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MACK PIENE UECKER WORKS ON PAPER FROM 1962 - 2012



MACK PIENE UECKER WORKS ON PAPER FROM 1962 - 2012



CONTENTS 06 Introduction 10

Heinz Mack

36

Otto Piene

56

G端nther Uecker

76

List of plates

80 Bibliography


INTRODUCTION by Edouard Derom At the basis of ZERO lies a friendship between two young artists, Heinz Mack and Otto Piene, who met when they were students at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf. Together with Günther Uecker, who had recently moved from East Germany to study at the same academy, they formed the core of an avantgarde group that would have a lasting impact on the postwar art scene, not only in Germany but also in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and Italy, as well as in the United States. These young artists were born before the Second World War and experienced its atrocities as teenagers. They came to artistic maturity in a country that was in ruins and dealing with a profound crisis of identity and ideology as a result of the destruction wrought by the Nazis. As young artists, their sources of inspiration were severely limited: all traces of modernism had been systemically erased and removed from Gemany’s museums by the Nazi regime. In the immediate postwar period, the European art scene was strongly influenced by what is commonly referred to as Art Informel or Tachism, a movement often compared to Abstract Expressionism in the US. Through the use of heavy impasto and broad brushstrokes, artists sought graphic expression of their innermost emotions and angst at a time of existential questioning. The young Zero artists embraced this movement at first, joining the Informel painters of Düsseldorf’s Gruppe 53. But by the mid-to-late Fifties Art Informel had become belle peinture, and young artists like Mack, Piene, and Uecker were no longer interested in what they saw as its excessive subjectivism. A change of course was not easy, however: no existing contemporary art movement accurately reflected their new ideas. Mack and Piene decided to take things in their own hands, organising a series of Abendaustellungen or one-night exhibitions in the studio they shared at Gladbacher Strasse 69. There were nine shows in all, the last being held at Galerie Schmela in 1961. Like-minded artists were invited to submit artworks for inclusion in the exhibitions. From the seventh show onwards, the group published an accompanying magazine, Zero, featuring illustrations and theoretical essays by the participating artists and scholars. Cheaply produced in a small format, and easily distributed, the magazine played a key role in the dissemination of their ideas across Europe. As Germans, it was essential for the group to overcome their nation’s cultural isolation and reach out to artists elsewhere in Europe. They invited artists from outside Germany to contribute to the shows and magazine, and frequently traveled abroad to meet, work and exhibit with other colleagues. The 1959 exhibition Vision

in Motion – Motion in Vision proved a groundbreaking moment in the development of the international ZERO network (in the literature “Zero” typically refers to the German artists’ group, while “ZERO” denotes the larger network). The show was held at the Hessenhuis in Antwerp. For many participants, it was the first time they had encountered like-minded fellow artists from across Europe. After the ninth and final exhibition at Galerie Schmela in 1961, ZERO quickly became an international phenomenon. The period 1961-1966

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represents the movement’s heyday, with numerous exhibitions in museums and private galleries, including a large, collaborative installation by Mack, Piene, and Uecker – a composition of seven light sculptures entitled Lichtraum: Homage à Fontana, occupying one room at documenta III in 1964. In the same year, ZERO made its US debut with exhibitions in Philadelphia and New York. The group’s last exhibition took place in 1966 at the Städtische Kunstsammlungen in Bonn. On that occasion Mack announced at a press conference that this would be the last show designed and organised jointly by the German trio. While recognising the importance of ZERO for their artistic careers, Mack and Uecker felt the movement had run its course, and were ready to move on. They were concerned that ZERO had become institutionalised. For Piene, however, ZERO was relevant, very much alive, and remained a source of inspiration to the end of his life. It is hard to pinpoint ZERO with any precision: the movement was a loose constellation of artists with widely varying interests and art practices. As the name suggests, these young artists sought a radical break with the past, and a clean slate. They shared a rejection of Art Informel, with its emphatic reliance on the subjectivity of the artist. In its place, they offered a positive, forward-looking practice, more in tune with the period – an era of space exploration and scientific progress. Otto Piene has stated that Zero was “not an expression of nihilism” but rather “a zone of silence and of pure possibilities for a new beginning, […] an incommensurable zone in which the old state turns into the new.”1 The beauty of Zero is that far from being a doctrinaire artistic movement like Futurism or Surrealism, with strict theoretical frameworks and guidelines on the making of art, we see a group of young friends coming together in opposition to a pre-existing artistic mode, but who are otherwise free to work exactly as they please. Nonetheless, certain themes recur frequently in the work of ZERO artists, notably light, vibration, and the use of grids. That light held such a central place in their art is not surprising. Most had experienced the atrocities of war, hiding in cellars and maintaining black-outs during bombing raids. After the war the lights came on again across Europe, and for that generation, light represented hope for a better and (literally) brighter future. In the second issue of

Zero, Piene published an essay entitled “The Purity of Light”. He would go on to develop a body of works known as “lightballets” using light as an artistic medium in its own right. Mack’s so-called light-reliefs make use of hand-embossed aluminum sheets to capture light and explore its artistic possibilities. Vibration is another recurrent theme for many ZERO artists, closely related to the use of light, which is itself a form of vibration. “Vibration” was the theme of the eighth evening exhibition and its accompanying magazine. Many different strategies were developed to capture vibration, which could be optical (in Mack’s dynamic structures, Piene’s Rasterbilder, and Uecker’s fields of nails) or kinetic, using small motors. The group’s meeting with Jean Tinguely at his 1959 exhibition at Galerie Schmela undoubtedly had a lasting impact, and encouraged the Düsseldorf artists to include mechanical movement in their art. Grid forms reflected

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the ZERO movement’s emphasis on structure, which Mack also explicitly connected to natural phenomena. The grid was a strategy adopted by ZERO artists to rid their art of subjective composition, one of the central characteristics of Art Informel. Unlike Art Concret, however, the ZERO movement invariably emphasised the individual artist’s handiwork, and the crafted nature of their artistic output. There have been quite a number of ZERO exhibitions in recent years, not only in Europe but also in Brazil and the United States. Unfortunately, however, few have focused on the Zero artists’ lesser-known graphic output. Far from preliminary studies, the group’s works on paper should be considered as autonomous creations in their own right. Mack has cited the seminal importance of drawing for his work, at the outset of the ZERO adventure in 1957.2 Indeed, he abandoned painting altogether in 1963, but returned to it in 1996. His drawings have a structuralist quality, frequently relying on parallel lines. Structural elements set his drawings in motion – an essential element for an artist creating kinetic sculptures. However, they often include disturbances generated by the individual language of the hand and which constitute an important counterpoint to “mechanical” repetition. Mack dispenses with colour in his early works, but experiments with the colour spectrum later, leading to his development of colour scales or harmonies referred to as Farbchromatiken. Made with colour crayons and pastels, these “delineate the purity of the primary colours and their nuanced changeovers as expressively as possible.”3 In the late Nineties, Mack produced numerous works in ink, using the brush rather than the pen. The compositions feature his characteristic, alternating passages of white and black, light and shadow, but the unforgiving medium of ink (which the artist took pains to master) resulted in a new and quite different body of work. The drawings witness Mack’s desire and capacity to constantly re-invent himself over the course of his long and fruitful career. Piene’s fire gouaches are part of a larger body of work using fire and smoke as graphic artistic media. During the war fire was associated with widespread destruction, not least during the bombing of the city of Dresden. Piene sought to move on from this, using smoke and fire to penetrate darkness, and make light (which depends on darkness) visible. Piene first used the medium of fire in connection with the Rasters – metal and cardboard stencils with manually perforated holes, which he used to create stencil paintings and lightballets. Piene attempted to use candlelight with the stencils, and quickly discovered that rather than projecting light (like the lightballets, which rely on electric light) the trace of the flame on paper produced a grid-form residue of soot with beautiful transitions, oscillations and visual vibrations. Piene coated his smoke drawings with fixative. When this was set alight with fire from a match, elegant organic

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forms resulted. Piene found stimulation in the technique’s inherent danger, demanding rapid action and reaction. Ultimately, colour was incorporated using loose pigment and spray paint.4 The fire gouaches form a nexus in Piene’s work: in the artist’s own words, they “predicted and suggested the forms and spaces” of his Sky Events, large-scale artistic projects which involved the elevation of inflatable structures into the sky.5 Günther Uecker’s use of nails is based on an autobiographical anecdote. During the war, at the age of fourteen, Uecker attempted to protect his mother and sister against the advancing Russian troops by barricading the doors and windows of the family house with planks and nails. In his work, nails represent both defense, like a hedgehog curling up into a ball, and tenderness, thanks to the soft-focus visual effects they engender.6 Uecker started using nails in 1956/57, even before he joined ZERO. The nails allow him to create what he calls poetic “fields” (a reference to his rural, agricultural upbringing), initially by using their sharp points to draw lines through the wet paint, and later by “nailing over” objects of all kinds, including canvases. The artist has compared the repetitive hammering of the nails to the recitation of mantras by priests seeking higher levels of meditation and concentration.7 The nails generate a structure that is basically a language in its own right, not alphabetical but optical, activated by the play with light. In Uecker’s Parallele Strukturen there are no actual nails, only the trace of their former presence. The resulting white reliefs exude a sense of quiet, and create subtle, homogeneous structures expressing fundamental human emotions. This selection of works on paper by Mack, Piene and Uecker reminds us that paper was the Zero artists’ medium of choice for artistic experimentation. The works witness the group’s struggles, and its constant search for new artistic solutions. Deeply personal, intimate and expressive, they witness, too, the exceptional draftsmanship underscoring much of ZERO’s creativity and output.

1

Otto Piene, “The Development of the Group ‘Zero,’” Times Literary Supplement, Sept. 3, 1964, pp. 812 – 13, reprinted in ZERO, ed. Piene and Heinz Mack, trans. Howard Beckman (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1973), p. xx 2 Gunda Luyken and Beat Wismer, eds. Mack: The Language of My Hand, exh. cat. (Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2011), p. 264 3 Ibid 4 For the origin of Piene’s use of fire see Heinz-Norbert Jocks, Das Ohr am Tatort: Heinz-Norbert Jocks im Gespräch mit Gotthard Graubner, Heinz Mack, Roman Opalka, Otto Piene und Günther Uecker (Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2009), pp. 111-112 5 Ante Glibota, Otto Piene (Paris: Delight Edition, 2011), p. 236 6 Günther Uecker: The Early Years (New York: L & M Arts, 2011), p. 8 7 Jocks, op. cit., p. 119

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HEINZ MACK b. 1931 Lollar, Germany


Untitled 1964 Spray paint on paper 51.5 x 66 cm 20 1/4 x 26 inches

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13


Blaue Pyramide 1965 Pastel on handmade paper 62.5 x 48.6 cm 24 5/8 x 19 1/8 inches

14


15


Lichtwirbel (Light Vortex) 1968 Spay paint on paper 81 x 59 cm 31 7/8 x 23 1/4 inches

16


17


Untitled 1977 Pastel on handmade paper 112 x 77 cm 44 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches

18


19


Kleiner Fl端gel (Little Wing) 1986 Pastel on handmade paper 78.5 x 65.5 cm 30 7/8 x 25 3/4 inches

20


21


Untitled 1992 Gouache on paper 65.5 x 59.5 cm 25 3/4 x 23 3/8 inches

22


23


Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 39 x 55 cm 15 3/8 x 21 5/8 inches

24


25


Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 42 x 59.3 cm 16 1/2 x 23 3/8 inches

26


27


Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 50 x 38.5 cm 19 5/8 x 15 1/8 inches

28


29


Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 112 x 77 cm 44 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches

30


31


Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 43.8 x 36.3 cm 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

32


33


Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 41.5 x 36 cm 16 3/8 x 14 1/8 inches

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35



OTTO PIENE b. 1928 Bad Laasphe - d. 2014 Berlin, Germany


Untitled 1962 Fire gouache on paper 36.5 x 51 cm 14 3/8 x 20 1/8 inches

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39


Untitled 1962 Fire gouache on paper 36 x 50.5 cm 14 1/8 x 19 7/8 inches

40


41


Untitled (n.21) 1962 Fire gouache on paper 54 x 80 cm 21 1/4 x 31 1/2 inches

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43


Theatre 1972 Fire gouache on paper 99 x 70 cm 39 x 27 1/2 inches

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45


Forget It 1972 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches

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47


Chaugete Architecture 1976 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches

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49


24 Januar 77 1977 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches

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51


Gas 1977 Fire gouache on paper 99 x 65 cm 39 x 25 5/8 inches

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53


Laterne Central 1957/83/91 Raster painting, oil and fire on board 73 x 103 cm 28 3/4 x 40 1/2 inches

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55



GÜNTHER UECKER b. 1930 Wendorf, Germany


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Ink on embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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59


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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61


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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63


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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65


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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67


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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69


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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71


Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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73


Untitled c. 1970 Lithograph on paper Edition of 150 64.8 x 49.9 cm 25 1/2 x 19 5/8 inches

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75


HEINZ MACK LIST OF WORKS

76

Pg 13 Untitled 1964 Spray paint on paper 51.5 x 66 cm 20 1/4 x 26 inches

Pg 25 Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 39 x 55 cm 15 3/8 x 21 5/8 inches

Pg 15 Blaue Pyramide 1965 Pastel on handmade paper 62.5 x 48.6 cm 24 5/8 x 19 1/8 inches

Pg 27 Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 42 x 59.3 cm 16 1/2 x 23 3/8 inches

Pg 17 Lichtwirbel (Light Vortex) 1968 Spay paint on paper 81 x 59 cm 31 7/8 x 23 1/4 inches

Pg 29 Untitled 2010 Indian ink on handmade paper 50 x 38.5 cm 19 5/8 x 15 1/8 inches

Pg 19 Untitled 1977 Pastel on handmade paper 112 x 77 cm 44 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches

Pg 31 Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 112 x 77 cm 44 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches

Pg 21 Kleiner Fl端gel (Little Wing) 1986 Pastel on handmade paper 78.5 x 65.5 cm 30 7/8 x 25 3/4 inches

Pg 33 Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 43.8 x 36.3 cm 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

Pg 23 Untitled 1992 Gouache on paper 65.5 x 59.5 cm 25 3/4 x 23 3/8 inches

Pg 35 Untitled 2012 Pastel on handmade paper 41.5 x 36 cm 16 3/8 x 14 1/8 inches


OTTO PIENE LIST OF WORKS

Pg 39 Untitled 1962 Fire gouache on paper 36.5 x 51 cm 14 3/8 x 20 1/8 inches

Pg 51 24 Januar 77 1977 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches

Pg 41 Untitled 1962 Fire gouache on paper 36 x 50.5 cm 14 1/8 x 19 7/8 inches

Pg 53 Gas 1977 Fire gouache on paper 99 x 65 cm 39 x 25 5/8 inches

Pg 43 Untitled (n.21) 1962 Fire gouache on paper 54 x 80 cm 21 1/4 x 31 1/2 inches

Pg 55 Laterne Central 1957/83/91 Raster painting, oil and fire on board 73 x 103 cm 28 3/4 x 40 1/2 inches

Pg 45 Theatre 1972 Fire gouache on paper 99 x 70 cm 39 x 27 1/2 inches Pg 47 Forget It 1972 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches Pg 49 Chaugete Architecture 1976 Fire gouache on paper 99.5 x 64.5 cm 39 1/8 x 25 3/8 inches

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GĂœNTHER UECKER LIST OF WORKS

Pg 59 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Ink on embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 69 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 61 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 71 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 63 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 73 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 65 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

Pg 75 Untitled c. 1970 Lithograph on paper Edition of 150 64.8 x 49.9 cm 25 1/2 x 19 5/8 inches

Pg 67 Parallele Strukturen 1965 Embossed paper Edition of 35 46.4 x 46.4 cm 18 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches

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SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY by Edouard Derom Beuckers, Klaas Gereon, ed. Günther Uecker: Die Aktionen. Petersberg, Germany: Michael Imhof Verlag, 2004

Kuhn, Anette. ZERO: Eine Avantgarde der sechziger Jahre. Berlin: Propyläen Verlag, 1991

Caianiello, Tiziana, Antoon Melissen, Andres Pardey, Johan Pas, Francesca Pola, Dirk Pörschmann, Ulrike Schmitt, Mattijs Visser, Thekla Zell, eds. The Artist as Curator: Collaborative Initiatives in the International ZERO Movement, 1957–1967. Ghent: AsaMER, forthcoming

Lichtraum (Hommage à Fontana): Der documentaBeitrag von Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, und Günther Uecker 1964. Düsseldorf: ZERO foundation and Museum Kunst Palast, 2009

Fleck, Robert, and Nathalie Hoyos, eds. Heinz Mack: Licht, Raum, Farbe = Light, Space, Colour. Exh. cat. Cologne: Snoeck, 2011

Luyken, Gunda, and Beat Wismer, eds. Mack: The Language of My Hand. Exh. cat. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2011

Glibota, Ante. Otto Piene. Paris: Delight Edition, 2011

Mack, Heinz. Mackazin: Die Jahre, the Years, Les Années 1957–1967. New York: Howard Wise Gallery, 1967

Group Zero: Mack—Piene—Uecker. Exh. cat. New York: Howard Wise Gallery, 1964 Group Zero: Mack Piene Uecker. Exh. cat. London: McRoberts and Tunnard Gallery, 1964 Gruppe Zero. Exh. cat. Düsseldorf: Galerie Schoeller, 1989 Günther Uecker: The Early Years. New York: L & M Arts, 2011 Günther Uecker: Twenty Chapters. Exh. cat. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2006 Honisch, Dieter, ed. Mack, Sculptures, 1953–1986. Düsseldorf: Econ, 1987 Honisch, Dieter, ed. Uecker. Translated by Robert Erich Wolf. New York: Abrams, 1986 80

Jocks, Heinz-Norbert. Das Ohr am Tatort: HeinzNorbert Jocks im Gespräch mit Gotthard Graubner, Heinz Mack, Roman Opalka, Otto Piene und Günther Uecker. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2009

Otto Piene: Licht und Rauch; Grafik. Exh. cat. Leverkusen, West Germany: Städtisches Museum Leverkusen, Schloß Morsbroich, 1962 Otto Piene: A Retrospective; Paintings, Ceramics, Light Ballets, Inflatables. With interviews of the artist by Hans Ulrich Obrist. London: Mayor Gallery, 2012 Piene: Light Ballet, Exh. cat. New York: Howard Wise Gallery, 1965 Piene, Otto, and Heinz Mack. ZERO. Translated by Howard Beckman. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1973 Pörschmann, Dirk, and Margriet Schavemaker, eds. ZERO The International Art Movement of the 50s and 60s. Exh. cat. Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2015


Pörschmann, Dirk, and Mattijs Visser, eds. 4 3 2 1 ZERO. Düsseldorf: Richter/Fey Verlag, 2012 Ribas, João. Otto Piene Lichtballett. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT List Visual Arts Centre, 2011 Schmied, Wieland, ed. 0: Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, Günther Uecker. Exh. cat. Hanover, West Germany: Kestner-Gesellschaft Hannover, 1965

Visser, Mattijs, and David Leiber, eds. ZERO in NY. Ghent: Mer. Paper Kunsthalle; New York: Sperone Westwater, 2008 von Wiese, Stephan, and Susanne Rennert. Otto Piene: Retrospektive 1952–1966; Raster, Rauch, Feuer, Licht, Sky Art, Inflatables, CAVS, neue Arbeiten. Exh. cat. Cologne: Wienand Verlag, 1996

Schmied, Wieland, ed. Utopie und Wirklichkeit im Werk von Heinz Mack. Cologne: Dumont, 1998

Wember, Paul, ed. Mack, Piene, Uecker. Exh. cat. Krefeld, West Germany: Museum Haus Lange, Kunstmuseen Krefeld, 1963

Schmitt, Ulrike. The Zero Era: The Lenz Schönberg Collection; Living in Art. 2 vols. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2009

Wiehager, Renate, ed. ZERO aus Deutschland 1957– 1966: Und heute. Exh. cat. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 1999

Stachelhaus, Heiner. Zero: Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, Günther Uecker. Düsseldorf: ECON Verlag, 1993

Wilhelm, Jürgen, ed. Mack im Gespräch. Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2015

Til, Barbara, ed. ZERO: Internationale KünstlerAvantgarde der 50er/60er Jahre. Exh. cat. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2006

Wilhelm, Jürgen, ed. Piene im Gespräch. Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2015

Titz, Susanne, and Jee-Hae Kim, eds. Mack: Kinetik; Mack: Kinetics. Exh. cat. Düsseldorf: Richter, 2011 Uecker, Günther. Weisstrukturen und Texte. Düsseldorf: Hans Möller, 1963

ZERO in Bonn: Mack, Piene, Uecker. Exh. cat. Bonn: Städtische Kunstsammlungen Bonn, 1966 ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s-60s. Exh. cat. New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 2014

Uecker, Günther. Schriften: Gedichte, Projektbeschreibungen, Reflexionen. Edited by Stephan von Wiese. Sankt Gallen, Switzerland: ErkerVerlag, 1979

Uecker. Exh. cat. New York: Howard Wise Gallery, 1966 Uecker. Exh. cat. Düsseldorf: Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, 2015 81



THE MAYOR GALLERY 21 CORK STREET FIRST FLOOR LONDON W1S 3LZ T: +44 (0)20 7734 3558 F: +44 (0)20 7494 1377 info@mayorgallery.com www.mayorgallery.com Printed on the occasion of the exhibition: MACK PIENE UECKER WORKS ON PAPER FROM 1962 - 2012 04 JUN - 24 JUL 2015 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publishers or copyright holders. Edition of 500 Introduction © Edouard Derom Photography © Archive Heinz Mack (VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015) pg 13 - 35 © Richard Valencia pg 39 - 75 All dimensions of works are given height before width before depth The colour reproduction in this catalogue is representative only Design by Jamie Howell and Christine Hourdé Printed by Birch Print, Heritage House, DE7 5UD ISBN: 978-0-9927984-6-8



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