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A weekly publication by Loras College students

Vol. 90, Issue 12

March 15, 2012

photo illustration by AYUSH SUBEDI

Bold, beautiful strokes Methamphetamean 3 senior art students earn the distinction of displaying their works at the Integrated Visual Arts Show, which will run until March 23 SAJJAN K.C.

staff writer

This past Friday, the Integrated Visual Arts reception was held at the Woodland Art Gallery in the Visitation Complex. This show provides a forum for Loras’ future artists and designers to exhibit their works of art. The works will be displayed for another week, until March 23. Associate Professor of Art Wendy Romero explained that, every year, art faculty come together as a panel of reviewers and critics who scrutinize students’ works and scrupulously select a few art majors who will receive the honor of having their work displayed in the Integrated Visual Arts Show. For the opening reception three senior students Mike Roth, Sarah Gotto and Emily Full were chosen to display their works. The displays, on first sight, were overwhelming: from Mike It is a love/hate permanent relationship. I love Roth’s marker strokes to Emthe feedback. I love ily Full’s abstract inkpen collections to Sarthe outcome, but Gotto graphic deI hate the amount ah signs. of work behind it. “(The show) is a milestone for art stuMike Roth dents and a great opsenior art student, portunity. This show reflecting on his is truly inspiring,” experience of said senior James creating art while at Brown, who was one Loras of the many attending the show. One of the main attractions of this show was senior Mike Roth’s dexterity with permanent markers. It is traditional belief that art — or sketch, to be precise — is done on paper. Roth has completely defied this by drawing on shoes, car doors and a car trunk. His vivid yet single-colored sketches were available for purchase from anywhere between $50 and $300. When asked about his experience of his art life at Loras, Roth said, “It is a love/hate relationship. I love the feedback. I love the outcome, but I hate the amount of work behind it.” The goals of this show are to expose art students to the critiques of the general public while giving the art majors a chance to show off their hard work, which ultimately serves to boost their confidence and prepare them for the competitive world.

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Meth usage in the Dubuque area has risen steadily in recent years. For the first time, it hits close to home.

vestigation with the school. “Everything from the fire department’s response, the Loras College finds itself in the middle of a metham- sprinkler system’s engagement, and other related aspects are being investigated,” Sunleaf said. “We’re working with both phetamine investigation. On February 29, sometime before 3 a.m., a meth lab ex- agencies to make sure the response process worked on both ploded in the bathroom attached to the commons area in sides.” Damage to the bathroom in the Lynch-McCarthy apartment the Lynch-McCarthy Apartments. According to authorities, the suspect — who is not a common room was extensive. According to the Loras Physical Loras student — is known, but will not be apprehended Plant, the total damages assessed are roughly around $10,000. Most of water damage is a result of the activation until a case against him is built. of the sprinkler system, not the fire itself. The explosion at Loras is an indication of yet another upward swing of meth use in the Much of the damage has been repaired, or is Dubuque area. in the process of being repaired. Servicemaster, We’re working According to the Dubuque Police Departa local business, was called to clean the carpets ment, 2011 was a very active year for the with both agencies and remove as much water damage as possible. to make sure drug’s trade and production in Dubuque. In to“Any time the sprinkler system runs, there’s tal, 46 “dump sites,” or discarded cooking apthe risk for water damage,” said Sunleaf. the response paratuses, were located, and eight active meth “Thankfully, they did their job.” process worked labs were vanquished as well. By comparison, The incident on campus is consistent with on both sides. just 17 “dump sites” were found in 2010. methamphetamine trends in Dubuque. The The lab at Loras marks the second conin methamphetamine cooking and usage Art Sunleaf boom firmed active lab in Dubuque County in is something new to Lieutenant Scott Baxter, Dean of Students crime prevention and public information officer 2012, emerging just a few weeks after another lab was seized downtown on White at the Dubuque Police Department, who said Street. Two dump sites have been found there are several possible causes for the drug’s around the county as well in 2012. recent popularity in the area. Loras is working in conjunction with the Dubuque Po“One theory out there it that the people we locked up lice Department to conclude the investigation, but it is a awhile back in the late ’90s are getting out of prison, and long process. Art Sunleaf says Loras’ main job is to stay they might attribute to the uptick,” Baxter said. out of the way. The increasing numbers are somewhat shocking, but the “From the moment of the incident on, the Dubuque police department is dispatching as much staff as possible to Task Force has been investigating,” he said. “Witnesses combat the meth trade. to the incident are being sought now.” continued on page 4 The Dubuque Fire Department is conducting its own in-

by NICK JOOS

co-executive editor

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Weird Weather illustration by Emily Full


news

March 15, 2012

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The ‘R’ Word

that pairs Loras students with kids and adults with intellectual disabil“I brought it here because it’s ities. Through the program, the Loneeded on campus,” said Du-Bud- ras students attend monthly events dies president Katie Kasten. She is around campus and the local comreferring to the campaign that went munity, contact their buddies once on last week called, “End the ‘R’ a week, and visit their buddies once Word.” The ‘R’ word refers to the a month. Though, she said, “end words retard or retarded. But what the ‘R’ word is not just for Duis the purpose of ending the use of Buddies. This event should help all the word? And what, if anything is people cultivate respect.” wrong with that word? The weeklong event collaboratKasten described it as a deroga- ed on by Du-Buddies and the Loras tory and “personally hurtful” word, College Students for Inclusive Eda word that is hurtful to, “a lot of ucation included a speaker, Allypeople with disabilities.” The word son Beytien, who spoke on Autism, used to be a medical term that was a pledge to end the “R” word, and used to refer to someone who has a T-shirt raffle. The T-shirts were an intellectual disability. Howev- worn on the 7th which is the offier, a federal law has been passed to cial “End the ‘R’ word” day. remove its use in all medicine and “People were unaware that (regovernment. Howtarded) was derogever, it is often used atory,” Kasten said. as a put-down from She views the week one person to anothIt’s important to as a success in eduer: “you’re so retardcating students about make people aware ed.” When one utters the issue. of this issue — it’s that phrase to anoth“It’s important to about respect. er, it can be taken ofmake people aware fensively, because this issue- it is Teresa Gwardys of the word retarded about respect,” said sophomore Teresa Gwardys, a can be substituted with ‘dumb’ or ‘stusophomore and Dupid.’ Because of this, Buddies member. retarded is now equated with dumb But there have been some peoor stupid, qualities that people with ple who have opposed it. This has intellectual disabilities don’t have. not stopped Kasten. She welcomes So, Kasten wanted to bring the the opposition. “We need peonational “End the ‘R’ Word” pro- ple to challenge us,” she said. She gram to Loras. The program was also said that if people challenge started by Soeren Palumbo, who, the program, Du-Buddies can betin 2004, after giving a speech at his ter learn how to communicate their high school about ending the use of message. the word retarded, gained nationKasten says she appreciated the al attention. He has since gone on support that Loras has given the the University of Notre Dame and event, and she thinks that, “it is a has given talks educating schools good step toward social change on and businesses about the use of the the Loras Campus.” word. If you have any comments, quesKasten wanted Du-Buddies in- tions, or concerns about the event volved because with this pro- or the Du-Buddies program, congram “we are honoring our friend- tact Katie at Kathryn.Kasten@loship.” Du-Buddies is a program ras.edu.

by NICK SENTOVICH staff writer

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Pro-life Thought for the Week Umbert the Unborn by Gary Cangemi

photo by RAJENDRA THAKURATHI

Bird’s-eye view

Early Saturday morning, a waking sun, singing birds and a cool zephyr graced the Loras campus.

Jigging the night away Irish spirit invaded Loras on Saturday night at the Hooley Dance, which featured a live band and traditional Irish dancers by Nang khai staff writer

Green is back. I’m not just talking about the beautiful weather and the newly blooming leaves. Think about green Chicago River, St. Pat’s Auction (Debbie’s Scotcharoos), Shamrock Shakes, and Irish fiddling. The atmosphere and the excitement surrounding us is hard to evade. For the Duhawks, it is the stepping feet that set the Irish mood. Hosted by Loras Intercultural Student Association, four Loras Students including sophomores Kaitlyn Keely and Sarah Rochford, junior Shannon Cohoon, and firstyear Sarah Leonard, and featuring a band of Professor John Eby, his daughter Amanda Eby, and Peter Fraterdeus from Galena, celebrated the Irish Hooley Dance last Saturday. photo by RAJENDRA THAKURATHI The evening began with the tra- Kaitlyn Keeley, Shannon Cohoon, Sarah Leonard and Sarah ditional and popular piece, “The Rochford strike a pose before performing. Lark of Morning.” The audience was small and yet spirited, ready to has different steps and uses differ- to the fiddling and whistling is sigshake the ground with their danc- ent shoes. The soft shoes are often nificant. ing feet and wake the entire com- used by beginners and as one gets “I have enjoyed learning about a munity into the month of Green. better, the lessons are with steps new culture, and dance is one way Irish music has a theme of joy that mostly involve hard shoes, to show that we all have someand celebration. explained Shannon thing in common,” said senior “The music is Cohoon. John Keane. for dancers, it is for As liberating as Peter Fraterdeus will be spendthose who come toDance is one way the music is, the ing his St. Patrick’s Day in Wisgether and dance,” to show that we all dance is the symbol consin, and his next event will said Peter Fraterdeof freedom and re- be on Thursday at River Lights have something us. taliation against the Bookstore where there will be in common. Normally, the legal restrictions im- more Irish music. For Fraterdeus, Irish pubs are popby the British it is wonderful to have events like John Keane posed ular destinations for blended with patriot- Hooley, and the idea of preserving senior some good traditionic movement to pre- a culture in a diverse population. al music. But last serve the Irish cul“We have common culture. So Saturday, Loras stole ture. many things that we share, but it is the hype. Bodhran A popular folklore also wonderful to bring those little is like the bass beat, and there is is that Irish dance has strict rules core parts of culture and share it sweet touch of whistle or flute that about straight hands to prevent the with people,” said Fraterdeus. makes an art of inevitable dance. dance from being noticed by the The night was a success, a celeThe dance and the instruments go British through the window. The bration of culture and family. The hand in hand – the musicians play tradition has been sustained till month of green began with a bang for dancers and the dancers jig to this day, and the hands and the up- and will continue to be celebratthe music. Generally, there are soft per body don’t do much in Irish ed in different ways in the comshoes and hard shoes. Each dance dance while the tapping of the feet ing week.

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— Advertisement from Duhawks for Life


news

Royal Comedy

March 15, 2012

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Comedian Roy Wood Jr. had the campus rolling with laughter during his performance in the Pub last Friday night by ANDREA BERNS staff writer

The sound of laughter resonating through the Pub could be heard throughout the ACC last Friday night. The laughter was for comedian Roy Wood Jr. The thirty-three year old hails from Birmingham, Alabama, and isn’t afraid to crack jokes about himself or his background. “That’s where I think honest comedy comes from,” said Wood. “Either who you are as a person or how you feel about particular things.” Wood displayed himself in a comfortable and carefree way on Friday night, using his fluent humor to communicate his witty worldview, especially his perspective on his home-state. “Alabama is exactly what you think it is, minus WiFi,” Wood joked. Alabama wasn’t the brunt of all of Wood’s jokes. Wood covered a variety of topics including Facebook, rap music, sports, racism and relationships. His most popular bits photo by MARLON TORRES were his ideas for pranking Walmart greeters and a rap song he performed about turkey and gravy. Whatever the topic, the co- they were like, ‘Oh wait, you do this for median had the audience rolling with laugh- real?’” he said, laughing. Not only has Wood done stand-up comter. As a nineteen-year-old college student edy for national television such as the Toat Florida A&M, Wood snuck into comedy night Show with Jay Leno and the Late shows with a friend and watched the stand- Show with David Letterman, but he was up comedians perform. After watching also a news reporter for a Florida radio station, Hot 105.7. This job these shows, Wood knew gave him a chance to prohe wanted to become a cofessionally prank call varmedian. During this time ious people and organizain college he was taking a Just make life tions. These prank calls can screenwriting class, which decisions; make be listened to by searching also had a major influence “Roy prank calls” on Youcareer choices on on his decision to become and are also featured a comedian. Today, Wood what fulfills you, what Tube, on several CDs, the most finds inspiration in comemakes you happy. recent entitled “I’ll Slap dians Chris Rock and LouYou To Sleep.” is C.K. And the money will Although the majority of In 1998, Wood began his come. You always get the night was light and fun, career while performing at money, but happiness Wood shared a fair amount open mics. He graduated of wisdom throughout his from Florida A&M in 2001. is not for sale. performance. His message Although he graduated to the students of Loras for from college, Wood’s decithe night was to make sure sion to be a comedian did Roy Wood Jr. that they are doing what not go over well with his they love. family. His mother, a colHe claims that his career lege professor, wanted him has had highs and lows, but to go into an occupation he has always been happy with his choice of with more of a guarantee for success. “I would estimate that there are … no career. In the end, 14 years in, he still canmore than 400 to 500 comedians that are liv- not think of anything else that he would rathing comfortably and supporting themselves er be doing. doing this and nothing else,” Wood explains. “Maybe playing first base for the Chicago “Not a lot of people are able to do this full Cubs, but I suck at baseball, so there goes time; to be at the ground level open mic sta- that dream,” Wood added, laughing. “Just tus.” make life decisions; make career choices on The rest of his family viewed his comedic what fulfills you, what makes you happy. role as merely a hobby. And the money will come. You always get “It wasn’t until I was on television when money, but happiness is not for sale.”

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Thank a donor ... become a donor by SMRITI SHAKYA staff writer

Philanthropy Day is a special day set aside to recognize the importance of philanthropy and to pay tribute to the people that have contributed significantly to the Loras community through their active role in philanthropy. The Alumni Relations Office along with the Loras Student Alumni Council (LSAC) takes the initiative to celebrate this day. The purpose of celebrating this day is to give the entire Loras College community the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the importance of being involved and giving back to make impact on Loras and its students. The College raises more than $5 million in donations each year from more than 8,000 donors. This year’s theme — “Thank a donor ... Become a donor!” — emphasized the importance of donor recognition in the fundraising process. For more information, visit myduhawk.com.

The Lorian is hoping to start a tradition, but we hope the entire campus community gets involved. We want you — students, faculty and staff — to do the voting. We are asking that everyone help select deserving nominees among all of the students, faculty and staff, and to vote twice. The first vote will yield several finalists and the second will yield the “Person of the Year.” The Lorian’s overall goal is to honor everyone who made an impact — as a result of his or her actions or accomplishments either on campus or off of it — during the 2011-12 school year. Maybe it was a student who selflessly volunteered countless hours of service, maybe it was a professor who earned a high distinction, maybe it was an administrator whose idea/s sparked a huge success, or maybe it was a coach who engineered an amazing year for his or her team. Here are the nuts and bolts: 1. NOMINATIONS will be taken until March 23. 2. NOMINEES INTRODUCED with photos and summaries in the March 29 Lorian edition. 3. CAMPUS-WIDE VOTE in order to settle on finalists. 4. FINALISTS INTRODUCED with more comprehensive articles in the April 26 edition. 5. CAMPUS-WIDE VOTE to determine the winner. 6. WINNER FEATURED in an in-depth cover story in the May 10 “Senior Edition.” We are purposely trying not to “pigeonhole” the criteria for the award. We want you to determine what is significant, inspirational or influential. The votes of students, faculty and staff will be equally represented via “weighted” poll results. We will be sending out campus-wide e-mails asking for nominations. We don’t care about the origin of the nomination (unless you want us to include your name) and you are free to nominate as many people as you wish. We simply ask that each nomination come with a reason as to why you are nominating that person. If you insist on being anonymous, you also could visit mylorian.com and clicking on nominations. — Thank you, The Lorian staff


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CAMPUS-WIDE CLIMATE SURVEY https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ StaffCampusClimat The climate survey is an opportunity for Loras to gather data on the state of the climate on campus in order to better address the needs of members of our community. The data gathered is intended to identify areas of concern and to assist the Diversity Committee and Human and Organizational Development office determine priorities for action. The results will serve as an important benchmark, a starting place for measuring campus climate change. The survey will be open through Wednesday, April 4, and the initial results will be shared with the campus during the week of April 30 at the Diversity Statement and Agenda for Action. The Loras College Diversity Statement by the Diversity Committee gives voice to core values of human dignity and diversity. The Diversity Committee exists to assist the campus community in achieving the values and objectives set forth in the Diversity Statement and the Agenda for Action.

photo by RAJENDRA THAKURATHI

Hometown hopes

Argaw Omero gives a presentation during an event organized by UNICEF in which he illustrates some of the highlights of his experiences in his hometown of Homacho, Ethiopia, during the winter break. His nonprofit organization, along with the support of Dubuque resident Don Koppes, is striving to improve the conditions of his village. Omero, an Ethiopian native, came to the U.S. in 2008 as a winner of a lottery from the Diversity Immigration Visa program that welcomes thousands of people from countries with low rates of immigration to the U.S.

Meth: Chemists ‘will call you crazy for combining these chemicals’ continued from page 1 “The most alarming figure to us is the 46 dump sites,” Baxter said. “The dump site numbers are the most accurate when determining the total number in the area.” A dump site is an active meth lab that has been discarded, usually haphazardly. They are found in dumpsters, street gutters, and other public areas. These are, obviously, a danger to the public. The lab at Loras was classified as active, and was a “1-pot” lab. photo illustration by Emily Full According to BaxOld meth labs required hundreds of ter, 1-Pot labs are much more dangerous be- pseudoephedrine pills to concoct their brews. cause they are portable The “shake and bake” method requires just a and confined to a much few pseudoephedrine pills and some household smaller space, and thus, chemicals. the combustible mate1-pot labs can be disposed of in a 2 lirials are in close contact with each other. It is also a much ter bottle. The fires are usually caused by lithimore amateur form of meth production. Due to their condensed size, individu- um strips found in batteries. When the als sometimes transport the labs in pop strips come into contact with moisture, bottles, then stuff them in suitcases, or the lithium reacts with a production of sparks, leading to fire. even coat pockets. “The chemicals being combined in They are much more dangerous and such a small space are very dangeroccasionally, the labs explode, which is ous,” said Baxter. “Consult a scientist what happened at Loras The 1-pot method is gaining popular- or chemist. They’ll call you crazy for ity due to its lack of smell, lesser ingre- combining these chemicals, even in a dients, and is easier to dispose of. Many controlled environment.”

Loras ensembles join forces with area high-schoolers Collegians perform alongside musicians from a Catholic school in Dyersville by Emma SMith staff writer

Together, the Loras College Wind Ensemble and the Dyersville (IA) Beckman High School band created music together that resonated throughout the Fieldhouse on Saturday night. The two ensembles were brought together to spark community outreach between a Catholic high school and Loras College in the spirit of music. The Loras College Jazz Ensemble also performed with the Beckman High Jazz Ensemble. The night also included a featured singer, Megan Moore, a Loras senior. Glenn Pohland, assistant professor of music and director of the Loras College Wind Ensemble, thought the event was an appropriate way to promote the Loras College program through the outreach to others. “The more that people get to know the Loras program and attend the concerts, the stronger the program will become,” he said. In addition to the opportunity to strengthen the program, the night gave the Beckman students the chance to be mentored by Loras students, encouraging fundamental musicianship and the love of music. “It is also important for Loras to get the exposure to audiences that may otherwise not attend our concerts” Pohland offered.

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“The more that people get to know the Loras program and attend the concerts, the stronger the program will become.”

Glenn Pohland

assistant professor of music and director of the Loras College Wind Ensemble

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The Fieldhouse was full, and the variety of the crowd made the concert even more special. The hope is that this supportive and varied crowd will return for other concerts throughout the Loras school year. The eagerness to grow as a musician becomes stronger as more support is given from the community. Music is something that is often cut from school budgets, so it is important to take opportunities from the community, such as concerts like this, to play together and show that music is still alive in our schools from elementary all the way to high school, as well as at the college level. “The concert was a great opportunity to meet prospective Loras students from Beckman,” said Paige Nebel, first-year and percussionist for Loras. The hope is that these prospective students will be future Duhawks, representing music at Loras College, so they too may give back to their community: the community that gave them a chance to share their love of music.


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Say it ain’t so: Limbaugh went too far?

March Nov.15,3,2012 2011

— A little over the top — Loras student is perplexed after seeing some discolored pop bottles ... and wondering about those terrible fumes

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s someone who believes that President Obama is better for this country than any narrow-minded, elitist Republican who hates government but wants to be president, I have never been a fan of Rush Limbaugh. I would choose listening to any Republican candidate share his or her views on America any day over ach ittle hearing Limbaugh’s outrageous neo-conservative firebrand. His rhetoric and his attitude frustrate me to levels that cannot be fully expressed through writing alone. The fact that he has a steady audience bothers me even more. However, with the controversy of late, Limbaugh’s future may be (thankfully) hanging in the balance, a la radio host Mr. Don Imus. In 2007, Imus called some women on the Rutgers University basketball team “nappyheaded hos.” After a period of shock and much controversy, Imus’ show was cancelled, and he was taken off of the air. Last week, Limbaugh called Georgetown University student Sandra Fluke a “slut” because she “wants you and me to pay her to have sex.” We want “the videos of all this sex posted online to see what we are getting for our money,” said Limbaugh. Her craven desire for contraception makes her a “slut” and a “prostitute.” Limbaugh’s word choice was not just poor diction, it was a personal attack against a private citizen who has decided to lend her voice to the debate, which previously had been led only by men. Alanis Morissette, you are so right about how ironic life is sometimes. So Imus called Limbaugh an “insincere pig” for the “vile, personal attack” on Fluke. In the wake of his latest remarks, Limbaugh has lost at least a dozen advertisers, including AOL, Sears, and John Deere, among several other big-name sponsors. So what did Limbaugh do next? Well, he apologized, of course. That is the natural thing to do when you offend someone … excuse me, when you start losing money. When you face such intense public backlash, you know you stepped over the line. I am afraid it’s simply a case of “I’m sorry, I got caught.” Attitudes and behavior like this are exactly why some people accuse Republicans of hating women. I will say that such generalizations are quite dangerous, and that making such blanket statements in politics, and life in general, are not prudent. However, the perception stands, and for good reason. Whatever resides in Limbaugh’s skull probably looks markedly different than any of the brains scientists have found in the rest of our heads. I just cannot understand what goes on in Limbaugh’s mind to think that such language and bullying is acceptable behavior. I am afraid Limbaugh is like the kid on the playground at recess. He gets his kicks by pushing others around, but every so often gets caught by the teacher. So, very sullenly and usually accompanied by the teacher, he comes over and apologizes because he has been forced into this counter-intuitive behavior. It is so unlike anything he has done before ... you know, being nice. The apology is forced, and you know it’s completely disingenuous. However, let’s not worry about Limbaugh the bully, because he will probably be back at it again once the teacher turns the other way. And you have to wonder: Who will he slander next?

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opinion/politics

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To the Republicans for which they stand

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editorial

Kony and the power of social media Sometime last week, Joseph Kony must have been shocked to learn that his name was appearing over and over again in newspaper headlines, on magazine covers and on countless Facebook posts. Once known to only a few social activists and to people fully informed on the atrocities in Uganda, he was given a starstudded status — thanks to the slick video that Invisible Children unveiled. Watching and moved by the Invisible Children video, many hopped onto the “FIND AND STOP KONY” bandwagon and shared posts and videos about him. However, others say that Invisible Children’s leaders are a bunch of selfpromoting, overprivileged young Americans, and there were backlashes against the intentions of the campaign, triggering vigorous online debate about the film’s accuracy. Within a few hours, data surfaced that suggests that less than half of the donations to Invisible Children actually is used for social activism. And it was true. Nonetheless, by the end of the week, Invisible Children co-founder Jason Russell and his colleagues achieved what they wanted — putting Kony at the center of media attention. Ignoring the intention of a “nonprofit” campaign and hunt for Kony, social media like Facebook and Twitter once again showed that they can be a weapon in this age when more than 500 million people are actively involved in something more serious than a video of a cat dancing. In line with the Iranian students demonstrating against sham elections, and the Arab Spring’s youth frustration, millions of

nescient minds were instantly educated about something they otherwise might never have cared about. It was a cry of democracy, of justice and putting the culprits under a guillotine. So, the jury is still out. Did a bunch of young Americans contrive this film, or are they sincere in providing a voice for the voiceless? Just liking or sharing a video might not make a difference. Questioning the legitimacy of a viral video, getting the truth behind a story and actually acting for a worthy cause would certainly do. —The Lorian staff

Editorial staff co-executive editors Nick JOOs and rajendra thakurathi news editor MARY AGNOLI features editor SURYA PANDEY sports editor JACK METZ photo editor KeLSEY BERGAN illustrator AYUSH SUBEDI advertising manager Mike Broton assistant features editor

COLIN HALBMAIER

assistant news editor

MATT KOCH

copy editors Laura Hebbeln K.T. Heidorn Hannah way moderator TIM MANNING

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itt Romney may be the prettiest of the Republican candidates, but he’s also the least sensational. That may very well be the reason for his success thus far. Romney is a Mormon and originally from Michigan. He engineered and managed leveraged buyouts for Bain Capital, served his eith linn country leading the Salt Lake City Olympics, and was the governor of Massachusetts. The main controversy over Mitt, at least among conservatives, is his progressive behavior, as exemplified by the health-care program he erected in Massachusetts. Another common attack against Romney is that his demeanor is unauthentic and elitist. Romney has also caught some slack for his silver spoon upbringing and the legacy of his formergovernor father. Mitt, however, has garnered the support of many Republican leaders and has maintained the sticker of front-runner all throughout the process. (454 delegates as of March 13). Rick Santorum is from Pennsylvania and represented his state in the Senate. He has received an M.B.A. and J.D. Santorum is known for being a social conservative, giving him an in with a large group of voters. Santorum is the man that captured Iowa (although, it would take a recount to confirm his 8-vote victory). The news of his victory came out just before the South Carolina primary, and provided him with the momentum to carry on. Santorum has had his ups and downs, but overall he has had a very impressive run. Recently, issues over contraception coverage have highlighted Santorum’s charge to maintain freedom of religion. Economically, his aim is to reinvigorate the industrial side of our economy. He had gained 217 delegates as of March 13. Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich pulled out big victories in Georgia and South Carolina. Perhaps the most seasoned in politics, he is a hardnosed debater. During his tenure as Speaker, the government balanced the budget. But Gingrich is haunted by what the pundits call “baggage.” He has committed adultery, divorced a dying wife, and essentially lobbied for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Gingrich aims to lower taxes drastically and decrease gasoline prices to $2.50. If any candidate were to a viable option to Romney, this would be the guy. He is a warrior and would have no trouble with Obama in the debates. He had 107 delegates as of March 13. With Ron Paul, you’ve really got to recognize there is no chance the guy is getting elected. His behavior is outdated: he is anti-Israel, has offended the gay community, and is against the use of Spanish in this country. However, he might be the most consistent politician in the history of this country. A former OB-GYN and a congressman from Texas. Paul bleeds smaller federal government, and opposes most federal spending. Paul may be the only guy on stage not lying to you, and he’s got a “trilliondollar plan” to fix this country. The youth have been attracted to Paul in this election probably due to his libertarian views. Paul promises to legalize and tax recreational marijuana, as well as prostitution, and drastically change our foreign policy. He had 47 delegates as of March 13.

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March 15, 2012

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Porcelain Heart by ANDREA BERNS staff writer

I was born with a heart made of porcelain and had to be very careful of giving it to the right person who wouldn’t break it. I gave it to you wrapped in love sealed with trust tied with a ribbon of affection and asked you to please handle it carefully. You unwrapped it with ginger hands took my heart in those hands

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A Ticket To Creative Adventure by COLIN HALBMAIER

Assistant Feature’s Editor

Last November, I had the pleasure of joining hundreds of thousands of other writers across the globe in an endeavor known as NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month. This project, organized by a non-profit organization by the name of The Office of Letters and Light (OLL), encouraged writers and non-writers alike to compose a 50,000-word novel in the confines of November. The experience was an incredible one, pushing me to my limits and opening my eyes to the things that anyone is capable of if they are truly dedicated. Every April, OLL hosts another writing event, known as Script Frenzy. Similar to the objective of NaNoWriMo, Script Frenzy’s purpose is to encourage the production of a 100-page script in the confines of April. This is not so much a competition as it is a challenge; there are no prizes awarded at the end (unless offered by sponsors), but “Frenziers” walk away with their freshly-written script to do with as they please. The purpose is not to write a highquality script that will go on to be a Broadway musical, but to help you get in touch with your creative side and overcome many of the barriers that stand in the way of accomplishing something great. Script Frenzy is a much smaller and younger event, likely attracting 20,000 or so participants in its sixth year. However, there is a scriptwriting presence here on campus: the actors of the Loras Players, the students of script writing classes, and anyone who loves the performing arts. While 100 pages may seem daunting at first, it’s not as bad as it seems. On average, this only comes to 3.3 pages per day. The topic and type of script you write is entirely up to you. Suggested categories range from stage production to TV series to radio productions and beyond. If you’re feeling

humorous, you could write a comedy, or a musical if you are feeling musical, and anything else you can imagine, no matter how bizarre it is. Unlike NaNoWriMo, you are also able to designate a partner to work with you in completing your goals. This teamwork can lead to less work for both of you and an even greater project. OLL provides the basics for starting your Script Frenzy endeavors. By signing up at www.scriptfrenzy.org, you’re given access to your own profile where you can share your thoughts, ideas, and excerpts with the world. Your “Frenzy Stats” page lets everyone know the progress you’re making, which can be a motivator if you know that there are people checking up on you. Any friends who are participating can add you on the site, giving you a quick snapshot of how you’re stacking up against the people who are closest to you. You’ll also be given access to a community of fellow script writers from across the globe who are engaged in the exact same things as you are. These forums serve as a sort of support group to help you get through the month, as well as a place to simply sit back and talk with about the project as a whole. Script Frenzy isn’t about abiding to certain rules or meeting certain standards. What you put in is what you get. I know from my experiences with NaNoWriMo that anything is possible with dedication and passion for what you’re doing. My greatest tip would be to get other people involved, and keep them interested. I found that their interest and encouragement made NaNoWriMo a lot more fun and a lot more fulfilling than it would’ve been otherwise. Most importantly though, have fun doing it. This is a chance to improve yourself and embrace your inner creativity. Script Frenzy truly is your ticket to creative adventure.

and crushed it between the ugly fingers that created beauty on a piano.

Lent: A Journey of Faiths by JOEY RUDDY Staff Writer

As a child, Lent was always a season of questioning for me. Though I was raised Catholic and believe whole-heartedly in the miracle of Jesus’ death and resurrection for our sins, I always wondered about the whole idea of giving up and sacrificing. I mean yes, if Jesus went through so much for our sins, we should at least have the common courtesy to try and dedicate a little time to giving up and giving more time to prayer. However, after my first year of college, I feel that my views on this are changing. Why do we give up things for Lent? Isn’t it enough to go to Mass more, pray more, and do more and more good works? Is the most important part of Lent really dedicating more time to yourself than God? I could not answer these questions alone, so I asked for three different perspectives on the Lenten season. “It’s become more of a widespread Christian tradition to give up something, rather than just Catholics giving up something,” explained Megan Moore, a senior. “A lot of people, though, don’t know why they are giving up something for Lent,” added Moore. “We should focus on giving up things that take us away from our

faith,” she said. This process made her more mindful in focusing in on her adoration of Jesus. Megan also said that when it comes to the choice between giving up something and focusing more on the mysteries of Lent such as the Passion, being more reflective is more important to her during Lent. Whereas Megan explains this from a Catholic perspective, Jordan Burkholder, a first-year, someone who was raised Catholic but no longer practices it, has a different opinion. He said he wasn’t sure what the whole deal is with giving up things for Lent. Jordan was raised Catholic, but during high school, he felt his views change. Eventhough as a kid Jordan said he still gave up things, he said he never really understood why he was doing it. He also said he never realized what the symbolization was behind fasting, but understands why people give up things and try and better themselves for Lent. Everybody has their own set of beliefs and has their own traditions during Lent. However, I wondered if there was anything priests do differently during this special time. Fr. William Joensen, head

Chaplain of Loras College said “Yes, I give up music at certain points of the day or while driving, political talk shows and other distractions.” He also said that college is a perfect opportunity to reflect on what is truly important instead of reflecting on the things that appear to enrich life but actually cheat us of peace, patience, and a sense of purpose. He added that as a child he gave up peanut butter but his biggest challenge for Lent in life was the time he had to decide between leaving medical school and his fraternity friends or going into the seminary. He says “there were lots of grace given!” Fr. Joensen was not free from temptation either during Lent; recalling his college years he said,“I still practiced my faith and it was the background context of my world, but my passions and focus, I must confess, were on other things.” Though there are many questions that arise from Lent, and just as many opinions, it was interesting to see three unique perspectives of how people view this holy time. As Lent continues on, I hope these questions will be answered and we will all continue to share in this holy season.

The Next Generation of iPad by COLIN HALBMAIER

Assistant Feature’s Editor

Since its initial launch in April 2010, Apple’s iPad line has been nothing short of revolutionary. While the concept of tablet computers has been around years longer than Apple’s product has, it was this new development that truly set the standard for tablet computing and began what many people are calling the “Post-PC” era. 2011 saw the birth of the iPad 2, which added new features, such as a webcam and software updates such as iMessage of iCloud. Last week, during a closed-door presentation in San Francisco, the latest in the iPad line was announced by Apple CEO Tim Cook. As many had predicted, the latest iPad will feature what Apple is calling “Retina Display.” The screen resolution of the device is 2048 x 1536. That amounts to over 3.1 million pixels on the screen. In less technical terms, there are so many pixels packed so tightly on the screen that the retina of your eye is unable to distinguish them, producing images comparable to the printed word or a high-quality paragraph. As one observer at the event commented that the iPad’s biggest competition, particularly in terms of eBooks, is paper, and now it’s finally better. To say the iPad is better than paper in terms of viewing is a bold statement, but a fact that no one seems to be denying is that the latest in iPads is a game changer in more ways than one, and has once again raised the standard for tablets. The Retina Display can translate to virtually every aspect of the device: watching movies, reading books, playing games, and anything else imaginable. Many expect Apple to take advantage of this in their iTunes U campaign, which has recently introduced interactive textbooks for the classroom environment. The camera of the device has also been drastically improved, going from .7 megapixels to 5 megapixels, which is a major step toward being a legitimate replacement for a digital camera in today’s world. In addition to the new hardware, new software was also announced for the iOS platform. Owners of iPads and iPhones will now be able to update their device to iOS 5.1, which addresses many of the bugs and security flaws in the device. Many of Apple’s products on the App Store have also been issued an update, notably Pages, Numbers, Keynote, and Garageband. Finally, Apple has brought iPhoto, the traditional photo management software for Apple computers, to the iPad, complete with photo-editing capabilities. “What do we call it?” asked many of the people at the presentation. Speculators were calling it the iPad 3 or the iPad HD, which were adopted by anyone discussing the presentation beforehand. Much to everyone’s surprise, the device will simply be named “iPad.” While many anticipate confusion with the first generation of the product, which is also called iPad, there are plenty who believe that this will actually become a trend for Apple products. The infamous iPod line carries no numbers, always remaining the iPod Shuffle, Nano, etc. Specific details of the device, such as speed tests and online speeds, were unable to be determined during the demo and will not be available until the product’s release on March 16. The new iPad will start at $499 for WiFi models and $629 for Wifi + 4G LTE models. In addition, the older iPad 2 will drop significantly in price, falling to $399 and $529, respectively. Both models are available for purchase at most retailers and through the online Apple store.

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activities

March 15, 2012

8

duhawk.com

KENKEN 1-

Boydology

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Dr. Mike Boyd, the director of the Counseling Center, answers student questions concerning anything that relates to keeping it together while doing this crazy thing called college.

Boredom

Hey Mike: This place is boring. There is nothing to do in this town. I wish I had gone to a bigger school in a bigger town. Now I’m stuck. What can I do? --Bored to Death Mike Says: Oh, my poor dear! What a pity that your parents never taught you to entertain yourself. I mention your parents because this calamity could never be your fault. Cowuld it? OK, all sarcasm aside (Maybe.) We all get bored sometimes. It is perfectly normal to be bored when we must be waiting someplace and did not have the foresight to bring along something to read or do. But notice, it is your responsibility to have that foresight. Concerning being bored here, believe me, boredom is a state of mind, not a result of location. Believe me, there are students even at City College of New York who get bored. You can’t get a much bigger town than that. So take boredom as a sign that you are missing something from your emotional diet, or are homesick, or are stressed. Distract yourself with reading for pleasure or study. Get involved in a club or organization on campus. If it is normal boredom these things will fill up your days in no time. If not then talk to someone. In other words, do something. --Mike

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Accused

Hey Mike: When a teacher accuses a student of cheating on a test, yet they have no proof, what can you do? The student honestly did not cheat. Does the teacher have the right to go to the student’s adviser before asking the student if they wrote it? --Angry Mike says: OK, let’s see if I understand you. You were accused of cheating. You didn’t cheat. The instructor talked to your advisor before talking to you. Should the teacher have done that? Different schools have different policies. At Loras, the Student Rights and Responsibilities Governing Student Behavior says that if a teacher believes you cheated, the teacher should talk to you about it and give you a chance to respond. If they go ahead with any discipline they are to advise the head of the department, your advisor and both the academic and student development deans. If you did not cheat and you want to appeal, you can do that through the Academic Dean. However, there are allowances for deviation from these policies. For instance, colleges allow less formal handling of allegations, without penalties, if the teacher chooses. So if you are innocent but still the teacher told your advisor of the allegation, go to your advisor and make your case. You only lose self-esteem if you do nothing. If you were disciplined, such as by getting a lower grade, talk to the Academic Dean. However, focus on the allegation and your behavior, not on what the instructor did afterward. If you argue that your rights were violated, in this circumstance, it just makes you seem guilty. --Mike

E-mail questions to Michael.Boyd@loras.edu. The identities of the senders will be kept confidential.

Cash Back

Rules: Your aim is to fill up each column and row with numbers 1 to 5 without repeating any of the numbers. At the same time, each heavily outlined cages must produce the mathematical operation indicated in the top corner.

courtesy of kenken.com

LAST ISSUE’S SOLUTION 100x

5

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3

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by MIKE HARLOVIC


Spiritual/Opinion

March 15, 2012

The unending tug-of-war between church and state Rockin’ RObbins

W

hen President Obama introduced the healthcare initiative that would require religious healthcare providers to supply contraceptives, the debate over the separation of church and state was reignited.

This contention over what role government and religion should play over one another has resulted in rather corrupting political stances on both sides. This doesn’t just pertain to contraceptive care, but to schools, rett obbins sex education, gay rights, and public property. It seems far too frequent that both ends of the spectrum like to overstep their boundaries, entering into in the realm of oppression. To put these issues in context, let’s analyze both stances. To start, the secularist’s aim to remove religious influence oversteps its boundaries many times, leading to the loss of religious liberty. Forcing private Christian organizations to provide contraceptives when it’s against their religious beliefs is morally wrong and abuses the government’s intended powers. Similarly, forcing a church to perform a gay marriage ceremony is also unconstitutional, denying private institutions the right of association. Religious institutions can be as exclusive as they wish, and the government doesn’t have the right to intrude on how they wish to practice their faith. Doing so puts secular authorities in charge of faith, a vice that the U.S. was built to rescue its people from. On the other end of the spectrum, religious Americans have developed the nasty habit of believing their religious values should be the basis of government policy. Whether it’s having God entrenched on secular

B

R

‘‘ Churches have every right to deny

gay people the right to marry in chapels; however, they have no right to make gay marriage illegal.

,,

government property, in the pledge of allegiance (God was added in the über-conservative 50s), or in educational or civil rights policy, religion has been notorious for overstepping its bounds. Just as the government has no right to dictate the practices of churches, religious people have no right to impose their religious policies on the entire nation. Churches have every right to deny gay people the right to marry in their chapels; however, they have no right to make gay marriage illegal. Religious intolerance of gays stops at the church doors, the moment it enters government policies is the moment theocratic corruption takes root. All the same, secular government is secular for a purpose. Having God inserted in government emblems, pledges, and other federal and state property is the promotion of religion. Even worse are nativity scenes and crosses being erected on public property, creating a Christian biased government. Ruling against sex education in favor for religious teachings, as well as demanding prayer or creationism to be taught in public schools, are all forms of religious tyranny. Government is secular in order to prevent religious favoritism in its policies, and this principal needs to be defended.

A fraternal organization by BLAKE NEEBEL grand knight

When you hear the name “Knights of Columbus” you might think of those old guys wearing feathered hats and capes. While this is not incorrect, there is so much more to the organization. Throughout the city of Dubuque alone, there are five councils, and each council serves a parish or multiple parishes. At Loras we are lucky to have a group of college men to serve the campus. You might ask yourself, “What are you talking about “serve”? I have never seen anyone serving me on campus. I only ever see the Knights on Sunday when they sell Tootsie Rolls.”

LORIAN CLASSIFIEDS

lorianclassifieds@gmail. com 563-588-7954

Apartment for Rent 4-bedroom house for rent one block from campus. Available mid-May. Includes washer & dryer. $925. Call Jeff @ (563) 590-1000.

Property for Rent 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, off street parking, 1 block from Loras. Washer/dryer. $1,200 plus utilities. 1 year lease. Call (319) 240-2873.

While this is true — we do sell tootsie rolls occasionally — there are many other things that we do. When I say serve, I give a very broad definition. I include in this definition not only the physical act of serving, but also giving men the opportunity to share in positive deeds. The Knights at Loras are there for Catholic College men who are looking to find a community. One of the main things we emphasize is fraternity, or brotherhood. The dictionary definition of fraternity that I find most helpful here is “the quality or state of being brothers: brotherliness.” I think this captures what we are about in the Knights of Columbus: men supporting men in a common faith along a path of service. (And, by the way, we like to have fun doing it.)

If you have anything to sell or donate, send us the details and we’ll list your items. For more information contact us.

edu or alyssa.schroeder@loras.edu for more information.

Part-time job College Pro Painters is looking for students to knock on doors and offer homeowners free estimates for their painting needs this summer. This job pays well and has flexible hours. For more information, please contact Joshua at (563) 542-8548 or Joshua.Wernimont@loras.edu

letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed and verifiable (a phone number and address usually will suffice), and they must not be libelous or mean-spirited in nature. The Lorian reserves the right to edit letters for accuracy and space. All of the columns in this opinion section — outside of the editorial — represent the views of the individual writers, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lorian staff. Please send letters to lorian@loras.edu.

Furniture for sale House to Sublet Looking for 2 people to sublease a house for the summer. $340 per month. All utilities are included. Bed included as well. Located on Belmont St. Please contact kelsey.bergan@loras.

The following pieces of furniture are for sale: Dresser $15, Couch $25, Lounge chair $10, double-size bed rack $5. Pictures available on request Please contact Roger at (563) 581-1879 or rloewenberg@gmail.com

For more information on what’s happening around campus and in Dubuque, check out our website at myduhawk.com. YWhether you’re on campus, somewhere in Dubuque, or overseas, myduhawk.com keeps you on top of the goings-on in Dubuque and on campus.

duhawk.com

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Antioch brings lifelong friends and deeper faith by BLAKE NEEBEL for The Lorian I attended Antioch my first semester at Loras. My friends told me that it was a great experience, and also a lot of fun. I was hesitant at first, because they didn’t tell me a lot about what went on during the retreat. They just revealed that there were some talks, skits and small group discussions. I wasn’t sure what to think. I didn’t know a lot of people on campus at the time, and I was told that Antioch was a great way to meet new people and make some friends, so I decided to sign up for the retreat and give it a try. “It’s only a few days,” I thought. To make a long story short, I’m so glad I made the decision to go on the Antioch retreat. For a long I had a great time, I time getting to know a lot of had been new people, and enjoyed sharing one of the stories. The talks really helped me youngest grow more in my people I faith life. In turn, my new friends knew who helped me to appreciate all was excited that I have. My small about the group had some great people in it faith, and and we are still Antioch friends today. The skits that gave me a the leaders put on were really whole new entertaining, and my friends and I perspective. still laugh when remembering them. I was even introduced to some games that I had never played before. One game, ‘ninja,’ is probably one of the best games I have ever played. One thing that I really value from my experience was that I met people my age who love their faith. It was so refreshing to see people who were excited about their faith and I really appreciated the witness they gave to me. For a long time, I had been one of the youngest people I knew who was excited about the faith, and Antioch gave me a whole new perspective. My friends at Antioch really helped me to see that I’m not the only college student happy to be Catholic. I can’t say that anyone who goes on Antioch will have the exact same experience as me. However, I do know that whoever goes on this retreat will encounter some really awesome people their age, and that there will be opportunities to deepen their personal faith.

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opinion

March 15, 2012

10

What do you think?

duhawk.com

... about the housing lottery?

Andrew White

senior I don’t think it makes sense because students with more credits can still get a higher number because of the divisions.

Katie Gallagher junior

I think it’s stupid, it makes me very happy to live off campus.

Liam “Bones” Doyle

senior As a senior, it’s not a huge problem. A lot of people miss out and lose to upper classes because of it.

Dale Elenteny

sophomore It’s kind of unfair. I was two credits away from being in a higher section, but instead, I was placed in the middle.

Morgan Rea freshman

I think it’s good that it’s based on credits, but it’s unfair for seniors, who might lose out to others.

Brittney Blaschak, Jess Withey

juniors We’ve been roommates every year, and one of us gets lucky each time.

Ted Wittman

senior I don’t care because I don’t live on campus.

Kate Mantyh

sophomore I hate it. It makes it difficult to get the housing you want, and it complicates things.

Caitlin Floro

junior In the past, I haven’t had the best numbers. I’m living off campus this year, so it doesn’t apply to me.


sports

March 15, 2011 duhawk.com

Tennis team still hunting for 1st win

11

Halfway through the season, the men remain winless, but the coach is pleased with the progress he is seeing

Women 2nd at IIAC meet, men place 3rd

by RYAN BINSFIELD

by JEFF SCHMIDT

sports writer

Halfway through the season, the men’s tennis team has yet to find their footing and are now winless in their first 9 matches after falling most recently to Wartburg at home 0-9 last Saturday. The Duhawks will have three weeks to prepare for their next competition, a home meet on April 7th against Central. The nice weather will also allow the team to get more practice time outside. “This three-week break will be good for us, and will give us a chance to play outside and get used to that surface,” said Coach Daniel Kurt. “Our doubles play was not very good on Saturday against Wartburg, but the week before it was pretty good. As far as singles, we just need to take advantage of the opportunities.” The Duhawks sit at the bottom of the conference standings and hope that they will be able to turn the season around in the second half and take advantage of the outside surface. Kurt noted that despite the team’s record, a lot of the matches have been close, and he expects the team to continue to capitalize on those opportunities for the remainder of the season. “The season so far has gotten progressively better, but we still are not able to get over the hump, we have lost our last 11 tiebreakers and that is killing us. We are also losing a lot of close sets too,” said Kurt. The two seniors are John Keane and Justin Steines who play 3 and 6 for the Duhawks respectively and Coach Kurt says they “lead by example on the court.” The top two players for the year have been first-years Jonathan Moore and Brian Falvey who play at the 1 and 2 spots for singles and are also paired up together for doubles. “It is rare that you have 2 first-years at the top of the lineup. They are getting a little baptism by fire and are handling it well,” said Kurt.

ARCHIVE PHOTO

Sophomore Jeff Kasel return a volley during a meet last season.

sports writer

ARCHIVE PHOTO

Junior outfielder/infielder Mike Canevello beats out a close play at first base last season.

Loras pounds the ball during trip to Florida by JULIAN GALLO sports writer

The spring baseball season is under way, and the team has jumped to a stellar 6-2 record in the early going this 2012 season. Last season ended with a very respectable record, the team coming just one game under .500 with a record of 19-20. This year’s team has improved from last year’s first eight games. The Duhawks’ two extra wins show great progress for Coach Carl Tebon and company. The team traveled to Winter Haven, Florida to participate in the RussMatt invitational which consisted of six games total. The team put on an impressive showing earning six straight wins after taking its first two losses. “When in Florida we faced some unknown teams and talent,” said coach Tebon. “I thought this was very important for our program because we learned that if we can do the little things we will do very well. That being said, we still need to improve as any team does.” Some of the team’s success has come from its excellent pitching crew. The team has an ERA of 3.90 which is 1.17 points better than the opponents they have faced. With great pitching, the road ahead looks promising. This is not to say that the bats are not doing their job. As a team the Duhawks are batting .284 which again is higher than their opponents. The team is led by Eric DeSousa batting .414, Billy Kass batting .393, and Mike Pudlo batting .367. The team has scored a whopping 64

points in a total of eight games, the result of a good set of seniors and a solid group of underclassmen. “This team is a good mix of upperclassmen and underclassmen,” said Coach Tebon. “The seniors do a great job of motivating everyone and keeping them focused when we need it the most. They really help make this team complete.” Even though they are in a very tough conference, the team finds itself seated in eighth place, which is a great place to start. However, Coach Tebon is less than concerned with this particular piece of information. “Yes it’s very motivating for the team, and we like to see such a good standing, but we don’t want to think about that right now,” said coach Tebon. “The conference is very competitive, and we have ourselves to worry about. We want to make the conference tournament, and why not? We have a great bunch this year and anything is possible.” This weekend the team will be facing Concordia College-Moorhead for a triple-header which will be a task for the team, but will also provide some much needed aid to the team in multiple ways. “This weekend will be a difficult one for the team,” said coach Tebon. “It will show us where we are in our preparation and will also help to prepare us for conference play. Experience at a high level is important anytime you can get it, and we look forward to the challenge.” The team sees the challenges ahead, but hopes to meet them with the success that has been characteristic of the season thus far.

At the Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference meet two weekends ago, the Loras Track and Field Team laid it all on the line. After several months of preparation, the Duhawks had been anxious to finally compete in the all-important conference meet, but were prepared as they showed up in Mount Vernon to compete for top honors against the other eight league schools.. Going into the meet, both the men and the women had high hopes and lofty goals for success. Neither team was disappointed. On the men’s side, the team goal for indoor conference was a top-3 finish. They placed third in the meet, coming behind nationally ranked Wartburg and Central. The Duhawks’ 4x200-meter relay team of Ryan Seymour, Josh Goerdt, Mike Roth, and John Kawka ran their way into the record books with their relay result. Their second place time of 1:31.20 was a half second better than their seed time and the best in the program’s history. Goerdt and Roth were not done there as they collected All-IIAC honors in individual events. Goerdt finished second in the 400-meter race in 50.10 seconds and Roth was third in the long jump at 22’-1.75”. Sprints and hurdles coach Matt Jones assessed his position as coach as he works with the athletes each season to prepare them to be the best they can be. “Every year that a new season begins, as a coach you are excited to see what lies ahead,” said Jones. “How will the freshmen that have joined the team adjust to the new surroundings and level of competition? What have the returning athletes done in the off-season? Now that we are approaching the indoor conference meet, some of the answers to our questions are starting to surface.” On the women’s side, their goals were realized as well with a second-place finish. Only the #1 team in the nation, the Wartburg Knights, outdid the Duhawks at the Iowa Conference championships on Saturday. The Duhawks earned All-Iowa Conference status in five total events and crowned one Iowa Conference champion. Senior Meggen Elsen came through in the weight throw, throwing her second-to-last attempt 50 feet to give Loras its individual title for the weekend. The throw topped the second-place finisher by a foot-and-a-half and collected 10 team points for Loras. In the pole vault, sophomore Emily Roth and junior Rachel Kolbeck got as high as 10 feet to place in the top four for the event. Roth claimed second place, giving her an All-IIAC spot while Kolbeck placed fourth. The team now is gearing up for the upcoming outdoor season. “Looking towards outdoors, I’m hoping that the mid-distance guys, including myself, will improve; we need to have some scoring in the 800 and 1,500,” said sophomore Chris Higgins. “As a team, I think there is still a lot of room for improvement as we transition to outdoor. Our focus on the team is always to peak for outdoor conference and I fully expect us to get third once again.” The month of March is a work month for the Duhawks, with only the home Alumni meet on the 23rd.


sports

March 15, 2012

12

duhawk.com

sports editorial

Utter madness It’s March, so that means NFL free agency and NHL news ... oh, and basketball

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Jack’s Smack

s I sat watching the NCAA Selection Show Sunday on CBS, I could not help but wonder if technology will advance enough to eliminate on-site satellite delays of teams celebrating, but that’s just what I do: I wonder. I wondered if the host of the Selection Show, alum of Loras, Greg Gumbel, deep down wanted to accidently say that Loras College made the big dance and then awkwardly pause (something he does too much of) and wait for a satellite feed from the AWC. But some things just are not possible. A possibility is NFL quarterback, Tim Tebow, the favorite to land on the cursed Madden video game cover, could be the first back-up football player to covet the famous game series cover, depending on whether Peyton Manning signs with the Broncos. Talk about a real curse. A real curse in today’s world is the sport of hockey has not eclipsed the sport of basketball as the more popular sport, but that’s just my wishful thinking, and with the way things are going under David Stern, a guy can hope that the NHL keeps growing in popularity. Speaking of the NHL, no one reading this knew that the general managers around the league were meeting this week to bring up issues and tweak any rules. And if you are still reading this, then you are obviously saying to yourself right now, “Jack, tell me what these possible changes could be, please.” Some of the possible changes include turning icing into hybrid icing, eliminating the trapezoid behind goalie, and re-adding the red line. Hybrid icing is likely to get passed and it is a great idea, the concept is taken from the collegiate ruling where if the puck gets cleared down the ice for a possible icing, the ref will look for two things and make a ruling. If the defenseman gets to the face off dot on the opposite end of the ice first, then the whistle is blown and any possible injury caused by face planting into the glass is eliminated, or if the forward beats the defenseman to the face off dot then play continues. The other two rule change possibilities more than likely will not get the 20 required general manager votes that it needs to be pushed a rule through, but I would like to see the trapezoid behind the goalie removed. If there was ever a mistake made in the sport of the NHL, it was that a trapezoid shape would have a say on whether or not a goalie could play the puck, not to mention it bothers me more than anything when I play the NHL video game, but once again that’s my problem. With today being the start of March Madness, aka the second round according to the NCAA, I figured I would give some oddities about the teams in the bracket that I found interesting, and a hat-tip to the brilliant sports business reporter, Darren Rovell, for working out the odds on most of them. The odds of picking all of the sweet 16 teams? 1 in 13.4 million, but if you want some perspective from me, you have zero chance of hearing Gus Johnson call a game unless he invites you over to his house, since he has a contract with Fox, which does nothing in March with basketball. So, at least you might have all the teams that are going to the Sweet 16. The odds of picking the 1st round correctly? 1 in 19,323, but as Darren Rovell points out, the odds of being struck by lightning once in your lifetime is 1 in 10,000 so try to justify that point. 48 teams in the tournament, including all four number one seeds, wear the Nike brand, which seems like a lot until you find out that this is the first time Nike has had fewer than 50 teams, outfitting 55 years last year and 53 teams in 2010. The final tidbits I will share include 57,900,000, the amount top advertiser General Motors spent on March Madness TV advertising last season, and 90 million dollars that is estimated the tournament will yield in bets in Nevada, just equivalent to the amount of the Super Bowl alone. Good luck with your tournament brackets, even though chances are its busted by the time you read this.

Jack Metz

ARCHIVE PHOTO

Despite having to replace six graduating seniors from last season’s 23-17 campaign, the Loras softball team is off to a terrific start, going 7-3 during their spring trip to Arizona.

Softball team starts season strong during Arizona trip With a 7-3 record in Arizona, Loras looks to continue winning ways against Blackburn College by JACK METZ

sports editor

Despite losing six seniors to graduation following a 2011 campaign, the softball team found success in Arizona with their new group of players. In the team’s first action of the season, they took to The Copper State and won seven of ten games on the road trip, but Coach Ashley Rogers saw a team that could have come away with more. “I was happy with the 7-3 record. We had opportunities to probably go 9-1. We had a good chance to defeat Chapman the second time we played them as well as St. John Fisher. So we gave ourselves opportunities to win those games, unfortunately did not get the win, but we did play well.” Last season, the Duhawks finished with a 17-23 record overall, and placed fifth in the Iowa Conference at a 7-9 record. Last week, the Iowa Conference came out with its coaches poll where it deemed Luther College the favorite to repeat at the top of the conference when the season concludes in May. Loras was picked to finish sixth, being edged out of fifth place by Cornell College, who received 42 points based off the votes, while Loras received 41. “It was not a surprise being polled at sixth, after graduating six seniors from last season. But it is just a poll; it is just a pre-season ranking. So it does not mean a whole lot, but definitely looking to improve on last season’s effort.” Pitcher and utility player Kellie Klein has been a fixture for the Duhawks since she arrived, finding success both on the mound and at the plate. Klein has been a two-time second team all-IIAC selection as a utility player in 2010 and a pitcher last season. Klein hit .231 a year ago with 21

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I was happy with the 7-3 record. We had opportunities to probably go 9-1. We had a good chance to defeat Chapman the second time we played them as well as St. John Fisher. So we gave ourselves opportunities to win those games, unfortunately did not get the win, but we did play well.

Ashley Rogers, softball head coach

ARCHIVE PHOTO

Junior Kellie Klein sparkled with both her pitching and hitting during the softball team’s trip to Arizona. hits, four home runs and 14 RBI in 34 games. On the mound, she made appearances in 20 games, 16 starts, posting an 8-8 record with a 3.39 ERA, 12 complete games, three shutouts and 62 strikeouts in 107-1/3 innings. In Arizona, Klein did not miss a beat, going 3-1 with two complete games in the circle, while hitting .276 with eight total hits, including one home run, and driving in nine runs.

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Unfortunately for the Duhawks, they suffered the loss of their top returning hitter. Junior Beth Miller, who was a 2011 All-IIAC honorable mention selection, tore her ACL during the ninth game of the 10-game trip. “We are going back to the drawing board,” said Rogers. “It is unfortunate for her because she started off so strong, but that is why we are a team. We are looking for someone to step up and fill that role. Since we have come back from Arizona we have had players step up and compete.” One pleasant surprise has come from first-year catcher/infielder Katie Serpico, who lit up opponents with her bat, leading the team with a .481 batting average and 15 runs batted in, collecting a whopping 13 hits in 27 at-bats. “Katie had an outstanding Arizona trip,” said Rogers. “She had great at-bats, and it did not surprise us too much because we had seen some quality at-bats from her in practice, she has a lot of power. If there was anything we were surprised by it was her composure with runners in scoring position and that was great to see.” This weekend the Duhawks start their schedule closer to home as they travel to Blackburn College for a double-header on Saturday. “Hoping for good team chemistry, picking up where we left off in Arizona. First game playing in the Midwest area, it is going to be a long travel day for us, but hopefully we get some great weather and have an opportunity to win two ballgames.”


March 15, 2012, Lorian