. Friday October 4 at the Waterloo gun & Bocci

5-6

Club in Stockton for the 14th Annual Lobster Dinner hosted by the Community Center for the Blind. Check out the fun raffle, silent auction, no host bar, and great food with family and friends. For reservations and tickets call 209-4663836. For more information, contact trinal@communitycenterfortheblind.org.

MAnTeCA KIwAnIS PuMPKIn fAIr

Manteca Sunrise Kiwanis will once again be hosting the annual fall pumpkin celebration in downtown Manteca. Enjoy the finest in pumpkin-flavored foods, music, crafts and more. As always, there is no event admission, so families can enjoy the rides, games, entertainment, food and shopping at minimal costs. We hope to see you October 5-6 in downtown Manteca. For more information, contact info@sunrisekiwanis.org.

CeLebrATe STOCKTOn: STOCKTOn IS MAgnIfICenT

5

Join in on the fun and celebrate Stockton with food, entertainment, arts, local nonprofits, unsung heroes, a children’s parade, historical figures, history and agriculture exhibits and more on Saturday, October 5 from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Stockton Miracle Mile. For more information, contact jeffergirld@sbcglobal.net or call 209-465-6829.

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Stocktoberfest is Saturday, October 5, from 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Waterfront Warehouse, at 445 W. Weber Avenue, Stockton. Adults 21 and over, can enjoy craft beers on tap, sausages, various competitions, dance-offs and more. Modeled after a german Octoberfest, Stocktoberfest seating is outdoors on the waterfront with long tables, wooden benches and BIg glass steins. For more information, call 209-464-5246.

10

Experience the epicurean event of the year when more than one dozen top valley-area chefs and California vintners come together for the March of Dimes’ Signature Chef’s Auction. guests will enjoy signature culinary masterpieces specifically made for the event, from the most prominent valley chefs of some of the best restaurants and catering companies around. Come support March of Dimes on Thursday, October 10, from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. For more information, contact Jill Faso at 209-416-3304 or jfaso@marchofdimes.com.

ASTrOnOMy In The PArK

12

See the stars at Oak grove Regional Park on Saturday, October 12 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at Astronomy in the Park. Stockton Astronomical Society’s telescope volunteers will have telescopes set up for the public to use, and the Nature Center will have indoor astronomy games, crafts and activities for the whole family. For more information, call 209-953-8814 or email oakgrovenaturecenter@gmail.com.

octob er /n ovemb er 2 0 1 3


19

Stockton Shelter for the homeless is celebrating its 29th Annual Festival of International Cuisine. This fundraising event includes entertainment, live and silent auctions, fine wines at each table, a complete no-host bar, and incredible dishes from local restaurants featuring recipes from at least 17 countries! Don’t miss out on this exciting event and opportunity to help the homes in San Joaquin County. Come out to the Church of Presentation Community Hall on Saturday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. For ticket information, please visit www.festivalofinternationalcuisine.com.

26

Diwali, or Dipawali, is India’s biggest and most important holiday of the year. Join us Saturday, October 26, for this year’s celebration at the East Indian Cultural Show, featuring dances with traditional costumes performed by local youth. For more information, call 209-476-1553.

November ~ Mark the date

31-2

Oct.

Annual Diwali Celebration

Nov.

Pacific Invitational

The mission was simple… to build one of the most respected golf tournaments in America, and after seven years of dedication, the Annual SCVB Pacific Invitational presented by Ron Berberian, BAC is back for its 8th Annual event at the Stockton Country Club. The tournament will run starting Wednesday, October 31 to Saturday, November 2. Spectators are welcome to come and watch the event. For more information, visit www. pacificinvitational.com.

CAPC Fashion Show

2

Start off the month right and support the Child Abuse Prevention Council at their 28th Annual Auxiliary Fashion Show – “Believe.” The CAPC is committed to protecting children of the community, strengthening families, and giving hope to those who seek to break the sometimes generational bonds of physical, verbal, sexual and emotional abuse. Come out to the Stockton Hilton Saturday, November 2 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.nochildabuse.org, and for tickets contact Shauna at 209-644-5318.

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1-3

21

17th Annual Lodi Sandhill Crane Festival

ATHENA Awards Luncheon

In November, the Stockton Chamber of Commerce will present the prestigious ATHENA Award to an outstanding individual in our community. This award is presented to one who has attained and personified the highest level of professional excellence in their business or profession, has devoted time and energy to our community in a meaningful way, and most especially, has opened doors of leadership opportunity for women. The award luncheon starts at 11:30 a.m. Thursday November 21 at the Stockton Golf & Country Club. For tickets and more information, call 209-547-2770 or e-mail Heidi@StocktonChamber.org.

Experience one of nature’s amazing spectacles at the 17th Annual Lodi Sandhill Crane Festival. Come out and enjoy the sights, wildlife tours, workshops, an art show, live animal displays, family activities and more, at Hutchins Street. Square in Lodi, November 1-3. For more information, call 1-800-581-6150 or visit www.cranefestival.com.

Ladies Night Out Volume 2

The hottest concert series returns to the Stockton Arena on Saturday November 9 at 7:00 p.m.  Featured performances include R&B superstars 112, Genuwine, Jagged Edge, H Town, J Holiday and a special guest to be named later.  BET comedian Ralph Porter will be hosting with DJ Funkdaddy on the mix. For more information, visit www.stocktonlive.com.

23-25

9

Community Philanthropy Summit

Come out Saturday, November 23 through Monday, November 25 to the San Joaquin County Fairgrounds and see what all the bark is about at the San Joaquin Kennel Club Annual Dog Show. There will be over 2,500 of the top dogs from all over the country. The show starts at 8:30 a.m. and is free to attend. Parking is $5.00. For more information, visit www.sanjoaquinkc.org.

30

Zoo Lights at

12

The Community Philanthropy Summit will be held at Hutchins Street Square in Lodi, on Tuesday November 12. This exciting event offers a wide variety of topics for professional advisors, nonprofit executives, board members, donors and anyone else involved in charitable giving. Come out and network with other philanthropically-minded people from around the valley. CPA and attorney continued education credit available. For information, contact assistant@cfosj.org.

5 December

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San Joaquin Kennel Club Annual Dog Show

Mark the date

Micke Grove Zoo will be bright at night for the Zoo Lights event this winter. Stop by the Zoo for games, crafts, entertainment, free Santa pictures, and more from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on November 30, December 1, 7, 8, 14 and 15. For more information, call 209-331-2010.

Business Diversity Mixer AT THE Haggin Museum

The Business Diversity Mixer has been in existence for more than 25 years, with each local Chamber featuring food tastings reflecting their specific ethnicity. The Greater Stockton Chamber of Commerce coordinates the event in partnership with the Hispanic Chamber, the African-American Chamber, the Delta Chamber and the Asian American Chamber with the Haggin Museum graciously hosting the mixer. The Business Diversity Mixer will be held on Thursday, December 5, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. For more information, call 209-547-2770.

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Lifestyles Magazine October 2013  

The new October issue of San Joaquin Lifestyle from the Stockton Record.

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