Page 1

The Magazine For San Joaquin

I DO TWO LOCAL WEDDINGS PAGE 38

NEW TO STOCKTON

FRENCH 25 & PAGE 10 MARKET TAVERN PAGE 15

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH PAGE 18

february/march 2014 ■ sanjoaquinlifestyles.com


l e t t e r

f r o m

t h e

e d i t o r

Publisher Roger Coover

Publication Director Deitra R. Kenoly

Editor

The Magazine For San Joaquin

W

Carrie Sass

MANAGING Editor Karen Bakhtegan

hat do YOU love about living in San

5 Jazz on the Mile • Get a designated driver and take

Graphic Designers

Joaquin County of Northern California? Each issue of

friends on a Lodi Wine Tour • Attend LIVE! at Lincoln

our magazine is brimming with places to go, people to

Center • Support literacy by shopping at Friends of

Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

see and things to do.

the Library Bookstore • Educate yourself about our

Let’s take our love of San Joaquin to a new level.

county by taking the Certified Stockton Ambassador

Let’s not only get out into the community, let’s support

Program • Buy veggies at a farmers market • Plan

our non-profit organizations, our local venues, and

to attend the lighted boat parade in December •

arts programs. Let’s enjoy our parks and let’s support

Attend a play at Stockton Civic Theatre • Shop one

our local businesses. I started a list – just thoughts.

local small business per week • Check out two new

A bit random, but it might help you started! I know

restaurants during restaurant week! Yum! • Surprise

it’s going to help me.

the neighborhood kids with a trip to a Ports game •

Attend an event at the Haggin Museum • Volunteer

Take a walk with the Delta Tule Trekkers • Volunteer

at the Asparagus Festival • Attend one of a gazillion

at a “clean up our community” event • Ride the fire

crab feeds to support a non-profit • Take a boat tour of

truck at the Children’s Museum • Go on a historic tour

the Delta • Go bird-watching at Oak Grove Regional

of downtown architecture • Buy a hot dog from a hot

Park • Take the kids or grandkids to the SJ Memorial

dog vendor • Seek out events at one of our 80 local

Historical Society Museum at Micke Grove Park • Take

wineries (there are plays, live music, events!) • Attend

a bike ride through UOP and Delta College • Buy

a cultural festival that you have not previously attended

tickets to the Stockton Symphony Pops Concert (it’s

• Bring the kids/grandkids to Family Day at the Park –

a western theme this year… yee haw!) • Make it a

Literacy & Book Fair • Write a note to a hard-working

point to check out the activities at Eagal Lake in Tracy

director of a local non-profit • Plan a picnic • Enjoy

• Tour a non-profit to learn more about their services

an afternoon at the WOW museum • Ride your bike

• Take a group of kids to a Thunder game • Gather a

to church • Go to the zoo • Run through the water

few friends and take in an old movie at the Bob Hope

feature at Weber Point and Pixie Woods • Attend at

Theatre (usually one Sunday a month) • Buy lemonade

least one community event in downtown Stockton

from the kids at the lemonade stand • Watch a Friday

and downtown Lodi • Volunteer one hour a month to

night city-league softball game at Louis Park • Have

a different non-profit • Attend a high school play or

dinner at Taco Truck Frenzy • Enjoy Thursday Night Take

sporting event • Plan a block party for your neighbors.

Contributing WRITERS Cort Carlson Charleen Earley Larry French Dennis Hall Nanci Lesley Joann Marks, RN Heather Mompean Leah Myers Peter Ottesson Mary Raffetto Jennifer Torres Siders Susan Michener Spracher

Contributing Photographers Ashlee Blackard Charleen Earley Larry French Lindsay Ortez Helen Ripken David Sowers

And most of all – have fun!

Carrie xoxo

Please continue to forward story ideas to: The Record/Lifestyles Magazine, 530 E. Market Street, Stockton 95202 or call: 209-546-8351; or email: kbakhtegan@recordnet.com

To advertise in Lifestyles magazine, call 209-546-8200 Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

On the cover: LOCAL WEDDINGS PHOTO BY Lindsay Ortez lindsayophotography.com

$3.95 Value


SAVOR 10 French 25 15 MARKET TAVERN 29 BUD'S SEAFOOD WINE CRITIC 13 BONJOUR TO LOVE

WINE & SPIRITS 25 WINE SOCIAL

4 o'clock martini 27 THE LOVE OF A LIFETIME

OUR CULTURE

18 Celebrating BLACK HISTORy MONTH 31 Indian Valentines

MOM ABOUT THE TOWN

PEEK A BOUTIQUE

OUT AND ABOUT

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

44 MARRIED & DATING 46 SPECTATOR

51 FIND YOUR BLISS

56 Chef michael midgley 78 stockton golf & country club

c o n t e n t s

TRAVEL 62 AUSTRALIA – land down under

SWEET CHARITY 68 STOCKTON ANIMAL SHELTER 72 flying samaritans

SPORTING LIFE 76 stockton thunder

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

90 STOCKTON CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU Corrections The December 2013 edition of Lifestyles Magazine featured Thornton House Furniture on pages 86-88. The article omitted the names of two of the co-owners of the business and both the opening and relocation dates were incorrect. The correct information is as follows: Thornton House Furniture was opened in Stockton in 1978 on Thornton Road by Al and Kate Nunes and Mike and Pat Nicholls. The company moved to the corner of School and Pine Streets in Lodi in 1988. THE MEXICAN-AMERICAN HALL OF FAME DINNER WAS ERRONEOUSLY TITLED IN THE DECEMBER 2013 EDITION OF LIFESTYLES MAGAZINE. THE CORRECT FEATURE CAN BE SEEN ON PAGE 43.


THE Taste of

New Orleans

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PHOTO BY Frankenmuffin

F

BY NANCI LESLEY

rench 25 sprang from the minds of restaurateurs Greg May and

want to create another expensive restaurant in Stockton; we saw

Bruce Davies when they saw an opportunity to create a New Orleans-

French 25 as a restaurant for everyone to experience without emptying

style restaurant in the heart of Stockton’s historic downtown. With the

their pocketbooks. Our location in the historic Hotel Stockton, and

Delta waters as their backdrop, May and Davies created an authentic

the restaurant space itself, was a perfect fit with the ambiance of city

New Orleans menu that is both delicious and fairly priced. “We didn’t

dining with the Delta waterways in full view,” said May. “We wanted ➤

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to create something different, and New Orleans Creole is down-toearth. “ May studied under master chef Gerard Morris in New Orleans, and with this knowledge created a dazzling menu of delicious New Orleans dishes. Appetizers are filled with Creole delights – hush puppies, shrimp creole, blue crab tacos, and andouille sliders, a mixture of andouille sausage and ground beef with Creole seasonings and alligator grilled and served with red chili that will bite your taste buds! Under the creative craftsmanship of Chef Keith Breedlove, you are assured of an excellent dining experience. To warm your souls, gumbo ya-ya and blue crab & roasted corn soup are full of savory combinations. A specialty salad such as the beet & goat cheese or the shrimp cobb tantalizes your taste buds. For the adventurous in spirit, try the root beer braised short ribs (yes, root beer is a food group) or the shrimp etoufee, a sautéed shrimp and vegetable stew. The almost famous combination of chicken-n-waffles is a surefire comfort food and the blackened catfish will surrender your palate to the Creole cuisine. Stunning desserts await you with banana bread pudding, beignets (classic French doughnuts tossed with powdered PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

sugar) and Bananas Foster ice cream crepes prepared at your table. The interior design of the restaurant is both elegant and comfortable with high ceilings, sumptuous spaces to dine, and a relaxed ambience where you can visit with friends and family or meet with business associates. The 3000-square-foot restaurant feels wonderfully grand, yet welcoming. Inside the restaurant is seating for 190 guests and a separate dining area that accommodates 50. For special events and an uptown view, French 25 has a beautiful rooftop dining/event area where the evenings are lit by the stars above – a perfect event or wedding venue. With 42 talented staff members who are fully involved in the restaurant’s personality, the combination for a perfect dining experience – excellent food, beautiful bar, stately historic setting, and the magnetic attraction to the Delta waterway – French 25 is a place to which you will want to return, again and again. ■ French 25 110 N. El Dorado Street • Stockton 209-451-0617 french-25.com


Bonjour to Love W

e Americans envy and

love the French romance playbook for

our own enjoyment on Valentine’s Day

accenting our loving lifestyles. Merci to local vintners, as even their dessert wines are now of French influence, prompting raised glasses, toasts and grins to the splendors of love! Valentine’s Day has the added bonus this year of spilling over into the wee hours of Saturday morning. Bring on the wine! Stay up late! Want to surprise your loved one with a hint of magic? Present forth some PHOTO BY ASHLEE BLACKARD


grapevine

barrel. Once bottled and labeled, they rest for

sweet dessert wines such as white Chateau

For the white 2012 Chateau d’ Joaquin, I

d’ Joaquin from Fields Family Wines or red

recommend that you sip, savoring the candied

Toasted Toad Cellars Toadilly Lucky in their

peach sensation with leanings toward tropical

Jeff and Laura Werter, the father-and-

cute, petite bottles.

nectar earning this wine a reputation as liquid

daughter winemaking team at Toasted Toad

These San Joaquin vintners deserve kudos

gold. Nibbles of bleu cheese with crackers

Cellars in Lodi, blend their sensuous red

for their French spirit and all the tender loving

bring out a fabulous explosion of flavor.

Toadilly Luscious and their sultry red Toadilly

care they lavish on exquisite dessert wines.

Chateau d’ Joaquin is a Sauternes-style wine

Likable dessert wines to deliver their new

Fields Family Wines rolls out just one barrel per

in that it emulates the Sauternes dessert wines

Toadilly Lucky dessert wine. The rich green

vintage of its white Chateau d’ Joaquin, and

produced in the Bordeaux wine region that lies

wax closure of the neck renders it inviting for

Toasted Toad Cellars blends its red dessert

in the southern area of western France. Ryan

Saint Patrick’s Day celebration as well. Pair

wines, delivering its scrumptious reddish

Sherman, winemaker for Field Family Wines,

with rich, dark dots of chocolate or mashes of

cherry Toadilly Lucky Wine.

allows the vineyards golden-skinned Semillon,

chocolate frosting and cake.

By virtue of their cozy presentation alone,

Sauvignon Blanc and Viognier grapes to hang

dessert wines lure curious, adventuresome

on the vine until a very late harvest to get

intrigue. Undress the closure, twist out the

super-ripe with high sugar levels. He mellows

cork, and pour into elegant stemware. Toast

out the wine with a refined balance of acidity

to your love, then draw the blossomed glasses

and sugar. After some preliminary time in

close to your nose, and sniff gently, relishing

stainless steel, he transfers the wine for aging

festive bouquets.

ten to twelve months in a neutral French oak

six months before celebrated release.

All of this culminates in a romantic adventure with French flair. Cheers! ■ Dennis Hall is a freelance writer, author and entrepreneur. 916-541-1992 Dennis.SipCalifornia@gmail.com


savor

WHERE SUSTAINABLE

MEETS sociable

STORY BY MARY RAFFETTO PHOTOS BY RED CARPET STUDIOS COURTESY OF LINCOLN CENTER

V

isiting Stockton’s Market Tavern for the first time, a sworn foodie exclaimed, ”I’m going

to eat here constantly until I simply can’t fit through their doors anymore!“ Admittedly not a

great plan for the long-term, but if first impressions count for anything, and rumor has it they do, then somebody is doing something very right over at Lincoln Center’s newest, and blazingly popular restaurant.

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Delicious food is a big part of this story,

even counting the on-draft selection, boasts 18

Back to the food: it is superb and the

but certainly not the whole story. There’s the

varieties of 22-ounce bottles in addition to the

choices are many. The fish taco is a lightly

inviting ambience, the outstanding service,

larger (750 ml) Belgian IPA and ale.

fried, firm, white filet topped with the freshest

and even if you never touched a bite, you could quite happily choose from Market Tavern’s

extensive wine list, specialty cocktails both new-

Unsure

what

to

order?

Cocktail-ly

shredded

cabbage,

cilantro,

challenged? The “Proprietor’s Blends” section

pico de gallo, and chipotle crema. Each

of the menu promises drinks “crafted with the

bite of vibrantly flavored, warm, crunchy

intention of pairing with our MT food.” Lindsay,

deliciousness is proof that chef Nick DiArenzo

one of the Market Tavern servers, says, “So far

and his team go the extra mile.

everyone has gone crazy for the ‘Sparkling

Like all their pizzas, the prosciutto and

Pear’ house cocktail,” a custom concoction

arugula version arrives piping hot, straight

of head bartender Arzou, composed of a

from the wood burning oven sporting a puffed,

beguiling blend of Roederer sparkling brut,

crisp-edged, tender crust. The homemade

Grey Goose “Le Poire,” St. Germaine and pear

tomato sauce has just the right balance of

purée. There are many other appealing choices,

tangy sweetness, making a perfect canvas

many of which showcase in-house infused

for the vivid flavors of arugula and smoked

liquors, and all of which are the product of

prosciutto, accented with dabs of creamy

and old-school, and a beer menu which, not “Proprietors” who definitely know their stuff.

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guacamole,

feb r u a r y/ma rch 2 0 1 4

Italian ricotta melting atop this masterpiece.


Market Tavern’s carrot-leek lentil soupof-the-day was an absolute delight with surprisingly distinct layers of flavor against a subtle yellow curry. Neither too salty nor sweet, as restaurant soups can be, this one is a gem, and one can’t help but hope that it becomes a regular part of the menu. When Market Tavern’s manager Jeff Berretta recommends his personal favorite, the Painted Hills Burger, he is not fooling around. An assembly of premium ingredients, this beefy beauty is everything you ever loved about the American classic. It is presented on their made-from-scratch, freshly-baked bun and begging for you to just go WWF on it. Do they even call it WWF anymore? Is it WWE now? Whatever, you get the picture: you’d gladly don a cape and tights and leap off the ropes to have at this thing. The menu humbly describes it as having “all the fixin’s,” but don’t overlook it; this is a burger bound to have its own fan club until the cows come home. Which they won’t. Because they’ve clearly found better things to do. Market Tavern offers 6 tempting dessert choices, from the mandatory chocolaty to the seasonally fruity such as pear gallette or apple crisp, both with gelato. If you somehow forgot to save room, fear not; these treats and others are available next door, all packed up and ready to go. While you’re there be sure to grab a takeout menu. But pace yourself, you really will want to fit through those doors so you can come back for more. ■

Market Tavern 236 Lincoln Center • Stockton facebook.com/MarketTavernCA

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O U R

Black History Month FEB. 2014

C U LT U RE

B

lack History Month celebration involves a number of activities that honor the history

and heritage of African-Americans and the African Diaspora. Throughout the month of February, the University of the Pacific puts on numerous events, including a keynote speaker, gospel concert, poetry reading, roundtable discussions and various guest lecturers. â–

Claudia Rankine Poet Claudia Rankine will read and discuss her work during this Black History Month event. Rankine was elected in 2013 as a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poets. She is currently the Henry G. Lee Professor of English at Pomona College. Her latest book, Plot, crosses the genres of poetry, dialogue and prose while exploring what it means to be human.

COMMON Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist and actor Common is the featured keynote speaker for the 2014 Black History Month Celebration. On Saturday, February 8, at 7 p.m., he will speak and perform at the Bob Hope Theatre in downtown Stockton.

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O U R

C U LT U RE

EVENTS WOW Hip-Hop You Don’t Stop Reading Book Drive February 1, 2014 Warren Atherton Auditorium, San Joaquin Delta College Black Barbershop Health Outreach Program February 8, 2014 at 12 p.m. This year’s Black Barbershop screenings will be held at the following locations: • Binder Barbershop 526 E. Weber Street Stockton, CA 95202 • Frontline Barbershop and Saloon 517 Martin Luther King Blvd Stockton, CA 95206 • Tru Barber Styles 8037 West Lane, Suite A Stockton, CA 95219 Black History Month: Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist Common to lecture, perform February 8, 2014 at 7 p.m. Bob Hope Theatre Film: “Lee Daniel’s The Butler” February 20, 2014 – 8 p.m. Janet Leigh Theatre, University of the Pacific

The closing event for the month’s celebration is Gospelfest 2014. On February 28, in collaboration with San Joaquin Delta College, Gospelfest 2014 will feature nationallyacclaimed gospel artist and Stellar Award winner, Tye Tribbett. His latest CD, Greater Than, debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Top Gospel Albums Chart and #9 on Billboard’s Top 200 Chart overall. His music is reaching the hearts of sold-out multigenerational, standing-room-only audiences around the country. Greater Than, his debut album with Motown Records, is his most successful album to date. Tye Tribbett offers a message of hope and encouragement with an energetic performance style best experienced live.

lifestyles

Poetry Reading with Claudia Rankine February 27, 2014 – 7 p.m. Wendell Phillips Center, University of the Pacific Gospelfest 2014: Featuring Tye Tribbett February 28, 2014 – 7 p.m. Warren Atherton Auditorium, San Joaquin Delta College

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2 014 Family Resource & Referral ABC Awards

A A

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FA

EA A

B

Linde Turner, Arnetta Martin and Gene Hardin

Cliff and Ann Johnston and Kay Ruhstaller

D

Pam Cook, Dr. Robert Morrow and Melissan Bonta

Peggy and Mark People, Barbara and Tim Daly

F

Marguerite Toliver, Shani Richards and Constance Smith

C E

Jamie Baiocchi and Debra Kellar

Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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S P E C I A L

D I N I N G

A D V E R T I S I N G

S E C T I O N


S P E C I A L

D I N I N G

A D V E R T I S I N G

S E C T I O N


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A A

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A

Phil Shannon, Doug Dinjian and Gary Long C

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Arlene Galindo and Lee Neves

Waynee Lucero, Laura Cabanero, Debra Ellison and Geri Blas D

Delroy Sibblis, Doug Wilhoit and Michael Harris Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN

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IS THE PLACE TO FIND GOOD WINE, FOOD AND FRIENDS

W

By LEAH MYERS PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

hat used to be a Piggly Wiggly

grocery store is now a cozy winetasting room in downtown Lodi, better known as Wine Social. With its handsome brick interior and comfortable seating arrangements, Wine Social is a welcomed addition to an already bustling wine scene in Lodi. The tasting room, which opened in July 2013, features a wide range of wines from Sorelle and Six Hands wineries.


grapevine

Wine Social’s slogan,“Where Wine Flows,

sugar and Pinot Grigio is a refreshing choice.

Minds Mingle and Time Flies” is the best

Served in fall and winter, the delicious Vin

way to describe their business. Manager Tara

Brule, or “warm wine” is made with Sorelle

Smith said the space was designed to create

Sangiovese, cranberry or pomegranate juice

a comfortable, open environment where

and mulling spices.

everyone can enjoy wine – even those who

In January, Wine Social will have live

have little to no knowledge of wine and

music on Saturdays from 7:30 to 10 p.m., and

its many varietals. As I sat with Smith, she

for those who want to spend an afternoon

happily greeted her customers as they walked

visiting downtown Lodi, Wine Social is

in the door; she even knows what day and

located within walking distance of several

time some of them will arrive to enjoy their

boutique wineries and restaurants.

favorite wine.

For Smith, leaving her former job as

Wine Social takes an unconventional

a property manager was an easy choice,

approach by offering unique items on the

because working with wine is her passion.

menu that you will not typically find at other

Juggling the many duties and unexpected

wineries. Popular in the warmer months,

tasks as a manager is no small feat, but for

the “Wine Slushy,” made with a frappe mix,

Smith, it never feels like work at all. ■

Wine Social 7 N. School Street • Lodi 209-224-5740 facebook.com/lodiwinesocial


LIFE S T Y LE

C OL U M N

The L ve of a Lifetime F ebruary. The month that holds the big love holiday – Valentine’s Day.

we can make our own happily ever after right now. She’s drawn an easy-

If you’re in a relationship, it’s fun and romantic. It can feel prickly if you’re

to-navigate road map for living an empowered, dynamic single life. The

not, and it seems like all the world’s a couple. As with anything, it’s all in

more interested you get in discovering what you want out of life or in a

how you look at it, and I’m here to say single is the new fabulous!

mate, the less time you’ll waste on the pain and chaos of throwing darts

How do you get to this way of thinking? It’s a process, but one well worth the time investment. I’m suggesting that in the absence of

at the relationship dartboard. Buy the book as a valentine to yourself. I did!

a relationship, you fall in love with… yourself. When you think about

Even the kids are doing it. In a recent conversation with my teenage

it, knowing yourself, liking yourself and enjoying your own company is

daughter I asked her what was going on with her group of friends –

really the basis of the relationship you’re always going to have, and the

did any of the girls like any of the boys? She matter-of-factly said no,

one you can always count on. If you’ve recently become single, you know

they were the “Single Pringles.” I was impressed that girls her age were

that any break-up worth its salt will send you back to the reflection chair,

already comfortable enough in their own skin to embrace being on their

yoga mat, meditation pillow – whatever place helps you decompress,

own.

get your bearings and heal. You’re not the same person coming out of a relationship as the one who went in. It can be a time to grow new you.

Pick up some champs and a box of chocolates and celebrate yourself this Valentine’s Day. You are divine! Don’t let anybody forget it. ■

There’s nothing wrong with taking a little sabbatical to recharge and refresh your expectations. Sometimes just the sheer act of prolonged exposure to the dating scene can call for a time-out. Let’s call a spade a spade; unless you’re

fouroclockmartini.com

having a ball, the dating scene can be a jungle. Where is it written that

facebook/thefouroclockmartini

being paired up is a must? Being single doesn’t have to mean that

twitter@absolutelySusan

you’re lonely, unwanted or washed-up. Meet Mandy Hale, who’s written a book, blog and has taken to social media under the username “The Single Woman” to let us know

lifestyles

By Susan Michener Spracher

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S C E N E

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Florentino and Zeny, Ayanna and Sirdon Navarro C

D

B

Duncan and Nancy McPherson

Cheryl Ongaro and Jane Vail Jaffe

Mimi Eberhardt and Vi Hickinbotham

E

Al and Teresa Garibaldi, Luigi and Shay Trinchera

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN 28

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BUD’S SEAFOOD GRILLE CHEERS TO 20 YEARS IN STOCKTON

R

BY LEAH MYERS PHOTOS BY DOUG JOHNSON COURTESY OF LINCOLN CENTER

estaurants often come and go; however, Bud’s Seafood

Grille has remained a staple in Stockton’s Lincoln Center for over 20 years. Always having a passion for cooking and perfecting recipes, Bud Millsaps opened the restaurant in April 1993 and continues to provide exceptional food and personal service to his loyal customers each day. With the help of his beautiful wife Jeanne and son Matt, the family-owned-and-operated business lives up to its mission, which is to consistently serve food that is “simple and fresh.” ➤

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Voted “Best Seafood Restaurant” in San Joaquin County every year since 1994, Bud’s provides the ideal seafood dining experience with an extensive menu of fresh seafood, a variety of beef and chicken entrees, as well as delicious salads and fresh homemade desserts. If you are in the mood for the delicious Bud’s Beef or the ever-popular clam chowder soup (which sells gallons a day) made from scratch daily, you are sure to find something on the menu to satisfy a craving for delectable entrees, soups and seafood made from the highest-quality ingredients. Champagne brunch is served for $14.95 every Sunday. Bud’s also offers a full-service bar, lunch and dinner to go, patio dining and a banquet room available for up to 40 guests. Bud’s takes pride in catering for special events such as weddings, office luncheons, company picnics and birthday parties. What makes Bud’s Seafood Grille special is not just the menu, but rather the warm hospitality, attention to detail and their passion for food, which is evident when their loyal customers return on a regular basis to dine at the restaurant. Don’t hesitate to visit Bud’s for an outstanding dining experience in Stockton! ■

Bud’s Seafood Grille 314 Lincoln Center 209-956-0270 www.budsseafood.com


Feast of Love By Jennifer Torres Siders PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

W

hen she was a child, Kirti Mohan

watched her mother, aunts and other married women in the community fast from sunrise to moonrise on a day in late fall, praying for the health and wellbeing of their husbands in a ritual that evokes romance and celebrates feminine friendship. ➤


O U R

C U LT U RE

After she married, Mohan began taking part in Karwa Chauth herself, and for the past 25 years, she has been hosting a celebration of the north Indian festival in her Stockton home. Popularized in Bollywood films, Karwa Chauth has increasingly been embraced throughout India – as well as by Indian communities in the United States. “I feel good that we can continue this tradition,” Mohan says. “It’s something that brings us closer to our husbands, almost like renewing our vows.” On the morning of Karwa Chauth, Mohan and other observers of the holiday wake before sunrise to drink and eat – sometimes a light Indian pudding made with milk and sweetened with sugar. Then, Mohan explains, “we pray for our husbands – for happiness, good health and prosperity.” Not until she spots the moon that evening does she eat or drink again. “The husbands will feed the wives,” Mohan says. “The fast is over. We all sing and dance – Indians celebrate everything with dancing and food.” In the early years of her marriage, Mohan says, she celebrated Karwa Chauth with a few friends. Since then, her celebration has grown. Guests wear fine saris in traditional Indian wedding colors of red and gold. Some have intricate henna designs painted on their hands. Mohan recites traditional stories associated with Karwa Chauth. “It’s very romantic and very sweet, and has been one of my favorite customs ever since I was a little girl,” says Dr. Harjit Sud, who celebrates Karwa Chauth with Mohan every year. “It pulls wives and husbands together, and it pulls the community together.” New generations of women continue to be drawn to the festival – this year, Sud’s daughter-in-law, Lauren, celebrated for the first time. “She was a very new bride,” Sud recalls. “It was very meaningful for her.” Mohan says she is pleased to welcome young wives to Karwa Chauth. “Every year there is someone who is just married and there for the first time,” she says. “Hopefully, next year, my daughter-in-law will do it, too.” ■

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2 014 Athena Award Luncheon

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Past and present Athena Award Recipients

Dr. Kathy Hart and Judy Chambers D

C

Mimi Nguyen, Darcy Koster and Phyllis Grupe

Marcia Elam and Marguerite Toliver Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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3730 N. Wilson Way • Stockton, CA

(209) 467-0154


Wes Rhea Age: 43 Occupation: CEO at Visit Stockton How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: My entire life, except for the 10 years I was in the Army. The people who mean the most to me: Family. My wife Kristi and our boys Max and Jack are number-one in my world. I am also very fortunate that my parents and grandparents are all still here in Stockton (and I also have a grandmother in Joshua Tree). I feel very fortunate to be able to spend time with them all and to have my boys know their grandparents and great grandparents. Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: Miracle Mile, Lincoln Center, the Delta area and beyond. We look at what’s going on in the area. There are so many great events and cultural celebrations going on all of the time. A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: My ten years I spent serving in the U.S. Army. I can honestly say that my time serving made me who I am today. It provided me with a sense of pride, purpose and service that guides me every day. I wish everyone had the opportunity to serve. My bucket list includes: More travelling! I want to explore more of the U.S. and go back to Europe (I served in Germany for 2 years). Favorite sports team: When it comes to football our family are Niners fans. For baseball we tend to root for both of the NorCal teams! Favorite vacation destination: Our family loves to go camping in the Sierra, at either Pinecrest or Union Valley Reservoir. Sports I enjoy: We like going to Stockton Thunder games and Ports games. Nothing beats rooting for the home team! Pet: Pepper, a dog my wife rescued from the downtown streets. She is one of the Rhea pack now! Favorite food/dessert: Anything with peanut butter. I “give back” by volunteering with: The United Way and the Stockton Asparagus Festival, and the Stockton Historical Maritime Museum, which is restoring the USS Lucid minesweeper here in Stockton. PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS 35


F W F E A T U R E D

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AIRYTALE EDDING PHOTOS BY LINDSAY ORTEZ LINDSAYOPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Erin McCole & Harvey LaFlamme October 19, 2013 How we met: We met in high school and dated – reunited 8 years later. How he proposed: Harvey proposed in Big Sur, CA. We love camping, so it was a weekend getaway. Wedding location: Hans Fahden Vineyards, Calistoga, CA Bridal

party: Jennifer Cirimele-Ross, Jennifer

DeJanes, Maureen Rohlfs, Ken Watkins, Kevin Russell and Jon Davis, Leighton LaFlamme and Anabelle Homes (flower girls) and Harvey LaFlamme Jr. (ring bearer) Photographer:

The

amazing

Lindsay

Ortez,

lindsayophotography.com (Stockton) Wedding gown purchased from: Janene’s Bridal in Alameda Caterer: Piper Johnson Catering Cake: Just My Taste Cakes What made our wedding day special? It was like a fairytale. It was a beautiful sunny day and I was finally able to marry the man of my dreams. We celebrated with close family and friends.

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Michelle Gerolaga & Anthony Delano November 1, 2013

How we met: Introduced by a cousin of the bride

How he proposed: On Christmas Day, he put my ring in a huge box and filled it with tissue paper. Wedding location: Japanese Garden in Lodi, CA Bridal party: Our 6 children: Flower girls were Alexia Delano, Izabel Thompson, Danesah Thompson, and Kaylina Delano. The groomsmen were Xavier Delano and David Thompson Photographer: Levi Wells of Mr & Mrs Photography Cake: Fizz Bakery What made our wedding day special? Our wedding was very small and intimate; it was special because it was shared with our 6 children and our vows were written to include their blessings as well (they also had I do’s). We have a blended family (yours, mine, and ours) but they are all ours.

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PHOTOS BY MR & MRS PHOTOGRAPHY www.MRMRSPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


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Patty Erardi, Claudia Strobel and Midge Dobbins

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Victor Fong and Michael Duffy

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Christina Herrera and Maria Herrera

Al Espinor, Jr., and Monica Andeola

Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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LIFE S T Y LE

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Mom About The Town

Married & Dating

T

By HEATHER mompean

he running joke with the husband and I is that we never really

I was starting to get a little exhausted! I mean, this dating thing was

dated. We met and we were together. The end. We bypassed dating

taking quite a bit of time and work. I started to wonder for a moment

and went straight to living together – we were inseparable. We are

if it was all worth it, and by worth it, I mean worth it! It looked like a

inseperable.

night out might cost us upwards of 150 bucks between the babysitting,

However, after nearly 15 years of togetherness and raising 5 kids, this “dating” idea has become a little more intriguiging. Maybe it’s not

Was all this really necessary? After all, the husband and I, even after

too late? Maybe we can start dating now? I think a date night might

15 years, are actually outrageously happy. Maybe every day isn’t bliss,

be good for us. Or maybe we can call it what it really is, a “ditching the

but on the whole, we are two people that just seem to work well and

kids” night. Sugarcoated or not, we both agree we live a hectic life, and

love well, together. I know, gross, right? By gross I mean awesome.

it would be fun to slow our roll and do something with only the two of

Of course, we don’t tango at sunset, stare adoringly into each other’s eyes for hours at a time, or feed each other peeled grapes, but what we

us, for the two of us. And just like that, the mad searching of event calendars began. I

do works well for us.

scoured all the hottest local venues such as the Bob Hope Theatre, the

For instance, I cook him pot roast and gravy, and in return he takes

Stockton Arena, Hutchins Street Square, and the Stockton Civic Theatre.

the trash out! He cleans up the dog poop and I keep the kids clean. I

Every place I could think of was on my radar.

watch the kids while he goes to band rehearsal, and he finds my lost

Next up was coordinating our schedules and hooking up a babysitter,

keys, wallet and phone. There are lots of these little arrangements that

not an easy feat when you have an eight-year-old, three-year-old, and

keep our marriage strong. Maybe a date isn’t necessary to keep up the

an eleven-week-old puppy – only one of the three is fully potty-trained.

wedded bliss?

But alas, we know excellent people who are up for the challenge. With 4 days of planning behind us and just a day away from our date,

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dinner, and entertainment. That’s a lot of duckets!

But with hours of research already invested, we continued on with our plans. On the day of the date, I pulled out all the stops. I shaved my

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LIFE S T Y LE

C OL U M N

legs, curled my hair, wore a blouse instead of a t-shirt and put on my

a family playing games, swinging at a park, refereeing arguments and

fancy jeans instead of my regular jeans. I smelled good, too.

taking road trips, there is also great satisfaction that comes from being

The husband was in it to win it as well. He, too, smelled wonderful,

two people instead of more. After all, before we were Mom and Dad we

and he shaved his face. We were both ready for our night out on the

were a man and a woman, sitting on the same side of the table, eating

town.

warm pizza, and not fretting over spilt milk, literally.

The sitter arrived, we grabbed our things, and out the door we

We will probably schedule more of these “ditching the kids”

scooted. I have to admit, there is an unconscious mood change that

interludes; maybe we’ll even make it to a fancy play or symphony. But

takes place when two parents step outside the front door with their

in the meantime, we will do what we have always done. We’ll snuggle

kids safely on the other side. We became man and woman instead of

up on the couch and enjoy some shoulder-to-shoulder, hand-in-hand

“Mommmy” and “Daaaddy” and it was exhilarating – and a little hot!

snuggles until one of the kiddos wedges in between us. We will sneak

As soon as we were in the car, all our plans changed. No more did

kisses in the kitchen until we hear screaming from elsewhere in the

we care about a fancy dinner and late-night plays. All we really wanted

house, and we will keep on loving like we always have. Sure, it’s not

was a pizza and a movie. Not just any movie, but a rated R movie!

very sexy, but it makes the two of us supremely happy, and that’s all that

Nothing like a little bit of cursing to spice up the night. We ended up

really matters in our pot roast, “where’s my phone?” trash-on-the-curb

having a great time and did some smooching right out in public.

marriage. What works for you and yours? ■

Turns out, this married and dating thing is a lot of fun. Knowing we already love each other and are in it for the long haul, we were able to spend less time making the night wine-and-roses perfect and instead put our focus on what is most important – time together. While we absolutely get a lot of our happiness spending time as

Clickity on over to the bloggity: www.momaboutthetown.com Join in on Facebook: www.facebook.com/momaboutthetown


Spectator

S

pectator is a truly unique

boutique in Lodi specializing in chic and modern women’s fashions and accessories. With a focus on quality and an everchanging selection of designer fashions, jewelry, handbags and

accessories, Spectator promises a shopping experience that is nothing short of fabulous. â–

PHOTOS BY ASHLEE BLACKARD


P E E K

A

B O U T I Q U E

1420 W. Kettleman Lane • Lodi • 209-369-3636

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Beth and Eleanor Lawrence

Dolores DeCarli, Joan Cortopassi, Becky Carlson (Mary Dunne Award Winner), Katie Whitlow and Kaitlin Carlson

Bridget Kresky, Lynn Parker and Kelley Bestolarides

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Sally Ottolini, Melissa Grizzle, Karen Chandler, Jenger Carli and Dee Yates

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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O U T

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Find Your Bliss By Susan Michener Spracher

W

ith Valentine’s Day around

the corner, a spa certificate makes the perfect gift, or a way to spend time together with a loved one. Refreshingly, there are several spas to choose from in and just outside our community. We give you a snapshot of spa locations and services sure to help you find just the kind of relaxation and respite experience you’re looking for. ■

Refresh at Sutter Creek

I

t took Kathy Ghormley a couple of years to locate the perfect spot to open a

spa. Her vision of a cottage and garden environment came to fruition in 2005 as Refresh at Sutter Creek. Guests making their way through the garden report feeling more relaxed by the time they reach the spa’s front door. Refresh’s specialty is massage. Guests can choose from a variety including deep tissue, Swedish, sports, Reflexology, Reiki, and maternity. The Perfect Balance massage is a favorite, incorporating traditional massage with hot stones and aromatherapy, with a selection of oils available. Also popular is the spa’s signature Healthy Glow revitalizing face treatment, which includes cleansing, exfoliating, an optional mask, and an acupressure massage of the scalp, face, neck and shoulders. Hot stones are used to soften facial muscles, and cold stones to stimulate circulation. Body wraps and salt scrubs are also available. PHOTO COURTESY OF REFRESH AT SUTTER CREEK

81 B Hanford Street (Old Highway 49) Sutter Creek 267-0887

“We really focus on wellness, stress relief, pain management and providing a place to come and calm yourself,” said Ghormley. Clients from Stockton, Lodi, Sacramento and the Bay Area choose Refresh for the experienced, friendly staff plus the charm and ambience of the spa’s environment.

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Kharma Spa & Salon ocated on the Miracle Mile, Kharma Spa & Salon is a

full-service spa offering facials, massage, body wraps, waxing, manicure/pedicure, make-up application, spray tanning and hair salon services. The spa offers several packages that allow pampering-together opportunities for weddings, birthdays, graduations or anniversaries. The best-seller Ladies Night Out package features side-by-side services including facial, manicure and pedicure, and one-hour massage. All packages include use of a quiet room and refreshments (coffee, tea, wine and water). Guests appreciate the spa’s quiet (no televisions), warm, and expansive atmosphere. The awning out front reads, “best-kept secret” but owner Chrissy DeHoyos is ready to let the spa become well-known. “We’re Kharma – the good that comes back around.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF KHARMA SPA & SALON

2009 Pacific Avenue Stockton 469-2009

Kym With a Y Organic Spa & Waxing Studio

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uests looking for organic products in their spa experience can

find it at Kym With a Y Organic Spa & Waxing Studio. Featuring the awardwinning Eminence organic skin care line from Hungary, the spa rates facials among its most-asked-for services. Offering several options to choose from, including one for men, facials include deep cleansing, exfoliation, paprika to stimulate, treatment masks to correct, and shoulder, neck, and face massage. Hands and feet get attention, too, and eye and lip treatments are included. Treatments can be tailored for correction of acne, rosacea, and anti-aging. Peels and microdermabrasion advanced skin care services are available. The spa also provides waxing, massage and pedicures using vegan nail polish with no chemicals. For owner Kym Thompson, presenting exceptionally friendly service with a highly-trained staff and exceeding guests’ expectations is key. “I’m

Lindsay Ortez Photography

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307-B Lincoln Center Stockton 952-2299

honored when guests choose us. I want to make it as easy and wonderful for them as possible.”

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ou need not travel far for an award-winning relaxation experience. Voted

among the Top 100 in 2012 by Spas of America, The Spa at Wine & Roses offers

The Spa at Wine & Roses

a complete menu of services, paired with “green” product lines in a beautiful, Zen-like indoor/outdoor environment. Top-rated services at the spa include La Stone massage, considered to be the original hot stone treatment. An hour-and-a-half treatment with both warm and chilled stones leaves guests deeply relaxed. The Wine & Roses ultimate wrap treatment starts with an organic body scrub, a rinse in a private outdoor shower, followed by a massage with a choice of body butters. A face massage completes the experience. Facials are said to be extraordinary. Other services include makeup application, manicure/pedicure, and hair salon services with Aveda products. A new suite has been recently added that offers space for couples’ side-by-side massage in a waterfall atmosphere. Spa Director Joline Harrington cites that the spaciousness and beauty of the property lends itself to group experiences. “This a great meeting point for friends and family to connect. We’re hugely supported by the local community and offer discounts for repeat guests.”

Thyme Out Day Spa

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SPA AT WINE & ROSES

2505 W. Turner Road Lodi 371-6165

T

he atmosphere of Thyme Out Day Spa draws you in immediately with serene

blue walls, and whitewashed floors and furnishings that give a light, airy, beachy, shabby-chic aesthetic. Co-owners Cindy Sellers and Lisa O’Dell will offer you a cup of tea, and you can take a turn at the community Scrabble game that’s always in play before your treatment starts. Therapeutic massage with Cindy addresses your history and physical needs, leading to a custom-designed treatment that will leave you feeling brand-new. Offered in increments of a half-hour to an hour and a half, the goal of this massage is to take you on a journey out of everyday life for a time. Lisa offers skin care services with customized European facials that can be coupled with refreshing image peel treatments such as organic passion, 4-layer, wrinkle lift, lightening lift, or acne lift. Other spa services include waxing, exfoliating scrub, paraffin treatment, eyelash extensions and brow and lash tinting.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THYME OUT DAY SPA

Located in the Grand Canal retail neighborhood, the spa seeks to deliver a home-

2222 Grand Canal Boulevard, Suite 5 Stockton 956-3107

like, comfortable environment. “We want to give the guest an experience that has its own casual sense. Everything here is selected and delivered with love,” said Sellers.

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you’re gonna love it on

The Mile One look, and you’ll be head over heels. Spectacularly situated on the Miracle Mile.

stocktonmiraclemile.com


Winning Cutthroat Kitchen Never

d o o G o Tasted S


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PHOTOS AND STORY By Charleen Earley

on’t be fooled by Michael Midgley’s charming dimples and

flipped back, plaid newsboy cap… when he’s in the kitchen, the challenge-ready chef is ready to take his opponents down. Like he did on the Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen, hosted by

Alton Brown, which aired last month on January 12. Pitted against three chefs, Midgley says his opponents were out to sabotage him beginning with the first round.

Midgley, father with Laci of three kids ages five and under. After personality screenings, interviews, flying to L.A. and back, he made it on the show along with 14 chefs, and was the tenth contestant

“I got 20 minutes taken away from me and had to cook chicken Parmesan in 10 minutes instead of 20,” laughs Midgley now. “They took all my tomato products too, and I had to use tomato Jell-O instead.”

to finally be eliminated. Meeting Bobby Flay was a highlight for him. “He’s straight up. He’s a cool guy,” said Midgley, whose love for cooking began well before he got a driver’s license.

His vegan chicken parmesan made the cut – obstacles and all – only proving his prowess in the kitchen and desire to win.

“I started working in a restaurant at 14 with a worker’s permit,” he says. “My first job was at the Elkhorn Country Club in Stockton. I

Born and raised in Stockton, Midgley, 35, says his wife Laci is the

started as a dishwasher, then prep and cooking.”

one who first encouraged him to take his culinary smarts to reality

Even before prep work, Midgley says he came from a family

television, where he went to a casting call for Bravo’s TV show, Top

of cooks. “My family is really into food. We’d do the big dinner on

Chef, Season 2 in 2006.

Sundays; grandma always baked pies, and my dad would cook up a

“She told me, ‘if you’re so bad-ass, you should do it!’” recalls

bunch of red sauces.” ➤

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Midgley earned his AOS Degree at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, and throughout the years worked in various restaurants, including Wine & Roses in Lodi. He opened Stooges of Lodi and Pine Street Pub before starting his own catering company, called Midgley Catering. Currently Midgley creates many of his own culinary specialties at Ernie’s Food & Spirits, a luxury boutique restaurant in Manteca, where general manager (also longtime friend and neighbor) Bryan Soria has nothing but positive things to say. “I’ve known Michael for a long time and he’s so funny. He’s such a talented chef, too,” said Soria. “I’m happy for him with everything he’s got going for himself.” During the second round on Cutthroat Kitchen, Midgley says opponents swapped out his knives for knives that were chained to a ball. Based on the strategy of the show, chefs are given $25,000 to bid and purchase unique items to bestow upon another chef, in order to make cooking more difficult. “I purchased rubber gloves for one of the chefs, but she ended up working well with them!” says Midgley. Making it to final round three, Midgley had to bake with a child-sized Suzy Homemaker-type oven to bake a strawberry shortcake. It seemed to be the lowest of lows for his final round. “Even Alton Brown couldn’t believe it. He said he would’ve just given up and left,” recalls Midgley. “I felt like a bull in a china shop!” Despite all challenges, he won the judges over with his dessert. “I was proud to win. It’s amazing to do something out of those circumstances – it was pretty extreme,” says Midgley, who emerges from Ernie’s kitchen at least once an evening to visit restaurant diners and greet fans. “I try not to take food too serious. I’m not curing cancer. When I’m home, I eat frozen burritos!” ■

www.midgleycatering.com www.erniesfoodandspirits.com


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Orage and Linda Quarles

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T R A V E L

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Sydney Opera House

AUSTRALIA downunder

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PHOTOS AND STORY BY LARRY FRENCH

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s winter sets into the Central Valley, we start

getting used to the rain, fog, cold temperatures and grey skies. We sometimes go days without seeing the sun. I have a cure for this gloomy weather. Just remember that when it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere. Therefore, it is summer in places like Chile, South Africa and one of my favorite destinations, Australia. A trip to Australia starts with a long flight of about twelve hours or more. But the long trip is well worth it, and you will soon find out Australia will meet and exceed your expectations. When you think of Australia, there are three iconic symbols that come to mind, and those are the Sydney Opera House, the monolith Ayers Rock and the Great Barrier Reef. If you arrive in Sydney, then you will discover a truly great city. It is modern, clean and has great attractions for tourists. As you explore Sydney Harbor you will be delighted by all of the wonderful sites it has to offer, such as amusement parks, Bondi Beach and

Sydney Harbour Bridge

the famous Sydney Opera House. You will soon find out that the Sydney Opera House will be the focal point of your photos taken from many different vantage points throughout Sydney Harbour. The Australians (Aussies as they call themselves) spell it “Harbour” – just to be perfectly correct. Some of the best views of the Sydney Opera House and Sydney Harbour are from the Sydney Harbour Bridge. You can walk across the bridge and get great views of the city skyline and the harbor. If you are adventurous I would highly recommend the Sydney Harbour Bridge climb. I don’t know of any other major bridge in the world that conducts tours that allow you to climb all the way to the top of their bridge. Yes, I said all the way to the very top of the bridge. This highly-organized tour is operated with safety in mind. At all times during the climb you are tethered to the bridge by a safety line so you can’t fall. Your climb starts at the base, and you work your way up to the very top of the bridge. The views from the top are spectacular. Then you walk across the top of the bridge ➤

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Bridge Climb Sydney Width – 161 feet Height – 440 feet

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The best time to view Ayers Rock is during

While visiting the Ayers Rock area I would

a sunset, when the angle of the sun’s rays

recommend the Sounds of Silence Dinner. You

continually change the color of the rock to

are driven to a remote outdoor location where

varying shades of red. During a sunset you

you sip champagne and have canapés while

and descend the other side. What a great thrill

can see Ayers Rock change from light pinkish

listening to the sound of a didgeridoo (an

the bridge climb is, and if you go to Sydney,

colors to deep shades of red. Upon close

Aboriginal instrument) as the sun sets on Ayers

it is a must. After you complete your tour of

inspection of this huge rock you will see that

Rock. You are then escorted to an outdoor

Sydney you are ready to move on to explore

it is the iron in the rock that is “rusting” and

location to have dinner under the stars. The

your next icon: Ayers Rock.

that gives Ayers Rock its reddish color. Ayers

tables are set with nice white tablecloths and

To get to the Ayers Rock area you must fly

Rock is over five hundred thousand years old,

Australian wines are served with dinner. By

about four hours into the middle of Australia.

and it is over one thousand feet high and 6

the time dinner is over the sun has completely

You are virtually in the middle of nowhere.

miles in circumference. You can climb to the

disappeared. Your host then shuts off all the

Most of the population of Australia lives in

top, but it is difficult and the Aborigines prefer

lanterns, leaving you in complete darkness. You

the coastal areas, and the center is barren,

that you don’t, since it could desecrate their

are instructed to just sit there in the blackness

desolate and sparsely populated. If it weren’t

sacred land. If you do decide to climb it, you

and listen to the silence. There is complete

for Ayers Rock, almost no one would live in this

have to leave very early in the morning, before

quiet, and it is something many people have

area except for a few prospectors, maybe some

the climb is closed due to either high winds or

never experienced. With no ambient light, the

cattle ranchers and of course the indigenous

excessive temperatures. There is a chain you

stars are wildly abundant and an astronomer

people called Aborigines. Ayers Rock is sacred

can hold on to for safety because the path is

points out the constellations of the southern

to the Aborigines, and there is a fine balance

so steep, but from what I understand the view

sky, including the famous Southern Cross.

between tourism and the Aborigines’ beliefs.

from the top is worth all of your effort.

Telescopes are set up so you can view the


heavens in one of the darkest places on Earth, as there are almost no external light sources in the middle of Australia. After you have explored Ayers Rock (Aboriginal name Uluru), you are ready to move on to see the third iconic site in Australia, the Great Barrier Reef. I would recommend going to the city of Cairns for your exploration of the Great Barrier Reef, as the Cairns area is the only spot in the world that has two World Heritage sites that are next to each other. They are the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics rainforest. This whole Cairns area has many things to see and do, which is why I would recommend it as your base. One of the best ways to see the Great Barrier Reef is by signing up for one of the large catamaran excursions. These large boats hold hundreds of people, and have all the modern conveniences you would want, such as air conditioning and bathrooms, and they can get out to the reef in about ninety minutes. They normally will take you to one of their own anchored pontoons. You are typically provided with snorkel gear including wet suits in case the water is too cold, or for your protection against jellyfish stings. Another way to see the Great Barrier Reef, and one that I would highly recommend, is to take a helicopter ride over the reef and the adjoining rainforest. You can cover a lot of territory in a helicopter, but even with this method you will still only see a small portion of the reef. The Great Barrier Reef stretches over two thousand miles, and it is said that it is the only living structure that is visible from the moon. Australia is a huge country/continent and has so much to offer. I have talked about the three iconic symbols of Australia, but this country has so much more. A must-see are kangaroos and koalas, but you might try a trip to Tasmania where you can see Tasmanian devils, and if you are lucky a duck-billed platypus. The Australian people are friendly and they speak English (with an accent), so you have no excuse not to go. When the winter is starting to get you down, remember it is summer in Australia. So pack your bags and let me know, and I will tell them to put another shrimp on the barbie. â–


Linda Philipp Age: 59 Occupation: CEO and President of Community Foundation of San Joaquin How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: 42 years The people who mean the most to me: My husband, family and close friends Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: Brookside Golf and Country Club A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: Working at St. Mary’s Dining Room taught me to realize how blessed I am to have food, shelter and clothing every day. My bucket list includes: Watching White Christmas on the big screen – which I got to do in December at the Bob Hope Theatre! Favorite sports team: San Francisco Giants and UOP women’s basketball What I’m reading now: Tim Conway’s autobiography, What’s So Funny? and Charity Case by Dan Pallotta Favorite vacation destination: Two of the most beautiful places on Earth – Lake Tahoe and Kauai Hobbies: Reading and gambling (penny slots – they’re hilarious!) Sports I enjoy: Playing – golf and bowling; watching – basketball and baseball Pet: Polo (a black and white cockapoo) and Tipper (cat) Favorite food/dessert: Do I have to pick just one? Gyros salad (Papapavlo’s), chicken tacos (Casa Flores Marina) and berry pie with vanilla ice cream I “give back” by volunteering with: Rotary Club of Stockton, Read-to-Me Stockton and several Catholic church organizations and committees Other information you would like to share: My husband, Larry, and I love Stockton and the San Joaquin community, where we are all connected in a variety of ways. PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS 67


New Beginnings

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BY CORT CARLSON PHOTOs COURTESY OF THE RECORD

ith winter comes the promise of new beginnings, and for the

Stockton Animal Shelter this promise has been fulfilled. As the saying goes, “it is better to give than to receive.� The San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is the embodiment of free giving.

Their compassion for Stockton and its resident animals has transcended distance as well as the initial plea for help from the Stockton shelter. Throughout history humans have always shared a special relationship with animals. This love is the reason that such establishments as the Stockton Animal shelter exist today. Over eight hundred cats and dogs are brought into the Stockton shelter each month, and only one hundred leave. The shelter has an animal intake rate disproportionate to its city size, and this disparity between need and proper maintenance makes it almost impossible for the shelter to care for all of the Stockton animals in need. The shelter struggled to survive, let alone properly care for area animals. The Stockton Animal Shelter, which only a year ago was one of the


least effective in California, has been charitably

both human and animal alike. Animal services

and the SF SPCA all know that their collaborative

adopted by the San Francisco Society for the

supervisor Pat Claerbout manages only seven full-

efforts are revolutionary for the United States.

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

time kennel employees. Sacramento, almost twice

More than ten thousand animals a year are

the size of Stockton but with less needy animals,

ushered through the Stockton shelter’s doors.

employs 14 full-time kennel overseers.

Many are neglected, malnourished, sick and infirm.

The SF SPCA, which has access to large amounts of self-raised funds, has been able to bring a positive change to Stockton’s bleak

The Stockton shelter, barely able to keep up

The Stockton shelter has long been dedicated to

situation. So far almost $100,000 have been

with animal intake, was unable to meet safety and

making a better place for the animals, but in recent

funneled to the Stockton shelter to improve it

care requirements, according to Claerbout. Lack

times they have fallen short of their goal, despite

from the inside out.

of sanitation, overcrowding, exposure to climate

best efforts.

Sarah

extremes and the sheer size of Stockton’s animal

However, due to Claerbout’s unwillingness to

Lamborn to the staff was one of the first

population made the shelter’s survival a main

give up, Kuzminski’s desire to constantly improve

major improvements to the Stockton shelter.

priority, rather than the survival of its occupants,

and the San Francisco SPCA’s ability to help, the

She works four days a week, and is the only

the animals. She began to search for other solutions.

Stockton shelter now has the chance to become

vet at the shelter. Kate Kuzminski, Lamborn’s

The San Francisco SPCA answered Claerbout’s plea.

the first of its kind: a collaborative effort between

supervisor and the San Francisco liaison, has

The SF SPCA, which had been a former transfer

two semi-distant organizations to provide asylum

provided professional animal knowledge

agency to the Stockton shelter, agreed to all of

for animals. A new beginning. One in which

and progressive changes to the shelter’s

Claerbout’s requests, and much more.

humans work with humans to protect animals. ■

The

addition

of

veterinarian

management. Though the dynamic duo

The San Francisco group has assets approaching

cannot and have not immediately changed the

$80 million, which gives it the requisite resources to

number of animals arriving each day, they have

reach out. Its board of directors is compassionate

achieved relative success.

and has committed to providing for the helpless

For instance, cat euthanasia is down 33 percent from last year, and dog euthanasia has

Save the date Stockton Animal Shelter Fundraiser Luncheon Thursday, May 1, 2014 • Villa Angelica 209-955-2555

animals of the Stockton area. Claerbout, Kuzminski Veterinarian Sarah Lamborn pets a dog before surgery at the Stockton Animal Shelter.

dropped 13 percent. Due to amazing efforts, 20 percent more animals are able to now leave the shelter in the arms of loving owners. Yet

another

example

of

Stockton’s

increased proficiency is the growing TNR (trap, neuter and release) rate. In Stockton the feral cat population’s incredible size makes shelter aid seem inconsequential; however the trap, neuter and release practice returns cats to the wild unable to reproduce, thus allowing the shelter to make measured strides toward a better future. In all, the TNR rate has gone up 45 percent since 2012, which is great progress. These improvements allow the shelter’s small overworked staff to actually see the difference they are making in the community,

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Wag Tales Mischa

PHOTO BY ashlee blackard

I am a: Deer head Chihuahua Age: 2 years old I was adopted/rescued from: My mama and bubby rescued me from a boy selling me outside of a bank in a rainstorm; I was so cold! When they saw me, they knew they had to have me! Who wouldn’t want me? I’m adorable! Anyway, they took me home and I saw my new sister, who is a cat! I loved her right away! And my new home – it was amazing, I was loved so much! But two days later I wasn’t feeling very good, and my new mommy took me to the vet. Turns out I had parvo. The cost to keep me there on treatment was high, but that didn’t stop my new family from paying the price to keep me alive! I had to stay in that icky place, hooked up to IVs for three days! My mom visited me every day. One day she even stayed for five hours because I fell asleep on her arm. She loves me almost as much as I love her! My new family rescued me twice and I am so grateful! Favorite place to hang out: In my mom’s room with my kitty sister, Marley. Most recent accomplishment: Eating all of Marley’s food without getting caught. Amazing dog tricks: I can stand on my back legs for quite a while. Favorite place to walk: In the park! Guilty pleasure: Cat toys, especially the ones with catnip inside! Naughtiest deed: Ripping up my mom’s bunny slippers. Obsession: Marley, Marley, Marley! Also, stuffed animals… and food. Where I go to get beautiful: Nowhere; I was born beautiful. Other interesting info about me: I enjoy food – all food, walks, sunbathing, playing with my sisters, watching movies with Mom, taking naps on Mom and fluffy stuffed animals! Oh, the fluffier the better – I just love to rip out the fluff and make a huge mess! Sometimes the fluff gets stuck in my teeth, and I look like I have a beard – so fun. Adopted parents: Ashlee Blackard and Kathleen Manion


Flying Samaritans Since 1977

Medical care to those in need

E

PHOTO and story By Charleen Earley

veryone knows angels can fly, but did you know Samaritans

can, too? Born in 1964, Flying Samaritans is a non-profit organization that flies – via general aviation aircraft, not feathered wings – doctors, dentists, optometrists, nurses, students and translators to San Quintín, Baja, Mexico, to provide free medical care to its residents. The Mother Lode Chapter members fly to San Quintín the second week of every month out of Atlantic Aviation in Stockton, using their own money and resources to give back to humanity. Member Joe Zachwieja talks about his experience with their trip last November. “People really need the help that we can provide and most have no other place to go for that help,” said Zachwieja, manager of Hybridoma technologies at Igenica Inc., who makes monoclonal antibodies to PHOTO COURTESY OF FLYING SAMARITANS 72


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“The people we see at clinic are without

much as possible. For me, it’s a perfect way to

“This trip is to give out glasses and

any medical or dental care at all,” added

blend my love of aviation, my quest to improve

examine new patients who will receive their

McDavid. “So even though what we provide

my Spanish and my desire to help people,” he

glasses next month,” added Zachwieja, who

is minimal, it helps them.”

said.

cancer targets.

on average, has tried to make 10 trips a year for the last six years. “Last month we had four

Donations are what keep the organization

McDavid said every trip he makes is important to him.

running. “We are getting short on funds,” said

“I feel I have lived a privileged life here

Doug Wirzberger, who has piloted his Cessna

in the United States, and seeing life in other

Registered nurse Debbie Marino has been

210 aircraft for the Mother Lode Chapter since

countries like Mexico only reinforces how

with the Mother Lode Chapter for 11 years,

August 2013. “We are really in need of some

fortunate we are here in the States,” said

dentists join us on the trip, and we saw 123 patients!”

with each monthly weekend trip having an impact on her. “Some people walk for miles and miles to get to the clinic,” said Marino. “It’s a very humbling experience and creates enduring memories for me.” Bill McDavid of Placerville is a retired anesthesiologist and the Medical Director for the Mother Lode Chapter, who has made close to 130 trips to San Quintín in the last 13 years. “It feels good to give back, given the good life we all enjoy here in the U.S.,” said McDavid, also a member of the Tumor Board at Marshall Hospital in Placerville. “Each month is different. We see repeat patients who we have come to know, and also those who have never been to clinic. Occasionally, we will see someone with an unusual problem, which challenges us to find a way to help.” The group of professionals typically spends about $400 each trip per person to PHOTO COURTESY OF FLYING SAMARITANS

cover airplane fuel, food and lodging, and any additional miscellaneous medical supplies. “Costco Pharmacy gives us a special discount on medicines, which we purchase every month and averages $250. Glasses are also purchased from an optical company,” said McDavid, who personally sees and examines patients who come to the clinic.

company sponsors. Even a donation of $500

McDavid. “Going to clinic each month makes

can provide up to 100 pairs of glasses to kids

me feel like I am giving something back.” ■

who need them.” In addition to giving back, Wirzberger gleans other benefits from the monthly trips. “Soon after embarking on my first clinic, I knew it was something I wanted to do as

lifestyles

For more information www.flyingsamaritansmotherlode.org 916-551-1212

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Photos bY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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Rich Kromm, Coach Stockton Thunder

BY CORT CARLSON PHOTOS Courtesy OF ASVITT PHOTOGRAPHY and THE RECORD

COMMUNITY LEADER ON & OFF THE ICE

S

TOCKTON – “You miss 100 percent of

the shots you don’t take,” said Wayne Gretsky, former Canadian ice hockey player and head coach, in reference to the importance of calculated risk in the game of hockey. Brad Rowbotham, owner of the Stockton Thunder ice hockey team, understands the role that measured risk plays in winning a game, and has used this understanding to help choose the new head coach of the Stockton Thunder team, Rich Kromm. Rich Kromm received his new position as head coach on July 15, 2013. Kromm, a seasoned former NHL player as well as an experienced ice hockey

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S P O R T I N G

L I F E

coach, is the perfect fit for Stockton’s Thunder.

As pleasant as Stockton has been, Kromm’s

community, especially when it involves young

With a decade-long career as a NHL player

main focus revolves around the development of

and aspiring hockey players,” said Kromm.

under his belt, Kromm seamlessly segued

his team, the Thunder players.

After all, educating the youth and encouraging

into the realm of coaching for 16 seasons.

“Players will be worked hard and prepared

them to play hockey is an integral part of

Westward-bound, Kromm arrived in California

to win hockey games. For fans, we’ll do our

keeping the sport alive. Plus, the newfound

via his previous post as head coach of the

best to make sure our players are more

confidence that comes with excelling in a sport

Central Hockey League’s (CHL) Evansville

involved with the community, especially minor

often propels children to accomplish even

IceMen. In an interview, Thunder owner Brad

hockey here in Stockton,” said Kromm. His

greater goals.

Rowbotham said, “Players like to play for

dedication to a closer relationship between

Kromm knows how he wishes to accomplish

someone who knows how to win, and to get

the team and community is exactly the type of

his own vision for the Thunder. “I like my teams

you to the next level.” It follows that Kromm,

professionalism Stockton can benefit from.

to be the best defensive club in the league, but

The Stockton Thunder is currently ranked

also exciting to watch offensively, and you

second in the Western Pacific region. Under

can do both. You just have to have guys who

Positive changes are on their way to the

Kromm’s leadership their win/loss record

buy in and work hard. And that’s the kind of

Thunder team and the Stockton community

stands at 16-10. This position was achieved by

club we will be.” With an optimistic attitude,

as a whole, with Kromm at the helm. A

hard work and dedication. Stockton Thunder

a willingness to work hard, a supportive family,

family man, Kromm and his wife Jackie have

has exceeded expectations and continues to

and a history of pursuing success, Rich Kromm

four children: Erica, 24, Alex, 21, Bryan, 18,

drive itself toward victory. However, along

continues to prove himself as a great coach for

and Natalie, 13. Kromm’s youngest, Natalie,

with this determination to succeed is the

our Stockton Thunder team, and is the exact

is currently enrolled at St. Mary’s High

team’s sincere desire to be a part of its local

type of leader that Stockton can learn from and

School. Natalie said that she and her family

community. “We want to be involved in the

grow with. ■

with his lifelong dedication to the sport, could provide just that: a will to win.

have moved nine times, so she has become accustomed to change, “At first it was hard to get to know people at St. Mary’s, but my involvement in soccer has helped me find friends, which makes a new place seem more ‘familiar.’” Kromm himself was asked what he thinks of Stockton. His response is perfectly aligned with the positive way in which he is shaping the Stockton Thunder players as well as fans, “Stockton is great. We’ve enjoyed it so far. A great location, close to fabulous places, and the community has been very friendly.” In addition to feeling welcomed in his new community, an added, unexpected bonus was the Stockton Arena facility, one of the nicest Kromm has ever experienced, he noted. A wonderful complement for the local hub of activity that is the Stockton Arena.


Stockton Golf & Country Club By Peter Ottesen PHOTOS courtesy of stockton golf & country club AND THE RECORD

I

n 1914 Stockton was booming and

widely considered the largest, most successful manufacturing town west of the Rockies, second only to San Francisco. Holt Manufacturing Company and the Sperry Flour Company shipped their products worldwide, from Europe and Latin America to the Pacific Rim. During the recession that lasted from 1913 to 1914, Stockton as a whole continued to move forward, opening Dameron Hospital, beginning construction of Victory Park and

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FE A T U RED

Back in 1914, Stockton’s perimeter included

said the golf course stands out because of its

Harding Way (North Street), West Street

“stout holes – a combination of tightness of the

Most of the Delta island land had been

(Pershing Avenue), East Street (Aurora Street)

fairways that are magnificently tree-lined.”

reclaimed by dredges built in Stockton, as were

and Charter Way (southern edge). To reach the

Quinn opined, “Playing the Stockton Golf

irrigation pumps. Shipbuilding flourished and the

country club wasn’t easy, requiring a bumpy

& Country Club requires a high level of shot

waterfront was alive. The Lincoln Highway didn’t

ride on a five-mile dirt road (gravel was tough

making. You’ve got to keep the ball in play and

connect Podunk cities, but major industrial

to come by) from Tuxedo Junction to the steps

hit it straight.

hubs linked Stockton to the U.S., as did three

of the clubhouse, passing through nothing but

transcontinental railways.

farm land.

passing a bond issue to improve public schools, including El Dorado and Stockton High School.

The SGCC will host its Centennial Gala in December 2014 to relive its glorious past and

Is there any wonder that the “good life”

The original golf course was just nine holes

its dynamic future moving forward, still set on

shared by a community of just 41,000 residents

and not much more than a swamp, laced with

the same acreage that borders the San Joaquin

yearned to embrace a distinctly European game

tidal sloughs that often flooded.

River.

In 1921, with the assistance of War

What has changed is the clubhouse,

Department, an old Calaveras River channel

completed in 2006, that overlooks the water, a

With visionary men such as Frank Guernsey,

that cut through the property was allowed to

$7 million edifice by architect Michael Donaldson

W.G. Wallace, George Wilhoit, Pliny Holt, George

silt up and the Corps of Engineers built a levee

that takes advantage of its unique amenities –

Burton and A.B. Lang serving on its board of

to contain the flows. A similar plan was used

site location, view opportunities and relation to

directors, the Stockton Golf & Country Club was

to de-water the slough around Brown’s Island,

the golf course. This will be the focal point of the

incorporated in 1914. The civic-minded Tuxedo

allowing the country club develop its entire

centennial gala.

Park Developers donated 15-20 acres on which

holdings as a contiguous parcel. By 1928 the golf

Would you like to join the celebration of the

to build the original three-story Manor House

course had expanded to a full-fledged 18 holes.

country club and its rich heritage? You’ll learn

and an elegant social scene that created one of the early country clubs in northern California?

that served as a stately clubhouse.

Tom Quinn, Jr., a writer for Golf Digest,

about Stockton’s glorious past, too. ■


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PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN feb r u a r y/ma rch 2 0 1 4


Not Your Husband’s Heart Attack! By Joann Marks, RN Director of Cardiovascular Services, St. Joseph’s Medical Center

M

aybe it’s the inner superwoman in us, but many

women think of heart health as a man’s disease. However, the hard truth is that heart disease kills more women than men every year. With one third of deaths in all women caused by cardiovascular disease, heart health is something all women need to learn more about. So what can women do with this startling reality? All women should know signs and symptoms to watch for – and many might surprise you. A sudden cold sweat, a heart-wrenching pain in your chest, or your heart beginning to race; this is how many women look for a heart attack. However, signs and symptoms of heart disease can be far more subtle, especially for women. ➤

lifestyles

These vague symptoms can include: • Flu-like symptoms – specifically nausea, clamminess or cold sweats • Unexplained fatigue, weakness, or dizziness • Feeling of anxiety, loss of appetite or discomfort • Shortness of breath • Pain in upper back, jaw or neck

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While cold sweats and chest tightness are definitely still signs of heart disease, these subtle symptoms are more common for women than men. In fact, women have more heart attacks that go unrecognized. It’s also true that women often deny, ignore, or do not recognize heart disease symptoms. I know of women who went to their doctor with what they thought was the flu or indigestion, only to be referred to a cardiologist or taken directly to our Heart Center for a procedure. This isn’t to say that every woman needs to run to a cardiologist every time they feel like they have the flu. This just means that we, as women, need to learn more about heart health and be aware of our risk.

Risk factors for heart disease in women include: • Age

• Inactivity

• Smoking and diabetes • Family history of heart disease • High cholesterol

• Gestational diabetes

• High blood pressure

• Preeclampsia during a pregnancy

While many of these factors come as no surprise, gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are probably news to most regarding heart disease risk. And while risk of heart disease is higher as women age, the rate of cardiovascular death in women ages 35-44 has been increasing by 1 percent each year. It’s so important that women proactively educate themselves about their own risk, as 69% of women who die suddenly from heart disease have no prior history. For many women, waiting for something to happen with their heart health will be too late. In an effort to educate women about their risk of heart disease and save more lives with early detection, St. Joseph’s is partnering with local cardiologists, family practice, and OB/GYN physicians to establish a simple heart health screening test for women during their annual health exams. This collaborative is based on Abbott Vascular’s PULSE program, a national women’s heart health initiative. In addition to this program, St. Joseph’s Heart Center Research Department collaborates in a number of national studies and programs with institutions including Duke and Yale University, to advocate for education and awareness of heart health for different populations. So, to all of my fellow superwomen out there, empower yourselves by taking charge of your health, understanding your risk, and speaking to your doctor about how you can keep those hearts healthy. ■


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AmbassadorS of pride

STORY AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF VISIT STOCKTON

V

isit Stockton (formerly known as the Stockton Convention &

10 years of vacancy, Cort Companies remodeled the floors to welcome

Visitors Bureau) finished off a busy 2013 in a new centrally-located

Visit Stockton to the second floor in May and the Downtown Stockton

downtown office location, and with nearly 100 newly-certified Stockton

Alliance to the third floor later in the summer. “It was important for us to remain in the downtown core, as we have

ambassadors. In May 2013, Visit Stockton moved into its new offices at 125 Bridge

since our founding in 1979. With the waterfront, arena and ballpark,

Place in downtown Stockton. The building, known as the B&M Building, we believe downtown is primed for rebirth, and look forward to being

90

is owned by Cort Companies and is located between the historic Hotel

a part of that change,” noted George Kaplanis, General Manager of

Stockton and the Regal City Centre Cinema 16, and faces the waterfront.

the Hilton Stockton and Board President of Visit Stockton. “The new

Portions of the building were built in the 1860s and later in 1909.

location’s high traffic and visibility will do well to further the mission of

Through its rich history it has housed a hotel (the Philadelphia House), a

Visit Stockton and better serve our visitors. We are very excited about

speakeasy, restaurants, and more recently, the state parole office. After

the move.”

feb r u a r y/ma rch 2 0 1 4


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For information: Visit Stockton 209-938-1555 VisitStockton.org

The move to the new downtown location

Feedback from program participants has

interacts with customers or visitors seeking

happened to also coincide with the launch of

been extremely positive. “Even as a lifetime

more information on Stockton, including

Stockton’s own Certified Tourism Ambassador

Stocktonian, the CTA class taught me a

realtors, hospital employees, government

Program, a national certification program

wealth of information that I did not know

employees,

focused on enhancing the visitor’s experience.

about Stockton,” said Jeremy Estarziau, a

community volunteers and more!

The objective of the program is to make

Stockton police officer who recently went

The new location and ambassador program

Stockton the leader in hospitality in the

through the program as a bike patrol

capped off a year that ended with an uptick in

Central Valley, where groups and guests know

officer for the Downtown Stockton Alliance.

hotel occupancy and revenue citywide, and an

they will find friendly and knowledgeable

Newly-minted ambassadors have shared a

increase in hosted meetings and sports events.

front-line staff, retailers and residents.

renewed sense of pride and dedication to

It was a great 2013, and we are really excited

Becoming a Certified Tourism Ambassador

the city, along with the tools to provide great

to see what 2014 brings. ■

(CTA) goes well beyond customer service

customer service to visitors.

training. It’s product knowledge at the front-

Bi-monthly certification class are available,

line on the great things Stockton has to offer.

and include a pre-reading assignment, four

Helping visitors find more things to do equals

hours of instruction and an exam to achieve

more spending and growing tourism! There

the certification. While the focus may be on

are over 10,000 CTAs in 11 states, and the

the hospitality industry, the Certified Tourism

program is growing.

Ambassador will be useful to anyone who

retail

employees,

educators,


February ~ Mark the date Peabody Trio

The Peabody Trio is celebrating its 26th season as part of the Stockton Friends of Chamber Music Series. The Peabody Trio is returning to Stockton Sunday, February 9 at 2:30 p.m. for another amazing concert. The concert is being held at the Faye Spanos Concert Hall at the University of the Pacific. Tickets are $25 and available at the door. The audience is invited to meet the musicians following the show. For information, visit www.chambermusicfriends.org or call 209-467-0224.

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Haggin Museum celebrates 100 Years of Stockton Rotary

In conjunction with a mini-display honoring 100 years of Rotary service to the Stockton community, Frank Whitney will give a presentation about the history of Rotary at The Haggin Museum on Thursday, February 20 at 7 p.m. Vocalist Mary Zastrow, a recipient of the Rotary Clubs music scholarship, will also perform. Complimentary wine and snacks will be available as part of the museum’s 1st and 3rd Thursdays series. For more information, call 209-940-6315 or visit www.hagginmuseum.org

Bridal Faire

On Saturday, February 22 Lincoln Center will host its 4th Annual Strolling Bridal Faire from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Brides and their guests will enjoy a relaxing day strolling from store to store to find everything needed to make their wedding day unique and worry-free. The cost for brides is $15, with $10 of that good towards lunch or dinner at participating Lincoln Center restaurants. For more information, visit www.lincolncentershops.com/strolling-bridal-faire/ or call 209-477-4868.

Atmospheric

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Stop by the Knowlton Gallery February 25 through April 26 and enjoy “Atmospheric.” There will be 9 artists exhibiting 40-45 paintings at the gallery in downtown Lodi. For more information, call 209-368-5123.

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“Around the World in 80 Minutes”

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Join the Stockton Chorale for an armchair trip around the musical world February 28 and March 2. Choral music representing 20 different regions will make these concerts truly an international experience that you won’t want to miss. The first concert will be held Friday, February 28 at Central United Methodist Church in Stockton at 7:30 p.m. The second concert will be held Sunday, March 2 at 3 p.m. at The Episcopal Church of St. John the Baptist in Lodi at 3:00 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults in advance, $25 at the door, and $5 for children and full-time college students. For tickets or more information, visit www.stocktonchorale.org or call 209-951-6494.

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Black History Month FEB.2014

The University of the Pacific’s annual Black History Month celebration involves a number of activities that honor the history and heritage of African-Americans and the African Diaspora. Throughout the month of February, students, faculty and staff put on numerous events, including a keynote speaker, gospel concert, poetry reading, roundtable discussions and various guest lecturers. For more information visit www.pacific.edu/Campus-Life/Diversity-and-Inclusion/Multicultural-Affairs/Black-History-Month or call 209-946-2011.

March ~ Mark the date

Twice is Nice Rummage Sale

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The San Joaquin County Junior League’s enormous “Twice is Nice” Rummage Sale will take place Saturday, March 1 at the San Joaquin County Fairgrounds. Thrifty shoppers will find 14 specialty departments covering over 21,000 square feet of shopping paradise. Doors open at 8 a.m. for this event. For more information, call Monica at 209-612-3749, Barbara 209-478-0340 or Jenger 209-993-9771.

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Stockton Art League

Stockton Art League is proud to present Denny Ah-Tye and Ann Ranlett during the month of February. A reception is being held Thursday, February 13 for demonstration artist Ann Ranlett. There will be another reception for the featured artist of the month, Denny Ah-Tye on Saturday, February 15. Both receptions will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. at Stockton Art League, 1902 Pacific Avenue, Stockton.

There’s No Place Like Home

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Join the San Joaquin Library and Literacy Foundation at their 23rd Annual Trivia Bee Friday March 7 at 5 p.m. The theme for this year’s Trivia Bee is “There’s no place like home – All things San Joaquin.” Tickets to this fun event are $25 per person and include dinner, raffle, and a silent auction. For more information contact Anna Sass at 209957-7277 or anna_sass@sasspr.com

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Musical Chairs Children’s Concert Series

The Musical Chairs Children’s Concert Series is proud to present the Banana Slug String Band on Friday, March 14 at 10 a.m. at the Scottish Rite Auditorium. Tickets are $9. This concert is guaranteed to be a fun-filled science learning experience for students from preschool through 6th grade. For more information visit www.musicalchairsconcerts.org or call 209-487-2559.

lifestyles

University of the Pacific’s Brubeck Institute will feature an impressive Grammy Awardwinning lineup for its 13th annual Brubeck Festival celebrating the music and life of Dave Brubeck. The festival will be held March 27 through 29. The headlining concerts for this year’s festival includes Eddie Palmieri, who will perform Thursday, March 27 at 7:30 p.m. at Warren Atherton Auditorium at San Joaquin Delta College. To buy tickets, call the box office at 209-954-5110. Al Jarreau performs Friday, March 28 at 8 p.m. at the Bob Hope Theatre. For more information, call the box office at 209-373-1400. The last headlining concert is Terri Lyne Carrington performing at the Faye Spanos Concert Hall at University of the Pacific, Saturday, March 29, 2014 at 8 p.m. For tickets, call 209-946-3201. Contact the Brubeck Institute at 209-946-3196, for more scheduled programs.

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‘Last Chance’ Crab Feed

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United Cerebral Palsy is holding its 5th Annual “Last Chance” Crab Feed on Friday, March 14. This fun event could quite possibly be your last chance to enjoy a crab feed this season! Tickets are $45 per person and the event is being held at the Lodi Grape Festival Grounds. The social hour will begin at 6 p.m., followed by dinner, music, and dancing. Raffle and silent auction items will also be part of the festivities. Please reserve your tickets by March 3. For more information, please call 209-956-0290.

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Chris Perdoni’s Stunt Dog Experience

Performers and dogs will delight audiences of all ages with high-energy excitement! During Chris Perondi’s Stunt Dog Experience, your family will witness some of the most incredible stunts and behaviors ever performed by dogs. This experience has amazing tricks, big air stunts, comedy antics, dancing dogs and athletic feats, and is the most entertaining show of its kind. Come out and watch this incredible show Saturday, February 15 at 2:00 p.m. at the Bob Hope Theatre. For tickets, contact the Bob Hope Theatre at 1-800-745-3000.

Haute Couture Société Fashion Show Celebrate TIMELESS VOGUE at the 46th Haute Couture Société Fashion Show on Saturday, March 22 at the Hilton Stockton. Guest designers and member-created garments strut the catwalk while the proceeds provide scholarships to local students of apparel design and fashion merchandising. Vendors open at 9:30 am. Luncheon and show starts at 11:30 am. Tickets are $45. For more information, visit www.HauteCoutureCa.org or call 209-648-0637.

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Women’s Center Annual Luncheon

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The Women’s Center – Youth & Family Services will be hosting its 34th annual luncheon on Wednesday, March 26 at the Stockton Civic Auditorium. Carissa Phelps will be the keynote speaker for this event. For more information, please call 209-941-2611.

April ~ Mark the date

American Red Cross Heroes Breakfast

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Do you know people who have demonstrated acts of heroism? Now is your chance to place them in the spotlight. Nominate your heroes for recognition by the American Red Cross! Submit the story of your heroes and why they should be recognized by February 14. Candidates for nomination can be anyone who lives or works in San Joaquin, Calaveras, and Amador Counties who has gone above and beyond the call of duty to exhibit a true act of selflessness. Heroes will be honored at the annual Red Cross Heroes Breakfast, to be held Wednesday, April 9 at Wine & Roses in Lodi from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Tickets for breakfast are $65. For more information, contact Liza Cruz at 209-644-2828 or liza.cruz@redcross.org. To nominate your hero, visit www.redcross.org

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feb r u a r y/ma rch 2 0 1 4

“Puttin’ on the Ritz for Art”

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The Lodi Community Art Center’s 54th annual Spring Art Show, “Puttin’ on the Ritz,” is scheduled for April 11 through April 13. It will be the largest open juried art show that’s free to the public in Northern California. The online entry system will begin taking entries at their website, www.lodiartcenter.org on January 5.


Lifestyles Magazine February 2014  

The new February issue of San Joaquin Lifestyles from the Stockton Record.

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