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The Kansas City

GARDENER A Monthly Guide to Successful Gardening

April 2019

Edible Winners 2019 All-America Selections Part II

National Safe Digging Month Create Outdoor Space Spring Show Uncommon Hosts for Common Butterflies Bird of the Month: Ruby-throated Hummingbird


Attention Homeowners! If you’re thinking of adding a water garden this year, here’s why you should call Swan’s Water Gardens.

Today’s Marketplace We realize that you are bombarded with many companies competing for your business. Everyone claiming to be the best or having the best products with the lowest price.

In search of the ultimate Water Garden

The “Water Garden Village”

After 24 years of researching and installing water gardens, we have refined our building techniques to a level that produces the most naturalistic and easiest maintenance water garden you can have built today.

Located on 8 acres dedicated to building and maintaining water gardens. Make a day of strolling through water gardens and quaint shops of our Water Garden Village.

With so many companies just wanting to sell you their products for a price, then leave you We call it the “Four Season Water Garden” alone to deal with the many costly mistakes that for good reason. It’s the water garden for all first-time pond builders and landscapers make. seasons. From the beautiful flowers of summer, to the magical ice sculptures of winter. We don’t think that’s right! The best part of the “Four Seasons Water Garden” is its guaranteed from leaking for When you entrust Swan’s Water Gardens with your business, you get more than just the 5 full years! The longest guarantee in the materials to build your pond. industry.

You’ll be able to see container water features you can build for as little as $295, ideal for small patios or courtyards.

You get over 24 years of pond building experience and knowledge to go with your purchase. We are going to be here to assist you with the step-by-step pond building process from start to finish, or we can build it for you. Your end result, a Water Garden Paradise.

Why do we stand behind our work for so long? Very simple, when you hire Swan’s Water Gardens to build your water garden, it’s the beginning of our relationship, not the end! So if you’re looking for a company you’ll never hear from again, we’re probably not the company you’re looking for.

We also have many more display gardens ranging in price from $2,500 up to $40,000 for a more elaborate feature built by Swan’s Water Gardens. We have many exciting events and classes scheduled for 2019 so be sure to watch for them in upcoming issues of The Kansas City Gardener. We are Kansas City’s only full service water garden company that carries everything you’ll need to complete and enjoy your water garden lifestyle.

We’re Living and Loving The Water Garden Lifestyle! “Creating Paradise ... in Your Backyard” www.swanswatergardens.com

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We back our Water Garden installations with a 5 year leak free guarantee!


The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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The Kansas City

editor’s notes

GARDENER A Monthly Guide to Successful Gardening

Spring brain

Independently owned and operated since 1996 Publisher Michael Cavanaugh Editor Elizabeth Cavanaugh Contributors Abby Byrd Nik and Theresa Hiremath Lenora Larson Ken O’Dell Dennis Patton Judy Penner Tamra Reall Chelsea Didde Rice Phil Roudebush Brent Scheuerman Scott Woodbury Distribution Publishers Delivery Solutions, Inc.

How to Reach Us ...

P.O. Box 8725 Prairie Village, KS 66208 Phone: 913-648-4728 For advertising information contact Michael Cavanaugh at mike@kcgmag.com Submit editorial questions to Elizabeth Cavanaugh at elizabeth@kcgmag.com

See us on the Web: www.kcgmag.com

Don’t Miss A Single Issue! Get a subscription for yourself or your favorite gardener. See page 39.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

T

here are a few pages in my personal calendar/ journal dedicated to notes about the garden. Marked with a lime green sticky tab for easy reference, these pages collect ideas (plausible or dreamy), desired objectives (attainable or far fetched), people and plants to research, and dates to accomplish specific tasks. I’m also one to note book titles, prospects for Mr. Gardener, and recipes. That’s why I call it a calendar ‘slash’ journal, because it collects all sorts of musings, and if I don’t write it down it will not happen. This is a personal size calendar that I carry everywhere. It conveniently fits in a purse, and is brightly colored so I can easily spot it on my desk. This little treasure keeps track of everything, from production schedules and doctor appointments, to birthdays and vacation days. In fact, if Mr. Gardener and I are meeting about work, he is not allowed to start talking until I am ready to write. I have tried using the digital method of tracking appointments, to-do lists, Royals opening day, etc., sadly without success. It seems my nature to be paper-and-

pencil oriented. I am more likely to write it down than to enter it into some sort of app on my smartphone or tablet. And don’t give me some pen pretending to be a pencil (a.k.a. mechanical pencil). Don’t mess around with off brands either. Only a Ticonderoga #2 will do! For the record, I have no preference or criteria for paper. Scrap or letterhead, lined or blank, as long as it can hold up to the pressure of a real pencil, we’ll get along just fine. Right about now, boosted by warming temperatures and longer days, my brain reaches a level of chaos with thoughts and ideas of all that needs to be accomplished– what I call spring brain. Similar to a pinball machine, the plans bounce around from one side to the other with that same familiar clanging noise. In order to keep this seasonal mayhem at bay is exactly why I implemented a ‘garden notes’ page in my calendar.

One of those entries reminds me to hard prune boxwood late winter to early spring. Hopefully, that chore will be finished soon. A n o t h e r entry describes the elements of the planned and long-awaited new perennial bed. It’s a list of criteria, or a wishlist of sorts. Similar to when going to the doctor, you make a list of questions to remember to discuss. I have the same sort of list for discussing with the designer. Do you experience spring brain too? How do you keep the riot quiet? Are you a list-maker? What methods help curb the seasonal insanity? What ultimately solves all the brain problems is having muddy knees and dirty fingernails. So I’m going to stop writing now and go get dirty in the garden. I hope you get dirty too! I’ll see you in the garden!

In this issue April 2019 • Vol. 24 No. 4 Ask the Experts ........................ 6 Kids Ask Dr. Bug ..................... 8 Miami County Farm Tour ........... 10 Amur Cork Tree ....................... 12 Technicolor Trees of Spring ....... 16 Create Outdoor Spring Show ... 18 Edible Winners AAS ................ 20 Rose Report ............................ 23 Hummingbird .......................... 25 African Violets ........................ 26

about the cover ...

Time for Rose Show ................. 27 Safe Digging Month ................ 28 Pets & Plants ........................... 29 Host Plants for Butterflies .......... 31 Upcoming Events ..................... 32 Professional’s Corner ............... 35 Garden Calendar .................... 38 Hotlines .................................. 39 Subscribe ................................ 39 Meet a Master Gardener........... 39

Pale white to light yellow fruits are between the size of a currant tomato and a cherry tomato on this Fire Fly variety, awarded 2019 All-America Selections winner! Learn about all the winners beginning on page 20. Photo courtesy of all-americaselections.org.

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Ask the Experts Gardeners have plenty of questions about soil and plant issues, DENNIS PATTON answers a few of them here. MIRACLE FOR LAWNS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE Question: What is microclover Black Beauty for lawns? It is promoted as needing little water or fertilizer. Can it grow here in Kansas City? Answer: Thank goodness for the internet, as I have never heard of this so-called miracle microclover. After exhaustive research, I would say it falls in the sounds-toogood-to-be-true category. Microclover is related to white clover, which is a commonly found legume. Some people prize it for its nitrogen-fixing abilities and nectar for pollinators, while others call it a nasty weed. Microclover, when mixed with cool season turf, is reported to balance nitrogen levels and help the lawn tolerate stress with lower inputs. Like white clo-

Allium bulbs require excellent drainage.

Be careful to not plant Zinnia starts in the garden too early, since they will not tolerate a frost.

ver, it thrives best in cooler, moist climates. Heat and drought will either force the plant into dormancy or, in the case of microclover,

kill it. Bottom line, I don’t think it would be a suitable substitution or replacement for typical turf species.

sow into your pot. These seeds are quick to germinate and should be planted before they become overgrown. Usually, these transplants need only about a two-week growth phase before planting into the garden. By using a transplant instead of direct seeding in the garden, you may gain a couple of weeks in growth and an earlier harvest. The moist towel just seems like an extra step to me.

Meet us in the KC area at one of these locations. Give us your order by Tuesday before a sale, and we will bring it to the location.

DIRECT SEED GERMINATION Question: I’m interested in germinating seeds in wet paper towels, then transferring them to individual pots to grow until planting outside. I want to try cantaloupe and squash. Will this help me get a jump on an earlier harvest? Answer: Okay, I will be direct. It sounds like you want to create more work for yourself. You could pre-germinate the seeds in the moist towel, but why not direct sow the seeds? Cantaloupe and squash seeds are large and quickly germinate. I would just direct

Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Ave. KC MO 64110.Missouri Prairie Foundation Native Plant Sale, 816-716-9159 www. moprairie.org April 20 & May 18, 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

The Northland’s Largest Selection of High Quality Wild Bird Seeds and Supplies!

Missouri Wildflowers Nursery 9814 Pleasant Hill Rd Jefferson City MO 65109 www.mowildflowers.net mowldflrs@socket.net 573-496-3492, fax: 573-496-3003

Opening day at our Brazito location is March 16.

Kansas City Community Gardens, 6917 Kensington Ave, KC MO 64132 (Swope Park). Westport Garden Club Native Plant Sale April 27, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

DO ALLIUM BULBS RETURN Question: Are alliums oneand-done here in Kansas City or do they return year after year? Do I plant in spring or fall? Answer: Alliums are a great addition to the garden to add spring color. Keep in mind that there are

Hummingbirds and Orioles start arriving at feeders mid-April. Make sure you are stocked up on oranges, jelly and nectar!

Shawnee Indian Mission, 3403 West 53rd St, Fairway KS 66205. KCNPI/ Deep Roots & Shawnee Indian Mission Foundation - Native Plant Sale. Info: 913-262-0867, simfoundation.org. April 27, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Powell Gardens, 1609 US-50, Kingsville, MO 64061. Best of Missouri Life Market Fair. missourilife.com. April 27 & 28, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Backyard Bird Center, 6212 NW Barry Road, KC MO 64154, Native Plant Sale by Burroughs Audubon, Backyard Bird Center 816-746-1113, May 4, 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

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a number of different species that can be planted in the KC garden. Allium giganteum is one of the more common species which forms a softball-size purple flower. Other species can have smaller blooms or even white blooms. Allium bulbs require excellent drainage. The determining factor on whether they are one-and-done or comeback plants depends on drainage. Heavy clay soils can doom them. Also keep in mind that as they start to flower in the spring, the foliage quickly fades. Plant spring blooming alliums in the fall. Not to get too complicated, but there are other species that are summer blooming. One of the hottest perennials is Allium ‘Millenium.’ This plant is a summer bloomer, heat and drought tolerant with long lasting foliage. It is a winner in the landscape but treated completely different from its spring-blooming cousins. So one-and-done or longlasting alliums depends on the species you select and the growing conditions. WHEN TO TRANSPLANT STARTS Question: I started zinnias from seeds in March. When can I transplant them into the garden? Answer: Zinnias will not tolerate a frost so ideally they would not be planted until all danger of frost has passed–usually after May 5 to 10. Of course, this all depends on the season and soil temperatures. As temperatures warm in April, the plants can be hardened off which helps with transition to the garden, by slowly exposing them to more extreme outdoor conditions. Bring the developing plants outdoors in a protected area about one to two weeks before planting and gradually increase their exposure to sun and wind. If the temperature drops, bring them back indoors. This will

develop a sturdy plant that will tolerate the garden exposure. GROW CUCUMBERS IN CONTAINERS Question: I want to grow cucumbers in a container with a pretty trellis. My pot is 13” in diameter and 12” high. How often should I water? What kind of fertilizer should I apply and how often? What variety do you suggest for success? I want a tasty, nonbitter prolific producer for salads. Answer: My best recommendation is to get a larger pot. I am concerned with this size. Unless it is made of concrete, it will be top heavy and will likely blow over even in a light breeze. However, if this is all you have, then go ahead, and be careful of the wind. Watering frequency depends on location and conditions. This small pot on a warm, windy day may need watering daily. The best answer is water as needed. What kind of fertilizer? For a single pot, invest in a water-soluble fertilizer and follow the instructions. Depending on the product, apply once a week or every couple of weeks. A container this small will need frequent fertilization for a successful crop. As for variety, look into the so-called space saving category or those bred for container production. These varieties usually have smaller, compact vines that will be more manageable on a trellis. K-State Extension recommends these varieties: Bush Champion, Fanfare, Pot Luck, Salad Bush or Spacemaster. Dennis Patton is the horticulture agent for Johnson County K-State Research and Extension. For free information fact sheets, visit www.johnson.ksu.edu, or call the Extension office at 913-715-7000.

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Kids ask Dr. Bug Home to more than plants, kids ask DR. TAMRA REALL about the curious things found in the garden. What are the white, wormy things in the soil? Charlie, 10 What you are seeing are grubs. Grubs are larvae that will become beetles. Like caterpillars become butterflies, beetles have four major life stages: eggs, larva, pupa, and adult. Grubs live in the soil and feed on plant roots, such as grass, flowers, or trees roots, before coming out in the open and feeding on the above-ground parts of plants. Some of these grubs can get as big as your thumb! We have four main types: May/June beetles, Masked Chafer, Japanese beetles, and Green June beetles. Even though the adults look very different from each other, the grubs all look about the same. Entomologists can tell them apart by looking at the hair patterns on their hind end, called the raster. Many larvae and nymphs

Yellow spotted Ladybug

Red spotted Ladybug

live in the soil for part of their life cycle. You may remember a few years ago when the periodical cicadas emerged. They had been living underground for 17 years before emerging as an adult!

tion. Only in the adult stage do they have wings and those wings never change. So, if the ladybug has two spots or 22 spots, that’s what will be there their entire adult life. Most ladybugs live about a year. The bright red, orange or yellow wings with black spots (or vice versa) are a warning to other animals that says, “Don’t eat me! I taste bad!”

Do the spots on ladybugs tell you how old they are? Maggie, 7 Ladybugs, also known as ladybird beetles, have four life stages like the grubs in the previous ques-

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Can mosquitoes send you to the hospital? Emily, 9 The short answer is yes, although not every mosquito is carrying a disease so not every mosquito bite will get you sick. However, because we don’t know which mosquitoes are and which are not carrying diseases, be careful so that you don’t get bitten in the first place. Wearing insect repellent is a good idea, as well as not playing outside when

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Dr. Tamra Reall (@MUExtBugN Garden) is the new horticulture specialist for MU Extension in Jackson County. For free, research-based gardening tips, call 816-833-TREE (8733), email mggkc.hotline@gmail.com, or visit www.extension2.missouri.edu.

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Is it okay to kill insects? Andrea, 10 Yes, if you need to, but remember that most insects are important to our environment and for our health. Insects pollinate plants, are a food source for many animals, break down dead plants and animals to recycle nutrients, and they make our world a much more interesting place because they are beautiful (think: butterflies), fascinating (dragonflies), and magical (lightning beetles).

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mosquitoes are out–at dusk and dawn typically. I also recommend emptying any water in containers around your yard. Buckets, old tires, tire swings, gutters ... these are all places mosquitoes will lay eggs, and that means more mosquitoes that can bite you. If you do get a bite, don’t panic. Just be aware that if you start feeling sick, see your doctor.

7130 Troost, Kansas City, Mo. www.soilservice.com Garden Center • 816-444-3403 Nursery • 816-333-3232


Here’s to the tickle of grass between your toes, games that can be played with a drink in hand, and a fireworks display of amazingly colorful blooms.

experience life in full bloom The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019 TM

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Miami County Farm Tour May 11-12, 2019

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iami County farms will welcome visitors from across the region Saturday and Sunday, May 11 and 12 for a fun look at rural life in Eastern Kansas. This is event attracts families, young couples, retirees, aspiring farmers and just about anyone who would like to enjoy some time in the country. Three new stops have been added to the tour. Nighthawk Vineyard & Winery: After taking a few years off, Nighthawk is back on the tour with some new features for visitors. Their outdoor patio offers a shaded space for enjoying musical performances and a glass of their wines. 
 Whispering Elm Farm: Tucked away by Hillsdale Lake, Whispering Elm is an organic farm specializing in culinary and medicinal herbs as well as elderflowers and elderberries. They offer several tonics and syrups as well as classes and events to support a healthier, more natural lifestyle. 
 Wildwood Outdoor Education Center: Summer campers love the wide open spaces of Wildwood. During the camping offseason, the center provides outdoor leadership and team building activities for schools and corporations. Visitors

Picking strawberries at Foxfire Farms.

Feeding a cow at Miami Purebred Herefords.

Visiting with pigs at Lakemary Farm.

will be able to enjoy canoeing on the pond, guided hikes and fishing. 
All stops will be open to visitors 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. Information about the tour and a map of the sites is available at www.MICOFarmTour. com. 
The farm tour offers families an opportunity to spend time outdoors enjoying the more rural aspects of Miami County. Each site offers activities for the whole family. Animals range from alpacas to Hereford cattle and horses. Most stops offer picnic and rest area amenities. Those on the lookout for the perfect photo should keep an eye out for selfie stations. 
 Visitors will be entered into an individual drawing for each stop they travel to. To enter, visitors can pick up a “Farm Passport”

at any participating location. For every new stop visited, participants can ask the farm’s workers to sign or stamp their passport. 
Weather plays a big role in the weekend, so visitors are encouraged to watch the forecast. Warmer weather may limit the activity level of some animals. So visitors may want to schedule those stops earlier in their day. 
Several stops will have products for sale that may require refrigeration, so participants are encouraged to bring a cooler. Products include cheese, pecans, fresh vegetables, wine and blackberries. Not all locations accept credit cards, so visitors may want to carry cash if they plan on making any purchases. 
 This self-guided tour celebrates the county’s diversity and high-

lights local farm products found on the back roads of Miami County. Watch for directional signs the day of the tour and visit as many of the tour stops as you like. Parking areas will be designated at each stop. While parking is available at each site, please be aware that weather and terrain may create some physical challenges. Although this event is child friendly, each site is a working farm. Visitors are asked to encourage to respect for the farm’s operations, plants and animals. For more information about the farm tour or to receive a map of the sites please call 913-2944045. The tour’s website, www. MICOFarmTour.com, features a map of the sites and a copy of the tour’s brochure.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com


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Amur Cork Tree Local plantsman and top-notch tree expert, KEN O’DELL highlights this deciduous and dioecious tree. Photos by Ken O’Dell.

F

orming the border between Southeast Russia and Northeast China is one of the world’s longest rivers. The mighty Amur River flows through 1755 miles of this rugged terrain made up of forests, flood plains, and villages. In 1855 Russian naturalist Richard Karl Maak (1825-1886) explored this Amur River Valley. Fifty years later, C. S. Sargent of the Arnold Arboretum in Boston spent six months gathering plants, seeds and roots in the valley. Many of these plants are named for Richard Maak and the Amur region where the plants were discovered. One of the greatest trees from the Amur River Valley is the Amur cork tree, Phellodendron amurense, which will grow to 45 feet tall and 50 feet wide with large low

Amur Cork tree, left, at Black Bob Park will bear fruit like what is pictured, right, in late spring. The fruit will mature to black in fall (October) and persist well into winter. If you are able to cut into one, it will like remind you of kiwi. hanging branches. The scientific name phellos means cork and dendron means tree and amurense for the Amur River. A member of the citrus family (Rutaceae), this tree is dioecious having separate male and female trees. The female trees

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have pale greenish-yellow flowers in small panicles in May and June and when pollinated, will produce 1/2” round fruits. Cut one of the small green fruits in half and it reminds me of a kiwi fruit. Clean dark green foliage changes to dull yellow autumn leaf colors. Thick, ridged, corky bark is a light grey color. Black Bob Park at 151st Street in Olathe has a male and a female Amur Cork tree on the left as you enter the park. The Overland Park Arboretum, located a half mile west of Highway 69 at 179th and Antioch, has a female tree located in the east end of Stous Promenade.

A much older Amur Cork tree lives in Loose Park, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, Missouri. It is at the north edge of the large colony of oak trees. This may be the oldest Amur Cork tree in our area. If you have not been to Loose Park lately, it has some of the finest trees of varieties and species not found in other places. Ken O’Dell is a long time volunteer at the Overland Park Arboretum. A life member of Friends of the Arboretum and the Kansas City Regional Leader of the Kansas Native Plant Society.

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2 Offer valid on qualifying purchases made between 1 February 2019 and 30 April 2019. Subject to approved installment credit with John Deere Financial, for agricultural, consumer, or

commercial use only. No down payment required. $16.67 per month for every $1,000 financed. 0% APR is for 60 months only. Taxes, freight, setup and delivery charges could increase monthly payment. Available at participating U.S. dealers. Prices and models may vary by dealer. Offer available on new John Deere 1025R Compact Utility Tractors and in the U.S. only. Prices and savings

3 Offer valid for $500 off on all New John Deere 1 Family Sub-Compact Tractors when purchased with two or more John Deere or Frontier Implements

f rom a participating John Deere dealer between 1 February 2019 and 30 April 2019. Some restrictions apply; prices and models may vary by dealer. This can be combined with the regular installment options. Prices and savings are in U.S. dollars.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

APRIL SHOWERS SALE Save 10% if you come shop on rainy days

913-642-5034 Open Mon.-Sat. 9am-6pm Sun. 12-5pm 6303 West 75th St, Prairie Village, KS


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Plant Sale sponsored by Paola-area Extension Master Gardeners offering gardeners plants for the butterflies and bees

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aola-area Extension Master Gardeners are on a mission to educate the public about the need to help save the butterflies and bees. That’s why the sale will feature an extensive collection of beautiful butterfly host plants, the caterpillar food plants sought out by the many species of finicky butterfly moms for egg laying. Butterfly expert Lenora Larson will be on hand during the sale to answer questions and guide shoppers toward the best selections. We will also have an extensive selection of pollinator plants so that you can choose the most beneficial varieties to plant in your vegetable and flower gardens. Beekeeper Vickie VetterScruggs will be ready to answer pollen and nectar questions. Our growers do not use neonicotinoid

Unusual Butterfly Host Plants

Candlestick Senna systemic insecticides so the plants are safe for butterflies and bees. Plant Selections Plants are all locally grown so they are adapted to our clay soil and unpredictable weather. In addition to host and pollinator plants, shoppers will find other native and ornamental plants; fruit trees, native trees and shrubs; colorful annuals for containers and bedding;

Best of Missouri Life Market Fair Saturday & Sunday, April 27-28

tropicals and succulents; vegetable transplants; and gorgeous hanging baskets for instant beauty. The timing is perfect for home gardeners who are itching to get outside and begin working in their gardens. Convenient Location The annual Plant Sale will again be held in the Family Center parking lot, 808 Baptiste Drive,
in Paola, KS. (Take the Baptiste Drive exit from Highway 169 and go west on Baptiste just past Hospital Drive. The plant sale is on the north side of Baptiste.) Hours are: Thursday, April 25, 11 am to 5 pm; Friday, April 26, 8 am to 5 pm; and Saturday, April 27, 8 am to noon. Sponsored by the Marais des Cygnes Extension Master Gardeners. For more information contact the Extension Office at 913-294-4306.

In addition to the common host plants, we will feature some unusual species. For Monarchs, we will 
offer Hairy Balls, the Milkweed
 Tree and both red/orange and pale yellow Tropical Milkweeds. For 
Black Swallowtails, we will have the evergreen Moon Carrot; for Pipevine Swallowtails, the White-veined Pipevine, and for Sulphurs, two tropical Sennas will be available. They all perform as stunning specimen plants in your garden as well as feeding butterfly caterpillars.

Bee-friendly Pollinator Plants

Because most pollinators are not flower species-specific, it can be difficult to know which flowers are best. We will provide free helpful handouts and a robust selection of nectar-rich herbs, trees and shrubs, native plants and heirloom flowers.
If your garden is in full sun and insecticide-free, you will attract clouds of hard-working pollinators.

Planters Seed Co. • Since 1927 •

Retail • Wholesale Lawn • Garden • Farm 513 Walnut, KCMO • 816-842-3651

Now open Sundays 9a-3p

Enjoy the wares of more than 80 Missouri craftsmen, artists, wineries and distillers, along with historical re-enactors, musicians, and food, all with Powell Gardens as a backdrop!

powellgardens.org 14

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Time to plant your Garden! Vegetable, Herb, Flower seeds and plants are here!

Flowers & Vegetable Seed ~ Largest Selection in the Area ~ Grass Seeds of All Types • Fertilizers Mulches • Bulbs • Bird Supplies • Pottery Best Quality of “Locally Grown” Bird Seed!

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entire purchase Must present this ad at time of purchase for 10% off entire purchase of retail priced products at Planters Seed Co. Coupon applies to regular retail priced items. Cannot be combined with any other discounts. No ad reproductions, duplications, or electronic coupons accepted. One per customer. One-time use only. Expires 4/30/19.

April Planting Dates Plant Above-Ground Crops: 7, 8, 11-13, 18, 19 • Plant Root Crops: 19-21, 24, 25 Transplant: 12, 13, 18-20 • Plant Flowers: 7, 8, 11, 12 • Control Pests: 1, 4, 27, 28


The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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The Technicolor Trees of Spring

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ne of life’s simple joys happens when winter finally yields to spring. Dormant woodlands of grey twigs, brown bark, and tan leaf litter suddenly come to life, like when the first Technicolor movie, The Wizard of Oz, brightened TV screens back in 1939. Every year silver maple, sugar maple, and ash turn treetops purple, chartreuse, and mauve with their flowers. They are the first noticeable colors painted across the forested Interstate 44 corridor in spring. Less obvious, but no less Hazelnut beautiful, are the purple or yellow catkins—or male flowers—of early pollinators on warm sunny hazelnut, black alder, river birch, days. hop hornbeam, and musclewood, 1/4 pg ad for March and April issues of KC Gardener magazine As much as I love looking at all remarkable woody plants in maples in Gardener spring, I don’t recomthe birch family that work well in 1/4 pg ad for March and April issues of KC magazine mend planting them because their small gardens and attract myriad

Paola Plant Sale Thursday, April 25 11 am to 5 pm Friday, April 26 8 am to 5 pm Saturday, April 27 8 am to noon Pollinator Plants 808 Baptiste Drive, Butterfly Host Plants Paola, KS 66071 Midwest Native Plants the Baptiste Drive exit Annuals • Perennials Take off Hwy. 169 and turn west. Tropicals • Succulents The sale is in the Family Vegetable Transplants Center parking lot. Sponsored by Master Gardener Research and Extension 16

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Marais des Cygnes District

Photos by Scott Woodbury.

Native plant guru, SCOTT WOODBURY describes scenes of the first noticeable colors of spring.

Hop Hornbeam dense roots are impossible to garden in and they spread prolifically from seed. Nor do I recommend planting ash trees because the emerald ash borer is killing them off lock, stock, and barrel. I strongly recommend planting plums, short-lived as they are, because they flower nicely in spring and produce fruits that may be turned into tasty jam. Big tree plum (Prunus mexicana) produces the biggest wild plums, which are a whopping one and a half-inch in diameter. Pawpaw is also top on the list of early spring-flowering edibles because the blossoms are heavenly, particularly to pollinating flies. My

colleague Jen Sieradzki turns the fruits into the most amazing ice cream. These are the first colorful brush strokes of spring, a warm-up of what is still to come. If you are fortunate to live near a rocky glade in the Ozarks, you are lucky enough, because there is so much living diversity that exist on or near glades. At the glade edge, you might notice eastern red cedar draped in yellow flowers (technically male cones) or the puffs of yellow pollen that follow. Mixed between cedars may be serviceberry and redbud flowers and the silvery-light green leaves of gum bumelia. Each mingles EST.2007

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Red buckeye gardens. Be sure to pull unwanted seedlings early, or their roots will quickly grow to China. When redbud is ending its bloom, flowering dogwood begins. Its four-corner blossoms hover in the woods by the thousands, like chimney smoke lingering on a calm cold morning. Soon after, fringetree blooms with fragrant frilly cream-colored clusters of drooping petals. All of the plants mentioned in this paragraph grow in Ozark glades and so tolerate extreme dry-rocky garden soils, but are also easy to grow in most gardens with varying soil types. Buckeyes are found in the wild along rivers and creeks. Both red and Ohio buckeye, with their intoxicating colorful flowers, attract humans, tiger swallowtails,

and hummingbirds alike on Easter. They are great candidates for use in or around rain gardens because they tolerate flooding and drought. Red buckeye is the most satisfying flowering tree of all to grow because it will bloom within two to three years from seed. In ten, it will grow to a stately rounded tree eight feet tall and wide. By contrast, Ohio buckeye takes its sweet time, growing ten feet in twenty years and exhibits various growth forms. On a recent trip to northwest Arkansas, gardener friend Susan Pang showed me colonies of Ohio buckeye that grew as multistemmed shrubs. We walked past them twice before noticing them because I thought they were supposed to be trees. These trees, err shrubs, obviously have not read the botany books. With a little luck and hard work, from their seeds, they will be making an appearance in the Whitmire Wildflower Garden in Shaw Nature Reserve in the coming years. Life is full of surprises and discoveries to be made, especially if you go outside, get lost and see for yourself. Reminds me of a favorite quote “It is not down on any map, true places never are” by Herman Melville. Happy botanizing ya’ll! Horticulturist Scott Woodbury is the Curator of the Whitmire Wildflower Garden at Shaw Nature Reserve in Gray Summit, MO, where he has worked with native plant propagation, design, and education for 27 years. He also is an advisor to the Missouri Prairie Foundation’s Grow Native! program. Find suppliers of springblooming native trees and other native plants and native plant services at www.grownative.org, Resource Guide.

Top Soil • Mulch • River Rock • Sand • Gravel Fireplace Materials • New & Used Brick • Pavers

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The Garden Club of Shawnee presents

Garden Sampler Tour Saturday, June 8, 9a to 5p (Rain or Shine)

The tour features six wonderful gardens, all from the Shawnee area. Tickets are for sale for $15. Tickets will be available at several locations throughout Shawnee, from club members and on our website, www.gardenclubofshawnee.org or visit us on Facebook at “The Garden Club of Shawnee”. Proceeds from the tour are used for the club’s grant program, which provides funds to schools, churches, museums and other nonprofit organizations projects to support their gardening projects which help fulfill the club’s objectives.

WATER’S EDGE

and contrasts with the dark green cedar needles like the magical Woodpecker Tapestry of British Arts and Crafts designer William Morris. Keep in mind that cedar trees are not welcome on natural glades because they take over, and redbuds can be somewhat weedy in

Find the oasis from the ordinary

Visit the water garden specialists

9th & Indiana, Lawrence, KS 785-841-6777 Open Tues-Sun (Closed Monday)

www.watersedge.com

The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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Create outdoor space spring show ABBY BYRD offers tips for creating a colorful outdoor space and what is needed for it to thrive.

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alking through a garden center or greenhouse in the spring, you are sure to see some impressive shows of color. Petunias spilling out of hanging baskets, carpets of marigolds lining benches and giant hibiscus blooms catching your eye at every turn. Spring is all about the rejuvenation of color back into our outdoor spaces. The choices you have while shopping to fill your containers and flower beds can seem overwhelming. Maybe you’ve had the experience of planting something that looked great in the greenhouse but were eventually let you down once summer kicked in. Gathered here are a few tips to ensure your outdoor space is full of color and life throughout the summer season.

Lantana

black-eyeed Susan vine

Mandevilla

Know your garden and yourself as a gardener A lot of customers are very upfront with us in the greenhouse. They want something easy that

even the brownest of thumbs can’t hurt. Other customers are seasoned gardeners looking for a new, unique flower to experiment with. Are you one that enjoys spending a fair amount of time caring for your plants? Are you home a lot in the summer? Do you travel often? Do you host a lot of outdoor gatherings? How accessible is water to the spot you’re planting? Do you get a lot of hot sun or more shade? All these factors can play into which plants are best for you.

containers or beds are in the hot sun, try Periwinkle, Lantana, or Purslane. If you have a trellis you want filled with color all summer, try a Mandevilla or black-eyed Susan vine. If you have a shady spot that needs a splash of color, look for Begonias, Impatiens, Fuschia, or Torenia.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Pick the right plants Utilize knowledgeable staff to help find plants that will give you the best color show for your dollar. If you are wanting large blooms in bright, vivid colors, try Geraniums, Hibiscus, or SunPatiens. If your

Watering and fertilizing Watering is the single most important aspect of plant health and success. Contrary to popular belief, it’s actually better to err on the side of underwatering than overwatering. Most annuals are pretty forgiving and can bounce back from drying out. However, it’s very hard to come back from too much water as disease and rot can set in.

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Always thoroughly water in your plants when they are first planted, then monitor them every couple of days, feeling the soil to know how often the soil feels dry. Feel down a few inches into the soil to make sure it’s not just the top layer that is dry. You’ll start to get a rhythm for how often plants need your attention. Some plants like hibiscus love water and will ask for it more often. Others like begonias prefer their soil to have less moisture. Plants in the shade will dry out more slowly than plants in the sun. Once the dog days of summer sun set in, you’ll likely be watering daily. As a rule, strive to get your watering done early in the afternoon to give the plant plenty of time to dry before the sun goes down. This measure, combined with watering the soil instead of the foliage, will help cut down on disease. Remember that plants are a living being, and just like us, they not only need water to drink, but food to eat. Slow-release granules are an option that will feed your container for you over the course of the summer. However, the more often you water, the quicker the fertilizer will wash through. For immediate nutrition, liquid feeding can be a good solution. Check the fertilizer label for specific rates and instructions. Plants need nitrogen for healthy foliage and phosphorus for generating blooms. Regular feeding is essential to maximize color in your garden.

ment your flowers, as well. Have fun adding color to your outdoor space this spring. It’s a beautiful thing! Abby Byrd has worked at Colonial Gardens for 12 years. She serves as the Greenhouse Coordinator and teaches workshops and painting classes at the garden center.

Pure plant inspiration! Photos courtesy of Proven Winners www.provenwinners.com

Grand Traverse

Lilac Festival

Va Va Voom

Prettiest baskets in Kansas City! www.johnsonfarms.net

Come pick strawberries later this spring! Follow us on Facebook for updated information. CHECK WEBSITE FOR HOURS, MAILING LIST & SPECIAL EVENTS Downtown Kansas City N W

E S

Highway 150

Highyway 71

135th

Holmes Rd.

KS MO

State Rte D

Other sources of color When putting together containers (or flower beds), I always encourage gardeners to think about

green by using creeping jenny or sweet potato vine. Dichondra or dusty miller can add some silverywhite. The more color contrast you add, the more each plant gets its opportunity to shine. And don’t forget the container! Neutral pots can help put the focus on the plants, but colorful containers can add contrast and comple-

Plants & Pumpkins

State Line Rd.

Trimming and deadheading There are a handful of supposedly “self-cleaning” flowers, however, a little bit of maintenance will pay off big time and give you the best possible color and success. Deadheading spent blooms will help the plant focus energy on new blooms. Be sure to pinch back to the stem, not just pull off flowers. Flowers like hibiscus will thrive when you take the effort to pinch off spent blooms each morning. Trailing plants like verbena and petunias can get leggy and their blooms can become less impressive when they are not maintained. Regular trimming will force the foliage to branch, creating more alleyways for blooms to appear.

other ways they can introduce color beyond just the bloom on a plant. Try using a few accent plants that have colorful foliage. Many Coleus are suited for sun or shade and come in an endless color spectrum. That splash of purple or orange next to the green foliage of your ‘bloomers’ is a great way to add interest. Throw in pops of lime

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17701 S. State Route D (Holmes Rd.) Belton, MO 64012 • 816-331-1067 The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

19


Edible Winners 2019 All-America Selections Part II

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CHELSEA DIDDE RICE continues introductions of the All-America Selections 2019 Fruit and Vegetable Winners.

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ast month we shared the newest All-America Selections (AAS) Flower Winners and our colorstarved eyes feasted on fresh plant photos after a long, snowy winter. As we continue on with spring, let’s keep looking at the AAS winners, but focus on some delicious fruits and vegetables that will be right at home in your garden! First, a little background. All-America Selections is an independent non-profit organization that tests new, never-before-sold varieties for the home gardener. After a full season of anonymous trialing by volunteer horticulture professionals, only the top garden performers are given the AAS Winner award designation for their superior performance. Fair warning: Because these varieties are so new to the market, it may be tough (but not impossible) to get your hands on them for the 2019 growing season. If you are searching for one, I’d suggest calling around to several garden centers and asking about availability before making the trip. If you are inspired to start plants from seed, the All-America Selections buyer’s guide will provide names of companies that sell AAS winning seeds and plants. Visit https://allamericaselections.org/buy-winners for more information.

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Mountain Rouge F1 Tomato This stunning new pink tomato in the “Mountain” series has a tasty flavor and strong disease resistance to common culprits. 20

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Plant this variety and you’ll enjoy a large harvest of beefsteak tomatoes weighing 12-14 oz. each. Another benefit is that the indeterminate plant produces fast – just 73 days from transplant. Be the talk of the block by serving pink tomato slices from Mountain Rouge on burgers at your barbeques this summer!

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Red Torch F1 Tomato If you are looking for a tomato with unique skin coloration, look no further! Red Torch is an oblong, striped tomato that produces prolifically in the early season when other varieties aren’t even blooming yet. The fruits appear on indeterminate, vigorous vines that grow five to six feet tall and ripen about two months from transplanting.

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Chef’s Choice Black F1 Tomato The sixth color variation in the popular Chef’s Choice tomato series, Chef’s Choice Black is a beefsteak tomato with a dark green/ brown/black color. Definitely not your average red tomato! AAS judges noted healthy plants with uniform, meaty fruits perfect for salads, grilling or sandwiches. The indeterminate, hybrid plant was shown to produce 30 or more picture perfect fruits throughout the course of the season and has disease resistant vines covered in dark leaves that’ll cover any support you give it!

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Sparky XSL F1 Tomato One of the few X-tended Shelf Life cherry tomatoes available to

home gardeners, Sparky is great because it’s prolific, flavorful and early to mature. Just one plant in your garden will produce a huge number of sweet fruits that are one inch in diameter and grow off of indeterminate plants that are five to six feet tall.

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Fire Fly F1 Tomato Pale white to light yellow fruits are between the size of a currant tomato and a cherry tomato on this Fire Fly variety. The indeterminate, disease resistant plant is easy to grow and as long as you provide it with support, it’ll keep cranking out small, juicy fruits for weeks and weeks!

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Cal Sweet Bush Watermelon If you haven’t grown watermelons in the past because of a lack of space, now’s the time to change up those garden plans. Cal Sweet Bush is a new variety with vines that only grow 14 to 18 inches long, yet still provide enough foliage cover to protect the melons. Count on each plant producing two to three fruits that weigh 10 to 12 pounds and deliver incredible taste.

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Orange SilverWave F1 Melon Bred in South Korea, this exotic melon boasts sweet orange flesh and a unique, dappled rind color. For foodies, this is a “must grow” since it’s unlike any other melon on the market and easy to grow on a trellis when concerned about garden space. It’s delicious eaten

alone or in fruit salads, smoothies or even a melon margarita!

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Just Sweet F1 Pepper Small on size, not on taste – Just Sweet is a miniature, yellow version of the traditional bell pepper and has a theoretical trophy case full of taste test awards. It’s easy to grow because of its bushy habit (no need for staking) yet reaches 36 inches tall by 15 inches wide. If you’re looking for ways to work veggies into the menu, it’s a great lunchbox addition for kids!

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Clancy F1 Potato Finally, a potato from seed wins an AAS designation! Why grow potatoes from seed, you ask? First and foremost, growing potatoes from seed eliminates the potential for introducing disease to the garden and ruining the rest of your potato crops. Second, seeds are much easier to store and keep much longer than potato tubers. Clancy produces a healthy, compact, green plant atop beautiful spuds in a mix of ornamental hues ranging from rose blush to red. Cut them open and you will see creamy white interiors and enjoy a tasty union between that of a russet and a yellow-skinned potato. Its lighter texture is delightful for mashed potatoes! When Chelsea Didde Rice isn’t at work as a senior communications specialist, she’s an avid gardener who enjoys teaching people how easy it can be to garden.


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Photos courtesy of All-America Selections, www.all-americaselections.org

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9 The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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niversity of Missouri Extension Master Gardeners of Greater Kansas City is conducting a summer gardening program for youth ages 9-13. In the Garden ’N Grow Program, youths learn not only vegetable gardening, but also “cultivate” other science, math, and language arts skills and have fun! The goals of this program are to experience the fun of gardening, to enjoy a feeling of success, and to have the satisfaction of sharing harvested food with family and/or local food banks. The development of the whole child is emphasized as well as team building as they garden. Master Gardeners use cooperative teaching skills to educate youth about seeds, transplants, garden planning and design, site preparation, soils, plant growth and development, costs of production,

garden pests, plant health care, human nutrition, food value, food needs in the local community, and horticultural career opportunities. Each Master Gardener is trained by University of Missouri Extension specialists. The Garden ’N Grow Program will be held on Mondays and Thursdays from 9-11 a.m. from June 6 through August 15, 2019 at Fairview Christian in Gladstone. Cost of the 10-week program is $45 per single child or 2 siblings at $70. Enrollment fees include student workbooks, games and crafts, and some vegetable garden supplies. For more information on the program contact the Jackson County University of Missouri Extension Center at (816) 252-5051 or go on Facebook to copy enrollment form.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Wyandotte County EMG

Plant Sale T

he Extension Master Gardeners of Wyandotte County, Kansas, have scheduled their 20th annual plant sale for May 3rd and 4th at the county Extension Office’s Wildcat Room, 1200 North 79th Street, Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 2000s, the plant sale was a small event held in the courtyard of the former Wyandotte County Courthouse Annex at 94th and State Avenue, visited primarily by county employees and residents who were there paying their property taxes. After the Courthouse Annex was sold and the Extension Service moved to its present location in 2007, the EMGs’ plant sale grew to its current 2-day event where hundreds of shoppers purchase annual and perennial flowers, ornamental plants, and vegetable and herb plants for their home gardens. Although the EMGs now purchase the annual flowers for the sale, they still grow the perennials, woody ornamentals, native grasses, vegetable and herb plants offered each year. Planning for the sale begins months in advance of the event when the EMGs divide and prepare plants grown in their home and demonstration gardens in the late summer and fall. By January, they have determined what annuals they

plan to offer, and vegetable and herb seeds are sown and nurtured in home greenhouses and under grow-light systems. Proceeds from the annual sale are used for the WCEMGA projects, which include demonstration gardens, and youth and community education events. The EMGs maintain vegetable, pollinator, and flower gardens, which are open to the public to tour, at the National Agriculture Hall of Fame, 630 N. 126th Street, Bonner Springs, Kansas. They also have a pollinators garden and an aquaponics garden at the Turner Community Gardens at the intersection of Klamm Road and South 55th Street, Kansas City, Kansas. Over 1,500 youth and adults participated in educational events at the Agriculture Hall of Fame gardens, and over 3,000 youth were involved in educational events and activities at Turner Community Gardens during 2018. Additional horticulture support is provided at a variety of community gardens throughout the county. The hours for the sale are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, May 3rd, and 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 4th. Cash and checks are accepted as payment. If you would like additional information, please call 913-299-9300.

Photo by Steve Stalker, WCEMG.

Summer Youth Gardening


Rose Report JUDY PENNER talks about the importance of preventing diseases.

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ow that spring is here, we as rose gardeners need to turn our attention to preventing diseases in the rose garden. Two common diseases Black spot and Downy mildew often are mistaken for each other. Black spot, Diplocarpon rosae, one of the most common diseases we see in our garden, thrives in high temperatures and high humidity (summer), two things we have plenty of in the Kansas City area. Black spot starts as a small black spot/spots on healthy green leaves. It progresses to the leaves turning yellow around the black spot and defoliating the entire rose bush. The plant can lose all its leaves within a two-week period. Downy mildew, Peronospora destructor, likes cool temperatures and high humidity that are typical of our spring and fall seasons. Downy mildew has purple spots on green leaves that look a bit like black spot and as it progresses the areas around the spots will turn brown and yellow and fall of the bush. When downy mildew goes without treatment the canes of the plant can be covered in purple

spots which can cause the plant to die and infest your entire garden. Treatment for both of these diseases starts with sanitation. Removal of all old leaves and dead canes that are on the ground or on the bush. Also spraying a dormant spray before the roses leaf out will help cut down on spores. A preventative spray program should be started the minute the first rose leaf arrives. I alternate my fungicides so the roses do not build up a resistance to the product. If black spot gets ahead of you spray a contact fungicide like Mancozeb and pick off and destroy all the diseased leaves. Downy mildew typically occurs in the spring and the fall. During our cool wet times in the garden, you can spray a preventative like Aliette® WDG Fungicide. These preventative measures are key to keeping your roses healthy. Remember to Stop and Smell the Roses! Judy Penner is Expert Rosarian at Loose Park, Kansas City, Mo. You may reach her at judy.penner@ kcmo.org.

Powell Gardens Events Missouri Arbor Day & Tree Giveaway Friday, April 5 | 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. General Admission Applies. Join us in celebrating Missouri Arbor Day and receive a FREE Chinkapin Oak seedling for your home garden. Chinkapin Oaks are a Midwest native featuring strong branches and beautiful green, glossy leaves. Round out the afternoon and walk through the Gardens with our top ten trees handout and find them all! Frida Kahlo’s Garden April 6-May 25 | Daily from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. General Admission Applies. Join us for our spring exhibition featuring an intimate look at Frida Kahlo and the inspiration behind her world-renowned works of art. Explore iconic photographs of the artist Frida Kahlo (1907-54) and her home and garden in Mexico City and view reproductions of several of her paintings. Learn about native Mexican plants that were grown in her garden, view a dress from the Mexican state of Oaxaca where Kahlo sourced many of her dresses and see examples of folk art collected by Frida Kahlo and her husband, Diego Rivera. This exhibition was made possible by NEH on the Road, a special initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Frida Style: Exhibition Premiere Saturday, April 6, 6-10 p.m. $50 (Members receive 10% off) Includes one specialty cocktail. Cash bar available. Join us for the Kansas City premiere of Frida Kahlo’s Garden, a traveling exhibition on view exclusively at Powell Gardens. This ticketed event features live music, cocktails, and food inspired by indigenous Mexican cuisine. Enjoy a performance by Kansas City playwright and actress Vanessa Severo, who portrays Frida Kahlo in Frida: A Self Portrait (performed at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre beginning April 19), a hands-on painting activity facilitated by Kansas City artist Vania Soto, and an exhibition walk-through with Kansas City chef Renee Kelly who will discuss the culinary side of Kahlo’s work are part of the event. Visit powellgardens.org for more information.

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The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

23


OPA Spring Plant Sale It’s a great time to add nutrient-rich compost for a better planting season and a more beautiful yard. Compost improves soil structure, helps retain moisture and protect plants.

Bulk compost, mulch and top soil. Delivery or pick up! 2008 E 171st Street Belton, MO 816.761.3046

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Come see what’s blooming at Enrights ... We have everything you need from Azaleas to Zinnias. NOW BLOOMING AT THESE 3 LOCATIONS

2351 N. 400 Rd. • Edgerton, KS • Hours: 9am-6pm, Mon.-Sat. • Sun. noon-4pm 2 miles west of Edgerton on Hwy 56 • to County Line, 2 miles north 1/2 west Shawnee Location • 5920 County Line Rd., KCK • 913-375-1335 Nieman and County Line Rd. • Mon.-Sat. 9am-6pm • Sun. noon-4pm KCMO Farmers Market Location, 3rd & Walnut, Saturday only Stall 50 across (west) from the Arabian

Enright Gardens No Ordinary Gardening Adventure

gorgeous plants, wonderful staff, unique garden store 24

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

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ooking for Unique Plants? Come to the Overland Park Arboretum & Botanical Gardens’ Spring Plant Sale! Each year, the Friends of the Arboretum (FOTA) host their Spring Plant Sale, and this year promises to be better than ever! An experienced team has worked hard to find new suppliers and the latest varieties of annuals and perennials for the home garden. All proceeds from the Spring Plant Sale benefit the Arboretum. Whether you are a master gardener or a beginner, purchasing from the annual Arboretum Plant Sale not only nurtures your own garden but the Arboretum gardens too. Arboretum horticulturists Karen Kerkhoff and Anne Wildeboor, Dennis Patton, Horticulture Agent with Johnson County K-State Research & Extension, and Johnson County Extension Master Gardeners will be on site to help you shop, answer questions, and find the right plant for the right place so you can have a successful garden. Additionally, plants selected for the sale are more resistant to disease and specifically recommended for the Kansas City area. Each plant was selected by a group of passionate gardeners and trained horticulturists. Dedicated FOTA volunteers sourced local growers for a wide range of annuals for sun or shade, along with organically grown herbs, which are pesticide free. There will be newer varieties of Hellebores, Baptisia, and exciting Clematis. If you’re interested in a butterfly garden,

there’ll be plenty of native plants for the pollinators and milkweed for the monarchs.

SPEAKERS’ BUREAU

Greater Kansas City Dahlia Society

Need a speaker for your church, civic group or garden club? The Johnson County Extension Speakers’ Bureau have the speakers you are looking for on just about any topic like environmentally safe lawn care, or perennial flower gardening. To schedule a speaker for your group, please contact the office. For more information on this service, call 913-715-7000.

This year for the first time, the Kansas State University’s Horticulture Department is growing many of the new, hard to get perennials, and K-State horticulture students will be potting and growing many of the plants. The sale starts with a preview night for Friends of the Arboretum members on Thursday, May 2 from 4-7 p.m. If you’re not a member, you can purchase a FOTA membership on-site that evening. It’s the time to attend to get the very best selection. The sale continues Friday, May 3 from 9 a.m.–7 p.m., Saturday, May 4 from 9 a.m.–3 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 from 11 a.m.–3 p.m. The Overland Park Arboretum & Botanical Gardens is located at 8909 W. 179th St., just west of Highway 69, and is open 364 days a year.

Annual Tuber/Root Sale May 3 and 4 Contact Randy Burfeind for details (913) 451-3488


Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Local birding expert, THERESA HIREMATH profiles bird of the month ruby-throated hummingbird, and their arrival.

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he most exciting herald of spring and summer here in the Midwest for me is the arrival of the “Jewel of the Garden”, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird. Most ruby-throated hummingbirds spend the winter in Central America and fly across the Gulf of Mexico on their migration path back north, sometimes flying nonstop for 18 hours. That’s a very long trip for such a tiny bird! During the crossing, they can lose up to 2/3 of their body mass, so they are very hungry when they reach land. They pause to satisfy their hunger for a bit, then continue their journey further north, typically arriving here mid-April. The actual duration of the migration north from the gulf can vary depending on weather and food sources along the way. Hummingbirds are so tiny! They weigh 1/10th of an ounce… about the weight of a penny. Their brains are about the size of a BB, and their hearts are larger proportionally to their body than any other bird or mammal. Unlike their wings, which enable their amazing flying capabilities (more to come on that later), hummers’ legs are so underdeveloped that they are unable to walk well. One of the most distinctive things about hummingbirds is their precision flying skill. They zip around the garden and feeders like million-dollar fighter jets! Typically flying at 30-45 miles per hour, they have an amazing ability to turn on the after-burners and reach 60 miles an hour! They can hover and are the only birds able to fly both backwards and upside down. Their wings beat 20-80 times per second, and their flight muscles comprise 25-50% of their body weight (as compared to other birds at 15-25%). As you can imagine, such amazing flying maneuvers require some serious fuel! These little powerhouses eat about every ten minutes, and can drink up to twice their body weight in nectar every day (most birds only eat 25-50%

of their body weight). They drink nectar from plants and sugar water from feeders, lapping up nectar with their long tongues. There is a groove on either side of the tongue that creates a capillary action to help draw the nectar up the tongue and into the mouth during the lapping action. In addition to flying fast, hummingbirds lap up nectar fast too! While eating, hummingbirds can move their tongues in and out of their bill at a rate of up to 12 times a second. While hummingbirds learn to associate flower colors, like red, with food, they do not have an innate preference for red, and their nectar should not be dyed red. Hummingbirds can be very protective with feeding areas and providing several different feeding stations can prevent a single male from dominating all the feeders. Remember the amazing flying skills mentioned earlier? Protection of their feeding source is where they really show off this talent! In addition to nectar, hummingbirds eat insects and insect eggs on the ground and in trees. They love spiders and spider eggs. They use their bill and not their tongue to catch insects. Ruby-throated hummingbirds have one of the highest nesting success rates of any neo-tropical migrant. A mother hummingbird weighs only about eight times more than her egg, and she lays the world’s smallest bird eggs. Hummingbirds generally lay two eggs, each about the size of a blueberry. Ruby-throated humming-

birds will have two broods, each taking 45 days from nest construction to fledging. Hummingbirds use spider webs as glue to attach the nest to a tree branch as well as a binding agent for the building materials. The nest is about the size of a golf ball; around 1 ½ inches in diameter. Approximately 20% of rubythroated hummingbird fledglings will survive their first year. Hummingbirds’ body temperatures are generally 105°-109°F, and during the night or times of cold weather, ruby-throated hummingbirds can enter a state of torpor to save energy. Similar to a type of short-term hibernation, torpor reduces their metabolic activity and drops their heart rate from 1,200 beats per minute to only 50 beats per minute.

Hummingbirds will bathe in shallow water sources like natural pools or dishes, and enjoy “showering” in sprinklers and misters. To keep their feathers in top shape for flying, hummingbirds will also leaf-bathe by fluttering against wet leaves. Whichever aspect you enjoy most about hummers–their beauty, energy, precision flying skills, quirky attitudes, curiosity–be sure to take time to enjoy them this spring! If you have any questions or want to learn how to attract and feed these beautiful birds, call or come see us. Nik and Theresa Hiremath own and operate Wild Birds Unlimited of Leawood at 11711 Roe Avenue, Leawood, Kansas. Contact them at 913-491-4887.

Experience...

Bringing glorious living color to your garden since 1977.

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www.arnoldsgreenhouse.com info@arnoldsgreenhouse.com (620) 964-2463 • 1430 Hwy 58, LeRoy, KS 66857 Open 9a-7p Monday-Saturday, Closed Sundays The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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African Violets – variations abound By Brent Scheuerman

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n African violet is one of the most popular house plants in the United States and around the world. Originating from the dense forests of Africa, this species has evolved from its original purple/ blue color found in the wild. The African violet is no longer just the plant grown on your grandmother’s window sill but has been hybridized into many different variations. You will now find them blooming in shades of red, white, blue, purple, pink and combinations of colors in between. New colors of yellows and greens blossoms have recently been developed. The blossoms may be a single, double, frilled edge and even a star floral shape bloom. Variegated leaves are prominent in the violet world. However, this is not a natural trait, but one developed by Mrs. Tommie Louise Oden, a United States hybridizer, in 1957. The variegated leaves are

Black Tie Affair no longer just a solid green but shades of green with color variations within the leaves themselves, i.e. pink, cream, white and other shades. In addition to colorful blossoms and leaves, the shapes of the leaves have also changed. You will find them in a variety of shapes such as heart, round or elongated. Some even have wavy edges much like a frilly flower. The length and size of the leaf additionally adds to the interest and appeal of the plants. The size of the violet plant can range from a micro miniature upwards to some very large plants.

OVERLAND PARK ARBORETUM & BOTANICAL GARDENS

SPRING PLANT SALE 2019 Learn from our knowledgeable gardeners while updating your garden with locally grown natives, including trees and shrubs, pollinator plants, perennials and annuals for sun and shade. All proceeds benefit the Arboretum. Thursday, May 2, 3 p.m.-7 p.m., members only preview Friday, May 3, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, May 5, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

MORE INFO AT OPABG.ORG

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Peppermint Girl This makes the African violet an ideal plant for your desk, at home or work. Many people are familiar with the standard size African violet. There is another variation of the African violet that is designated as a trailer. The plant grows with multiple outshoots, called crowns, and when mature, the plant can hang over the edge of its pot with stems carrying a multiplicity of blossoms spilling over the container. An African violet show and sale is a great way to start your introduction of viewing African violets and to possibly add to your plant collection. African violet shows are free and open to the public. There is a show/sale in the spring and fall. Check The Kansas City Gardener upcoming events for dates. All members will be available to answer questions about growing and showing violets. At these shows you will be exposed to the large family of Gesneriad as the shows encompass the exhibiting of other members of the Gesneriad group. Included in these are: Streptocarpus, a long leafed, free flowering beautiful plant; Petrocosmea, a low growing rosette shaped plant that is fuzzy enough to pet; Sinningias, a plant resembling an African violet in shape but with flowers that are totally in a different shape. These are just a few of the many options in the Gesneriad family. Attend our shows and sales to see many more. Hopefully after reading about our plants and our clubs you will be interested in attending or possibly joining one of our African Violet clubs here in the Kansas City area. Kansas City is lucky to have two great clubs to meet your needs. Many major cities have no clubs at all. The Sho-Me African Violet Club meets the second

LE-Koko Shanel’ Friday of each month September through June at 11:00 a.m. at the Loose Park Garden Center, 51st and Wornall, Kansas City, MO 64112. The African Violet Club Of Greater Kansas City meets the second Tuesday of each month September through June at 6 p.m. also at Loose Park Garden Center. Both clubs strive to educate members on the care, propagation, and hybridization of African Violets, from beginning levels to advanced. Members learn through meetings, demonstrations and various publications. We share through plant and leaf exchanges. We are a diverse group of individuals from many walks of life and are dedicated to the joy and advancement of growing African violets. The membership also has a large geographical area of members. Many are from far outside the metro area. The clubs are affiliates of both regional and national groups. Many of our members are judges for African violet shows and travel the United States to judge various shows. Part of our goal is to keep furthering the interest in the African violet and its Gesneriad family. We encourage all interested people to join us, especially young. The youth is our future. In order to obtain our goals of education and propagation of African violets, we are available to speak at other clubs, colleges, high schools, teacher groups, nurseries and various other venues. For more information, please contact kcvioletclubs@att.net. Join us as a guest at an upcoming meeting. We look forward to meeting you. Bring a friend. Brent Scheuerman is a longtime grower of African Violets, and is vice president of the Sho-Me African Violet Society.


It’s Time for the Rose Show

Happenings at Discovery Center Go Native April 20 ∙ Saturday ∙ 9:30 AM–2:30 PM Walk-in (all ages). Join us for a day of learning about the wide variety of native plants that can suit your landscaping needs. You will learn about and make a “seed ball” to get an easy head start on planting native seeds of grasses and flowers. You can also learn about native trees and how they can add long-lasting value and beauty to your landscape. We will be giving away free native plant and tree seedlings for you to take home and plant. We will offer guided landscape tours along with opportunities to ask experts for advice on how to improve your landscape with native plants. There will be activities for the whole family! Native Plant Sale April 20∙ Saturday ∙ 9:30 AM–2:30 PM Walk-in (all ages). The Missouri Prairie Foundation (MPF) will be on site to offer a native plant sale. Grow Native! vendors will be on hand with a wide selection of native flowers, grasses, sedges, shrubs and trees for a variety of growing conditions. Vendors will contribute a percentage of plant sale proceeds to benefit MPF’s prairie conservation in Missouri. Visit https://www.moprairie.org for participating vendors and information about preordering.

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he annual Kansas City Rose Society Rose Show, will be held at the Loose Park Garden Center, June 1, 2019. All rose growers are invited to bring roses to the show between 8:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on June 1. You do not have to be a member of the KCRS to enter roses in the show, and there is no entry fee. There are classes for all varieties of roses from miniatures to shrubs. All you need to know is the name of the rose you wish to exhibit. There will be a youth class for exhibitors 17 years old and younger, and a novice class for any exhibitor who has never won a blue ribbon in a rose show. You can also enter photographs of roses. The rose photography classes are growing in popularity and will be expanded for 2019 to include a class called Rose Potpourri encouraging artistic expression in rose photography. The rose show booklet listing the show rules and classes is available online after May 1 at www.kansascityrosesociety.org. You will also find helpful information about preparing for the rose show and tips for show success.

Sunday, June 2 is Rose Day in Kansas City. The rose show will be open for public viewing between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. In 2018, there were 351 roses and 57 rose photographs entered in the show by 18 different exhibitors. It is one of the largest rose shows in the Midwest. The public will be invited to vote on the “Most Fragrant Rose” entered in the show, and the winner will be announced during Rose Day Festivities. Enjoy family-friendly activities like face painting, balloon animals and an art experience table while enjoying free juice boxes for the kids, ice cream and bottled water. Formal events begin at 3:00 p.m. in the Laura Conyers Smith Municipal Rose Garden, and will include a brief awards ceremony, music by the Mighty Mo Combo Jazz Band, and performances by the Kansas City Youth Ballet and other entertainers. For further rose show information contact Kansas City Rose Society rose show Chairwoman Laura Dickinson, 913-449-9377 or email her at lkdickinson09@gmail. com.

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The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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April is National Safe Digging Month Missouri One Call System and Kansas 811 Promote National Safe Digging Month encouraging residents to always call 811 three days before digging

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pring is finally here! It’s getting warm and the trees are starting to show some green, eager homeowners like you are ready to start those outdoor digging projects. Before you reach for that shovel and start digging, remember to call 811, the national “Call Before You Dig” number, to ensure that your buried utility lines are marked. More than 40 percent of homeowners who plan to dig this year will put themselves and others at risk by not calling 811 before starting. Damaging an underground line can result in injuries, expensive repair cost, legal fees and outages. Landscaping your yard, installing a culvert, building a fence or even installing a mailbox requires that you call in to have the utilities marked before beginning

Overland Park Gardeners of America

PLANT SALE

your work. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, necessitates a call to your Missouri or Kansas One Call center. Notifying your state One Call center will allow the utilities to mark their underground facilities permitting your excavation to safely proceed. Using your Missouri and Kansas One Call System is free

ORCHID AUCTION

April 25, 26, 27

Sunday, April 28, 2019 2:00 – 4:30 p.m.

Thurs-Fri 10am-7pm Sat 10am until sold out

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Colonial Church 7039 Mission Rd Prairie Village KS 66208

Prices starting at $5 FREE admission

www.osgkc.org A fundraiser for The Orchid Society of Greater Kansas City 28

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

of charge, and you can process your request 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It only takes a few minutes to complete the process of notifying the utilities of your intent to dig. HERE’S HOW YOUR ONE CALL SYSTEM WORKS: 1. Three working days before you begin your work, place a locate request. In Missouri, call 1-800-DIG-RITE or in Kansas, call1-800-DIG-SAFE or 811 or go online to www.mo1call.com or www.kansasonecall.com. Our operators will map the dig site from excavator information and notify the utilities that have facilities in the area. 2. The utilities will respond by marking their facilities or notifying

you that they have no facilities at the dig site. The utilities will mark the facilities that they own, usually up to the meter. 3. Once all the utilities have responded, work can then safely proceed, avoiding damages. There are over 20 million miles of underground facilities buried in the United States. Never dig without knowing where the underground lines are located. HOW TO PLACE YOUR FREE NOTIFICATION: In Missouri, call 1-800-DIGRITE or 811 or go online at www. mo1call.com In Kansas, call 1-800–DIGSAFE or 811 or go on-line at www. kansasonecall.com

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Pets and Plants – Tea Tree Oil

The Master Gardeners of Greater Kansas City present

“Gardening with Compassion: Capturing Biodiversity for the Future”

By Phil Roudebush, DVM, DACVIM

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ea tree oil (TTO), also known as Australian tea tree oil or melaleuca oil, is extracted from freshly harvested leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia tree. The tree is native to Spain, Portugal and Australia, and has been introduced to the southern United States, especially Florida. Tea tree oil is a complex mixture of approximately 100 compounds but most of the therapeutic and potentially toxic effects of the oil are linked to terpenes of various types including cymene, terpinene, pinene and cineole. TTO is known to have antimicrobial properties and is most often used topically in humans and animals for various skin conditions. In veterinary medicine, TTO is marketed for use on dogs, cats, ferrets and horses for cleaning hair, healing skin rashes or infections and treating some skin allergies. The concentration of TTO used in most veterinary skin care products is low, usually less than 1.0%. Undiluted or 100% TTO products are available in human health food stores and other outlets – animal owners sometimes knowingly or accidentally use 100% TTO to treat various skin conditions in their dogs and cats, which can result in toxic signs. Terpenes are lipophilic compounds (fat-loving), which enhances their rapid absorption into the skin.

at Kauffman Conference Center, 4801 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110

A recent veterinary study summarized the clinical problems that occurred in over 440 dogs and cats exposed to 100% TTO during the past ten years. The study showed that use of plant-derived 100% TTO to treat various ailments including skin conditions in dogs and cats can result in mild to moderate clinical problems (drooling or excessive salivation, vomiting, listlessness, lethargy) or severe neurologic effects (tremors, wobbly gait, hind limb weakness, collapse, coma). Fortunately, most animals recover with skin decontamination (bathing) and supportive care. Because of the complex nature of plant oil extracts, there are no specific antidotes available for patient care. TTO toxicosis has also been reported in human beings after topical exposure to concentrated oil – children are most often affected, which suggests use of 100% TTO products should be discouraged in both animals and children. Phil Roudebush is a retired veterinarian and specialist in small animal internal medicine. He was an adjunct faculty member in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University and is now an Extension Master Gardener Volunteer in Buncombe County, North Carolina. He can be reached at philroudebush@gmail.com.

Thursday, April 18, 2019, 6:30 p.m.

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n what ways do gardens help wildlife in a time of mass extinction and climate change? How can wilder urban landscapes foster health and equality for all species? What strategies from psychology, science, and environmental philosophy can we use to rewire our ethical codes and advocate for wildness at home, work, and school? Author and garden designer Benjamin Vogt will address how to practice defiant compassion as we stand up for the rights of nature and the places we call home. Our landscapes push aside wildlife and in turn diminish our genetically-programmed love for wildness. How can we get ourselves back into balance through gardens, to speak life’s language and learn from other species? Author Benjamin Vogt addresses why we need a new

garden ethic, and why we urgently need wildness in our daily lives, lives sequestered in buildings surrounded by monocultures of lawn and concrete that significantly harm our physical and mental health. He examines the psychological issues around climate change and mass extinction as a way to understand how we are short circuiting our response to global crises, especially by not growing native plants in our gardens. Simply put, environmentalism is not political; it is social justice for all species marginalized today and for those facing extinction tomorrow. By thinking deeply and honestly about our built landscapes, we can create a compassionate activism that connects us more profoundly to nature and to one another.

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The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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10th Annual MGGKC Plant Sale

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ative plants are an excellent choice for landscape plantings because they have adapted to local weather and soil conditions. They need little to no fertilizer or pesticides, are relatively low maintenance, and help conserve water and energy resources. More importantly, native plant gardens preserve the habitat of many native birds, insects, and wildlife and help resist invasive non-natives that threaten wildlife habitat and crops. Native wildflowers in particular can thrive in tough spots. Many varieties have exceptionally pretty flowers and are highly attractive to pollinators. There are native wildflowers that are the perfect choice for any landscape setting. Perhaps one of the following plants would be a welcome addition to your garden! Monardia Bradburiana (commonly known as Bee Balm) was given a genus name in honor of Nicholas Monardes, a 16th century

Bee Balm

Phlox

physician and botanist from Seville. While a member of the mint family, Bee Balm does not spread by rhizomes. Forming in clumps, it grows one to two feet tall and wide, with pink to white flowers that often have purple flecks, and are excellent for cutting. Bee Balm nectar is highly attractive to hummingbirds. It is also a favorite of butterflies, moths, and bees, including the black and yellow bumblebee and the more rare American

bumblebee, two of the largest bees inhabiting the Midwest. Tolerant of deer, drought, and dry soil, Bee Balm is best grown in dry to medium moist, well drained soils in full sun to part shade. Coreopsis Lanceolata (known as Lanceleaf Coreopsis) gets its genus name from the Greek words “koris”, meaning bug, and “opsis”, meaning like, referring to the shape of its seed that looks like a bug or tick. Lanceleaf Coreopsis, a species of tickseed in the sunflower family, grows easily in dry to medium moist soil and reaches a height of one to two feet. Its yellow, daisy like flowers make a fantastic early summer display and make showy cut bouquets. Songbirds feed on the ripe, red Coreopsis seeds in late summer. The flower nectar is a Monarch butterfly favorite. Heat, humidity, and deer tolerant, Coreopsis has no serious insect or disease problems. It can tend to sprawl if grown in moist or fertile soil and crown rot can be a problem if it is grown in moist, poorly drained soil. Asclepias tuberosa (commonly called Butterfly Milkweed) takes its genus name from the Greek god of medicine Asklepios. Typically growing in tall clumps, Butterfly Milkweed features vibrant yellow to bright orange flowers from late spring throughout summer. Unlike other milkweed, Butterfly Milkweed doesn’t have milkysapped stems. Its showy seedpods, atop the one to three foot tall plant, are sought after for dried flower arrangements. Butterfly Milkweed is an extremely important native plant since its leaves are a food source for Monarch butterfly lar-

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vae. The flower nectar is also attractive to butterflies and other pollinators. Butterfly Milkweed is tolerant of deer and performs well in a sunny location even in poor, dry soil. It can be susceptible to rust and leaf spot and crown rot can be a problem when it is planted in wet, poorly drained soil. Phlox Paniculata (commonly called Garden Phlox) takes its genus name from the Greek word “phlox” meaning flame and referring to its long cluster of flowers thought to represent the shape of a tongue of fire. Garden Phlox grows two to four feet high in sun or part shade and in wet to medium moist soil. Its stunning, highly fragrant pink-purple to white flowers can be enjoyed from July in to September. Phlox was one of the first flowering native plants transported to the Continent by Europeans. The flowers were frequently found in ladies’ bouquets and were said to symbolize a vow of love and also a wish for pleasant dreams. Hummingbirds are highly attracted to Garden Phlox, as well as other birds. Butterflies are also drawn to the nectar of its flowers. Garden Phlox is not always easy to grow well. Phlox bugs, powdery mildew, and root rot can be problems. Native wildflowers create stunning and diverse beauty with their progression of flowers and seeds. Many are fragrant and make cheerful cut flower arrangements. They provide food and cover for butterflies, birds, and other wildlife. They help resist invasive nonnative plants and conserve water and other resources. All in all, there is every reason to embrace native wildflowers! Bee Balm, Lanceleaf Coreopsis, Butterfly Milkweed, Garden Phlox, and many other native plants will be available “Under the Tent at Independence Center” on Friday, May 3rd, from 2:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 4th, from 8:00 a.m. until sold out, at the 10th Annual Master Gardeners of Greater Kansas City Plant Sale. The proceeds from the sale will fund MGGKC projects and Community/Partnership Gardens throughout the year.


Uncommon Hosts for Common Butterflies LENORA LARSON identifies butterfly host plants for your garden that are suitable for a caterpillar nursery.

Photos by Lenora Larson.

For Monarch Butterflies: A Native Vine and Two Tropical Trees

Milkweed Vine, Cynanchum laeve, is a native perennial vine that aggressively grows up to 20 feet in full or partial sun. It remains edible for Monarch caterpillars until November’s hard freeze. Because it doesn’t wilt when held in water, it is also ideal for caterpillar-raising.

Hairy Balls, Gomphocarpus physocarpus, is a tender perennial from South Asia. In full sun and rich soil, it grows from seed to 6 feet in a mere three months. The fragrant pink flowers and seed pods co-exist on the plant all summer. It doesn’t survive our winters, but will self-seed if you have multiple plants for pollination.

For Sulphur Butterflies: Huge Tropical Sennas

For Black Swallowtails: A New Carrot

Moon Carrot, Seseli gummiferum, hails from Turkey and grows in full sun and rocky, welldrained soil. The white flowers are borne in massive umbels, but it’s the evergreen blue foliage that makes this plant a four-season knock-out in your garden.

Milkweed Tree, Calotropis gigantea, is a tender perennial from Africa with stunning white flowers. A 6-inch rooted cutting will grow to 8 feet in a single season when grown in full sun and moist soil, but it must be overwintered indoors.

Popcorn Senna, Cassia didymobotrya, from Africa is a tropical perennial that grows from seed to 8 foot shrub in one growing season. Full sun and constant moisture are the requirements to grow these 1 foot tall yellow flower spikes.

For Pipevine Swallowtails: A Shy Pipevine White-veined Pipevine, Aristolochia fimbriata, a native of Argentina, grows as a demure groundcover with striking yellow and brown fringed flowers in partial sun to partial shade. It also performs well as a “spiller” in containers.

Candlestick Senna, Cassia alata, from Central and South America grows as a small tree with amazing 2 foot tall flower spikes even in our zone 6 climate! As a tender perennial like Popcorn Senna, it doesn’t survive our winters, but both produce seeds that can be used to start new plants in a greenhouse each spring.

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earching for new host plants is exciting, especially for long-time butterfly gardeners. Plus the new plant may solve horticultural or caterpillar-raising dilemmas. All of these plants should be available at the Marais des Cygnes Plant Sale in Paola April 25, 26, 27. Google the botanical name for more information. Marais des Cygnes Extension Master Gardener, Idalia Butterfly Society and Kansas Native Plant Society member, Lenora Larson gardens and hosts butterflies in the cruel winds and clay soil of Paola, Kansas. She may be contacted at lenora.longlips@gmail.com.

The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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Upcoming Garden Events places to go, things to do, people to see

SPRING 2019 KANSAS CITY

Native Plant Sales For details or questions, contact the listed hosting organization.

April 6, 9:00am–2:00pm

April 27 & 28, 10:00am–4:00pm

Shawnee Civic Center 13817 Johnson Drive, Shawnee, KS 66216

Powell Gardens 1609 US 50, Kingsville, MO 64061

Healthy Yards Expo

Best of Missouri Life Fair

April 20, 9:30am–2:30pm

May 4, 9:30am–2:00pm

Club Meetings African Violet Club of Greater Kansas City Tues, Apr 9, 6-8pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Membership. Bonner Springs Garden Club Tues, Apr 16, 12:30pm; at United Methodist Church, 425 W Morse, Bonner Springs. We will hold a Flower Show Design Workshop. The presenter is Donna Schneck, NGC Master Flower Show Judge. Everyone is welcome. For more information email bonnerspringsgardenclub@ gmail.com.

Burroughs Audubon benefit

Anita B. Gorman Discovery Center 4750 Troost Ave, Kansas City, MO 64110

Backyard Bird Center 6212 NW Barry Rd, Kansas City, MO 64154

Bonsai Society of GKC Sat, Apr 27, 9am-12pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Workshop. www.bsgkc.org; 816-513-8590

April 27, 9:00am–2:00pm

May 18, 9:30am–2:30pm

Shawnee Indian Mission 3403 W 53rd St, Fairway, KS 66205

Anita B. Gorman Discovery Center 4750 Troost Ave, Kansas City, MO 64110

Greater Kansas City Dahlia Society Sun, Apr 14, 1-3pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Membership. 816-513-8590

April 27, 9:00am–2:00pm

June 1, 8:00am–12:00pm

Kansas City Community Gardens 6917 Kensington Ave, Kansas City, MO 64132

Lenexa Farmer’s Market 17201 W 87th St Parkway, Lenexa, KS 66219

Missouri Prairie Foundation benefit

KCNPI & Shawnee Indian Mission Foundation benefit

Westport Garden Club benefit

Missouri Prairie Foundation benefit

Kansas City Native Plant Initiative benefit

List compiled by the Kansas City Native Plant Initiative (KNCPI). Visit kcnpi.org for updated events and details. To add your sale to this list, email kcnpi@kcnpi.org.

Greater Kansas City Gardeners of America Mon, May 6, social and refreshments 6pm, program 6:30pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Special presentation by Judy Penner, Director of the Loose Park Garden Center & Rose Gardens. Judy will demonstrate proper care and trimming of roses, as well as exploring the rich history at Loose Park. Judy is an avid gardener and can be seen working with the crews and volunteers around Loose Park. Guests welcome, no charge to attend. Questions, contact Margaret Singer, 816-942-8889. Greater Kansas City Herb Study Group Wed, Apr 10, noon; at Rose Room, Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. This month members will be learning about Lavender and its many uses from skin care, herbal teas, and as an addition to desserts. This presentation will include its growing requirements, care and harvesting methods. Facebook: check us out at Greater Kansas City Herb Study Group. Friends and visitors are always welcome. Questions: Call Lynn at 816-308-5450.

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816-941-2332 www.rosehillgardens.com 32

April 2019 | kcgmag.com

GKC Water Garden Society Tues, Apr 16, doors open 5:30pm for snacks and socializing; at Our Lady of Sorrows Church lower level meeting room, 2552 Gillham Rd, Kansas City, MO 64108. Meeting begins 6:30pm. After meeting Cory Sackett at Home Remodeling & Garden Show in Feb, we invited him back to Kansas City to speak with all gardeners at our meeting. As one of the founders of Liqui-Dirt, Cory has done years of research and development with farmers and plant growers primarily in his home state of Utah. After years studying composting and how it breaks down microbes and micro-fungus into beneficial material absorbable by plants, he combined vitamins, and minerals with beneficial bacteria into a concentrated nano product called Liqui-Dirt. Come meet our featured speaker of the evening and learn how we can rejuvenate the soil, even from natural disasters or in leached soil from flood and fire. Visitors are always welcome! KC Cactus and Succulent Society Sun, Apr 14, 1:30-4pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 51st St and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. THIS IS A WEEK EARLIER THAN USUAL. Visitors are welcome! For information on the Kansas City Cactus and Succulent Society, call 816-444-9321 or visit our website: kccactus.com. Kansas City Garden Club Mon, Apr 1, 10am-2pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 5200 Pennsylvania, KC, MO 64112. The

public is welcome. ‘The Scrounge of the Earth– Japanese Beetles! What Can One do?’ by Chris Veach, Master Gardeners of Greater Kansas City member. Where and why did these plant destroyers so suddenly show up in KC to create such havoc in our gardens and lawns? Chris will give you the most up-to-date details. Bring a sack lunch and join us for drinks and desserts after the meeting. 913-636-4956 Kansas City Rose Society Sat, Apr 20, 10am-noon; at Loose Park Garden Center, 5200 Pennsylvania, KC, MO 64112. Rose Show Workshop. www.kansascityrosesociety.org Leavenworth County Master Gardeners Wed, Apr 10, 11am; at Riverfront Community Center, 123 Esplanade St, Leavenworth, KS 66048. Yvonne Willcott, a Leavenworth County Master Gardener, will give a presentation on Raised Bed Gardening. The meeting is free. Visitors are welcome. For more information contact Paula Darling at 913-240-4094. Leawood Garden Club Tues, Apr 23, 10:30am; at Cure of Ars Catholic Church, 9401 Mission Rd, Leawood, KS. At about noon, Steve Hess, an artist and passionate gardener, will present “Your Garden: Creating a Sense of Place.” The meeting and our membership is open to everyone and guests are most welcome. Bring a sack lunch – beverages and desserts are provided. For more information, please visit our website www.leawood.org/committees/lgc or send an email to leawoodgardenclub@gmail.com. MoKan Daylily Society Sat, Apr 20, 10:30am-2pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Membership. 816-513-8590 Overland Park Gardeners of America Mon, Apr 8, Meeting and hospitality at 7pm, Speaker at 7:30pm; at Colonial Church, 7039 Mission Rd, Prairie Village, KS. We will be offering hands on training digging and separating plants from the Church gardens. The plants will be for sale at annual plant sale Apr 25-Apr 27. Everyone welcome, we have treats. Contact Holly Ramsay 913-302-2014 for more info. Raytown Garden Club Tues, Apr 7, 10am; at Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church, 6429 Blue Ridge Blvd, Raytown, MO. We will have a brief presentation at the beginning of the meeting entitled “Bird Study and Conservation of the American Goldfinch”. Our program PowerPoint and lecture is entitled “Planting For Balanced Compost”, presented by Stan Slaughter, the Environmental Educator at Missouri Organic Recycling. Refreshments will be served, and visitors are always welcome. Come meet us, we would love to get to know you! Check out our Facebook page at Raytown Garden Club or visit our website at https://sites. google.com/site/fgcmwestcentral/clubs/raytown Sho Me African Violets Sat, Apr 13, 9am-3pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 5200 Pennsylvania, Kansas City, MO. Show and Sale. Visitors welcome. 816-513-8590 And Fri, Apr 19, 11am-1pm; Roundtable discussion, visitors welcome

Events, Plant Sales & more April Favorite Annuals that Thrive in Kansas Tues, Apr 2, 4pm; at Lansing Community Library, 730 1st Terrace, Suite 1, Lansing, KS 66043. Pat Matthews and Melony Lutz, two


Leavenworth County Master Gardeners, will give a presentation on annuals that Master Gardeners love to have in their gardens and why. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information contact Paula Darling at 913-240-4094. Native Garden Design & Management Tues, Apr 2, 6:30-8pm; at Anita B Gorman Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Ave, Kansas City, MO 64110. Walk-in (all ages). Now that you have a great native landscape how do you keep it looking nice? How is native landscape maintenance different from other gardening? Learn about all of the do’s and don’ts for maintaining your native garden. Join William Roth Gibson, owner of Down to Earth Services and Green Thumb Gardens, and Paula Diaz, from GardeNerd Consultants, to learn how the landscape will change over time, when to cut back dead heads and which plants can get an early trim to grow shorter. We’ll also discuss how easier maintenance begins with good design. All proceeds support KCNPI’s mission to promote more native landscapes in the Kansas City region. Advanced tickets are required and are available at https://kcnpi.org/2019workshops. For more information email discoverycenter@ mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc.mo.gov/discoverycenter; 816-759-7300 New Volunteer Orientation Wed, Apr 3, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Potential volunteers learn about the various opportunities available at the Overland Park’s 300-acre Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. We will complete the required paperwork, introduce you to our sign-up system and answer any questions. 18 and up. Free Edible Garden Design Thurs, Apr 4, 11:30am-1pm; in Sunflower Room of Wyandotte County Extension Office, 1216 N 79th St, Kansas City, KS. Wyandotte County Extension Master Gardeners invite you to join them for a presentation by Sherry Thomas, Johnson County Extension Master Gardener, that will touch upon the subject of the ornamental value of edibles that should pass homeowner association restrictions. Fee: $5 (waived for currently certified EMGs). For further information, call 913-299-9300. Caring for Roses Thurs, Apr 4, 6:30-7:30pm; at Clinton Parkway Nursery, 4900 Clinton Pkwy, Lawrence, KS 66047. Learn how to care for your roses; when and how to prune, fertilize, and general care. This workshop will be held outdoors with a demonstration (weather permitting). Workshop lasts an hour plus time for questions. FREE, but seating is limited, so please RSVP either by clicking on “going” on our Facebook page or call (785) 8423081. Handouts provided. Arbor Day Trees Fri, Apr 5, 8am-5pm and Sat, Apr 6, 1-4pm; at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center, 1401 NW Park Rd, Blue Springs, MO 64015. Walk-in (all ages). Visitors to Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center will have the opportunity to select a seedling (short leaf pine or tulip poplar) to plant in celebration of Missouri Arbor Day. One tree per family or group is available while supplies last. For more information email burr.oak@mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc.mo.gov/burroakwoods; 816-228-3766

School to learn how you can include more natives in your yard. Roxie McGee, Master Gardener and Co-coordinator of the KU Medicinal Plant Garden, and GHF Education Coordinator Kim Bellemere will talk about why gardening with natives is important and how to get started in your yard. Topics will include natives and wildlife, starting and enlarging native gardens, site assessment, and plant selection, purchasing, and planting. An RSVP is encouraged. Email GHF at grasslandheritage@gmail.com for more information and to RSVP. Missouri Young Birders Club of Kansas City Sat, Apr 6, 8am; at Anita B Gorman Discovery Center, 4750 Troost, Kansas City, MO 64110 for some urban birding. Meet again on Sun, Apr 14, 6:30pm at Trailside Center, 9901 Holmes, Kansas City, MO for hiking the Indian Creek trail. Bring binoculars, birding field guides or apps; dress for the weather. The Missouri Young Birders Club of Kansas City is a newly formed informal group for youth ages 8-17 who enjoy birding. FREE. Questions: Sara at 816-356-6986. Make a Gourd Birdhouse Class Sat, Apr 6, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Ever wanted to try your hand at building a birdhouse from a gourd? Come to this Arboretum class to personalize a predrilled gourd with paint, color, and decorations. At the end, you will have a work of art to hang in your own garden and provide a happy new home for small songbirds. Class will include care and hanging instructions, information on the types of birds that may use your birdhouse, as well as how to grow, dry and clean your own gourds. All supplies are included. Please register in advance. Ages 8 thru adult (Participants age 12 & under must be accompanied by an adult) $15 per gourd project plus Arboretum admission (max 10 per class) $15 members, $20 non members plus admission. 913-685-3604 Healing the Universe One Plant at a Time Sat, Apr 6, doors open at 8:30am; program 9-11am; at St Teresa’s Academy, Windmoor Ctr, 5600 Main St, Kansas City, MO 64113. Presented by the Sisters of St Joseph of Carondelet. Want to enjoy beautiful butterflies, delicious vegetables, fabulous flowers all in your backyard…and help protect the universe as well? Then join us as Sister Amy Hereford shares how, through caring for creation, we can heal our universe–one plant at a time. $15 per session, breakfast included. Register online at www.csjsl.org or call 816-501-2944. Predators of the Sky Sat, Apr 6, 2-3pm; at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center, 1401 NW Park Rd, Blue Springs, MO 64015. No registration required (all ages). What’s perching on that road sign? It’s a red-tailed hawk! Although much smaller than the bald eagle, hawks are one of the most skilled flying hunters in Missouri. Come on in and learn about these aerial critter controllers. For more information email burr.oak@ mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc.mo.gov/burroakwoods; 816-228-3766 Healthy Yard Expo & Native Plant Sale Sat, Apr 7, 9am-2pm; Shawnee Civic Centre, 13817 Johnson Dr, Shawnee, KS 66216. Details, seminars and schedule at johnson.k-state.edu. 913-715-7000

Night at the Arboretum Fri, Apr 5, 7-9pm; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. All Ages. Experience the Arboretum like you never have before–at night! Enjoy the night time sights and sounds and escape outdoors as a family while you learn about Native American Tribes that once lived here in Eastern Kansas. Bring your flashlights and be ready to gaze at the night sky. Included with admission.

Tomato Gardening Class Tues, Apr 9, 7pm; at St Paul United Methodist Church, 3601 S Sterling Ave, Independence, MO 64052. Are tomatoes one of your favorites? Learn the secrets of raising that desired variety of tomato whether it is an heirloom or hybrid. Cory Creed, University of Missouri Extension Horticulture Field Specialist, will teach this free class; open to the public. Bring your questions and invite a gardening friend. Questions: Sara Scheil 816-356-6986; stpaulcommunitygarden@ yahoo.com

Basics of Native Plant Gardening Sat, Apr 6, 9am; at Raintree Montessori School, 4601 Clinton Pkwy, Lawrence, KS. Native plants beautify our landscapes, lift our spirits, and nourish the life around us. Join the Grassland Heritage Foundation and Raintree Montessori

Keeping Backyard Chickens Tues, Apr 9, 6-9pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. An animal’s lover’s guide to

(continued on page 34)

Now Hiring for Spring

We are looking for friendly, enthusiastic people to fill positions at our Lenexa, Overland Park and So. Kansas City locations.

Cashiers Phone Operators Hardgoods Sales Plant Sales Merchandising Receiving Clerk Mechanic

Truck Drivers, (CDL & non-CDL) Equipment Operators Landscape Maintenance Trimming, Mowing, Planting Horticulturist

Fax resume to 816-941-3838 Email resume to suburban@suburbanlg.com Apply in person at our Corporate office. 13635 Wyandotte // Kansas City, MO 64145 Questions? Contact Human Resources at 816-941-4700.

Powell Gardens Events Seasons for the Soul: Spring Ephemerals Sunday, April 7 | 2 p.m. General Admission Applies Meet a Powell Gardens docent Casey Johnson in the Grand Hall of the visitor center for a walking tour of early blooms of the season. You are sure to discover something you perhaps don’t have at home and haven’t seen before. Planting an Impact: Earth Day 2019 Saturday, April 20 | 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Instructors: Mark Sharp and Travis Freeman General Admission Applies Celebrate Earth Day by restoring native prairie with Powell Gardens. Individuals, families, environmental groups, Girl Scouts, and Cub Scouts are invited to help Powell Gardens manage the native landscapes to better support diverse plant and animal species. Participants will learn about the importance of planting native species in their homes and communities and how the plants will support wildlife. Organizations and Scout groups may create banners to take back to their communities to encourage others to make a difference for their local environments. This workshop will allow families to work and learn together to make a positive impact in honor of Earth Day 2019. Many of the activities satisfy requirements for Cub Scouts’ Grow Something and Into the Wild badges and Girl Scouts’ Gardener and Eco Friend badges. Sign up your family or group before spots are filled! Best of Missouri Life Market Fair Saturday & Sunday, April 27-28 |10 a.m. - 4 p.m. General Admission Applies: $12 Adult, $5 Youth (5-12), 4 & Under are free | Members are FREE Join the best craftsman, brewers, distillers, artistans and winemakers Missouri has to offer at the second annual Best of Missouri Life Market Fair, planned in collaboration with Missouri Life Magazine. Peruse nearly 100 booths featuring clothing, decor, paintings, photography, sculpture and more and enjoy live entertainment while marveling at the spring show of daffodils and other early-bloomers in the Gardens. Food trucks and tastings available. Visit powellgardens.org for more information. The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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2019 Wyandotte County Extension Master Gardeners

PLANT SALE Friday, May 3, 9am-5pm Saturday, May 4, 9am-2pm Extension Office, Wildcat Room, 1200 N. 79th Street, Kansas City, KS

Upcoming Garden Events places to go, things to do, people to see (continued from page 33) sustainable agriculture on a small scale. Chickens provide natural bug control, as well as breakfast. Learn the how and why and what in order to avoid the perils of raising chickens on a domestic scale. Instructor: Emily Winchester. Fee: $39. To enroll go to https://ce.jccc.edu or call 913469-2323. Favorite Annuals that Thrive in Kansas Wed, Apr 10, 7pm; at Basehor Community Library, 1400 158th St, Basehor, KS 66007. Pat Matthews and Melony Lutz, two Leavenworth County Master Gardeners, will give a presentation on annuals that Master Gardeners love to have in their gardens and why. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information contact Paula Darling at 913-240-4094.

Vegetable Plants: tomatoes, peppers, herbs and more grown by our Master Gardeners for this sale Flowers: annuals, perennials and Kansas native wildflowers Cash and Checks Accepted.

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Have a lawn and garden question for the Gard’n-Wise Guys? Go to Facebook and ask them your question. NOW AVAILABLE AT: Jacksons Greenhouse & Garden Center, Topeka v Doctors At the Lake, Lake of the Ozarks v Manns Lawn & Landscape, St. Joe v Gronis Hardware and Seed, Leavenworth v Clinton Parkway Nursery, Lawrence v Barnes Greenhouses, Trenton, MO v Soil Service Gdn. Center, Kansas City, MO v Loma Vista North, Kansas City, MO v Skinner Garden Store, Topeka v Full Features Nursery, Smithville v Springtime Garden Center, Lee’s Summit v Heartland Nursery, Kansas City, MO v Planter’s Seed, Kansas City, MO v Penrod’s Greenhouse, Kearney v North Star Garden Center, Liberty v Grimm’s Gardens, Atchison v Moffet Nursery, St. Joe v Suburban Lawn & Garden, Kansas City, MO

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

Beekeeping III Wed, Apr 10 & 17, 6:30-8:30pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. This class will be a fun and active way to learn how to be a successful backyard beekeeper. We will provide the basic knowledge needed to keep and manage a healthy beehive, and produce honey and beeswax. This class will cover bee behavior, hive management, diseases, pests, swarming and how to harvest honey right from your own backyard. Instructor: Robert Hughes. Fee: $59. To enroll go to https:// ce.jccc.edu or call 913-469-2323. Vegetable Gardening in Containers Thurs, Apr 11, 6:30-7:30pm; at Clinton Parkway Nursery, 4900 Clinton Pkwy, Lawrence, KS 66047. Learn how to grow vegetables in containers. What veggies work best. What soil to use and how to care for them to maximize production. Workshop lasts an hour plus time for questions. FREE, but seating is limited, so please RSVP either by clicking on “going” on our Facebook page or call 785-842-3081. Handouts provided. 34th Annual African Violet Show and Sale Sat, Apr 13, 9am-3pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, W 51st St and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO 64112, west driveway immediately south of 51st St. The Garden Center side street is located just past the Pavilion. We suggest not following GPS directions. NOTE: Rock the Parkway Half Marathon may cause an access problem to Loose Park. The race should be completed between 9:30 and 10am. Let us provide a colorful gift for the coming Mother’s Day celebration. Then brighten up your own home with a variety of plants and colorful blossoms. No admission fee. Presented by Sho-Me African Violet Club. If further information is needed, call Lynn Canning 913-649-7334. Wildflower Exploration Sat, Apr 13, 10-11am; at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center, 1401 NW Park Rd, Blue Springs, MO 64015. No registration required (all ages). “They’ll be blooming around the…forest…when they bloom!” Join a naturalist to enjoy the floral delights of the Discovery Trail with Dutchman’s breeches, may apples, trilliums and more. If inclement weather occurs, enjoy a power-point presentation with beautiful photos of our native wildflowers. For more information email burr.oak@mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc. mo.gov/burroakwoods; 816-228-3766. Bird Walk Sat, Apr 13, 8:15-11am; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Ages 12 and up. Arboretum volunteers and all around birders, will lead this walk to look for and listen to the birds that live at the Arboretum. Nearly 100 different species of birds have been identified at the Arboretum, giving you plenty to look forward to. Included with admission. Please dress

appropriately, closed toe shoes and long pants are recommended. Bug repellent and binoculars are encouraged. $10 non-members/$9 members, plus admission. 913-685-3604 TreeKeepers Apr 16-18, 9am-1:30pm; at Anita B Gorman Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Ave, Kansas City, MO. Heartland Tree Alliance is offering a daytime course for anyone wanted to learn more about shade and ornamental trees. Learn about soils, biology, selection, pruning, ID, and planting. Classroom and hands-on learning taught by MDC Forester Chuck Conner. All tools provided, must register in advance, $50 fee https://tinyurl. com/treekeepers or call Sarah 816-561-1086. What Wild Edibles are Blooming? Tues, Apr 16, 1-3pm; at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center, 1401 NW Park Rd, Blue Springs, MO 64015. Registration required on-line (adults). By including a few spring flowers in your recipes, you will add essential nutrients and appealing color to your meals. Discover which edible native wildflowers you can include in your salads, pastries and even ice cubes. For more information email burr.oak@ mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc.mo.gov/burroakwoods; 816-228-3766. Wildflower Walk Wed, Apr 17, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Ages 12 and up. Meet at the Visitors Center then we will be walking on mulched paths, up and down slopes and hills as we go to the lower bluff area at Wolf creek. The Arboretum has 140 acres of woodlands that have tens of thousands of the same woodland wildflowers you will see in the Missouri Ozarks. In mid April we should see Wild Columbine, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild Ginger, Toothwort, Blue-eyed Mary, Aunt Lucy, Delphinium, Dutchmen’s Breeches, Bloodroot, Bed Straw, Wild Geraniums, Wild Blue Phlox (perhaps two species), Virginia Waterleaf, Maple-leaf Waterleaf, Wild Impatiens, False Rue Anemone, Turks Cap Lilies, Solomon Seal, False Solomon Seal, May Apples, and others. We should see thousands of flowers on the Pawpaw trees. Registration is recommended as space is limited. Included with admission, registration is required. 913-685-3604 Favorite Annuals that Thrive in Kansas Thurs, Apr 18, 7pm; at Leavenworth Public Library, 417 Spruce St, Leavenworth, KS 66048. Pat Matthews and Melony Lutz, two Leavenworth County Master Gardeners, will give a presentation on annuals that Master Gardeners love to have in their gardens and why. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information contact Paula Darling at 913-240-4094. Gardeners’ Gathering Thurs, Apr 18, 6:30-8pm; at Kauffman Conference Center, 4801 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, MO 64110. Sponsored by Master Gardeners GKC, Benjamin Vogt will present “Gardening with Compassion: Capturing Biodiversity for the Future.” FREE and open to the public. All are welcome. Basics of Native Plant Gardening Thurs, Apr 18, 7pm; at Eudora Community Center, 1630 Elm St, Eudora, KS. Native plants beautify our landscapes, lift our spirits, and nourish the life around us. Join the Grassland Heritage Foundation and Raintree Montessori School to learn how you can include more natives in your yard. Roxie McGee, Master Gardener and Co-coordinator of the KU Medicinal Plant Garden, and GHF Education Coordinator Kim Bellemere will talk about why gardening with natives is important and how to get started in your yard. Topics will include natives and wild-


life, starting and enlarging native gardens, site assessment, and plant selection, purchasing, and planting. An RSVP is encouraged. Email GHF at grasslandheritage@gmail.com for more information and to RSVP. Creating a Pollinator Garden Thurs, Apr 18, 6:30-7:30pm; at Clinton Parkway Nursery, 4900 Clinton Pkwy, Lawrence, KS 66047. Learn what it takes to create a garden that the Bees & Butterflies will love. Workshop lasts an hour plus time for questions. FREE, but seating is limited, so please RSVP either by clicking on “going” on our Facebook page or call (785) 842-3081. Handouts provided. Indoor Garden/Urban Farming Classes Sat, Apr 20, 11am-Noon (Entry level Class), 1-2pm (Advanced Class); 117 S Mur-Len Rd, Olathe, KS 66062. Classes are FREE but seating is limited so please sign-up via our website yearroundgarden.com. Learn tips and tricks of how to grow a successful garden indoors, new topics every month, and discounts offered to class attendees. 913-397-0594 Planting an Impact: Earth Day 2019 Sat, Apr 20, 10am-2pm; at Powell Gardens. Instructors: Mark Sharp and Travis Freeman. General Admission Applies. Celebrate Earth Day by restoring native prairie with Powell Gardens. Individuals, families, environmental groups, Girl Scouts, and Cub Scouts are invited to help Powell Gardens manage the native landscapes to better support diverse plant and animal species. Participants will learn about the importance of planting native species in their homes and communities and how the plants will support wildlife. Organizations and Scout groups may create banners to take back to their communities to encourage others to make a difference for their local environments. This workshop will allow families to work and learn together to make a positive impact in honor of Earth Day 2019. Many of the activities satisfy requirements for Cub Scouts’ Grow Something and Into the Wild badges and Girl Scouts’ Gardener and Eco Friend badges. Sign up your family or group before spots are filled! www.powellgardens.org Wildflower Walk Wed, Apr 24, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Ages 12 and up. Meet at the Visitors Center then we will be walking on mulched paths, up and down slopes and hills as we go to the lower bluff area at Wolf creek. The Arboretum has 140 acres of woodlands that have tens of thousands of the same woodland wildflowers you will see in the Missouri Ozarks. In mid April we should see Wild Columbine, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild Ginger, Toothwort, Blue-eyed Mary, Aunt Lucy, Delphinium, Dutchmen’s Breeches, Bloodroot, Bed Straw, Wild Geraniums, Wild Blue Phlox (perhaps two species), Virginia Waterleaf, Maple-leaf Waterleaf, Wild Impatiens, False Rue Anemone, Turks Cap Lilies, Solomon Seal, False Solomon Seal, May Apples, and others. We should see thousands of flowers on the Pawpaw trees. Registration is recommended as space is limited. Included with admission, registration is required. 913-685-3604 Advanced Beekeeping – Spring Management Wed, Apr 24, 6:30-8:30pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. Review the steps to help your bees prepare for the Honey Flow. Review different processes and techniques to add honey supers, equalizing your hives and most important, learning how to keep ahead of the honey that your bees bring to the hive. Instructor: Robert Hughes. Fee: $29. To enroll go to https://ce.jccc.edu or call 913-469-2323.  Paola Spring Plant Sale Thurs, Apr 25, 11am-5pm; Fri, Apr 26, 8am5pm; Sat, Apr 27, 8am-noon; in the Family Center parking lot at 808 Baptiste Dr, Paola, KS. As part of the Marais des Cygnes Extension Master Gardeners’ mission to educate the public and help save our essential insects, the sale will feature butterfly host plants and the best pollinator plants, as well as other annuals, perennials,

natives and veggies, all from local growers. Expert EMGs, including Lenora Larson, will be on hand to assist shoppers throughout the sale. Overland Park Gardeners of America Plant Sale Thurs, Apr 25 and Fri, Apr 26, 10am-7pm, Sat, Apr 27, 10am until sold out; at Colonial Church, 7039 Mission Rd, Prairie Village, KS. Annual indoor plant sale. Thyme for Kids Plant Sale Fri, Apr 26, 9am-6pm and Sat, Apr 27, 9am-5pm; at Cornerstones of Care–Ozanam Campus, Sims Greenhouse, 421 E 137th St, Kansas City, MO. Your purchase supports our horticultural therapy program, which gives youth the opportunity to heal by spending time in a greenhouse nurturing living plants. Through this program, youth experience firsthand the calming effects of nature while gaining valuable work experience and achieving a sense of accomplishment as they watch their plants flourish. Choose from a wide variety of plants and other garden items! Free to attend and open to the public. Contact Stefanie at Stefanie.lindsay@cornerstonesofcare.org or learn more at cornerstonesofcare.org/plantsale. Native Plant Sale Sat, Apr 27, 9am-2pm rain or shine; at KC Community Gardens, 6917 Kensington Ave, Kansas City, MO 64132 (Swope Park). Sponsored by the Westport Garden Club. Plants are from Missouri Wildflowers Nursery of Jefferson City. Plants may be pre-ordered by Tues, Apr 23 by calling 573-496-3492 or online mowildflowers. net; be sure to mention it as a Westport Garden Club order and that it is to be delivered to the KC Community Gardens for Sat, Apr 27 pick-up. Make a Gourd Birdhouse Class Sat, Apr 27, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Ever wanted to try your hand at building a birdhouse from a gourd? Come to this Arboretum class to personalize a predrilled gourd with paint, color, and decorations. At the end, you will have a work of art to hang in your own garden and provide a happy new home for small songbirds. Class will include care and hanging instructions, information on the types of birds that may use your birdhouse, as well as how to grow, dry and clean your own gourds. All supplies are included. Please register in advance. Ages 8 thru adult (Participants age 12 & under must be accompanied by an adult) $15 per gourd project plus Arboretum admission (max 10 per class) $15 members, $20 non members plus admission. 913-685-3604 National Audubon Day Bird Hike Sat, Apr 27, 9-10:30am; at Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center, 1401 NW Park Rd, Blue Springs, MO 64015. No registration required (families). Join us as we learn about the French-American ornithologist, naturalist and painter, John James Audubon, and his contributions to natural history. We will then head out on the stroller friendly trails for one of Audubon’s favorite activities, a bird hike of course! Dress for the weather. Bring your binoculars or borrow a pair from us. For more information email burr. oak@mdc.mo.gov; www.mdc.mo.gov/burroakwoods; 816-228-3766 Uptown Garden Faire Sat, Apr 27, 8am-2pm; at 211 W Truman Rd, Independence, Mo 64050. Celebrate Arbor Day, Earth Day and Spring at the Garden Faire with on-going demonstrations and raffles. Plants, gardenalia, plantiques, garden art, and much more for sale by local vendors. For more information call 816-797-8711 or 816-325-7843. Arbor Day Tree Planting Ceremony Sat, Apr 27, 11-11:30am; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. All Ages. Where better to celebrate Arbor Day than at The Arboretum? Arbor Day celebrates planting and nurturing trees. Help us plant a tree in honor of one of our special volunteers, and take a sapling home for your own yard so you can celebrate for years to come. No registration needed, all ages welcome. Included with admission. 913-685-3604

(continued on page 36)

Professional’s Corner

Meet Andrew Fox, new owner of Arnold’s Greenhouse. In the beginning: My grandmother introduced me to gardening early. As I grew older, so did my horticulture curiosity. From caring for the family vegetable garden to growing my own transplants under fluorescent lights in our basement. Curiosity led me to a BS in Horticulture (Greenhouse and Nursery Management) from Kansas State University, and I worked for Horticultural Services in St. George, Kansas for four years while in school. Present day: What better place to focus my passion for growing plants than here. As owner, I’m learning to pair my eagerness for growing with important elements of managing this amazing operation. Arnold’s team: We have a great team at Arnold’s Greenhouse, some of which have been with us for 30 years. We have a small core group of full time employees who help keep the operation running smoothly. In the spring, we add several seasonal part time members for the busy season. What type of plants are grown: A better question would be what don’t we grow. At Arnold’s we have over 2500 varieties of plants from Asclepias to Zauschneria. We specialize in Annual bedding plant production, vegetable transplants, and perennials. We also grow almost 1000 roses every year. Name your favorites: This is a tough question, I really don’t have a favorite. Rather it’s more like “favorite plant today.” I especially like learning about new plants or new cultivars of old favorites. With that said, here are a few. Tree: Liliodendron, simply a stunning tree and a host plant for the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail to boot. Shrub: Mahonia, I like the dark glossy green foliage especially in the spring when it contrasts nicely with the bright yellow blooms. Annual: ‘Calliente Hot Coral’ Geranium, simply fantastic. Perennial: Hesperaloe, stunning aloe-like blooms on a cold hardy plant that are hummingbird and oriole magnets. Fern: I like xerophytic ferns as a group, mainly because of how their preferred growing conditions vary so widely from what you would expect for a fern. Fruit: Persimmon, the flavor of a perfectly ripe persimmon is without equal. Vegetable: Black Beauty Zucchini, the one plant on this list that has been a favorite since the beginning. The first year that I planted Zucchini in the garden (I was about 9 or so) I had no idea how much to plant so I planted 6 hills of Black Beauty Zucchini. Thankfully everybody in the family liked Zucchini (and still does), that year I was also enrolled in cooking in 4-H and every baked item that I took to the fair that year had Zucchini in it. I still feel a bit nostalgic for that summer every time I pick the first zucchini of the year. Little known secret: I have a hard time keeping houseplants alive. I currently have one houseplant, a ZZ plant, and we get along very nicely together. How to find us: 1430 Hwy 58, Le Roy, KS 66857. March hours: 9-5 Mon-Sat. Apr-May hours: 9-7 Mon-Sat. Closed Sundays. (620)964-2423 (or 2463); www.arnoldsgreenhouse.com; #NeedMoreFlowers; Follow us on Facebook and Instagram @ arnoldsgreenhouse The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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Open House & Plant Fundraiser

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Upcoming Garden Events

Saturday, May 11, 8a to 2p

eady to start a butterfly garden or improve the one you have? If so, come visit us at Monarch Watch for our annual Spring Open House & Plant Fundraiser. We will have more than 10,000 butterfly plants, annuals and perennials, including seedlings of 11 milkweed varieties. These plants are ideal for starting butterfly gardens or adding to established gardens. Monarch numbers have been declining and we need to plant milkweeds to sustain the monarch migration. A list of available plants is posted on our website (http:// monarchwatch.org/openhouse/). Learn about creating Monarch Waystations and see the magnificent butterfly and pollinator garden maintained by the Douglas County Master Gardeners. There will be games

for the kids inside and out and they can make “seed balls” containing seeds of milkweeds and other butterfly plants that can be used to create habits for monarchs and other butterflies. They can also see lots of different insects and spiders, watch videos, or complete a variety of activities. All are welcome to tour our garden and lab space. We will have live demonstrations, and, of course, monarch butterflies! Refreshments will be provided. We’d love to see you so mark your calendars! If you can’t make it in person, be sure to check us out online – we plan to post photos and broadcast some LIVE video throughout the day (www.monarchwatch.org ). Monarch Watch is located at 2021 Constant Avenue on the West Campus of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047.

places to go, things to do, people to see (continued from page 35) Best of Missouri Life Market Fair Sat & Sun, Apr 27-28, 10am-4pm; at Powell Gardens. $12 Adult, $5 Youth (5-12), 4 & Under are free. Members are FREE. Join the best craftsman, brewers, distillers, artisans and winemakers Missouri has to offer at the second annual Best of Missouri Life Market Fair, planned in collaboration with Missouri Life Magazine. Peruse nearly 100 booths featuring clothing, decor, paintings, photography, sculpture and more and enjoy live entertainment while marveling at the spring show of daffodils and other early-bloomers in the Gardens. Food trucks and tastings available. www.powellgardens.org Orchid Auction Sun, Apr 28, 2-4:30pm; at Lenexa Senior Center, 13420 Oak St, Lenexa, KS. Orchid Society of Greater Kansas City annual fundraiser. Free Admission. Sale plants will be available, starting at $5.00. For more information about our auction and society, visit www.osgkc.org

May Annual Plant Sale to Benefit Cross-Lines Wed, May 1, 4-7pm; Thurs, May 2 & Fri, May 3, 8am-7pm; Sat, May 4, 8am-1pm; at Shawnee Presbyterian Church, 6837 Nieman Rd, Shawnee, KS. The sale will be held rain or shine under a tent. New varieties of perennials and annuals along with hostas, herbs, tomatoes, and peppers will be available. There will be a large variety of sun and shade hanging baskets & patio planters, as well as flowering pots. There will also be a large selection of individual and pots of succulents. Volunteers available to custom design pots. Bring yours or buy at the sale. Proceeds benefit Cross-Lines Community Outreach Inc. Questions, call Kelly Carpenter at 913-281-3388. Annual Dahlia Tuber/Root Sale May 3-4. Presented by the Greater Kansas City Dahlia Society. Contact Randy Burfeind for details at 913-451-3488. OPA Spring Plant Sale Fri, May 3, 9am-7pm, Sat, May 4, 9am-3pm and Sun, May 5, 11am-3pm. The 21st annual Overland Park Arboretum plant sale opens with this preview opportunity for Friends of the Arboretum members. Special emphasis on native, butterfly and pollinator plants with knowledgeable gardeners on hand to assist shoppers. Support the Arboretum as you choose the perfect plants for your 2019 garden. Sale is open to the public, rain or shine. The Arboretum is located a half mile west of Hwy 69 at 179th and Antioch. 913-685-3604.

One free, easy call gets your utility lines marked AND helps protect you from injury and expense. Safe Digging Is No Accident: “Always Call Before You Dig in Kansas” Call 811, 1-800-DIG-SAFE, (800-344-7233) or visit us at www.kansas811.com.

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April 2019 | kcgmag.com

MGGKC Annual Plant Sale Fri and Sat, May 3 and 4. TENT at Independence Center, East 39th St S, Independence, MO. The Master Gardeners of Greater Kansas City began the Annual Plant Sale in 2010 and it has “grown” every year. If you have attended one of the sales in the past, you know that we have built a solid reputation for offering great plants at reasonable prices. If you have not attended in the past, you will want to make it a point to come this year. Come early for best selection, quantities limited. Wyandotte County Extension Master Gardeners Plant Sale Fri, May 3, 9am-5pm and Sat, May 4, 9am-2pm; at Wildcat Room, 1200 N 79th St, Kansas City KS. Annual and perennial flowers and ornamental plants, and vegetable and herb plants will be available for purchase. Proceeds fund WCEMGA educational programs offered through demonstration gardens, youth education programs, and adult outreach programs. For info, 913-299-9300.

Central Missouri Master Gardeners’ Annual Plant Sale Sat, May 4, 7am-noon; at the Jaycee Fairgrounds, 1445 Fairgrounds Rd, Jefferson City, MO. The indoor plant sale features tomatoes, vegetables, peppers, herbs, annuals, perennials, natives, hanging baskets, container plantings, shrubs, and trees. Proceeds from sale fund scholarships, community garden projects, and River City Gardens. Farmers’ Market and KC’s Local Food Movement Sat, May 4, 9am-12pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. Do you love shopping the local farmers’ market, but get overwhelmed deciding who to support, who are the real farmers, how and what to buy? Learn how to shop the market wisely and what to know about the vendor guidelines. Farmers’ markets are just a part of the active local food and farmer movement. Also look at the city’s historical farming roots and discover the myriad of resources that connect us to our local food growers. Discover farm to table, organic, urban and local trends. Learn about KC organizations collaborating to feed our city on many levels and key programs that are training our next gen farmers. Instructor: Sherri Thomas. Fee: $39. To enroll go to https://ce.jccc.edu or call 913-469-2323. Rose Care Workshop Mon, May 6, social and refreshments 6pm, program 6:30pm; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. Special presentation by Judy Penner, Director of the Loose Park Garden Center & Rose Gardens. Judy will demonstrate proper care and trimming of roses, as well as exploring the rich history at Loose Park. Judy is an avid gardener and can be seen working with the crews and volunteers around Loose Park. Guests are welcome, no charge to attend. Questions, contact Margaret Singer, 816942-8889. Tour of the Trees Wed, May 8, 10-11am; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Our knowledgeable volunteers will lead this informative and interactive talk about the unique trees that live at the Arboretum. As you walk with them, learn about the trees uses in history, interesting facts and growing patterns. 18 and up. FREE. 913685-3604 Design Dilemmas & Solutions Thurs, May 9, 11:30am-1pm; at Sunflower Room Wyandotte Co Extension Office, 1216 N 79th St, Kansas City, KS. Will be an interactive class focusing on basic landscape principles and suggestions for improving your home landscape. Bring photos of your design dilemmas and we will offer guidance on what to do to improve your landscape. Class moderated by Lynn Loughary, K-State Research & Extension Horticulture Agent, sponsored by Wyandotte County Extension Master Gardeners. Fee: $5 (waived for currently certified EMGs). For info, 913-299-9300. National Public Gardens Day Fri, May 10, 10am-noon; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Celebrate by touring and learning about the many amazing gardens at the Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. Our knowledgeable volunteers will give free tours. Open to everyone. While no reservations are required, space is limited. Tours are approximately one hour in length. Bring a friend and meet at the kiosk to start get started. Bird Walk Sat, May 11, 8:15-11am; at Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a mile west


of US Hwy 69 on 179th St. Whether a backyard birder, a serious bird nerd, or you just enjoy a walk in the woods, you’ll love this bird walk led by Arboretum volunteers. Look for and listen to a lively mix of the nearly 100 different species of birds that have been identified at the Arboretum. Ages 12 and up. Closed toe shoes and long pants are recommended, and bug repellent and binoculars are encouraged. $10 non-members/$9 members, plus admission. 913-685-3604 Miami County Farm Tour May 11-12. For more information about the farm tour or to receive a map of the sites please call 913-294-4045. The tour’s website, www. MICOFarmTour.com, features a map of the sites and a copy of the tour’s brochure. Idalia Butterfly Society presentation Sat, May 18, 5:30pm Pot-luck Dinner & 6:45pm Presentation; at Prairie Village Community Center, 7700 Mission Rd. Free to the public. Are you interested in butterfly gardening? Join us for a presentation on “New Hosts for Old Friends”, a discussion about some uncommon host plants for familiar butterflies. For instance, three tropical species of milkweeds, the host plant for Monarchs, will be presented by Lenora Larson, columnist for Kansas City Gardener. Lenora has a 2 acre certified butterfly garden in rural Miami County and is a frequent presenter to gardening and nature groups. She belongs to the Idalia Society, Kansas Native Plant Society and North American Butterfly Association. Indoor Garden/Urban Farming Class Sat, May 18, 11am-Noon (Entry level Class), 1-2pm (Advanced Class); 117 S Mur-Len Rd, Olathe, KS 66062. Classes are FREE but seating is limited so please sign-up via our website year-roundgarden.com. Learn tips and tricks of how to grow a successful garden indoors, new topics every month, and discounts offered to class attendees. 913-397-0594 Herbs for Beginners Sat, May 18, 9am-12pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. May is the perfect time to plant more herbs! Become more familiar with growing herbs and their many culinary and medical uses with this hands-on class. Learn which are perennials or annuals and how best to grow each in your garden. In addition, learn about medicinal uses, useful recipes for the kitchen and the many ways to preserve the herbs you grow. Instructor: Sherri Thomas. Fee: $39. To enroll go to https:// ce.jccc.edu or call 913-469-2323. Advanced Beekeeping – Equipment Wed, May 29, 6:30-8:30pm; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. Learn how to assemble and review all the woodware, clothing and hardware needed for your beekeeping hobby. This includes everything needed for your bees, the beekeeper and your honey harvest. Instructor: Robert Hughes. Fee: $29. To enroll go to https://ce.jccc. edu or call 913-469-2323.

June Kansas City Rose Society Rose Show Sat, Jun 1; at Loose Park Garden Center, 52nd and Wornall Rd, Kansas City, MO. All rose growers are invited to bring roses between 8:30am and 12:30pm. No entry fee. Classes for all varieties of roses from miniatures to shrubs. Photography classes for rose photos. All you need to know is the name of rose you wish to exhibit. Helpers are available for new rose exhibitors. Douglas County Garden Tour Sat, Jun 1, 9:30am-5pm and Sun, Jun 2, 11am5pm. Douglas Co Master Gardeners are hosting a garden tour. There are seven gardens on the

tour. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the Douglas County Extension Office on the Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper St, Lawrence, KS. Native Plant Sale Sat, Jun 1, 9am-2:30pm, or until all plants are sold. The sale will be held in the Deal Six room at the Douglas County Extension Office on the Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper St, Lawrence, KS. Approximately 40 different species of natives will be available, with plants selling for $4 each or 3 for $10. All plants for sale are native plants. Hosted by Douglas County Master Gardeners. Drip, Soaker, or Sprinkler Wed, Jun 5, 6-7pm; at Clinton Parkway Nursery, 4900 Clinton Pkwy, Lawrence, KS 66047. Not sure of the best watering method for you? We will talk about the pros and cons of the big “3”; drip irrigation, soaker hoses and sprinklers. FREE, but seating is limited, so please RSVP either by clicking on “going” on our Facebook page or call 785-842-3081. Handouts provided. This workshop in held in conjunction with the Farmers Market at Clinton Parkway Nursery which runs each Wed from 4:30 to 6:30 from Mid May to the end of September. Garden Sampler Tour Sat, Jun 8, 9am-5pm (Rain or Shine). The tour features 6 wonderful gardens, all from the Shawnee area. Presented by Garden Club of Shawnee. Proceeds from the tour are used for the club’s grant program, which provides funds to schools, churches, museums and other non-profit organizations projects to support their gardening projects which help fulfill the club’s objectives. Tickets are for sale for $15. Tickets will be available at several locations throughout Shawnee, from club members and on our website, www. gardenclubofshawnee.org or visit us on Facebook at “The Garden Club of Shawnee”. MGGKC Garden Tour Jun 7 & 8. Save the date. Details to come. Beekeeping 101–Gr. 8-12 Fri, Jun 7 & 14, 8am-noon; at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd, Overland Park, KS. You will be introduced to the fun and exciting world of beekeeping. In today’s world, there are many beekeeping opportunities and challenges. Gain a good understanding about beekeeping and learn about the many products that come from bees, like honey, pollen and wax. You will also visit the JCCC Bee Yard and explore a working hive. Identify the honey, baby bees, pollen and find the Queen! This course is for students between the grades 8-12. Instructor: Robert Hughes. Fee: $99. To enroll go to https:// ce.jccc.edu or call 913-469-2323.

starts with

YOU

1

Call or Click 3 Working Days Before You Dig.

2

Wait the Required Amount of Time.

3

Confirm Utility Response.

4

Respect the Marks.

5

Dig with Care.

Indoor Garden/Urban Farming Class Sat, Jun 15, 11am-Noon (Entry level Class), 1-2pm (Advanced Class); 117 S Mur-Len Rd, Olathe, KS 66062. Classes are FREE but seating is limited so please sign-up via our website year-roundgarden.com. Learn tips and tricks of how to grow a successful garden indoors, new topics every month, and discounts offered to class attendees. 913-397-0594 Stems: A Garden Soiree Sat, Jun 22, 7-11pm; at Overland Park Arboretum & Botanical Gardens. The Arts & Recreation Foundation of Overland Park invites you to the premier event of the summer! $250 Patron Ticket, $150 General Admission Ticket (Early Bird Special - Purchase GA tickets by April 30 and save $25!). Tickets are all-inclusive–food, beverages, entertainment and fun! Visit stemssoiree.org or call 913.322.6467 for all ticket and event information.

More events are posted on our website, KCGMAG.COM, click on “Events.” Promote club meetings, classes, plant sales and other gardening events for FREE! Send details to:

Safe Digging

elizabeth@kcgmag.com

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1-800-DIG-RITE or 811 The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

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April

garden calendar n TURF

• Apply crabgrass control by tax day for best results. • Be kind to the environment. Spot treat spring broadleaf weeds. • Mow based on spring growth, 2-3 inches is recommended for bluegrass and tall fescue. • Delay fertilizing zoysia until mid to late May. • Avoid fertilizing bluegrass and tall fescue in April for improved summer health. • Sharpen mower blade if needed. • Repair mower to reduce problems later. • Don’t bag it! Let lawn clippings fall, returning valuable nutrients. • Be water-wise. Restrict watering now for increased summer resistance.

n VEGETABLES AND FRUITS

• Plant carrots, onions, beets, and other salad crops. • Thin seedlings to recommended spacing to promote good growth. • Harvest asparagus until spear size decreases, about six to eight weeks. • Harvest rhubarb leaves by pulling. Remove seed stalks from rhubarb. • Prune fruits if needed. • Plant fruit crops, tree fruits, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, and blueberries. • Remove mulch from strawberry bed. • Prune raspberry and blackberry plantings. • Plant asparagus and rhubarb. • Save the honey bees! Avoid spraying pesticides when trees and plants are flowering. • Cultivate soil to control weed growth by dragging the hoe just below the surface. • Hasten the compost pile by turning. • Fertilize vegetable gardens before planting for proper growth. • Spray fruit trees regularly for insect and disease-free fruit.

n TREES AND SHRUBS

• Prune spring flowering shrubs after bloom to promote good flowering next year.

• Prune deciduous trees now for quick healing. • Plant new trees and shrubs, but do not plant too deep. • Mulch around the base of young trees and shrubs to conserve moisture and control weeds. • Water newly planted trees and shrubs regularly. • Fertilize young trees to promote growth. • Check pine trees for needle diseases and control. • Remove dead or dying trees promptly to control insects and disease. • Never top a tree as part of a pruning program.

n FLOWERS

• Remove winter mulch from the perennial garden. • Cut back last year’s growth from perennials. • Remove mulch layers from roses. • Prune roses. • Plant new rose bushes. • Fertilize roses to promote healthy growth and excellent flowers. • Remove seedpods from spring flowering bulbs. • Do not remove green foliage from bulbs to encourage good flowering next year. • Plant annuals from transplants or seed. • Divide overgrown perennials. • Improve garden soil by adding organic matter such as compost or peat moss. • Make notes of areas for planting of bulbs in fall. • Clean up ground covers by raking or mowing over the tops at the highest setting.

n HOUSEPLANTS

• Remove winter dust from leaves with a damp cloth or by placing in the shower. • Repot older houseplants into a one-inch larger pot with fresh soil. • Start fertilizing for spring and summer growth. • Take cuttings of plants. • Fertilize amaryllis and keep in high light to encourage new leaves. • Do not move plants outdoors until nighttime temperatures remain above 55 degrees F.

Johnson County K-State Research and Extension recommends environmentally-friendly gardening practices. This starts by identifying and monitoring problems. Cultural practices and controls are the best approach for a healthy garden. If needed, use physical, biological or chemical controls. Always consider the least toxic approach first. Dennis Patton is the horticulture agent for Johnson County K-State Research and Extension. For free information fact sheets, visit www.johnson.ksu.edu, or call the Extension office at 913-715-7000.

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Meet Master Gardener, Georgene Caoile

What first drew you to the hobby of gardening: My mother and maternal grandmother both were encouraging. I loved working in the garden with my mother. Grandma gave me a tall garden phlox. How long have you been a Master Gardener: Class of May 2007 University of Missouri Extension. A neighbor who had completed the MG course told me about this training. As a life

long learner who earned two graduate degrees while working full time, this was an opportunity. I enrolled and was accepted! How long were you gardening before you became a MG: I have been gardening for decades. Work sometimes forced me to curtail “digging in the dirt,” but my desire to garden was always present. More recently high tunnels have been an interest. My husband, a neighbor, and several volunteers from Abundant Life Church erected a Rimol 26 feet by 40 feet high tunnel. My garden produced over 1200 pounds of produce. I was awarded a minigrant from Cultivate KC. It will allow me to purchase more equipment, irrigation tools and soil amendments to ease the labor and expand. Favorite tool: Probably my long-handled cultivator. It has four stout metal prongs bent at a 90-degree angle. It’s superb for weeding and can even be used to plant and cover the furrow. Favorite plants: Shrub: Native buttonbush (cephalanthus occidentalis) and David Austin roses Olivia, Graham Thomas, and Heritage. The buttonbush is covered with pollinators when in bloom. And the sphere-shaped white flowers are delicately beautiful. Rose Olivia is soft pink, 90 petals, fragrant, and a disease resistant shrub. A walk in the rose garden is a great way to begin the day! Tree: Flowering

crabapples in spring, Rising Sun Redbud, and Purple Autumn Ash in fall. These trees have been treated to resist the Emerald Ash Borer. It is worth it when one looks on their brilliant red and orange leaves in the autumn. Perennial: Easy to grow hybrid daylilies including those that are tetraploid. Although each flower only blooms for one day, a mature plant produces quite a show. Do you have a specialty: Probably the David Austin English Roses and hybrid lilies. I like orienpets, trumpets and martagon lilies. Gardener’s Connect event LilyPalooza is a source for lily bulbs. We now have a KC Lily Lovers Group that will informally meet in members gardens. What are you passionate about: It is my desire to inspire people to grow some of their own food and flowers. Self-sufficiency is empowering! Challenges you face: Japanese Beetles, high water bills, and I am not growing younger! Best advice: Find a mentor, join Gardener’s Connect and come to the presentations, visit other gardens and keep learning! Who/What inspired your love for gardening: God created this beautiful Earth and we are the stewards. We need to be growing food and flowers to care for our planet and each other.

The Kansas City Gardener | April 2019

39


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edible winners, AAS 2019, national safe digging month, outdoor space, uncommon hosts for common butterflies, hummingbird, amur cork tree, mi...

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edible winners, AAS 2019, national safe digging month, outdoor space, uncommon hosts for common butterflies, hummingbird, amur cork tree, mi...