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THE MAGAZINE FOR SAN JOAQUIN

SUMMER FASHION MARK THE DATE

FOR SUMMER FUN

TRAVEL NEAR & FAR

June/July 2013 ■ sanjoaquinlifestyles.com


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L E T T E R

F R O M

T H E

E D I T O R

PUBLISHER

Roger Coover

PUBLICATION DIRECTOR Deitra R. Kenoly

THE MAGAZINE FOR SAN JOAQUIN

C

hange – it can be wonderful thing. It can be a challenge. In the case of Lifestyles magazine, I am excited about the changes we’ve made and the changes yet to come. Lifestyles has merged with San Joaquin Woman. We’ve kept the best of both magazines. Our biggest change will be distribution. Lifestyles will now be delivered to more than 15,000 Record newspaper subscribers, and 10,000 additional copies delivered to local businesses. Our advertisers will have much more exposure, and our readers will enjoy more local articles. We will continue to focus on local stories written and photographed by local talent. Lifestyles magazine will be for, and all about the people, places and products that makes our region so unique. I’m very excited about our August issue – “More than 40 under 40.” We have searched high and low for young adults in our community that have invested their time and talent to be part of our community. Many of these fine young people moved away, began careers elsewhere, and returned. Many never left, but have made a commitment to our community. Others have started up their own

EDITOR

Carrie Sass

MANAGING EDITOR Karen Bakhtegan

businesses, while others have joined their families’ business. Some have jumped into politics. Many are investing in the lives of children through their work as teachers, pastors and counselors. Our writers and photographers for this issue will also be under 40. So encouraging. In April, we featured the Stockton Beautiful event – Lunch with Mimi. In my hurried state to meet the print deadline, I totally missed that honoree Mimi was not in one photo. Not one! And it was her party! So Mimi, here is a lovely picture of you with your daughters. Thank you for all you do. Roses. Flamboyant bouquets. Over-the-top events. Our community will greatly miss the beauty created by Dennis Specht, or as I called him, Mr. Atmospherics. I was fortunate to watch and experience the talent and passion of this most creative man. I will miss his big yellow truck, his Hawaiian shirts, his friendship, and frankly his orneriness. What a character. Rest in peace, my friend. Embrace your relationships. It’s what we’re created for.

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Katie Donahue Charleen Earley Larry French Eunice Green Dennis Hall Michelle Hart Jackie Korbolz John McClimans Heather Mompean Jason Roth Jennifer Torres Siders Susan Michener Spracher

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ashley Blackard Mike Chaves Jr. Manacim Medrano Lindsay Ortez Stan Rapada Helen Ripken David Sowers Tim Ulmer

Carrie xoxo

Wendy Harvey, Mary Elizabeth Eberhardt-Sandstrom, Mimi Eberhardt, Bonnie Belcher and Leslie Brown

?

Please continue to forward story ideas to: The Record/LifestylesMagazine 530 East Market Street, Stockton 95202 or call: 209-546-8351; or email: kbakhtegan@recordnet.com

TO ADVERTISE IN LIFESTYLES MAGAZINE, CALL 209-546-8200 Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

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On the cover: FASHION PHOTO BY DAVID SOWERS


CONTENTS LOCAL FLAVOR OLLIE'S PUB

9 ..........................................................................................

WINE CRITIC LODI WINE

14 ..........................................................................................

WINERY PROFILE WOODBRIDGE WINERY

17 ..........................................................................................

FASHION SUMMER FASHION IS A BREEZE

26 STORY OF FASHION 2013

32 ..........................................................................................

FOUR O'CLOCK MARTINI FROM FEAR TO FIERCE

34 ..........................................................................................

WAG TALES CHICO – ADOPTABLE DOG

36 REX – ADOPTABLE DOG

59 ..........................................................................................

OUR CULTURE DELTA FUSION

39 ..........................................................................................

REMEMBER THIS? THE ISLANDER RESTAURANT

41 ..........................................................................................

MOM ABOUT THE TOWN THE LIBRARY

46 ..........................................................................................

SWEET CHARITY BANKING ON FINANCIAL SECURITY

51 ..........................................................................................


TRAVEL NATIONAL PARKS

52 SUNDIAL BRIDGE

56

56 ..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT JESUS MOUNTAIN COFFEE

61 ..........................................................................................

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT HOSPICE HOUSE

66 ..........................................................................................

PEEK A BOUTIQUE OLIVE HEAVEN

68 ..........................................................................................

HEALTH & WELLNESS EUNICE GREEN – DEHYDRATION

72 ..........................................................................................

TOT CULTURE LOCAL KIDS PHOTO GALLERY

76 ..........................................................................................

MARK THE DATE LISTING OF ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS

78 ..........................................................................................

SCENE AND BE SEEN IOLA BRUBECK PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION

22

WYNTON MARSALIS RECEPTION

23

HATS OFF LUNCHEON – LINKS INCORPORATED

38

STOCKTON OPERA GUILD

44

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON

49

33RD ANNUAL WOMEN'S CENTER LUNCHEON

54

TRIVIA BEE – LIBRARY & LITERACY FOUNDATION

55

EASTER BASKET LUNCHEON – LADY BUGS

71

POPS & PICNIC – STOCKTON SYMPHONY ASSOCATION

75


L O C A L

F L A V O R

Family & Friends on Tap

Ollie’s Pub BY KATIE DONAHUE PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

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L O C A L

F L A V O R

A

midst the options of bars and pubs in the Central Valley, one

beloved spot in Lodi stands out from the rest. Ollie’s Pub, formerly known as Ollie’s Tavern, was purchased in 2010 by co-owners Justin and Dawn O’Byrne and Sean and Ashlee Guthrie. Ollie’s roots in Lodi are deep, and date back over 50 years. Originally, the tavern was owned by a man named Ollie Mint. When George Gladius bought it from Mint, Justin says the Mint family was happy to see that he kept the original name. Justin and Sean wanted to continue that legacy. “The daughters and family of Ollie Mint came for George’s retirement party, and have come in for our opening and anniversary parties,” says Justin. The new owners have made some improvements to the physical structure of the pub, and Justin says the process has been like an episode of This Old House. “The biggest thing I wanted to do is install the windows that open all the way to the outside. I like to refer to those windows as an invitation. It says, ‘Come inside.’ You can see what we’re about, and when you’re inside you don’t feel locked in,” he says. Additionally, he says they expanded their selection of beverages by at least 60 percent. “Originally we were told, ‘You’re not going to sell very much Guinness,’” says Dawn. “Now we’re the leading seller of Guinness in the Central Valley,” she says, laughing. Though some customers were worried the pub would change for the worse under new ownership, regulars have continued to frequent Ollie’s, and have found new events to enjoy. “Sunday Funday” parties are held on the third Sunday of every month, and feature live music and a beer garden. Every September there’s an Arthur Guinness birthday party, which pays homage to the creator of the infamous beer that bears his name. “The biggest compliment to us is the appreciation from the people who’ve always spent their time here – generations of family who say, ‘We really love what you’ve done to this place,’” Justin says. ➤

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L O C A L

Pubs were nothing new to Justin, who lived in Dublin, Ireland until he was seven years old.

F L A V O R

They hail from Ashbourne, Ireland and have that unmistakable Irish accent.

Jason worked in Australia and in New Zealand rugby stadiums, and at one point

“Pub means ‘Public House.’ Growing up,

“It really does make us a lot more

worked in a bottle store in Ireland, of which a

you went to the pub with your dad and uncles.

authentic,” Justin says with a laugh about

liquor store is the most analogous here in the

There was just a feeling of family,” he says.

the presence of his cousins. “Jason and Kurt

States. He recalls selling Francis Ford Coppola

His family has a long history of business

have always been the brothers I’ve never had.

wines to his customers, but never actually

ownership, whether it was in trucking or a milk

Besides being family, they’re great people, and

tasted it himself until he moved to Lodi.

shop, and Justin wanted to see that come to

they’re great at what they do,” he says. Justin’s

The brothers’ journeys took them through

fruition in his own life.

father is actually an identical twin of Jason and

Thailand, Malaysia, and Southeast Asia. They

Kurt’s father – which makes for two sets of

were even near Christchurch, New Zealand

identical twins in the same family.

when the devastating earthquake hit in 2011,

Additionally, there is another reason that Ollie’s Pub has an unmistakably Irish feel. Well, make that two reasons.

Jason worked in pubs around the globe as

Justin’s cousins Jason and Kurt O’Byrne both

he travelled the world with his brother Kurt in

work at the pub, and they’re identical twins.

the two years after college.

lifestyles

but were unhurt. “I was keeping in touch with my cousin [Justin] while I was traveling on Facebook. ➤

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He was telling me about Ollie’s and the bar. After New Zealand, we hit Fiji and Hawaii, and then San Francisco,” says Jason, and the brothers have lived in California ever since. Jason and Kurt’s father left Ireland at age 16 due to a recession, and found work in Los Angeles. After becoming a U.S. citizen, he met his future wife at a Los Angeles house party. It turns out that not only was she from Ireland, but she’d actually lived around the corner from him – but they’d never met until that fateful party in California. Since their father had become a U.S. citizen prior to their birth, the brothers have dual citizenships in Ireland and the U.S. Not only is Ollie’s Pub – and those who work in it – well-known to people in the Central Valley, they’ve attained something akin to international acclaim. People come from all over the world to skydive nearby. Recently, Justin says, he had a group of patrons in the pub at the same time who hailed from New Zealand, Italy, France, Fiji, and Ireland. All came to the area for the skydiving and ended up at Ollie’s. “’They tell each other, ‘When you go jump, you have to go to Ollie’s,’ which is something we never expected,” Justin says. That international fame has extended to social media through Facebook. Dawn says she recently mailed some Ollie’s apparel to a loyal fan in Australia. “It really is a labor of love,” Justin says of Ollie’s. “But to do something that you’re known internationally for, and to have your family and best friends involved, you just couldn’t ask for much more. And that’s what you invest in anyway. You invest in your friends and family, things that you’re proud of. This is just one of those things,” he says. ■

Ollie’s Pub 22 N. School Street • Lodi 209-333-9933 www.facebook.com/OlliesPub


G R A P E V I N E

Strolling through

Downtown Lodi

W

“There

Cellar Door asserts comfortable chat in

people’s lives with intrigue and discovery,

are 80 wineries now, versus just six about

Lodi instead of pretentious jargon. A customer

serving as a key element of social lifestyle.

twenty years ago,” he asserts. Staff “act as

exclaimed to Akaylia Sidener pouring behind

My wife Dana and I continually venture into

concierge,” making experiences pleasant. The

the bar, “Something cold!” and her instinctive

downtown Lodi wine tasting rooms to get the

Visitor Center stocks its tasting bar with scores

response was to pour him a glass of chilled

lowdown on what’s fresh and new at the Lodi

of “appellated” wines. A demonstration

Pinot Grigio. General Manager Vanessa

Wine and Visitor Center, Sorelle – Six Hands,

vineyard outdoors allows learning through

Foreman and Akaylia asserted that customers

Jessie’s Grove, Estate Crush, Vinedos Aurora

seeing actually planted vines.

may take advantage of round-trip Amtrak

ineries’ tasting rooms blend

developments

amaze

everyone.

at Pamplona Tapas, Riaza Wines, Cellar Door,

Sorelle Winery and Six Hands Winery

Fields Family Wines, HG Vineyards, Toasted

launched their tasting room on School

Toad Cellars, The Dancing Fox Winery &

Street. The U-shaped bar relaxes visitors for

Erin and Rick Taylor, winemakers for their

Bakery, and Jeremy Wine Company.

comfortably listening to tasting room staff,

new Riaza Wines, expressed delight at the

The surge and sustained interest in

sip, and buy wine. Old-fashioned incandescent

guests who come into Riaza’s tasting room on

Lodi wine converges with social media. This

bulbs hang down from the ceilings. A bank

Elm Street, where they serve Spanish varietals,

transforms tasting rooms into portals for

of windows flood soft light. Original 1930s

saying, “We’re making Lodi a destination

reaching and entertaining wine lovers.

Douglas fir floors richly shine. The left wall

point.” Riaza Wines' tasting room bursts

displays original plaster and red brick. This

with rich Spanish décor aglow from tastefully

Lodi Grape Commission based at the Lodi Wine

tasting

discreet small lights. There is seating at their

and Visitor Center, asserts Lodi Appellation

tasting rooms.

Camron King, Executive Director of the

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STORY BY DENNIS HALL PHOTOS BY ASHLEY BLACKARD

room

complements

neighboring

train travel into Lodi from either Sacramento or Modesto. What an incredible adventure!

bar, lounge or alfresco seating.

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G R A P E V I N E

Vinedos Aurora at Pamplona Tapas

In the foreground there are six chairs offered at

of its wine partners. Jeff Hansen, owner

tasting room on Oak Street is a collaboration

circular granite-topped tables. Says Courtney

and winemaker, does all the final blending

of winemaker Gerardo Espinosa and Chef

Chadwell, the tasting room manager, “this

with his winemaking team from throughout

Ruben Larrazolo, owner of Alebrijes Mexican

seating area affords guests a place to relax

California’s various wine regions. Dee Dee

and hang out while

Capps manages the tasting room, serving up

enjoying their wine.”

delicious, warm meatballs for pairing with the

The floor area is dark

wines.

Bistro. Staff pours three Vinedos Aurora Spanish

varietals.

Enjoy pairing them with

“this seating area affords guests

scrumptious

a place to relax

cuisine

and hang out

hardwood, repurposed wood

it was designed for decades ago: a showroom.

floor planks. Light grey

The corner recessed entrance door opens

granite, dark floors,

into an expansive room of wine bar with

and Tuscan-style, rich

cubby shelves holding bottles of wine, stools,

mustard-colored walls

tables and chairs for sipping, buying wine,

reflect

absorb

and relaxing. The bar face includes mounted

natural light shining in

brass hooks for hanging purses or sweaters.

located in the renovated Old Ice House. Back in

from a wide bank of windows. Ceiling lights

The décor shines with classy, exuberant

the day – several decades ago – this building

support continuous lumens regardless of

understated whites and greens. Estate Crush

provided coveted ice for local residents,

sunshine, overcast skies, or winter dusk.

sells some of its own vintages, but is also a

Spanish tapas.

Grove

while enjoying

Winery pours wines

their wine.”

for guests in its

– Courtney Chadwell

Jessie’s

second tasting room,

100-year-old

Estate Crush’s tasting room is today what

and

businesses, and the railroads. Entering the

H G Vineyards’ tasting room on Locust

resource for entrepreneurs who dream of

Jessie’s Grove Winery tasting room through

Street serves its own wines for the label

owning their own lines of wines. You may sip

the door on Main Street, the rich Tuscan

Hansen-Garbarino, and also those wines

and buy artisan wines for a client brand. ■

décor fills your eyes and heart. Guests sit upon six stools, or stand at the granite topped bar faced with dark, rich vertical mahogany staves. The tasting room subtly displays the Jessie’s Grove horsehead logo above the bar.

Dennis Hall is a freelance writer, author, entrepreneur, and San Joaquin County advocate. Dennis and his wife Dana founded Sip California, a wine industry business. Dennis.SipCalifornia@gmail.com 916-541-1992

lifestyles

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G R A P E V I N E

from

Woodbridge Brazil to

BY JOHN McCLIMANS PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

F

rom Stockton to Sao Paulo, Rio Vista to Rio de Janeiro, you’re now

able to order one of the area’s most well-known wines wherever you visit. Woodbridge Winery, known for its high-quality yet affordable wines, has begun exporting wines to Brazil. ➤

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G R A P E V I N E

The winery, which already ships to 85

Michael Jones, Director of Operations at the

Growing up and attending high school in Lodi,

countries, sent its first shipment of 3,500 cases

Lodi Distribution Center. “We hope to be an

Mondavi moved to Napa after graduating

in February and hopes to send approximately

established brand by the time these events

from Stanford in 1937. It wasn’t until 1966,

80,000 cases to Brazil during the first year.

come around.”

when he was in his 50s, that he started his

And while the citizens of South America’s

What will Brazilians will be sipping

largest country aren’t currently big wine

on? Mainly reds: Cabernet, Zinfandel and

drinkers, Woodbridge and its parent company,

Pinot Noir, with a couple of whites for good

“Robert Mondavi believed people should

Constellation Brands, hope that several

measure. “Robert Mondavi wines have been

be able to enjoy wine at every meal,” said

upcoming appearances in the global spotlight

winning lots of accolades recently, so it makes

Larry Pilmaier, Visitors Center Manager at

will facilitate a change.

sense to send those down to Brazil,” said

Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi, “but this was

Jones.

becoming difficult back then, due to the high

“With the World Cup in 2014 and the

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2016 Olympics in Rio, the timing is just perfect

It is Mondavi, after all, who started the

for us to start exporting to Brazil,” said

Woodbridge Winery label back in 1979.

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own label, including opening the iconic Napa Valley winery.

cost of grapes from Napa Valley.” So Mondavi came back to the Lodi area


where he was raised. Mondavi was familiar with

up to 1500 bottles a minute – it uses smaller

Interested in trying some of Woodbridge’s

the land and knew he could continue to grow

fermentation tanks and oak barrels to keep

wines? The visitor center, located in Acampo,

high-quality grapes at a lower price. He bought

batches small and create a consistent, quality

offers wine tasting, a gift shop and a deli

the facility and named it after the neighboring

wine.

for the perfect picnic lunch. It is open

town of Woodbridge.

“Woodbridge wines are all about sharing

seven days a week from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30

His commitment to quality and affordability

with your friends and family,” Pilmaier said. “You

p.m. Free public tours of the facility are

continues to this day. While the facility boasts

don’t have to be ashamed of sharing Woodbridge

offered daily at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. ■

one of the fastest bottling lines in the world –

wine because you know it’s going to be quality.”

The Delta Bistro introduces its new fresh, locally driven menu, featuring Niman Ranch Beef, fresh Alaskan Halibut, Pacific Salmon, and local produce. Chef Jeff Stogsdill and his team are driven to provide a fine dining experience in a casual setting with fantastic waterfront views. Enjoy dining in the courtyard, experience the wonderful atmosphere and treat yourself to gourmet delights. Pair your dining with local wines, or the best concoctions from the fully stocked bar. The Delta Bistro is located in the University Plaza Waterfront Hotel. Featuring Mimosa Brunch Sundays.

DELTA BISTRO AND LOUNGE 110 West Fremont Street • Stockton • 209.944.1140 www.universityplazawaterfronthotel.com lifestyles

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S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

2 013 Iola Brubeck President’s Reception The Brubeck Institute

A B

A

A C

A D

Back row: Dan and Trevor Brubeck, Sammy Bonner, Elizabeth Brubeck-Gero, Tish and Chris Brubeck. Front row: Jim Bancroft and Iola Brubeck B

Gina and David Rishwain, Giulio and Cheryl Ongaro D

C

Judy Chambers and Jim Darrah

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN 22

A A

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Gary and Sandy Mitchell


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

2 013 Wynton Marsalis Reception The Brubeck Institute A A

A C

A B

A D

The Brubeck Institute The Brubeck Institute impacts society through the arts, continuing the life’s work of Dave and Iola Brubeck in education, community engagement and serving as a catalyst for social change. 209-946-3970 www.pacific.edu

EA

A

FA

A G

Kate Post, Tena Carr, Valerie Hubbard and Debbie Demshar

B

Maya Rowe, Paul Kimball, Ella and Georgi Rowe

Rich Aschieris and Janet Dial

D

Lew and Peggy Katcher

C E

Cynthia Wagner Weick and Brian Weick

F

Jaclyn Long and Kerry Morris

G

Signe’ Beebe and Tony Spinetta

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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Bhagya Nakka, MD, FACOG Age: 43 Occupation: Physician, Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: 7 years The people who mean the most to me: My family and my patients Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: Lodi wine country A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: Taking care of my mom in her last days of her life who died with breast cancer Favorite sports team: New York Yankees baseball What I’m reading now: Heart Speaks by Rajagopalachari Favorite vacation destination: Maui, Hawaii Hobbies: Meditation, cooking and travelling Sports I enjoy: Swimming and table tennis Favorite food/dessert: Pasta with alfredo sauce / Cold Stone Creamery ice cream My favorite quotes: Devotion to duty is the highest form of worship to God. Favorite childhood memories: Spending times with cousins at grandparents’ place during vacations

PHOTO BY LINSDAY ORTEZ

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F A S H I O N

SUMMER FASHION is a

Breeze PHOTOS BY DAVID SOWERS

The temperature is rising. Get ready for nautical adventures with summer fashions that will keep you feeling cool while looking

HOT,HOT, HOT! Maxi Skirt by Billabong Top by RVCA Fedora by Volcom Cuff by Lenny & Eva Flip-Flops by Rainbow

Fashion items provided by ZUESTERS in Lincoln Center 26

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Board shorts by RVCA Tank by Volcom Cap by RVCA Flip-Flops by Reef


F A S H I O N

Yoga Tanks and Leggings by Lucy

Zuesters owners, Shaina Pijl and Kendra Nunez

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F A S H I O N

Dress by Billabong Cuff and Necklace by Lenny & Eva

lifestyles

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F A S H I O N

Left to Right: Dress by O’Neill, Flip-Flops by Reef; Boy’s Dress Shirt by Billabong, Shorts by RVCA, Flip-Flops by Reef; Shorts and top by Billie, Flip-Flops by Rainbow

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226 S School St, Lodi, CA 95240

209-334-6822


DESIGNER IS KATHY VANG, MODEL IS DANIELLE PORTER, PHOTOGRAPHER IS STAN RAPADA

The Story of Fashion 2013 San Joaquin Delta College Fashion Program


F A S H I O N

ROD RIGU EZ; BAG S. DES IGNE R: SUS AN M PLA STIC AND TRA SH COL LEC TION MAD E FRO CHAVES JR. E MIK : LEY; PHO TOG RAP HER MOD EL: CLA UDIN E HES

W

ell, it looks like Leslie Asfour, Director of the Fashion

Design program at San Joaquin Delta College, along with her crew, have pulled off another fabulous fashion event. The Story of Fashion, an annual showcase of student designers, was attended on May 10 by eight hundred guests. Planned and produced by the Fashion Event Class under Leslie’s direction, this year’s show at the Atherton Auditorium on the San Joaquin Delta College campus featured ten student designers, two alumni designers and eighteen red dress designers. The Red Dress Design Challenge, in association with the American Heart Association, was new this year. One hundred and twelve volunteer models graced the runway that was built thirty feet into the theatre over the chairs. Every seat was a good seat! ■ DES IGNE R: ALYS SA GIBS ON; MOD EL: KATI E HEIN Z; PHO TOG RAP HER : MAN ACIM MED RAN O

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L I F E S T Y L E

C O L U M N

From fear to fierce

A

BY SUSAN MICHENER SPRACHER

dark night of the soul. We’ve all had them. Usually a good

cry on the shoulder of a friend will see us through to the dawn of a brand-new sunny day. But what if the night turns into weeks, months or even years? When the rivets that hold your life together start popping out like the Titanic hitting the iceberg, you’re being sent back to the birth canal – a tight, dark space that requires a lot of pushing through before you come out into the bright light of newness. I had been in labor for almost three years. Let me just say that the birth analogy didn’t exactly resonate with me ,since I had both of my girls by Caesarean section. When the going got tough, they gave me a shot, the pain went away, and poof, I was handed a beautiful baby. I was finally starting to see the light of a new life when I found I had one more mountain to climb. What should have

■ MEDITATE – It’s not as hard as it sounds, and the rewards are HUGE. I have to use guided meditation. Having someone feed my brain positive messages that rewire my stinkin’ thinking is a godsend. You can say you don’t have time or you don’t know how, but really, you just sit down and DO IT. How much time do you have to keep feeling like crap? Giving yourself even one minute of sitting in silence is a start. ■ GET A GUIDE – I looked through my own library of books and found some good direction on how to spiritually cowgirl up. You could also go to the public library or Barnes & Noble. What you’re intentionally looking for will practically fall off the shelf and into your hands. They say when the student is ready, the teacher appears. ■ GO ONE-ON-ONE – Engage an advisor. Talking and getting guidance from someone caring, objective and knowledgeable is great fuel. If you don’t know a clergyperson, counselor, healer or spiritual teacher, Facebook message me – I know someone wonderful to refer you to.

been a straight climb to the top turned into a slippery slope. An ugly mudslide. A friend said to me, “You need to get a thicker skin.” I

I want to live my life on fire; just more of a controlled burn.

pondered that statement for a few days which led to an epiphany, “I

Something like a nice bonfire on the beach, as opposed to a three-

need to become a warrior.” Great! How do I do that?

alarm pyre. The balance is in taking the right amount of control of what

It’s a big question: how to go from fear to fierce when you’re out of juice? T-I-R-E-D. And there is still more to labor. Some more

you can, and surrendering the rest. Be good to yourself. You’re fabulous, and you deserve it, too. ■

pushing and you’ll be there, but it’s gonna get worse before it gets better.

Visit the Four o’clock Martini Online

So I started thinking about how to support myself, prop myself

www.fouroclockmartini.com

up, and fake it till I could make it. We’re not exactly born with the

Become a fan on Facebook

skill set to know how to manage long-term chaos, but we can put

www.facebook/thefouroclockmartini

together a toolbox. Here’s what I came up with:

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Wag Tales Adoptable Dog

Chico I am a: Dachshund/Chihuahua mix Age: I am 2½ years old Best moment: When my rescuers pulled me from in front of a bulldozer during the forced eviction of the homeless at Mormon Slough in 2012. Where I live now: In Stockton with my foster parents Lynne and John, who are helping me to find my forever home Favorite activity: Playing with my foster brothers Rex and Bubba and walking in the park. Favorite treat: Beggin’ Strips… yum! Guilty pleasure: Pepperoni pizza Other interesting info about me: I love cats and I have a beautiful “singing” voice. I am very loveable, even-tempered, and I love to snuggle. My ideal home: I am looking for adoptive parents who have plenty of time to spend with me. I love attention! I am great with children and cats. I will do well as the only dog in the home, but I do get along with other dogs as long as they are close to my size. Big dogs overwhelm me. If you are interested in making Chico a part of your family, contact Marilyn Williams at Pups Rescue via email at pupsrescue@hotmail.com, or call 209-956-3004 (before 9 p.m. only).

PHOTO BY ASHLEY BLACKARD


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2 013 Hats Off Luncheon Links, Inc.

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The Links, Incorporated is an international, not-for-profit corporation, established in 1946. The membership consists of over 12,000 professional women of color in 274 chapters located in 42 states, the District of Columbia and the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. It is one of the nation’s oldest and largest volunteer service organizations of extraordinary women who are committed to enriching, sustaining and ensuring the culture and economic survival of African Americans and other persons of African ancestry. 209-481-5387 info@stocktonlinksinc.org A C

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2013 Links members

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Bessie Baker, Debra Weaver and Irene Outlaw

Nora Clipper, Wilamina Henry and Essie Gilchrist E

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Marguerite and Carl Toliver

Marcia Elam and Anna Sykes

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Delta Fusion A Community Celebration

Building a Community, Igniting Creativity PRESS RELEASE PHOTOS COURTESY OF DELTA FUSION

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eltaFusion is a community celebration of the rich natural and cultural diversity of Stockton

and the San Joaquin Delta region. On June 29, in Victory Park, giant puppets and community performers will join together in a parade and pageant telling the story of local people, their cultures, and how they all came to be here. This year’s theme is “The Strength of Many.” Cathie McClellan, producer and artistic director of DeltaFusion, says, “We really seek out diverse cultures, diverse immigrant populations. We try to get everyone we possibly can involve, with the big goal in mind – that little by little, Stockton becomes a better place to live because we trust [one another], and love working together.” Puppets and masks for the pageant are created during free community workshops at the University of the Pacific’s Theatre Arts Department, June 10-21. Volunteer workshop mentors, artists and teachers recruited from the local communities will meet for three sessions of Big Builds on May 11 and 18 and June 1 to learn about building masks and puppets, and initiate creation of the largest puppets, some of them up to 20 feet tall. ➤

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DeltaFusion is currently recruiting mentors and participants for the free community workshops. There is no cost to participate. To register, contact the Haggin Museum’s Malloy Education Center at 209-940-6315 or education@hagginmuseum.org. A registration form is also available online at www.DeltaFusionStockton.com. All local cultural groups, both adults and children, are invited to participate in the workshops and pageant. DeltaFusion’s goal is to empower them to be artists, to learn something new, and discover that through working together they can build a successful community. During the workshops, the participants will create colorful and unique masks and puppets using techniques from simple cardboard cut-outs to papier mâché. Lead artist and workshop director Lisa Cooperman is excited to start registration for the third consecutive year of workshops. She comments, “The Delta Fusion workshops are a great place for families to have fun and make art together. The projects are designed for folks ages 5 to 500, and of all artistic abilities; they’re a place where really everyone is laughing and talking and getting sticky with papier mâché. The pageant is the magical place where it all comes together, and we can hear a collective intake of breath when the puppets come alive.” The mission of DeltaFusion is to celebrate community, and ignite creativity while telling the stories of the San Joaquin Delta region with giant puppets, music, and pageantry. In partnership with the University of the Pacific and Haggin Museum, DeltaFusion is a funded by community grants and sponsorships. It is also a recipient of a grant from The James Irvine Foundation. ■

Learn more about DeltaFusion: www.deltafusionstockton.com www.facebook.com/deltafusion www.youtube.com/deltafusionstockton


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Was located on the corner of Pacific Avenue and Ben Holt. It was one of Stockton’s most popular restaurants during the 1970s. It was later moved to become the Pollardville Chicken Kitchen off Highway 99. Rasputin Music currently stands in its original spot in Lincoln Center South.

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Dr. Jeanette “Jet” Reed Age: 50 Occupation: Chiropractor How long I’ve lived in San Joaquin County: I was born here. The people who mean the most to me: My mom, my son, and my twin sister. Favorite SJ County place to take friends when they come to visit: Oak Grove Regional Park A key event in my life and the impact it had on me: The birth of my son – it made me understand how love can grow bigger every day, and has no limit. Favorite Sports Team: San Francisco 49ers – My father went to the first game at Kezar Stadium with his father and brothers. What I’m reading now: Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual Favorite Vacation Destination: Florence, Italy Hobbies: Drawing, gardening, sculpting, and dancing Sports I enjoy: Bikram Yoga (yes, it’s a sport), swimming and basketball. Pet: Purdy, a Chihuahua mix, and Charlie, the tuxedo cat Favorite food/dessert: Chocolate cream pie – made by my mom I “give back” by volunteering with the following organizations: St. Mary’s Dining Room Hall My favorite quotes: “I treat each day as if it were my last, for life in all its moments is full of glory.” — Helen Keller Favorite childhood memories: Santa Cruz Boardwalk with my family, blackberry picking with my grandma, Sherwood Manor swimming pool, roller skating around and around the block, and Fourth of July at Legion Park.

PHOTO BY LINDSAY ORTEZ


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Remembering the Way We Were Fashion Show Stockton Opera Guild

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Through a series of social and fund-raising events, the Stockton Opera Guild helps to underwrite the costs of the annual opera productions our community is so fortunate to enjoy. They also organize and fund the Stockton Opera Guild Kathe Underwood Scholarship Competition, which provides financial awards to promising young singers who plan to study opera. Email: info@stocktonopera.org

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Colleen Fetters and Shannon Stockton

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Sandy Grupe Huber

Yvonne DuBois-Hill, Margaret Zuckerman, Anne Struek and Sharon Smith

Sharon Smith, Jeri Riddiford and Courtney Harrel

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Jennifer Gil, Lauren and Miya Meskis

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LIBRARY

BY HEATHER MOMPEAN

s a Mom About the Town, I think it’s pretty important to write about

Every now and then my brother would check on me. He would

one particular goldmine that can be found locally, used for free, enjoyed for

stand in the back row as though he was too cool for storytime, but

a variety of reasons and is perfect for all ages... the library! Yes, the library.

the truth is he liked them, too. Even adults would plop down on the

I met my local library, the Manteca Branch, when I was just a little girl.

library floor and get caught up in the fun.

My brother and I would visit the place fairly regularly, and in the summer

Though I was just a kid, I learned a lot at the library. I learned to

months, we darn near moved in! We lived about 2 miles away from our

be a better reader, I learned to make friends, I learned how to pay off

local branch, and as soon as we’d wake up, long after our mom went to

debt, and I learned that losing a book makes moms mad. I had fun

work, we would throw on some mismatched clothes, eat breakfast, dig our

at the library. Reading book after book provided me the opportunity

bikes out of the garage, and pedal our rumps to the library to hang out

to let my imagination run free. From the comfort of a brightly colored

for the day.

chair I was able to visit all kinds of faraway places, meet interesting

Once there, I would hang out in the children’s section and read book after book and excitedly await storytime. I almost always got there early

people, and explore the world in a way that my reality just wasn’t able.

enough to secure front-row seating. Storytimes were magical to me.

I don’t know exactly how old I was, but at some point my trips

Storytime wasn’t just about reading a book; it was about living the book.

to the library became less frequent. As a teen, listening to music,

The librarian would use a variety of voices, expressions and gestures that

dancing, roller skating, playing with makeup, and giggling at boys

made each character in the book come alive, making me laugh and giggle

became more interesting, I guess.

for what seemed like hours.

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However, when I started college, the library and I had a fling. I

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would visit in the late nights to do research or to have a quiet place to study for a final. I wasn’t there for fun; I was there to work. It paid off. I graduated a couple of times with a couple different degrees, and after that, the library and I broke up again. Until I had children. Now I am back and in a very big way! I love the library! Not just the place, but the people! The experts that work at a library are so much more than book checker-outers and fine collectors. They live and breathe books, reading, and literacy, and are way more knowledgeable than Google, Bing, and Yahoo. I go for storytime, summer reading programs, science wizard events, black-light puppet shows, and more. The kids are mesmerized. They are learning. And they are having fun. Just like the fun I had all those years ago. ➤


My hope is that my kids realize that they never outgrow the library. Even when they become teens, the library will still have something to offer them. While storytimes and puppet shows might be the hook for the young, they have so much more for every age! They have live music, cooking demonstrations, exercise classes, book clubs, knitting groups and more! So much more! They bring in authors, directors, producers, artists and snakes. Yes! Snakes! A reptile expert and wildlife team bring in real live animals! Animals that I can’t even see at local zoos, but there they are – at the Library. The library! All of this for free! Free! Like, it costs nothing. Nada. Zip. Zero. It’s free! Basically what i am saying is: Don’t forget the library! Really! You don’t need kids, you don’t need to be enrolled in school, you just need some time. Take the time, check out the library! You won’t be disappointed. And on the days the library is closed, no worries. You can check out audiobooks and eBooks to download to most any phone, tablet or reading device? Free. Easy peasy.   The library – it really is a goldmine. This reminds me: I have to get the kids signed up for the Summer Reading Program! ■

Check out the local Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library online at www.ssjcpl.org

Clickity on over to the bloggity: www.momaboutthetown.com Join in on Facebook: www.facebook.com/momaboutthetown


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2 013 Go Red For Women Luncheon American Heart Association A A

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American Heart Association Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. That single purpose drives all we do. The need for our work is beyond question. Go Red For Women速 celebrates the energy, passion and power we have as women to band together to wipe out heart disease and stroke. 209-477-2683

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Mary Ann Lagorio, Beverly Sambado, Lois Billigmeier, Olga Croce, Marie Demartini and Lorene Freggiaro C E

Mary Lou Sidener and Diane Vigil

Kristie Goes, Debbie Armstrong and Susan McCormac

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Drs. Antoinette and Michael Herrera

Carol Kovacs and Kathy Earle

Tammy Parrino, Melody Martinez, Sherie Almaas and Annette Fisher

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TEACHING GOOD HABIT$

BY JENNIFER TORRES SIDERS

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he federal government estimates that as many as 17 million adults

To help support the ongoing efforts of Sus Finanzas, the organization

across the country live in households where no one has a bank account,

has planned Fiesta and Finance, a fundraiser scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m.

making it difficult for them to establish credit, and leaving them to rely

on July 12. The event, to be held at Stockton Hilton, will feature dinner,

on payday loans, check-cashing businesses and other potentially risky

dancers and no-host cocktails. Reservations are $60 before June 1 and

options. The problem is especially prevalent in low-income and minority

$75 afterward. For ticket information: 209-470-1250. ■

communities. “The key is to educate people … before they develop bad habits,” says Leandro Vicuña, founder of Sus Finanzas, an organization that offers free financial guidance and education to the county’s underserved residents. Vicuña, a vice president with Community Bank of San Joaquin, founded Sus Finanzas in 2011 in an effort to support improved financial literacy and economic stability among local families. Since then more than 100 clients have completed the organization’s interactive financial literacy course. About 10 of them have received $250 each in an incentive program that matches the funds clients deposit into their newly opened savings accounts. “We are witnessing how our participants are reversing bad financial habits and implementing sound habits,” Vicuña notes. “We are gaining support from local community banks and larger banks for our innovative financial and economical programs.” Vicuña – whose father, Guillermo Vicuña, founded the widely acclaimed health-services organization, Su Salud – recently was honored by the San Joaquin County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce with the John Aguilar Spirit Award. “What an honor,” he says. “I didn’t expect to receive such a respectable award. A big reason why I received it was due to my outstanding team at Sus Finanzas.” Now, he said, he hopes to expand the group’s services, providing programs at local high schools, charter schools and San Joaquin Delta College.

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T R A V E L

Exploring the natural beauty of

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ast year when I drove 5,000 miles in

that made it a national park. My poor children

Gulf of Mexico to find a small island with a fort

ten days on my vacation, most people thought

spent hour after hour in the back seat of the

built on it. The second reason it can be difficult

I was crazy. Who would want to spend that

car, and to this day they all kid me that they

is because new ones are created. Years ago

much time in a car? Well, as it turns out, I do.

have enlarged bladders because I didn’t stop as

when I visited Savannah, Georgia, there was

I am on a quest to see all of the national parks

often as I should have. But putting that aside,

not a national park in that area. Now Congress

in the continental United States. At this time,

they loved seeing these wonderful parks, and

has created Congaree National Park, so I will

there are forty-seven national parks, including

speak fondly about the memories we made.

return.

the brand-new one just created in California:

After I had visited all of the national parks

People frequently ask me what is my

Pinnacles National Park. I have visited forty-

in the west, I started reaching out to different

favorite park. I would have to say that

one of these beautiful parks so far, and I hope

parts of the United States to visit more and

Yellowstone is probably my favorite. It has so

to visit the rest of them within the next few

more parks. Then I decided that I wanted to

much to offer with its natural beauty of forest,

years.

make it my goal to visit all of them. I soon

rivers and lakes, waterfalls and meadows. Then

When my children were old enough to sit in

found out this is harder than it looks, for two

it has all of the geothermal activity of boiling

the car for long periods of time, I started taking

reasons. First, many of the parks are located

mud pots and geysers like Old Faithful. But the

them on driving vacations to visit some of the

in very remote locations, often on the road to

one thing that no other national park offers is

national parks in the western United States. I

nowhere. Take for instance the Dry Tortugas

that it has animals. I can remember that within

soon discovered that if a park had earned the

National Park; first you have to get to Florida,

the first hour my children were in the park

designation of a national park, it was definitely

drive down to Key West, and then get in a

they saw buffalo, elk, deer, bighorn sheep,

worth visiting. There was something special

boat and travel an hour and a half out into the

antelope, moose and a coyote. Where ➤

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T R A V E L

Your National Park Bucket List

BY LARRY FRENCH

Forty-one …and Counting else in the world can you go and see that

Canyon. Each park is so unique. Just hike up

many animals in such a short time, outside

to the delicate arch and you will wonder how

of a zoo? When I returned to the park last

nature created such an unbelievable structure

year for the first time in many years, I saw all

out in the middle of nowhere.

of the above, and was also able to see and

I currently have plans to visit Voyagers,

photograph a mother grizzly bear with two

Isle Royale and Cuyahoga Valley National

cubs. Absolutely spectacular!

Parks later this year. I am sure I will visit

National parks are not limited to just

Pinnacles National Park this summer because

beautiful mountain parks like Yellowstone,

it is so close to us, and that will leave me

Yosemite, and Glacier. There are parks with

with only two parks left to visit: Hot Springs

desert landscapes like Arches, the Grand

in Arkansas and Congaree in South Carolina.

Canyon and Saguaro. Also, parks like Biscayne

I know this is a tough challenge to complete

and the Dry Torguas have great areas of the

but I am sure that I will make my goal to see

ocean preserved for future generations. In

all forty-seven of the continental national

addition, there are caves to see in parks like

parks. So get packing and join in the fun –

Carlsbad Caverns, Wind Cave and Mammoth.

you won’t be disappointed. ■

I thoroughly enjoyed exploring the ruins of the cliff-dwelling American Indians at Mesa Verde and taking a mule ride down into the Grand

Discover National Park Services online www.nps.gov/state/ca

lifestyles

❑ Acadia National Park, Maine ❑ Arches National Park, Utah ❑ Badlands National Park, South Dakota ❑ Big Bend National Park, Texas ❑ Biscayne National Park, Florida ❑ Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado ❑ Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah ❑ Canyonlands National Park, Utah ❑ Capitol Reef National Park Utah ❑ Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico ❑ Channel Islands National Park, California ❑ Congaree National Park, South Carolina ❑ Crater Lake National Park, Oregon ❑ Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio ❑ Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada ❑ Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida ❑ Everglades National Park, Florida ❑ Glacier National Park, Montana ❑ Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona ❑ Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming ❑ Great Basin National Park, Nevada ❑ Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado ❑ Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina and Tennessee ❑ Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas ❑ Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas ❑ Isle Royale National Park, Michigan ❑ Joshua Tree National Park, California ❑ Kings Canyon National Park, California ❑ Lassen Volcanic Park, California ❑ Mammoth Cave Park, Kentucky ❑ Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado ❑ Mount Rainier National Park, Washington ❑ North Cascades National Park, Washington ❑ Olympic National Park, Washington ❑ Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona ❑ Pinnacles National Park, California ❑ Redwood National Park, California ❑ Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado ❑ Saguaro National Park, Arizona ❑ Sequoia National Park, California ❑ Shenandoah National Park, Virginia ❑ Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota ❑ Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota ❑ Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota ❑ Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming ❑ Yosemite National Park, California ❑ Zion National Park, Utah

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2 013 33rd Annual Women’s Center Luncheon Women’s Center Youth and Family Services A A

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The Women’s Center Youth and Family Services’ primary mission is to build a stronger community by fostering the strengths in adults, children, youth, and families by providing a wide range of supportive, educational, and crisis intervention services, enabling them to regain control of their lives. 209-941-2611 www.womenscenteryfs.org

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Mia Dofflemyer, Bella Camfield, Debbie Holmerud, Jordan Lee, Olivia Hall and Sasha Ramos Kathy Morrissey, Lisa O’Leary and Becky Moffitt PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

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Library and Literacy Foundation A A

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The mission of the Library and Literacy Foundation for San Joaquin County is to support programs in our communities that foster literacy and promote the power of reading to enrich lives. www.sjcliteracy.org Phone 209-910-4548

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Collen Foster and Shari Garibaldi E

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Suzy Daveluy and Lisa Lee

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Murad, Masood and Zayd Cajee

Susan Carson, Jean McGurk, Barbara Schwartz, Ava Simpson, Sally Edmonds and Nishka Yudnich

Shayne Miles, Anna James, Keith Baisy, Manuel Rodriguez and Dulce Guzman PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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T R A V E L

The Sund al I

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BY MICHELLE HART

f Europe is calling your name but not your budget, I have the

Segways… and strollers… and I think you get the idea. There is so

adventure for you! Hop in your car and head to Redding! Yes, Redding!

much action around this bridge, it fills life with energy. The energy of

That is where you will find Santiago Calatrava’s exquisite Sundial Bridge.

the sun, the energy of nature, the energy of the bridge and the energy

This bridge has the distinct flair of a famous architect, while the tourists

of people all combine to create what my son calls… ”a good vibe.”

embody the easygoing “timeless” sense that Europeans are known for!

Our adventure to the bridge was meant to be a detour from a

Spanning the Sacramento River, 700 feet long, 23 feet wide and costing

college visit to my son in Chico; however, we ended up staying and

23 million dollars, this bridge will blow your mind!

meandering down to the water, throwing rocks, getting an Italian ice,

Meant to be an intersection of the human and natural worlds,

and people/dog watching for hours. No one wanted to leave! Figuring

the Sundial Bridge adds a sense of awe to all who cross it; and cross

out how the sundial works is a bit intimidating – I know somehow

it people do… along with dogs… and scooters… and bikes… and

the summer solstice is involved, but my naiveté only seemed to trouble

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T R A V E L

Bridge me… not the hundreds of people around me enjoying each other and the day, so I went with the flow and enjoyed life and the beauty of creation! This is truly one incredible piece of artwork! When Calatrava described his design he called it, “a goose in flight, with the pylon representing a wing.” Apropos there were several birds in flight showing off their weightlessness, vying for attention from the bridge! The synchronicity of the moment was not lost, and each of us went away thinking, ”I can’t believe this is here!” ■

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Wag Tales Adoptable Dog

REX I am a: Miniature dachshund/Chihuahua mix. Age: I am 1½ years old Where I live now: In Stockton with my foster parents Lynne and John, who are helping me to find my forever home. Best moment: The best moment of my day every day is when my foster daddy’s car pulls into the driveway at night. Favorite activity: My favorite activity is snuggling into my foster mommy and daddy’s necks and showering their faces with lots of sloppy sweet kisses… and I am all about the tummy rubs. Favorite treat: My favorite treat is cottage cheese (I am a bit of a health nut) or a nice plain yogurt once in a while… and I adore grilled salmon if you want to bring home a nice doggy bag for me! Yummy! Guilty pleasure: My favorite guilty pleasure would have to be French vanilla ice cream… mommy always lets me have a bite, and I love it! Other interesting info about me: I have a skin condition that makes me a special-needs dog. It caused me to lose my hair, so I look a little funny, but it is not contagious or messy, and I am happy and healthy. I love to snuggle, and I am sweet and affectionate. I am a little shy at first, but warm up to strangers quickly. And as a bonus… I never shed on your furniture or clothes! My ideal home: I need a human parent who has plenty of time for me, and is willing to give me medicated baths, cover me with sunscreen in the sun, and provide warm clothing in the cold.

If you are interested in making Rex a part of your family, contact Marilyn Williams at Pups Rescue at pupsrescue@hotmail.com, or call 209-956-3004 (before 9 p.m. only)

PHOTO BY ASHLEY BLACKARD lifestyles

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On Top Of

“Muse, tell me of the man of many wiles, the man who wandered many paths of exile…” — The Odyssey of Homer

STORY BY JASON ROTH PHOTOS COURTESY OF JESUS MOUNTAIN COFFEE AND THE RECORD

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arely in this life do we afford ourselves

a chance to experience something that transcends our physical senses. We maroon ourselves in our offices or our homes with a resounding notion that tomorrow will be the day. That later will never turn into now. We kindle adventure with the Travel Channel, and we skirt responsibility of our own destiny. But, what if life could still be simple and allow us the opportunity to escape… to dream? ➤

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S P O T L I G H T

Now, what if the answer was so simple,

immediately, he fell in love with the people and

would be sitting atop a grassy knoll, in the

you probably engage in it everyday? What if

the country. He spent much of his time working

dark, watching his former bosses’ hacienda

your adventure came in a 16-ounce bag of

for an American who owned many different

burn to the ground, after the Sandinistas set

roasted goodness? Still guessing? It’s coffee.

business interests in northern Nicaragua, but

it on fire in an attempt to show their dislike

At this point, you are probably wondering,

Bing quickly discovered he had a passion

and distrust for the American presence in their

“What does coffee have to do with my

for coffee. After a few years of working in

country. Bing recalls, “We sat on a hillside in

destiny?” And now for that simple answer:

the countryside of Nueva Segovia, political

the cool of the night and watched a family’s

everything.

unrest slowly made its way from nonviolent

legacy burn to the ground, sipping a bottle of

The country of Nicaragua has seen

protesting in Managua, to all-out civil war.

Flor de Caña”

many civil wars, political injustice and the

The conflict arose between the (US-backed)

In the coming days, Bing would make his

manipulation of its people. And one man,

Somoza family and the FSLN, or Sandinista

way back to Managua, behind the safety of

born and raised in Stockton, experienced all

National Liberation Front. “At night,” Bing

the Somoza regime. He was able to secure an

of this firsthand. Bing Kirk, owner and roaster

remembers, “you could lay in bed and hear

airline ticket, but it was not valid for 24 hours.

of Jesus Mountain Coffee Co., began traveling

the gunshots echoing throughout the valleys

Bing spent his last night in Nicaragua trying to

and living in Nicaragua in the 1970s. Almost

and hills around the farms.” Weeks later, Bing

stay safe in his hotel room. ➤

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S P O T L I G H T

It would not be until many years later that he would return, under the suggestion of a friend from high school who lived in Nicaragua before and after the conflict. “Dave got ahold of me and told me of the opportunity back in Nic. There were many coffee farms in the hills above Jalapa, Nueva Segovia that were abandoned when the conflict had started 15-20 years earlier,” Bing reflects. “So I headed down with Mike [Atherton], and we fell in love with the country all over again. We united 30 abandoned farms, and decided to name it after the mountain that towered over the small valley: Jesus Mountain Coffee.” To describe “The Farm,” as it is fondly referred to, is to have you imagine The Land Before Time, Land of

the Lost, a 1980s Vietnam movie and heaven all in one instance. It is somewhat obvious why the early Spanish explorers named the mountain Cerro de Jesús. The mountain provides water for the entire Jalapa Valley, a population of over 50,000 people. You are awestruck and humbled and left with wonderment at how you, a nobody-special kid from Stockton, CA (if you are in fact, from Stockton) could end up somewhere so beautiful. In the 13 years Bing and Mike have owned the farm, there are many fond memories of having to ride in on donkeys, traversing flooded roads, or most recently, have a world-renowned chef come and tour the farm, and share in what many consider the finest form of community: eating a meal together. And now, you wonder, where is the destiny? Where does my journey begin? Well, lucky for you, and lucky for Stockton, we have found a rare

will sizzle at the satisfaction of knowing your coffee is from seed to cup. From beginning to end.

spot for you to experience a hint of another life. To envelop yourself

So you are invited to our new location, in a very unassuming historic

into another world while exploring the stories Bing is willing to tell you.

building, in the alley behind 235 N. San Joaquin Street. See where

You have the opportunity to taste the soil, the sun, the pollination,

the beans and the history of the coffee ancestry can be traced and

the shade and the rain that produces award-winning coffee. You have the chance to see it being roasted. For those of you who know coffee is your morning Muse… you can now rest assured that your taste buds

appreciated. You are always welcome. For more information contact Jesus Mountain Coffee Company at 209-603-8292. ■

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

STORY BY JACKIE KORBOLZ PHOTOS BY TIM ULMER

A Vision, A Dream, A Conclusion

I

n 2001, Hospice House, the serene complex for terminally ill patients

evening of wines and hors d'oeuvres from top local restaurants, made

on Pacific Avenue, was little more than a blueprint. Yet Sharon

its debut on Brookside’s Heron Lakes Drive. Unlike the tea, men were

Benninger, a hospice volunteer, knew the new home would require

invited to attend. The rest is Hospice House history. Indeed, the two events were so successful the volunteers decided to

additional fundraising if it was to thrive once it opened. Eager for ideas, she

create a formal auxiliary as the fundraising arm of Hospice. They named

invited several volunteers to

the new group the Butterfly Auxiliary, a nod to the hospice logo and its

her house for tea, including

rich symbolism of new life. By the time Hospice House accepted its first

Barbara Tognoli, Executive

patient in 2004, the auxiliary had recruited women from throughout

support all

Director of Hospice at the

San Joaquin County. Fundraising was in high gear!

Hospice

time. Her plan worked. May

Fast-forward to 2013. Since 2002, the auxiliary has raised more

Eversole, a patient volunteer,

than 1 million dollars to help maintain Hospice House. In 2012 alone,

suggested

the Stockton chapter presented a $130,000 check to current CEO of

“Fundraising, the only way to

programs, was the only way to grow and excel in excellence.” — Barbara Tognoli

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organizing

a

formal tea with elegant

Hospice House, Stephen Guasco. The two Hospice signature events are now among the sought-after

place settings and an inviting would

tickets on the benefit calendar for residents of San Joaquin County.

handle all the details. The

This year’s Champagne & English Tea attracted more than 400 guests.

proceeds would go to the

On August 17, the 13th Annual Moonlight Sip and Stroll, Hospice of

new Hospice House.

San Joaquin's showcase fundraising event, will unfold. The Butterfly

menu.

Volunteers

One year later, Benninger

Auxiliary now has 125 members with chapters in Stockton, Lodi and

and fellow volunteer Shirley Luke hosted a ladies’ afternoon tea in

Tracy – a long leap from their twelve founders. Their efforts have

Benninger's home. It was such a success Luke decided it needed a

reaped rich rewards. To date, more than 2,000 terminally ill patients

companion fundraising event. Three months later, the Sip & Stroll, an

have been cared for at the Hospice House. ■

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S W E E T

C H A R I T Y

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN A A

A B

Champagne and English Tea Champagne and English Tea A C

FA

EA

E A C

A G

F

G

BR: Cathy Lutz, Pat Delucchi & Daisey Plovnick FR: Diana Cloos, Lesta Stevens & Julie Ebenhack Mary Morse, Mine Vang, Cherry Lorenzo, Eden Cabrigas and Suesta Cordoza E

BJ Stewart and Pat Gabbard

A D

F

D

B

Jan Heiman, Norma Miller and Sharon Walker

Jenna & Debbie Halvorson, Tuesday Borgh, Summer Henney & Taylor Linesburgh

Chinu Mehdi and Surinder Judge

G

Marilyn Kellen and Claudia Strobel


P E E K

A

B O U T I Q U E

a

STORY AND PHOTOS BY CHARLEEN EARLEY

taste

P

eace and serenity. It’s what you’ll feel the

second you walk through the doors of Olive Heaven on North School Street in Lodi.

of heaven 68

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Owner Jasmine Harris designed her store that way, not only because the olive branch is symbolic of peace, but because olive oils are simply divine to her. ➤


“It’s heavenly and ethereal. The décor is designed to be relaxing, soothing and elegant, but not standoffish,” said Harris, who opened Olive Heaven on December 3, 2012. She’s also the only olive oil boutique around. Her only competition is herself, since she opened a second store in Jackson in May of last year. Harris currently features 47 varieties of flavorful gourmet olive oils to taste with bread dippers and purchase from her boutique, include Basil Infused, Black Truffle Extra Virgin, Blood Orange, Chipotle Flavor Infused, Toasted Sesame and Garlic Mushroom. With a constant rotation, products don’t stay on her shelves for long. Some oils are produced locally – Calivirgin for example – and once harvested and packaged, Harris’s customers gladly come in to claim their oils. She also sells a variety of premium balsamic vinegars which she teaches her customers how to pair with olive oils; however, when it comes to selecting her favorites, Harris has a difficult time narrowing it down. “Virtually every product I have in the store, I’ve used at home for cooking, used as salad dressing, or drizzled over fruit,” she said. “Ones I use most often are the Meyer Lemon Olive Oil and the Basil Infused Olive Oil.” Classes and workshops are a regular feature in her store, where local experts in the field of olive oils, vinegars, and most recently teas, come in and teach. She says her customers are the most important part of her business. “Customer service is our number-one priority in every aspect of our business,” said Harris, a Stockton native, living in Galt with her husband John and daughter Cheyenne. “I have tons of products I still taste, because I want the best taste for our customers. I don’t want them to think olive oil is a luxury or specialty item; I want them to use it every day from their pantry.” ■

OLIVE HEAVEN 10 N. School Street • Lodi, CA 95240 209-331-5766 www.olive-heaven.com


JOAN JET T AND THE BLACKHEARTS

MELISSA ETHERIDGE LIVE

FRIDAY AUGUST 2ND

WHISKEY DAWN

SATURDAY JULY 20TH

BIG & RICH:

PARTY LIKE COWBOYZ TOUR

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

COWBOY TROY

SATURDAY AUGUST 10 TH

2013 Chicken Ranch Summer Concert Series at Ironstone Vineyards

Tickets: ironstonevineyards.com or etix.com (800) 514-3849


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

2 013 Easter Basket Luncheon Lady Bugs A A

A C

A B

A D

Lady Bugs Thelma Stewart and her gang of Lady Bugs have been fundraising for nearly 40 years to benefit area school programs for people with special needs. The annual Easter basket sale, held at Thelma’s home, is a favorite spring event.

EA

A

Diane White, Claudia Cozad and Thalia Virden C E

FA

B

Thelma Stewart

Dorothy Heisler, Pattti Benbrook and Patricia Garcia D

Pat and Brett Avery

Pat Ehlers, Norma Kaeslin, Elaine Kortzeborn and Walsie Jennings

F

Andy Prokop and Hazel Hill

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

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H E A L T H

&

W E L L N E S S

H20

Benefits of

water

BY EUNICE GREEN, NHD

D

ehydration is perhaps the most common, yet largely

unrecognized problem, with hydrating being the easiest, most cost effective way of combating illness. So often, people will tell me that they drink lots of water, walk around with a bottle of water all day long, sipping on it. Yet when we journal the amount that this person drinks, we find that they are sorely lacking in drinking enough. Many people believe that because they drink tea, coffee, soft drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks and juices, that they are getting enough water. But the more of these beverages you consume, the more dehydrated you become as many of these drinks contain caffeine, alcohol, sugar, artificial sweeteners, or other chemicals that act as strong dehydrators. You cannot substitute these other drinks for good quality water. Drinks with caffeine trigger stress responses that have a diuretic effect, leading to increased urination. Beverages with sugar drastically raise blood sugar levels. ➤

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H E A L T H

&

W E L L N E S S

Those who live for many years without proper hydration are the

Often when people are retaining water, they feel that they need to

most likely to succumb to the buildup of toxins in the body. Chronic

cut down on their consumption of water. The opposite is true. When

disease is always accompanied by dehydration, and in many cases,

the body doesn’t get enough water, it holds on to as much as it can.

caused by it.

Our bodies are smarter than we are. When this happens, the body will sometimes crave salt as it needs more salt to retain the water. Then the

■ Problems with heart disease? Drink more water. ■ Problems with obesity? Drink more water. ■ Problems with memory? Drink more water. ■ Have stomach ulcers? Drink more water. ■ Want more energy? Drink more water. ■ Problems with constipation? Drink more water. ■ Noticing wrinkles when you look in the mirror? Drink more water.

kidneys contract and the filtering process breaks down, and the urine becomes concentrated and scarce. If you have not been drinking enough water, it is best to gradually increase the hydration process. Increase about 1 glass a day until you are up to the allotted amount for your body. You will be amazed at how good you feel, the results you see in your health and your energy levels. Being adequately hydrated is the most important therapy, as there is

Even simple, common illness such as colds and flu’ are helped with more water. Bacteria and viruses do not thrive in a well-hydrated body. Not drinking enough water will undermine all body functions; every single cell in the body needs water. There are 60-100 trillion cells in the body and every single one of those cells needs water to maintain efficient digestion, metabolism and waste removal. So, how much is enough? Take your body weight, divide it by 2 and that is how many ounces you need to drink every day. Getting that much water will not happen with “sipping.” It takes a very concerted effort to drink enough water. A few tips: start the day by drinking one glass of water to end the night “drought;” this also helps to remove accumulated wastes from the night. About half hour before each meal, drink one glass of water. Don’t drink with your meal, as this will dilute the digestive juices necessary to break down your food. Drink lots of water between meals – not just sipping, but drinking larger amounts. Remember to drink before you get thirsty; if you wait until you are thirsty, it means that you are in a very dehydrated state.

not one part of the body that does not depend on it. ■

EUNICE GREEN, NHD


H E A L T H

&

W E L L N E S S


S C E N E

A N D

B E

S E E N

2 013 Pops & Picnic

Stockton Symphony Association

A A

A B

A C

A D

The Stockton Symphony is the third-oldest continuously performing orchestra in California, surpassed in longevity only by the San Francisco Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The Stockton Symphony is conducted by Maestro Peter Jaffe, now in his sixteenth season. 209-951-0196 www.stocktonsymphony.org

EA

A

Jim and Hazel Hill C

E

B

FA

Natalie Mosqueda, Jennica Harrison and Cara Sacco

Judy Tippett-Whyte and Carol Tippett Whitaker

Denise Jefferson, Coby Ward and Harvey Williams

F

D

Larry and Linda Philipp

Eddie Davidson, Gale and Roland Hart, Janie Reddish

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN lifestyles

75


T O T

C U L T U R E

TOT CULTURE

A D D IE 5 M O N TH S G R A N D PA R EN TS : FR A N K A N D PA T K IM

T E LE N A K A LI R O S E ER R EZ LO R IA G U TI 3 Y EA R S O LD RRY AND G JE : TS EN R G R A N D PA

C O LT O N JR . 5 M O N TH S O LD PA RE N TS : TA LI SH A L. A N D CO LT O N G.

K IN Z LE E 1 8 M O N TH S G R EG A N D M EG A N R EY N ER

BE NT LY JO LY NN 3 YE AR S OL D ST AC EY HO US TO N GR AN DM OT HE R: 76

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T O T

PA

C U L T U R E

LUCY LD R A 4 YE S O N LE IL G N N R E N T: A

O L IV E R LEVI 10 MONT HS OLD PARENTS : R IL E Y A ND

KAYLA C OX

OP AL LE NA 2 MO NT HS OL D GR AN DP AR EN TS : JA CK IE AN D JIM SIN IG AG LIA

JU LIA N AG UIL AR 2 YE AR S OL D IO PA RE NT : DE NIS E OS OR

GIANNA 3 YEARS OLD GRANDPARENTS: CAROL AND ANDY PROKOP

T A Y LO R R E ESE 3 M O N TH S O LD GRANDPAR EN T: LO IS M . SA H Y O U N

lifestyles

77


June ~ Mark the date

CONCERTS IN THE PARK Every Wednesday evening, June 5 through August 21, bring a

friend, a picnic supper and enjoy great music at Concerts in the Park, beginning at 6 p.m. Held at Victory Park, at Pershing Avenue and Argonne Way, Stockton, concerts are free. Lawn chairs and picnics are welcome! For further information, call 209-478-9388

5

7

THE 28TH STOCKTON SUNRISE ROTARY ANNUAL WINE TASTING

Sip wine and stroll through the Micke Grove Park Museum, taste delicious food, listen to amazing music, all while you support SJ Historical Society and Micke Grove Zoo. Friday, June 7 from 5:00 to 8:30 p.m. is when all this fun will happen. For more information or tickets, call 209-931-4009 or visit www.stocktonsunrise.org

8

I AM READY YOUTH CONFERENCE

The I AM READY Youth Conference brings celebrities, community leaders, and more than 3,000 young adults together to uplift the city of Stockton and empower the community to inspire change through culture. Slated for Saturday, June 8, the conference will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Stockton Civic Auditorium. For information, call 209-565-0161 or contact info@iamready.org

SPACE IS THE PLACE FEATURING JOSE HERNANDEZ

8

Check out this new exhibition “a View from Space” at The Haggin Museum on Saturday June 8 from 1:30 to 4:00 p.m. Learn how our small blue planet looks from miles above. Jose Hernandez will be there to talk about his journey through many frontiers, and all the way to outer space. For more information, call 209-940-6300 or visit www.hagginmuseum.org.

SESAME STREET LIVE AT STOCKTON ARENA

You won’t want to miss this date with your favorite Sesame Street characters! Singing, dancing, so much musical magic to enjoy! Join Elmo, Grover, and Baby Bear as they sing along with Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie! Tuesday, June 11 through Wednesday, June 12 at the Stockton Arena. For more information, call 209-373-1400.

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12

IT’S FAIR TIME!

The San Joaquin County Fair in Stockton is one of Northern California’s premier county fairs. Held June 12 through June 16, the fair features fun for everyone with big-name concerts, horse racing, a carnival, agriculture, livestock, food, live entertainment, and exhibits. There’s something to do for everyone – which makes the Fair a great event to take your family and friends. For more information, call 209-466-5041 or contact fun@sanjoaquinfair.com.

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June ~ Mark the date SATURDAY, JUNE 15TH

100% of Proceeds Benefit the United Way • Advance Registration at www.FleetFeetStockton.com

For questions and sponsorship information, contact: Fleet Feet Sports: 952-1446, staff@fleetfeetstockton.com Peter Pijl: 601-1912, paytersgrill@aol.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 14TH • 6 to 9 PM YMCA WINE STROLL

LIVE! AT LINCOLN CENTER YMCA WINE STROLL Taste wine from more than 15 local wineries, enjoy savory hors d’oeuvres and live

Wine Tasting ($20) • Hors D’oeuvres Live Music by Mojo Swingers & Other Local Musicians Proceeds benefit the YMCA of San Joaquin County

14

FRIDAY, JULY 19TH • 6 to 9 PM FAMILY BIKE NIGHT

Thank You to Our Sponsors:

Enter to Win A Bicycle! Jumbo Slide Live Music by RBX

music, shop and dine… all while supporting the YMCA of San Joaquin County! You can do all this and more at the LIVE! At Lincoln Center YMCA Wine Stroll, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16TH to 9p.m. PM For more information, visit Friday, June 14, from 6:00 •to 69:00 CLASSIC CAR SHOW www.LincolnCenterShops.com. Over 200 Classic Cars

15

Live Music by 209 All Stars Proceeds benefit student scholarships

15

The Annual Moonlight Gala is being held on Saturday, FATHER/SON FUN RUN June 15, at Casa De’Lago in Get rad with your Dad at the first Father/Son Fun Acampo. This beautiful Run on Saturday, June 15, at Lincoln Center. For event awareness S T O Ccan KTO N’S PREM E fun S H Orun P P I N G & D I N I N G evening DESTIN A T I Oraises N just $10, registrants participate inI Ea R5K for the American N J A M Isnacks N H O LT R I V E A T P A C I F I C A V E N U E | S and T O Cfunds KTON and will receive BaET-shirt, andDbeverages. Cancer Society. For further WW L I N C O L Nby CENTERSHOPS.COM Following the run, there will be a W. presentation information, call 209-941-2676. Feats of Strength with guest speaker Donnie Moore of Radical Reality. All ages are welcome. Mothers and daughters welcome, too! For more information and registration, visit www.FleetFeetStockton.com.

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21

FESTA ITALIANA

27TH ANNUAL WINE TASTING AT PIXIE WOODS

A local favorite, bring out family and friends to enchanting Pixie Woods. Stroll, sip wine, and dine on amazing hors d’oeuvres on Friday, June 21, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. Tickets available at Fine Wines, Wine Wizards, or call 209-969-6048.

TASTE OF THE DELTA

13

July

The Taste of The Delta fundraiser will be held at the Village West Marina on Saturday, July 13 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The California Delta Chambers showcase Delta wineries and restaurants. Guests sample wines, food, enjoy vendor booths, silent and live auctions, and live music by Waterloo! For tickets and more information, call 209-948-2940 or contact info@californiadelta.org.

This new event, brought to you by the Pacific Italian Alliance, is a day of family fun celebrating Italian culture. Sunday, June 30 from 10:00 to 6:00 p.m. at the Waterloo Gun and Bocci Club, enjoy puppet shows, face painting, an Italian marketplace, bocce, live music and traditional Italian music featuring Pasquale Esposito and Italian dance troupes. For more information, call 209-983-4375.

20

THE STOCKTON BUDDHIST TEMPLE BON ODORI

Attend the Stockton Buddhist Temple’s opening ceremony for the Obon Festival, held on Saturday, July 20. Enjoy a parade of colorful kimono-clad dancers dancing to Japanese folk music. Entertainment during intermission will be performed by the Stockton Bukkyo Taiko. Food and refreshment are available during the program. For more information, call 209-466-6701 or contact buddhist@sbcglobal.net.

The Stockton Convention and Visitors Bureau has a complete listing of activities and events for people of all ages! For further information visit www.visitstockton.org/events-calendar

lifestyles

79


The Right Choice

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Truck RV Auto Service Center

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Lifestyles june13 online  

The New June 2013 issue of San Joaquin Lifestyles from the Stockton Record.

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