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Meramec celebrates 50 years KELLY GLUECK MANAGING EDITOR

Fifty years ago, The Missouri Junior College District laid out plans to offer over one million students the opportunity to acquire affordable higher education. Coincidentally, “The Jetsons” aired its first futuristic episode on CBS that same year. Although students have yet to fly their cars to school or jetpack to the Phillips 66 on Big Bend, the Jetsons’ housemaid robot could be comparable to modern-day Siri; or perhaps she would qualify more of a Roomba. Either way, technology has helped fulfill the futuristic dreams of gadget lovers everywhere, just as the STLCC district has helped aid more than a million students achieve their academic goals. In the next seven issues, the Montage will flashback to events within the last half See inside for stories century to show the contrast between Meramec then and Meramec now.

Smoking ban more than line in the sand Board of Trustees to vote on smoking ban KURT OBERREITHER NEWS EDITOR Before spring 2009, students, faculty and staff could find smoking receptacles outside building entrances at STLCCMeramec. This semester, signs have been posted at doorways across the district: “No smoking. Violators will be subject to fines,” they read. On Jan. 26, the Board of Trustees will vote on the recommended approval of a revised board policy that will allow violators of the district-wide tobacco ban to be subject to a $15 fine and other disciplinary action. The use of tobacco products is prohibited anywhere on campus grounds, and campus police will issue citations to violators. This is the closest the campus has come to concretely enforcing the ban in the “Tobacco-free for you and me” saga. “It certainly will enhance our ability to get compliance,” Campus Police Chief Paul Banta said. “Because if there’s something to back up the fact that we don’t want people smoking on campus, that’s going to compel the people who don’t cooperate just because it’s the right thing to do.” According to Meramec President George Wasson, faculty and staff who are caught will be given a verbal warning on their first offense and given a written warning on their second. College policy dictates that employees of the college can face disciplinary action up to termination.

(MIAC). They reached a consensus and the Campus Leadership Team approved the tobacco-free initiative. The rule was enforced in the fall of 2009. However, the rule was not official college policy and therefore a fine could not be enforced. The ban and fine must be universal at all campuses – excluding Wildwood, which has maintained a green, smoke-free environment since its inception. The ban was lifted. “You can’t just tell people to do something without consequence,” said Addison Brown, vice president of Student Governance Council. “If the people don’t govern themselves, then they have to be governed.”

STLCC enforces the smoknginkdjaksjdkasjdkjsalkdjaskldjklasjdlkjakldjaslkjdlkasjlkdjaskljkl according to Me

Wasson said they will be fined every time. “I think it will be difficult to transition to the new rule,” Banta said. “Once people get used to it, I think we’ll be fine. It’s just going to be an adjustment period like anything else that changes; it always takes some time.” In the fall of 2008, former chair of the Wellness Committee Margaret Hvatum

Albrecht reaches fo

conducted a survey of faculty, staff and students to gauge opinion on smoking on campus. After an “overwhelming” amount of participants voted that smoking should at least be restricted, the results were presented to the Student Government Association (SGA), the Meramec Academic Governance Council (MAGC) and the Meramec Institutional Affairs Council

So in the following fall of 2010, the “ban” was lifted, but the tobacco ban was back the next semester after it became board policy. He said the main focus right now is informing students of the possibility of a fine and disciplinary action. Banta said he may increase the police force after the board decision. “I know that smokers find it difficult not to smoke whenever they want,” Hvatum said. “I hope they realize that by not smoking they might be saving lives – not just theirs but other people’s lives.” Meramec is hosting free smoking cessation sessions in February. A quit smoking

700 win landmark for SPENCER GLEASON SPORTS EDITOR As the buzzer sounded at the end of the St. Louis Community College Archers 87-77 victory over the Tohono O’odham Community College Jegos, on Jan. 4, in Yuma, Ariz., Archer head coach Randy Albrecht had just reached another milestone—win number 700— again. A year after winning his career 700th game, Albrecht had now won his 700th game at the helm of junior college basketball in St. Louis. Albrecht, who had coached for three seasons at St. Louis University in the mid 1970s and compiled a record of 32-47 while coaching the Billikens, is one of only nine active coaches to have hit the landmark and one of only seven to do it while coaching the same team. “There are too many celebrations of 700 to keep track of,” Albrecht said. “It’s very confusing for the average person. It’s like— ‘this guy, he can’t remember that he won 700 last year. He’s getting old @themontage

so they have to do it every year to remind him.’” Since taking the men’s head coaching position 35 years ago at STLCC-Meramec in 1977, and continue as the STLCC Archer men’s basketball coach at STLCCForest Park, Albrecht has coached over 400 student athletes within the span of five decades. “I’ve coached on this court in the 70s, the 80s, the 90s, the 2000s and now the 2010s,” Albrecht said. “That’s five different decades I’ve coached on this court, so it’s been a long time.” Being married to his wife Linda, for about 45 years, she has sat through over 1,000 junior college basketball games cheering on her husband’s team. “He does leave [high anxiety moments] out on the court,” Linda Albrecht said. “Mentally he may be thinking about it but he handles it very well.” In 1985, the National Junior

Voume 47 Issue 8

College Athletic Association (NJCAA) instituted divisions and STLCC basketball was placed in Division II. Since then, Albrecht has led his teams to 27 consecutive winning seasons. “The thing that I’m most proud of is the consistency of the winning seasons,” Albrecht said. “We haven’t won a national championship, but we’ve gone to the tournament. We’re averaging 20 wins a year. That’s about a normal year—[finishing] 20-11. To do that for 27 straight years of that kind of average is a testament that we [as a staff] do have some kind of plan. We have an idea of what kind of kids we need and how to coach them when they come.” While never picturing himself still on the sidelines in the year 2012, Albrecht still has a love for the game. “Years ago I used to think—the year 2000 will be a huge celebration and that’s the year I ought to re-

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tire… I would have never believed I would still be coaching… It’s still been a lot of fun and it beats work.”

January 26, 2012

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2NEWS

January 26, 2012

Smoking ban more than line in the sand

Board of Trustees to vote on tobacco ban KURT OBERREITHER NEWS EDITOR Before spring 2009, students, faculty and staff could find smoking receptacles outside building entrances at STLCCMeramec. This semester, signs have been posted at doorways across the district: “No smoking. Violators will be subject to fines,” they read. On Jan. 26, the Board of Trustees will vote on the recommended approval of a revised board policy that will allow violators of the district-wide tobacco ban to be subject to a $15 fine and other disciplinary action. The use of tobacco products is prohibited anywhere on campus grounds, and campus police will issue citations to violators. This is the closest the district has come to concretely enforcing the ban in the “Tobacco-free for you and me” saga. “It certainly will enhance our ability to get compliance,” Campus Police Chief Paul Banta said. “Because if there’s something to back up the fact that we don’t want people smoking on campus, that’s going to compel the people who don’t cooperate just because it’s the right thing to do.”

According to Meramec President George Wasson, faculty and staff who are caught will be given a verbal warning on their first offense and given a written warning on their second. College policy dictates that employees of the college can face disciplinary action up to termination. Wasson said they will be fined every time. “I think it will be difficult to transition to the new rule,” Banta said. “Once people get used to it, I think we’ll be fine. It’s just going to be an adjustment period like anything else that changes; it always takes some time.” In fall 2008, former chair of the Wellness Committee Margaret Hvatum conducted a survey of faculty, staff and students to gauge opinion on smoking on campus. After an “overwhelming” amount of participants voted that smoking should at least be restricted, the results were presented to the Student Government Association (SGA), the Meramec Academic Governance Council (MAGC) and the Meramec Institutional Affairs Council (MIAC). They reached a consensus and the Campus Leadership Team approved the tobacco-free initiative.

PHOTO BY: MIKE ZIEGLER

Students walk by a newly posted sign warning students, faculty and staff of the district-wide tobacco ban and the repercussions of smoking. The Board of Trustees will vote on the issue Jan. 26.

The rule was enforced in fall 2009. However, the rule was not official college policy and therefore a fine could not be enforced. The ban and fine must be universal at all campuses – excluding Wildwood, which has maintained a green, smoke-free environment since its inception. The ban was then lifted. “You can’t just tell people to do something without consequence,” said Addison Brown, vice president of Student Governance Council. “If the people don’t govern themselves, then they have to be governed.” In the following fall of 2010, the “ban” was lifted, but the tobacco ban was back the next semester after it became board policy.

He said the main focus right now is informing students of the possibility of a fine and disciplinary action. There may be an increase to the police force after the board decision, according to Banta. “I know that smokers find it difficult not to smoke whenever they want,” Hvatum said. “I hope they realize that by not smoking they might be saving lives – not just theirs but other people’s lives.” Meramec is hosting free smoking cessation sessions in February. A quit smoking informational session will be held Monday, Jan. 30 at 2 p.m. in room 200 of the Student Center. The program, Freedom From Smoking, consists of eight sessions. For more information, contact the Campus Life Office, (314) 984-7642.

Students with disAbilities

have Access at STLCC.

Preparing Students for Life Lindenwood University Offers

St. Louis Community College makes every reasonable effort to accommodate individuals with disabilities. If you have accommodation needs, please contact the Access office at the campus where you are registered. While accommodations may be requested at any time, some accommodations may require many weeks to arrange. Florissant Valley Access Office 3400 Pershall Road St. Louis, MO 63135-1499 E-mail: fvaccess@stlcc.edu Phone: 314-513-4551 Fax: 314-513-4876 Relay Missouri: 711

Forest Park Access Office

Meramec Access Office

5600 Oakland Ave. St. Louis, MO 63110-1393 E-mail: fpaccess@stlcc.edu Phone: 314-644-9039 Fax: 314-951-9439 Relay Missouri: 711

11333 Big Bend Road Kirkwood, MO 63122-5799 E-mail: mcaccess@stlcc.edu Phone: 314-984-7673 Fax: 314-984-7123 Relay Missouri: 711

Wildwood Student Enrollment and Disability Support Services 2645 Generations Drive Wildwood, MO 63040-1168 E-mail: wwaccess@stlcc.edu Phone: 636-422-2000 Fax: 636-422-2050 Relay Missouri: 711

St. Louis Community College expands minds and changes lives every day. We create accessible, dynamic learning environments focused on the needs of our diverse communities. Florissant Valley

Forest Park

Meramec

www.stlcc.edu

Wildwood

• More than 120 undergraduate and graduate degree programs • Majors ranging from business to the arts • Small class size • Top notch professors who are committed to your success • A thriving athletic program with 26 NCAA teams and 20 student life teams • Beautiful residential campus in historic St.Charles • Great tuition rates and help with financial aid

Call 636-949-4949, visit www.lindenwood.edu or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LUDayAdmissions. Transfer and Phi Theta Kappa Scholarships Available


NEWS Meramec emphasizes campus safety New PA system, instructional video aim to improve emergency preparedness KURT OBERREITHER NEWS EDITOR Emergency preparedness in situations like earthquakes, severe weather, fires and campus intrusion is the focus of STLCCMeramec’s most recent instructional video. The video was shown in classes throughout the first week of the semester. It introduced the new public address system that can be utilized in emergency situations and deadbolt locks installed on classroom doors. The video was produced by Meramec Community Relations Coordinator Toni Oplt. Campus President George Wasson starred in the video with members of the Theatre Department. “For as long as I can remember we’ve had an emergency preparedness plan,” Wasson said. “You’re seeing the result of a lot of planning and we’ve been increasing our ability to respond to situation and taking advantage of new technologies.” The video also made students aware of the deadbolt locks on doors throughout the campus. “I don’t think it’s really necessary, that it would be better served if the teachers just showed us the exits that pertained to

that classroom,” student Sarah Gill said. “It is informative for students who don’t know – it sums it up quite nicely.” One Meramec student, Billy Steffen, said he did not learn anything he did not already know. He said the video was a review of what he learned in grade school. Wasson said Wildwood is the only other campus with a video. “What we’re trying to do is make sure people have access to information. A part of that is instruction. People in California know to look and see if something can fall on you and don’t run outside. I don’t know if people in Missouri know that type of thing,” Wasson said. “The other part of that is awareness. There are times of emergency, there are times when you need to act in those situations.” Banta said the PA system can broadcast “canned dialogues” to alert the campus of emergency situations Banta said the system allows him or the president to manually make emergency announcements. The system can be accessed from any campus police chief ’s office across the district. According to Wasson, a flip chart,

detailing what students should do in a number of emergency situations, will be posted in classrooms this semester. “It’s not just been here today, but you’re seeing a culmination,” Wasson said. “The new flip chart, that is in response to the feeling that we did not have enough information readily available in the classroom.” Wasson said evacuation routes – which have not been changed since the 1970s – will be revised and posted in the classrooms. In addition to the PA system, the college utilizes computer alert pop ups that appear on all administrative and faculty computers in the case of an emergency. Students can also register for text alerts. New phone system will allow for announcements, too. “We build this redundancy in the system in case one fails,” Banta said. Banta said the system will not reach every part of the campus but he hopes to have an indoor system installed. He said they want to expand video surveillance and enhance lighting in the staff parking lot and put a camera there.

SIGN UP

for STLCC’s Emergency Notification System 1. Log into Banner Self-Service using your MySTLCC ID and password. 2. Select Personal Information tab 3. Select Update Address(es) and Phone(s) link. 4. Scroll down to Mailing and click on Current link below. 5. Scroll down to Phone Type and select Emergency Notification Phone # from drop down menu. 6. Enter area code and phone number (without dashes) in the proper fields 7. Select Submit.

STLCC

EMERGENCY SMS Anabel Gonzalez Staff Designer

Bookstore debit trial becomes tribulation KURT OBERREITHER NEWS EDITOR

This semester the STLCC-Meramec bookstore only accepts credit as a payment option when students rent books. Fall was the first semester STLCC allowed students to check out books with a debit card. Bookstore Manager Kevin Metzler said the book store lost approximately $6,192 because some students did not return their books. He said the numbers are not final because some books may still be returned. “We are trying to figure out what we

need to be doing to make this work for everybody,” Metzler said. “Universities have a different way to card, their own card. I was surprised to see that a lot of students didn’t give back their book they rented. It’s like a renting a movie.” According to Metzler, only allowing the students to rent a book with a credit card allows the bookstore to charge the student if they did not return the books. “The problem with taking a debit card is the money may be in the student’s

account when renting the book, [but] after a whole semester the money might not be there,” Metzler said. Metzler said he thinks students did not realize they had to return their books. Right before the students were eligible to buy back their books, the bookstore sent out an email stating that their books were to be returned to the book store by Dec. 16. If the students did not meet their deadline, the students were sent another email stating they did not meet the deadline

and to return the books by Dec. 19. Metzler said some students received phone calls after they did not meet the return deadline. “With three emails, somewhere the information [the students] gave us is an email they do not check,” Metzler said. There were no signs notifying the students for the spring semester that they are only accepting credit cards for rentals. “I know we had upset students which is not our intent at all,” Metzler said.

‘In Honor of Mary Davis’ KURT OBERREITHER NEWS EDITOR

STLCC-Meramec’s Student Governance Council (SGC) has formed a committee to create a memorial for Mary Davis, a former student who died last November. Davis was the gallery attendant, involved in the SGC, the international club, the photo club and the Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students club (Bacchus). Furthermore, the art department has created a Mary Davis scholarship. They are accepting donations in her honor. “In Honor of Mary Davis” Committee Chair Abdul Kariem-Matteuzzi said the group is “bouncing different ideas around.” He said there have been a couple of suggestions including planting

trees or building a bench in her honor. “She was a student for many years,” KariemMatteuzzi said. “She was very involved, cared about the image and voice of the students.” Kariem-Matteuzzi said the committee plans to incorporate other organizations’ ideas into the project. Kariem-Matteuzzi said the committee will use available SGC funds to pay for the project Davis was a student at STLCC-Meramec for 25 years and received over 100 credit hours. “It seems like everybody likes the idea of doing a bench but if anybody has any suggestions, they can contact me,” KariemMatteuzzi said. Kariem-Matteuzzi can be reached at amatteuzzi1@my.stlcc.edu.

Mark Your Calendars! Spring Career Fair Coming Soon!

Thursday, March 8, 2012 9am-2:30pm

*

* at the crestwood location for all of your school, team, or holiday function.

Crestwood (314) 822-4909 South County (314) 894-1600 Eureka (636) 938-7090


4OPINIONS

January 26, 2012

America Kicks Ass

The Wife of Campus Life

Boxing, the American Way KAVAHN MANSOURI EDITOR IN CHIEF

Why getting involved on campus can be good for you KIMBERLY MORICE SENIOR STAFF Community college is the place where you are supposed to stay anonymous. It is meant to be a part of your life for two years and if you are lucky, it will become a distant memory after you get a few general credits out of the way. Campus life should not exist, and even if it does, there is no way that it can be fun. These were always my thoughts on getting involved at my two-year college. That was until I got an email from a professor about a club on campus looking for members, the Student Ambassadors. I almost ignored the email, thinking that it was a pointless attempt at getting the quiet girl involved. I was happy with only knowing two people at STLCC-Meramec, or at least that is what I thought then. For me, the importance of becoming involved with campus life became more and more clear. If I had never answered that email, gone in for an interview, and become Student Ambassador president, I do not know where I would be. This is not the case for everyone, but for most of the people I have met, their involvement on campus of been a make it or break it situation. I always tell people that two-year college is an opportunity to build your resume, and it is the truth. There are so many connections to make with faculty and administrators; it would be a waste to pass them up. Not everyone who gets involved in campus life has a sunshine and rainbows experience. Some people get caught up in drama, some feel overwhelmed, friendships are made and broken, love triangles are formed and fall apart. There is a darker side to it, a more personal side that coincides with the people you may end up working with. I have had encounters with many of these problems, but the best part is that I have always found a way to pick myself up and move on. With over forty clubs for students to choose from, there is no excuse for them not to get involved. Our school makes each club very accessible to students, with various events on campus to promote themselves such as Club Days. To say that I am grateful for every opportunity that has come my way since being so involved in campus would be an enormous understatement. Cory Montero Staff Designer

Off the eaten path Maggie’s Lunchbox

JESSE HOFFORD OPINIONS EDITOR Depending on where you are coming from, Maggie’s Lunchbox is not the easiest place to find. Tucked away within the bowels of northern Fenton, it is off of the highway and down around a few turns. However, this should not stop you from taking the time to find it. You will have to take a second look when you do find it because chances are you’ll mistake it for an office space. That is until you see the sign. Part of the area’s many office complexes, it is almost hidden. The only thing giving it

away is the sign near the road displaying the specials. Upon walking in, one will notice the surprisingly hip interior. Art and ambient lighting give Maggie’s an inviting atmosphere. And the free Wi-fi does not hurt either. Not what one would expect from the outside. Their menu is something one will need to learn. Offering certain items at certain times may be confusing and slightly frustrating for the first timer. For example, one cannot get fries with their sandwich until after 4 p.m. Which may make little sense to those regularly frequenting the local golden arches. Also, they only serve certain sandwiches after that 4 p.m. threshold. Want to order one of their Italian grinders? You will have to wait; it is on the evening menu.

Boxing, although birthed in Rome and made modern in Britain, is a famous American pastime. Two men, hitting each other repeatedly in the face. Even in some cases women find satisfaction from participating in this sport of champions. By all means, boxing is another great reason America Kicks Ass. Champions of the sport like Muhammad Ali, George Foreman and several others would tell you that boxing is simply all there is to life, and maybe we can take a page or two out of that book. Taking several blows in the ribs and face is probably the most kickass thing that can be done nowadays. The longer they last the cooler you look and at the end of the day, you might have a broken jaw and a few cracked ribs, but the pride and liberty felt leaving the ring will resound for the rest of your days. Say someone challenges your kickass abilities, whip out your sweet bruises and scars and show the haters what is truly happening. No one messes around with a person who boxes, except for other boxers, and if they mess around with said boxer, then a boxing match will happen, which makes even cooler stuff happen. See the thing everyone needs to realize is that in America, if you can kick ass, you kick ass. Boxing is just one of the many ways to kickass, there are plenty of other sports, like karate, jujistu and even kayaking. But boxing makes those sports look like wussies, what says America more than taking a jab to the face and upper cutting your opponent, lifting them off the ground and into oblivion. So grab your cape and come up with a creative nickname to have labeled in big red, white and blue lettering on the back of it, have a buddy help get those American flag boxing gloves on and take to the ring, because boxing is another reason that America kicks ass.

One meal that is available for the lunch crowd is their Cuban panini with pasta salad. Highly recommended. Ham, pork, cheese, pickles and horseradish sauce all piled onto Cuban bread and grilled crispy and accompanied by a pickle spear. The premium meats and cheese are enhanced by the pickles and horseradish. Those who are not too fond of horseradish or have never had it need not be afraid. You will still find this sandwich plenty tasty. The pasta salad was a welcome change from french fries. I was actually glad I was forced to order that instead. It freshened up the meal a little bit. Cavatappi pasta tossed with feta cheese, red cabbage shreds and dressing all served on a bed of lettuce. A partner for the Cuban panini. Maggie’s Lunchbox serves more than just sandwiches. Pizza, bakery items and breakfast are all part of their menu as well. Eaters are sure to find something good to eat no matter what time of day. Maggie’s is located at 867 Horan Drive in Fenton. Open Monday through Friday 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. with dinner hours from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.


OPINIONS STLCC’s marketing shows it age

MIKE ZIEGLER PHOTO EDITOR St. Louis Community College has a big birthday coming up this year. As STLCC crests 50 years old, it is time to evaluate how the public sees this institution — over the hill, or just hitting its prime? STLCC faces large obstacles ahead with their rebranding push. Each campus provides unique challenges of their own. Different experiences are had by students and faculty at each along with different operation standards. Higher education is known for its inability to move fast and STLCC is no stranger to this. Big plans were unveiled during the December STLCC Board of Trustees meeting to address the birthday celebrations along with a presentation of an ongoing rebranding process. Historically, STLCC branded itself campus against campus. Marketing one campus against the other when all funnel to and use funds, strategy and resources from the same pie was a self-destructive strategy. Words like “consistent” and “consolidate” were reoccurring themes during the presentation, signs that STLCC is focused on creating a “one college” awareness. One thing that may prove to be the most challenging of all is understanding who the STLCC customer, or student, really is. STLCC is so many things to so many demographics of people, figuring out how to meet and set the expectations for all is difficult.

During the meeting a trustee asked the question of how research into how current stakeholders perceive STLCC was going to include input from students, or customers, without access to technology. While this is an important factor to consider, it shows the thought process at the top is out of touch with the modern day student. Nearly every class taken at STLCC requires interaction with Blackboard online. The advising office has quit the procedure of printing class guidebooks every semester and only offers them online. The question that should have been asked is how STLCC is going to catch up to other higher education institutions that are reaching students left behind by STLCC’s lack of forward-thinking marketing reach. One way that will hopefully be changed is refreshing the http://stlcc.edu homepage along with “investigating and testing mobile applications,” as hinted as items in progress during the presentation. Imagine one day being able to sign-up for classes or submit homework on Blackboard easily from a smart phone. Blackboard has mobile capabilities; it’s just on STLCC to take advantage of them. Often buried under menus online and seldom highlighted in advertisements are STLCC’s program and facility distinctions. Noting things like the exceptional center for visual technology labs and the only National Association of Art and Design

EDITORS Kavahn Mansouri Kelly Glueck Mike Ziegler Hans Steinert Lilly Huxhold Kurt Oberreither Jesse Hofford Tomi Storey Spencer Gleason Kait Thomas Justin Villmer Kelsey Koenig Shannon Philpott

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Photo Editor Multimedia Editor Graphic Design Editor News Editor Opinions Editor In-Depth Editor Sports Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Ad Representative Faculty Adviser

SLTCC’s logo received a modification in 1976 after a board approval for a rebrand.

accredited two-year interior design program in Missouri along with the many others only found at STLCC will help bring awareness of its unique educational value. Ads can be found all around St. Louis area bus depots as one example of the rebranding push. These along with newspaper ads were the only presented examples of STLCC’s new approach to brand visibility. Left out of the presentation, although mentioned as part of the overall plan in the opening slide, were strategies of how STLCC is going to address its scattered online image. Part of the rebranding includes how STLCC will celebrate 50 years within the community. The key message of the campaign is celebrating alumni success and inviting them to share their story. Defining who is STLCC alum is key and they have wisely taken the approach of inclusion versus exclusion.

Including everyone who’s taken just one class, to working towards a degree and updating career skills sends the message that anyone can find a home within STLCC, no matter your academic pursuit. Stories are king when it comes to sharing your brand and inviting alumni to share their story on a micro-site, http://stlcc.edu/50, is a sound strategy. Everyday people sharing their exceptional, individual experiences about how STLCC has impacted their life are what will set STLCC apart from other institutions. However, that strategy is nothing without participation from their audience. It will be difficult motivating people to share their story when they have not invested in building up their online community. It is like withdrawing from a bank account you have not deposited anything in; it simply will not go through.

MONTAGE STAFF THE MONTAGE Steven Duncan Amber Davis Victoria Barmark Clinton Borror Chris Campbell Rachael Freeman Jace Jones Aaron McCall Daniel Reynolds Brian Haenchen Jared Powell Alex Kendall Kim Morice Sara Murillo Tyler Burrus David Kloeckener Nick Rousseau Cory Montero Anabel Gonzalez

Senior Staff Writer Senior Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Staff Writer Senior Staff Photographer Senior Staff Writer/Photographer Staff Writer/Photographer Staff Writer/Photographer Staff Writer/Photographer Staff Writer/Photographer Staff Designer Staff Designer

To place an advertisement, contact the advertising manager for rates, sample issues, etc., (314) 984-7955. Editorial views expressed or content contained in this publication are not necessaritly the views of St. Louis Community College, the Board of Trustees or the administration. The Montage is a student publication produced seven times per semester at St. Louis Community College Meramec, 11333 Big Bend Blvd., Kirkwood, Mo., 63122. (314) 984-7655. One copy of The Montage is free of charge. Up to 10 additional copies available, $1 each, at the office of The Montage, SC 220. Bulk purchases may be arranged with circulation manager. Editorial policy: All letters should be no longer than 500 words and must include identification as a student or faculty member, phone number and address for verification purposes. Phone numbers and addresses will not be published. All letters are subject to editing for content and length. All letters submitted will be published in print and online.

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8 INDEPTH

January 26, 2012

KELLY GLUECK MANAGING EDITOR

1901 Joliet Junior College was founded in Illinois. This was the first public Junior College in the U.S.

1961 Legislation passed to permit creation of statewide Junior College Districts.

1962 Meramec’s first students took their first courses at McCluer and Roosevelt high schools. The first class of 44 graduated in 1965.

1963 The first Board of Trustees approved the construction, location and names of the three STLCC campuses to be raised – Meramec, Florrisant Valley and Forest Park.

1964 First sessions of school began in January in four temporary buildings on Meramec’s grounds.

1965 A $47.2 million bond issue approved by Missouri taxpayers. At the time, this was the largest bond in junior college history. Higher Education Act permitted Meramec to give out loans and scholarships. In order to raise such funds, the school held its First Annual Scholarship Carnival, which had a decade-long run for its money. Over $2,000 in scholarship funds were produced annually. Scholarships were also awarded through fraternities, such as Phi Theta Kappa.

Take a stroll by Communications South and try not to trip over the three-foot brick pedestal reading “Collegium St. Joseph.” This is the cornerstone that marked St. Joseph College, the Redemptionist Seminary which educated and ordained priests and brothers from 1889 to 1958. The land’s rich history in education made it an ideal location for Dr. Joseph Cosand’s vision for Missouri higher education. Cosand’s vision became reality when Missouri taxpayers voted on a $47.2 million bond which was used to aid the construction of the buildings used today; this was the largest bond awarded in Missouri history at that time. Meramec established its reputation by earning accreditation faster than any other school in the North Central Association of College and Schools. In its first three years, enrollment grew ten-fold to 8,200 registered students and was featured on the Today Show in 1966. In the hay days of Meramec there were scholarship carnivals with rides and floats, cheerleaders and even a nationally recognized Horse Management course. The campus had also hosted a slue of big name entertainment featuring Arthur B. Clarke, inventor of the communications satellite and co-author of the award-winning sci-fi novel and motion picture “2001: A Space Odessey” and musical acts such as The Grateful Dead; John Denver and The Carpenters sold out the “Field House” or as students know it now, the gym. There were also comedy acts on Wednesdays. Guests included comedians Graham Chapman of Monty Python, Jeff Dunham and Dave Chappelle. This year, the district will be celebrating 50 years by recognizing past and present students and their achievements. Stay tuned to http://meramecmontage. com for a complete list of events throughout the year.

1966 Junior College District

1968 The first smoking

1970 Many campus trees

obtained accreditation faster than any other junior college in the history of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

provisions were taken. Students could smoke anywhere with the exception of bathrooms, classrooms and carpeted areas.

1967 Board of Trustees passed

president, Glynn E. Clark, Ph.D., won the 26th Annual Council of North Central Junior Colleges’ Leadership Award. In the preceding year, Clark served as the vice president of the Council and brought the 1968 Conference to St. Louis.

were removed to create more parking availability for student/ faculty. Part of the reason the 79-acre lot became Meramec rather than a subdivision was because Meramec vowed to leave the majority of the original foliage. Meramec carefully chose the parking lot’s placement in accordance to Horticulture Club’s report of unhealthy trees. Many of the healthy trees were replanted around campus.

legislation permitting armed security. The nationally recognized Horse Management course began, lassoing students from California, New Mexico, Maine and the Carolinas.

1969 Meramec’s first


INDEPTH random tidbits 1960’s

1970’s

1980’s

KMCC, Meramec’s own radio station broadcasted soul, rock ‘n’ roll, jazz, folk and classical within a two-block radius.

Inmates at Missouri Eastern Correctional Center in Pacific received diplomas through Meramec courses taught at the facility. In its second year, registration grew from 80 to 240 registrations.

Meramec’s first feature film shown through “Friday Night Flicks” was “Boys’ Night Out.” ID cards becames necessary to identify students; they were issued for 75 cents. Meramec instituted a shuttle to get students from one end of campus to the other. The shuttle cost 5 cents.

The Grateful Dead played in the Field House (the gym) as a part of the first concert series. The Carpenters were another big name to pass through campus. Admission to each show was $2.50 with a student ID.

Meramec student Barry Rosen breaks a world record on campus. His claim to fame was for fitting 39 bodies into a VW Bug.

Joseph P. Cosand, Ph.D, 1970

1971 The four buildings that

1972 All buildings had been

served as Meramec’s temporary campus were replaced with 250 parking spaces. There were a total of 425 spots added.

raised. Meramec’s proposed “permanent campus” was now completed. Social Sciences and Humanites East were to be added at later dates.

The first major budget cut took away half of student control over activities and events; however, it did provide travel to clubs, organizations and athletics. Meramec’s nationally recognized Child Care Program opened its doors. Child care was available at a rate of 65 cents an hour. The latest Child Care Center, built in 1994 was closed in 2010 after a series of relocations and budget cuts.

1975 70 career programs were now available to students.

1978 For the first time in the 15-year history of Junior College District, faculty staged a one-day strike, protesting the proposed 34 full-time faculty lay-offs.

1979 Computer registration took STLCC registration from hours to minutes. Golf, Track and Cross Country were cut from Meramec athletic programs.

1982 International Club began representing Meramec students from Korea, Vietnam, France, Germany, Thailand, France, Mexico, Venezuela, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon and China.

1985 The Board of Trustees made physical education a STLCC graduation requirement regardless of age or disability. Assessment tests were introduced to ensure students’ success in college level courses.

1988 Missouri Public Interest Group (MoPIRG) established a Meramec chapter after 4,000 students signed a petition in support of the group. This was the first time the entire student body was asked to vote on a ballot issue.

1990 Meramec was named one of 11 Beacon Colleges nationwide by the American Association of Comunnity and Junior Colleges and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

1997 Missouri’s A+ program was established; thus, allowing students from designated schools to have their school and books paid for by the state.

archive photos LAYOUT BY: TOMI STOREY

2000 The Meramec Warriors became the Meramec Magic. The Magic reigned for 11 years until 2011, when all STLCC sports were consolidated under the name “The Archers”.

2010 STLCC became the first Missouri community college to join Achieving the Dream.


8ART&LIFE

January 26, 2012

Designing a future

Student earns 2011 Datile interior design scholarship TYLER BURRUS STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Many students enter national and global scholarships every year, competing against their peers and hoping to gain some type of achievement. Jenna Boyko, a graphic design major and soon-to-be interior design and kitchen & bath design major, submitted her school project into the 2011 Datile Interior Design Scholarship Competition. This scholarship competition was sponsored by Datile and the American Society of Interior Designers. “I’ve always been interested in interior design growing up. There were no specific things that led to my interest,” Boyko said. Competing with over 200 entries from two and four year design schools across the globe, according to the STLCC Messenger, Boyko was one of the ten Merit Award Winners. She received $2,500 and a certificate for her award-winning design. A current classmate saw the Datile ad and told Jenna about the scholarship opportunity. “I saw it posted and thought might as well. We thought it would be fun to submit designs just to see what would come out of it,” Boyko said. After almost three months of waiting, Boyko received an e-mail through her phone, getting the news of her achievement. “When I got the news, I was sitting in class,” Boyko said. “I had to wait until class was over but I was extremely excited.” After graduating Quincy University with a bachelor’s degree in graphic design, Boyko realized she wanted to explore more into interior and architectural design. As noted on the National Association of Art and Design (NASAD) and the STLCC Interior Design homepages, STLCC-Meramec is one out of seven colleges, including STLCC-Florissant, in Missouri, to have an Interior Design Program accredited by NASAD. “[Quincy University] didn’t have an interior design degree so I decided to go

PHOTO BY: TYLER BURRUS

Jenna Boyko explains how she based her floor plan displayed in the interior design hallway located in the Applied Science building. Inspiration from the painting, “Face of a Peasant Girl” by Ukrainian artist, Kazimir Malevich, went into her design.

to Meramec and see what was available. After taking a few architecture and interior design classes I just fell in love,”

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Competing with over 200 entries from two and four year design schools across the globe, according to the STLCC Messenger, Boyko was one of the ten Merit Award Winners.

Boyko said. The winning design was based off a school project that was also submitted into the 2011 Daltile Interior Design Scholarship Competition. The theme was to design a residence in a foreign country, of the student’s choice, for a U.S. Executive Ambassador. “We had to do the research on a country and start from a different point of view. I picked Ukraine because that’s where my grandfather is from and I thought it was interesting,” Boyko said. Along with the research of architectural style and Ukrainian culture, the students had to find a painting originating from that country and make a 3-D model based off of it. “I chose ‘Face of a Peasant Girl’ by Kazimir Malevich,” Boyko said. The colors in the painting are very similar to those of the floor plan designed along with hints of the artist’s style of 3-D and cubism. Boyko designed a floor plan based off of the architecture and culture of Ukraine mixed with that of the USA. “The executive could feel

comfortable yet acknowledge the Ukrainian culture,” Boyko said. “The color scheme and dome-like sky lights are very popular in Ukraine.” According to Boyko, the board and design layout can be found on display in the interior design hallway. “It was good to know that all my hard work was acknowledged and that is really cool,” said Boyko. Boyko said her design would not necessarily be made into a real building. “It could happen but it’s just a proposed idea. The scholarship was supposed to award those whose work was thoughtfully done, had the best design idea and then in return was awarded a certificate and money,” Boyko said. More scholarships may be in store for Boyko. She is waiting to hear back from others to whom she has submitted her designs. “Because I have a bachelor’s degree already and after getting enough knowledge after May, I want to go out and find a real job,” Boyko said. “I want to get started in the working world.”


ART&LIFE Student sets goals for newly launched business ALEX KENDALL SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Since fall semester of 2010, student Alina “It is very important for students to learn. Key, vice president of Phi Theta Kappa On one hand, it is important not only to learn and current president of Business Club, has something in the classroom but to apply your been looking into joining a Business Club knowledge outside of [the classroom],” Key at STLCC-Meramec. After failed attempts said. to communicate with the business and According to Key, the club is planning to economics department about the club, Key pair mostly with the business and economics decided to take it upon herself to start her department for joint-sponsored internship own. and job fairs, as well as Business Transfer “I’ve heard that many students were Day and other business-specific activities and interested in doing that before and I was events. waiting and waiting for a Business Club “[An internship] on your resume is to emerge, but it wasn’t there. I knew that going to look very good, whether you go to I really wanted to participate in business a four year university or if you go to get your club, and I was going to the business and associate’s degree and go into the job market. economics department and asking, ‘do you Regardless, to have an internship in your have a business club?’ and they said not right respected field is very important,” Key said. now and they said they would call when they “It is one of the focuses of [Business Club].” had one. There was no call. So I thought to Key said that the club plans to invite organize it myself since there was no business speakers within the business world and club on the campus,” Key said. teachers of Meramec. Key said that she is fascinated with “We are looking to start with speakers economics and that is what helped her push from Meramec faculty and teaching staff,” for the Business Club. Key said. “We also would want in the future “It is a science, but its not science like math a panel of representatives from different where you put something together. To me it is business industries with discussion of how amazing; through scientific approach you can the job market is, what you have to know and describe the events that surround us everyday what should you expect if you went into that and affect our life in various ways,” Key said. field.” “Business is the bricks of economy.” Key said that the Business Club would Key said that the club’s main goal is to give host field trips to local businesses around the students a better picture of  the business world, St. Louis area to help better understand the expand their knowledge of the business world job market. through learning outside of the classroom, “We would like to on field trips to see in to help students realize the importance of reality how businesses are operated,” Key degree completion, and to help students to said. “We would like to visit Anheuser Busch successfully transition to the next step, whether and see how they operate.” it is a four-year university or the job market. Along with field trips, Key said there are

PHOTO BY: ALEX KENDALL

STLCC-Meramec’s newest club, Business Club, led by Alina Key, spreads the word through fliers such as this, along with word of mouth in the business and economics classes. The Business Club plans to host guest speakers, discussion meetings and assistance with internships.

also opportunities to attend the meetings of local chapters of the American Marketing Association and the International 
Association of Business Communicators. “[The club] will give them practical knowledge and use their theoretical knowledge from the classroom,” Key said. Key said that Business Club would participate in the Meramec Club Days on January 25 and 26 to try and increase their membership numbers. “We will have a table set up both days for students to stop by and see what business club is. Any student who is interested is welcome,”

Key said. To increase awareness around the campus, Key said the club plans to use fliers and the business and economics teaching staff to spread the word and recruit members. “Teachers from business and economics will announce Business Club meetings in their class,” Key said. “We hope that it’s going to bring attention to our club and increase attendance.” Key said she hopes the Business Club will continue to grow. “We are going to start small and see where that takes us,” Key said.

Student and staff share stories of smoke cessation JAROD POWELL STAFF WRITER Donna Halsband looked at an X-ray of her lungs. "There were these little white lines through it. I said, 'Oh that's where the problem is.' The doctor said ‘No. The black part, that's the problem.’ So my lungs are basically black," Halsband said. “With a few little white lines through them, for oxygen." Halsband has since made smoking cessation a personal mission of sorts, particularly concerning students at STLCCMeramec, where she works as service learning coordinator. Halsband said she smoked for 25 years and quit with the help of a nicotine patch. "I cut from two to one pack a day. I went November and December of that year with that cut in half. Then I used the patch again and quit," Halsband said. "So I thought, okay, I've beat this." Halsband said that many of her ailments went away almost immediately after quitting. "I was always getting a cold. I was always getting bronchitis. I was always getting the flu," Halsband said. "When I stopped smoking, I got none of that stuff. Some people will say, 'Oh, that's normal,' but that's not normal--that's because of the smoking. It messes with your body." Halsband is the service learning coordinator at Meramec. Halsband says she tries to engage with students who smoke, some still on campus, even after all STLCC campuses went “smoke free.” "I'm trying to talk to students on campus, to make them aware," Halsband said. "You almost become a split personality when you smoke: There's the addict, and then there's you. And the addict is gonna fight to the death for cigarettes." Smoking cigarettes is socially acceptable and easily accessible, and so it's easy to

forget the bottom line: If you do not quit smoking, it will adversely affect your health, sometimes fatally. One Meramec student, David Mueth, said that for him, having a reason to quit was essential. "The act of smoking is a pleasurable experience," Mueth said. "So, you've got to have a reason behind wanting to quit." Mueth said that one day, he sat down and figured how much money he had spent on cigarettes. "I was paying to shorten my own life span," Mueth said. "I couldn't really fathom that." Mueth is a bartender and server at The Royale in St. Louis, and says that most of his co-workers smoke. "It's a very frustrating situation, watching your co-workers smoke," Mueth said. "I saw my friend, who has 'quit' numerous times, on Facebook say something about wanting to quit. I mentioned that I think I've done my part, giving her trouble about smoking and saying how gross it is." Mueth said that a vacation was his catalyst for deciding to finally quit, after smoking for 15 years. "I went on vacation and had significantly cut down by then. I only smoked when I went to work. So I decided while I was on vacation that I was not going to take any cigarettes with me," Mueth said. "I came back and smoked on my next three shifts. But even then, I was actively trying to quit." Halsband said she understands addiction to cigarettes, as someone who has lived through it herself, but most people who do not smoke simply fail to get it. "People who don't smoke will say, 'Well, why don't they just quit?' And that just

doesn't happen. Some people can 'just quit,', but most people can't," Halsband said. Mueth said that eventually, he simply made his mind up to quit, and has been smoke-free since last September. "I have cravings in very fleeting moments," Mueth said. "When on a warm spring night, and there's a bunch of people who are sitting around, and you know they're smoking cigarettes and having beers on the patio at work, that's a pretty specific trigger." Mueth said he felt some of the longerterm effects of smoking. "The mornings of waking up and coughing? That sucks," Mueth said. Service Learning Office Manager Debbie Corson, who works in Service Learning along with Halsband, said that many times, waiting to feel those symptoms as a reason to quit could be waiting too long. "A lot of times, kids think, 'I'll start to feel out of breath, and then I'll quit.' But it can be a really sudden thing, where you find your lungs are totally shot," Corson said. Halsband said her health started failing 12 years after quitting, partly because of surgeries, but mostly because of smoking. "Now I'm on oxygen all the time. I sleep with it on. I take a bath with it on. I'm on a leash," Halsband said. "It's really inconvenient." Halsband said that among the various methods of quitting on the market, there's no one correct way. "It's totally individual," Halsband said. "I've heard people who have had success with all of them. If something helps you a little, work with it to let it help you. There is no answer that works for everybody." Halsband said that support is also

important. Meramec is hosting an eightsession smoking cessation program Freedom From Smoking through Febraury. Tobacco-free Missouri is a valuable program," Halsband said. "They do a sixweek program. Step by step, you give up cigarettes. They give you strategies. It's a support group kind of thing." Halsband said that it could easily be done on campus, if the students were interested. "The students have to request it," Halsband said. "If there were 20 students on campus who said they wanted it, we could do it in a minute." Mueth, a Meramec student, said he agrees with the importance of a support system. He said that there are a few of his co-workers who are trying to quit right now. "I just try to be supportive. I don't get preachy about it, because I know they don't want to hear it. If it ever comes up, I give them trouble. Ultimately, though, they've got to want to quit," Mueth said. Let's Face It Saint Louis, a "smokefree" initiative by the Saint Louis County Department of Health, features several "Quit Guides" on its website, http:// letsfaceitstl.com, as well as information on medications, alternative treatments and online quit communities. Halsband said she has a good life, but it is very different than it was even five years ago. "I can't do a lot of things. I can't work full time. I can't do my own yard work. It makes life difficult," Halsband said. She said she's willing to help anybody who needs it, and wants it. "I'm willing to help anybody who needs it. I'll hold their hands. Whatever I have to do."


10 ART&LIFE

January 26, 2012

Meet the Deans KIMBERLY MORICE STAFF WRITER Dean of Engineering and Science Andrew Langrehr and Dean of Math and Communications Angela Grupas are two of the many Deans at STLCCMeramec who oversee the budget that decides the supplies required for the Dean of Engineering and Science Andrew Langrehr

With shows such as the popular NBC comedy Community creating a twisted view on community college, and in many ways the dean, it is no wonder that many community college students have no idea what a dean really does or who they could possibly be. “The dean in Community is a riot, he cracks me up,” Andrew Langrehr, dean of science and technology, said. “All deans aren’t nerds like in Community, even though I came out of the sciences.” Langrehr›s office contains a large mahogany desk, many chemistry and science books, and photographs of his family. He is originally from Iowa, where he got his start as an adjunct chemistry professor. Eventually, he transferred to Jefferson College, where he worked fulltime. “A faculty position opened up here at Meramec and it was attractive because it had a larger chemistry department, more equipment, it’s a lead for innovation schools, better pay, all of those things, so I applied for that,” Langrehr said. After two years the physical and engineering science department chair retired, and with that position open,

PHOTOS BY: ALEX KENDALL

Langrehr took that as his opportunity to alter his career path. He was the department chair for four and a half years until the dean retired and he took on that position. “Now I’m here. I liked all of those jobs and I like working here. There’s appealing things about the faculty position that I miss, there are some appealing things about the department chair position that I miss, but this is a good job too,” Langrehr said. Student success is most important for Langrehr and his colleagues. “Ideally, my role would be academic leader. I set a course for the division, where we›re going to go and things like that. A lot of what I do is manage budgets, people, and solve problems for the students and faculty. I move things up the pipe-line, and back down the pipe-line, so I would say that it’s a lot of management and some leadership and strategic planning,» Langrehr said.      Langrehr teaches a chemistry class one night a week at STLCC-Meramec with Nancy Collier. If a dean is interested in teaching a course at the college, they have to get special permission to do so "I team teach the class because chemistry classes are a significant amount

of credit and as an administrator I can only teach a limited amount. So if I team teach it, it partitions it so that I can teach more semesters,» Langrehr said. Angela Grupas›s office is filled with statues of tiny dogs, and pictures hang on her walls with different motivational sayings - one with a red high heel and the saying “I can do anything with the right pair of shoes.” She has been with the college for 23 years and has served as a faculty member and chairperson of the communications department. Grupas is now the acting dean of the math and communications departments, a position held by Vernon Kays. "My division is responsible for math, communications and English. A lot of times people kind of question math and communications as an odd combination, but what is unique about this division is that most of the students are in these courses in their first year. So while math is very different from English, we share the same students in their first year experience,» Grupas said. Grupas said about having some of the academic resources offered at STLCC-

Dean of Math and Communications Angela Grupas

Meramec in her division. "This is kind of the academic hub of general education and deals with all of the academic student support," Grupas said. Many of the deans spend countless hours in meetings, planning budgets and deciding on what will end up in the classroom each semester. Every computer, projector and Smart Board is placed in classrooms by the deans. “You don’t really see us because we›re always doing the background work to make things run efficiently,” Grupas said. “Even though we don’t see the students, we tend to be extremely student-focused. Mainly we›re just trying to make the student experience better.” Grupas would like students to realize that going to the dean's office is not like visiting the principle when you were in high school. “One thing you should know, I’m fun. I take my job very seriously, but dang it if you can't have fun while you’re doing it,” Grupas said. “I’ve got sayings around my office, I enjoy life, I’ve got glitter in my hair, and I wear funky shoes. We're accessible, we're fun people, we may deal with serious things, but you can come talk to me.”

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SPORTS

O’Keefe kicks it off for Archers

STLCC hires new men’s soccer

Brian Haenchen Staff Writer New men’s soccer coach Dan O’Keefe has had success at every level during his playing career. In 1979, as a senior at McCluer High School, O’Keefe scored 39 goals, which was fourth most in Missouri state history at the time, before moving on to Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville (SIUE), where his career mark of 27 goals scored is tied for twelfth most in school history. Professionally, O’Keefe played for six different teams over ten seasons and was the National Professional Soccer League’s all-time leading scorer by the time he retired in 1994. While O’Keefe’s experience and local ties were important factors, it was athletic director Johnna Kinney’s confidence in his ability to immediately start scouting new

players that was the determining factor in her decision to hire him. The timing of now-former head coach Mike Mayberry’s departure made it imperative for his replacement to hit the ground running in terms of recruiting. “We wanted someone with local ties that could step right in because we were already past the signing date and recruiting had started for soccer,” Kinney said. “We thought he was the best candidate who could get good recruits in a timely manner.” As a coach, O’Keefe’s focus is primarily on the development of each individual player. While he does hope to bring a national championship to St. Louis Community College, O’Keefe’s primary goal is to turn out players who can succeed with a four-year program.

“I’m good at developing skills and one of the good things about a junior college is you can just go two years [focusing on] nothing but development,” O’Keefe said. “By the time they’re done with two years with me, I want them to be so ready for the four-year college, that they’re going to make an impact on whatever program they go to from here.” St. Louis Scott Gallagher (SLSG) Youth Director Ken Godat, whose son Zack trained with O’Keefe early in his playing career, praised the new STLCC men’s soccer coach as “one of the top trainers in St. Louis.” O’Keefe played professionally for six seasons, three with the Kansas City Comets and three with the Fort Wayne Flames, before briefly retiring in 1988 to coach in Jefferson City. He returned to professional soccer a year later with the Indiana Kick to lead the American Indoor Soccer Association in goals scored. In 1990, he joined the Detroit Rockers, where he scored 130 goals over two seasons. After winning a championship with the Rockers in 1992, O’Keefe signed with the St. Louis Ambush, with whom he scored 60 goals in 40 appearances. He was traded by the Ambush after the 1993 season to the Baltimore Spirit. After his playing career ended, O’Keefe remained involved with soccer in the St. Louis area, spending a brief stint as the women’s coach at STLCC-Florissant Valley. More recently, he spent fifteen

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seasons as a skills trainer for Scott Gallagher Soccer Club. Inheriting a program that graduated 13 sophomores following a 6-12 season, the new head coach understands that he has his work cut out for him. However, there has been a recent increase in the number of high school players, creating a much deeper pool of college prospects. “Now, there are so many players,” O’Keefe said. “There are a lot of players that peak late. Florissant Valley, especially, has always gotten players that peak late. [Players] that have great potential, but maybe they didn’t develop it or show it in high school, but then they get to Florissant Valley and they’re just dynamite.” O’Keefe added that he will benefit tremendously as he begins recruiting from the consolidation of the STLCC men’s soccer program into one team located at Florissant Valley, which will allow him to recruit all over the St. Louis area. In addition to recruiting, O’Keefe also scouts players through weekly open scrimmages held at the Florissant Valley campus on Monday evenings at 6 p.m. “Back when I coached at [Florissant Valley] the last time, I basically had a good shot at getting North County kids only. Now, the way it’s spread out with Forest Park and Meramec, I can recruit all over St. Louis,” O’Keefe said. “One central team for the boys and girls that almost triples our strength. The potential to be great is really good.”


12 SPORTS

January 26, 2012

Déjà vu all over again

PHOTO BY: DAVID KLOECKENER

PHOTO BY: MIKE ZIEGLER PHOTO BY: MIKE ZIEGLER Above left: Archer guard, Toraino Hellems (3), goes up for a lay-up against the Shawnee Saints during the Archers 58-56 victory on Jan. 19. Bottom left: Toraino Hellems and Archer center, Ryun Davis (52), scramble after a loose ball. Right: Archer head coach, Randy Albrecht instructs Harvey Mills and Kyle Rice (42) before they enter the game on Jan. 19. Albrecht was honored for his 700th STLCC win before the game’s 7:30 p.m. tip-off.

SPENCER GLEASON SPORTS EDITOR Billikens, is one of only nine active Being married for about 45 years, his As the buzzer sounded at the end of the St. Louis Community College Archers 87-77 victory over the Tohono O’odham Community College Jegos, on Jan. 4, in Yuma, Ariz., Archer head coach Randy Albrecht had just reached another milestone—win number 700—again. A year after winning his career 700th game, Albrecht had now won his 700th game at the helm of junior college basketball in St. Louis. Albrecht, who had coached for three seasons at St. Louis University in the mid 1970s and compiled a record of 32-47 while coaching the

coaches to have hit the plateau and one of only seven to do it while coaching the same team. “There are too many celebrations of 700 to keep track of,” Albrecht said. “It’s very confusing for the average person. It’s like—‘this guy, he can’t remember that he won 700 last year. He’s getting old so they have to do it every year to remind him.’” Since taking the men’s head coaching position 35 years ago at STLCC-Meramec in 1977, and continue as the STLCC Archer men’s basketball coach at STLCCForest Park, Albrecht has coached over 400 student athletes.

Diving deep

wife Linda Albrecht has sat through over 1,000 junior college basketball games cheering him on. “He does leave [high anxiety moments] out on the court,” Linda Albrecht said. “Mentally he may be thinking about it but he handles it very well.” In 1985, the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) instituted divisions and STLCC basketball was placed in Division II. Since then, Albrecht has led his teams to 27 consecutive winning seasons. “The thing that I’m most proud of is the consistency of the winning seasons,”

Albrecht said. “We haven’t won a national championship, but we’ve gone to the tournament. We’re averaging 20 wins a year. That’s about a normal year—20-11. To do that for 27 straight years of that kind of average is a testament that we [as a staff] do have some kind of plan. We have an idea of what kind of kids we need and how to coach them when they come.” While never picturing himself still on the sidelines in the year 2012, Albrecht still has a love for the game. “Years ago I used to think—the year 2000 will be a celebration. That’s the year I ought to retire,” Albrecht said. “I would have never believed I would still be here...

Scuba class keeps students below the surface

AARON MCCALL STAFF WRITER

Different people scuba dive for different reasons. Some people scuba dive because it peaks their interests and others do it simply to relieve stress. For two physical education credits, scuba diving is available to everyone at STLCCMeramec. The community college is one of the only St. Louis-area schools to still offer the course. Scuba diving class is offered once a semester in the fall and spring. Scott Lesh, who has been running the program since 2004, since he took over for Bill Shadburg who started the program, has been teaching for 15 years and diving for 20 years. The course, which takes place in the Meramec swimming pool, can take the student into the depths of the waters, all across the country and the world. “Here at the school we are able to give people a full semester-worth of time in the pool developing skills

which makes a big difference,” Lesh said. “You don’t get that much time a lot of other places.” Along with giving students the opportunity to learn how to dive, Meramec provides the students with all the equipment necessary. “One thing that’s nice about Meramec,” Lesh said, “is the program is schoolsupported. They provide everything top to bottom to make the scuba diving courses available.”

ILLUSTRATION BY: CORY MONTERO

The course introduces physiological and psychological aspects of using self-contained underwater breathing apparatus. After successfully completing classroom work, which includes safety, care and maintenance of the equipment, confined water skills and four different open dives, the student will receive their open water diver certification. “Here in Missouri our opportunities for diving in the lakes are the quarries and that’s where people usually learn after they take the open water course,” Lesh said. “There are diving

opportunities around here where people can learn to dive and keep their interests peaked.” Once students attain their open water diver certification, they are allowed to take advanced scuba classes. “We take people down to Lake Norfork in Arkansas,” Lesh said. “They do their training dives there and get their certification… We have done trips to the Cayman Islands, Cozumel and the Bahamas. [We] have done shark diving. The big blue water is where it’s fun.”


26 Jan 12