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New Castle | Henry County

Chamber Magazine Spring 2020

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MYTHS HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW YOUR CHAMBER?

love local

The pandemic: Henry County fights back with heroes, telehealth & community support

INSIDE: Chamber adopts new logo


THANK YOU TO ALL OUR

Healthcare Heroes for your compassion, your dedication, your commitment and for your courage

hchcares.org


t - that you find the right checking account to help you manage your everyday expenses and cash flow.

All you want from your bank, especially bankers. We’re in a unique position to help you solve the financial challenges you face, even during an event as extraordinary as a pandemic. We offer a complete suite of business services, including Deposit Accounts, Treasury Management, and Commercial Lending. Let’s start with a Free Financial Review to determine if there are opportunities for you to lower your monthly payments, shorten a loan term, cash out or refinance, or if your current loans are the best fit.

New Castle #TeamCSB

Jeanette Davis

Mortgage Loan Officer jdavis@townfin.com

Seth Stevens

Treasury Management Officer sstevens@townfin.com

Colleen Huxhold

Relationship Manager chuxhold@townfin.com

Mark Taylor

Commercial Relationship Manager mtaylor@townfin.com

Latina Masters

Banking Center Manager lmasters@townfin.com

Rich Warner

Banking Center Manager rwarner@townfin.com

Call or visit our website (mycsbin.com) today! Discover the difference a local bank can make.

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Staying true to Chamber goals during trying times

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here has probably never been a greater need for a silver lining than now. And to find those rays of hope, one needs to look no further than here in Henry County. Our community has come together while being forced to separate physically. It’s that cohesive spirit that we all love most about Henry County. If we have learned anything EXECUTIVE from the COVID-19 global DIRECTOR pandemic, it’s that we are better when we are together, leaning on each other for support and encouragement. In this special edition of Chamber Magazine, you Shaun DuFault will learn more about how we are weathering a terrifying global situation; how we support each other in times of crisis and how we look to the future and healing we will need. Throughout these pages, you will read stories of hope and help, of collaboration and communication, of promise and preparation. We are all learning how to work differently in accordance with shelter-inplace directives, and we are mastering new ways to accomplish tasks. Through it all, we at the Chamber have stayed true to our mission by advocating

J

Jalen Lowder

for member businesses in these difficult times. Recent discussions during virtual board meetings have resulted in a new logo! While the familiar logo has served us well for some time, it no longer represents the vitality of the Chamber and its members. We worked closely with Jalen Lowder, a young, local graphic designer who offered a fresh perspective for the Chamber. Read more about the logo and Jalen’s background below. And there’s more to come! We have been working with Chamber Master, the website software provider currently being used, to upgrade the site to a more engaging, easier-to-use experience for members and visitors. Watch for a new look coming soon: nchcchamber.com Meanwhile, our message for you is simple. Like you, we’re staying apart, together. In just the last month, we’ve been keeping our small businesses informed about Henry County government updates, as well as the Small Business Administration’s COVID-19 grant and loan programs: See the “Not So Fast” section of our website. Let your Chamber help you manage your business needs. You can reach me at 765-529-5210 or by email: info@ nchcchamber.com n Shaun DuFault is Executive Director of the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce.

A new Chamber logo from a fresh face

alen Lowder graduated from Tri Junior Senior High School and the New Castle Career Center in May 2019. He is pursuing a degree in graphic design at IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design. During the first year of a two-year course in the Career Center’s Graphic Design program, Lowder’s design was selected by the Henry County Expo Center. Later, he produced a new logo for the New Castle Parks and Recreation Committee. That logo attracted the attention of the New Castle-Henry County Economic Development Corporation, and he was hired as an intern. It was during the EDC internship that he became acquainted with Chamber Director Shaun DuFault, who later connected with Louder to work on the Chamber logo. For inspiration, Lowder looked to some of his previous work, the Chamber’s slogan -- Your Success is Our Business – and the original Chamber logo. “It included an arrow, which I always interpreted as “moving forward” in relation to success and future businesses,” he said. The new logo has an arrow pointing upward diagonally, to further represent progress, and the color red is often associated with success. “Honestly, the new logo is based on the old one, just recast to fit a more modern standard,” he said. n

4 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020

New Castle | Henry County

Chamber Magazine Volume 10, Issue 1

PUBLISHER Shaun DuFault, Executive Director, New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce info@nchcchamber.com DESIGN AND EDITORIAL DIRECTION The JMetzger Group Juli Metzger juli@thejmetzgergroup.com John Metzger john@thejmetzgergroup.com www.thejmetzgergroup.com 765.744.4303 CONTRIBUTORS Writing: Doug Gruse, John Metzger Photography: Kurt Hostetler Design: Tammy Pearson To advertise, contact The JMetzger Group: 765.744.4303 john@thejmetzgergroup.com For subscription information, contact Shaun DuFault at 765.529.5210.

Chamber Magazine: The voice of New Castle-Henry County Chamber businesses. It is a product of the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce and The JMetzger Group. These materials are the sole and exclusive property of the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce and The JMetzger Group, and may not be used without written consent. Copyright 2020: The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce and The JMetzger Group. The JMetzger Group specializes in branded content, custom publishing and social media solutions. Learn more: www.thejmetzgergroup.com




    

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New Castle | Henry County

Chamber Magazine TABLE OF CONTENTS

love local

WHO WE ARE | PAGE 20

A COVID-19 special report

Patients turn to telehealth Families react to pandemic Local heroes go to work

pages 10-18

Community reopening theme: ‘Not so fast.’

H

enry County Indiana business owners and managers: First, thank you. Thank you for doing your part to keep our community EDC DIRECTOR safe and healthy during this challenging time. And now, we ask that you continue this mission to fight the spread of COVID-19 as we prepare for the muchanticipated “reopening” of the economy. Henry County business owners and managers are encouraged to review their policies, procedures and operations as we prepare for reopening. The exact timing and details of the reopening are still to be determined. We ask that you stay tuned and become prepared. Corey Murphy The theme for our community’s reopening is “Not so fast.” We need to move slowly to protect each member of our community, and your continued vigilance and patience is appreciated.

View the webinar. Read updated reopening guidelines. Learn of business funding/grant sources.

Not so fast Slow. Steady. SAFE.

growinhenry.com nchcchamber.com

6 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020

One fact is clear: it will be a new normal; it will be different. The health of our employees, customers and community will need to be high priority until COVID-19 treatments and vaccinations are widely available. Business owners and managers should consider the following: • Incorporating social distancing with customers and employees • Infection control procedures and cleaning schedules • Personal Protective Equipment for employees • Occupancy considerations, including limitations, traffic flow, and office layout • Customer and employee interaction • Alternative work schedules • E-commerce channels (marketing and product sales) • Communication channels • Business owners are encouraged to study the Center for Disease Control’s business guidance to determine likely changes in their own businesses. Answering your questions and addressing your comments responsibly is important to us. Please send your questions to info@growinhenry.com. Your questions will help us develop local resources, webinars and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for the business community. n Corey L. Murphy, CEcD, serves as President of the New Castle Henry County Economic Development Corporation.


“I can’t wait to get started so that lives can be changed for the better…” Sybil Roseboro

Meaningful real-world opportunities for employers and students.

iue.edu/internships

WE’LL HELP YOU SEE BEYOND

THE BOTTOM LINE. GENBNK-ADPR-CHAMBER- 0320

NEW CASTLE 2118 Bundy Ave Michelle Back

Sharon Herbert

Commercial

Banking Center Manager

Relationship Manager

765-599-2276

765-521-7506

NMLS #: 793317

mback@firstmerchants.com

sherbert@firstmerchants.com

Vickie McIntosh Mortgage Lending Officer 765-599-2228 NMLS #: 1488949 vmcintosh@firstmerchants.com CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 7


Stellar Communities proposals offer exciting potential for region’s future

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he COVID-19 pandemic has forced the world to operate differently, and we are all learning difficult lessons about coping with change. Much of the Chamber’s energy and time is being devoted to the crisis, working together to help our member businesses to deal with immediate problems. But it’s important for you to know that your Chamber continues the work on events and initiatives in place long before the world order changed. Here are some updates:

BOARD PRESIDENT

Chris May

‘Our region’s group, Safe and Welcome, did not receive the designation for 2019. However, as a finalist, it was awarded $333,333 from Indiana’s Office of Community and Rural Affairs.’

EXECUTIVE BOARD: The executive board (office-holders) continues to meet virtually. Although we typically meet monthly, meetings are held more often when necessary. The executive board is especially tuned in to making difficult decisions that advocate for our members in a timely, efficient manner. FULL BOARD: Full board meetings that include all members of the Chamber board are also meeting virtually on a regular basis. We are able to use those meetings to inform each other on important Chamber business, and discuss progress made by various committees. CHAMBER EVENTS: Several scheduling changes to be know: ● The Memorial Day Parade was replaced by a virtual ceremony. If you didn’t watch it live you can view the video on our website. ● The Chamber’s Golf Outing was cancelled this year

8 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020

● The new date for the Annual Meeting is Aug. 18 at the Armory ● Cash Bonanza is planned for Sept. 12 at the Armory. Be sure to watch the website for updates: nchcchamber.com STELLAR PROGRAM: This space in the Fall 2019 edition of Chamber Magazine was devoted our region’s designation as a finalist in the annual Stellar Communities Program, which is a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment initiative led by Indiana’s Office of Community and Rural Affairs (OCRA) and made possible through a partnership of various state agencies. Our region’s group, Safe and Welcome, is a collaboration of community members, businesses, government agencies and local organizations including the Chamber of Commerce. Here’s the latest on Stellar: ● Safe and Welcome did not receive the designation for 2019. However, as a finalist, it was awarded $333,333 from OCRA. ● Through community input obtained through two meetings, two projects have been selected to share in monies, while the exact amount of the grant share is undetermined as of now: 1) Early learning project for daycare, and 2) Owner-occupied housing ● Part of the $333,333 award might be used to help those hardest hit by COVID-19, but OCRA will be guiding that decision. ● There will be no Stellar Communities 2020 because of the pandemic. There might be some interest in trying again in 2021, but that discussion has been tabled for now. ● Under consideration is a plan to start transitioning the Regional Development Plan (RDP) from the Stellar leadership team to a more community-organized team that would be comprised mostly of city and county officials. The “new” team would implement and give oversight to a new RDP. n Chris May is president of the Board of Directors for the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce. He is executive director of The Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame.


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CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 9


COVID: HOSPITAL RESPONSE

T

&

ELEHEALTH

technology bring social distancing to medicine

S

STORY BY DOUG GRUSE

|

PHOTOS BY KURT HOSTETLER

martphones, iPads and laptops aren’t just helping people stay socially connected during the Coronavirus pandemic, they are saving lives. As health-care systems in densely populated regions of the country became overwhelmed and shelter-in-place orders deterred many patients from visiting medical offices, telehealth quickly evolved into an integral resource.

10 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020


‘I think we are a little on the cutting edge, at least in our area. I think its success has made it clear that this is just the beginning.’ — Sherri Bergum

“Telehealth works surprisingly well. This pandemic pushed us into this technology a lot quicker than what we expected. We are now trying to see as many people as possible through telehealth sessions,” said Dr. Robert Stevenson, an internist with Henry Community Health. Telehealth, also known as telemedicine, distributes health-related Stevenson services and information through telecommunication technology — allowing patients to connect with medical professionals without direct physical contact. Utilization of the technology has grown so rapidly in the last months that Forrester, a tech-focused market research company, estimates virtual health-care interactions will top 1 billion by the end of 2020. In fact, during the month of March, telehealth visits surged 50 percent, according to research from Frost and Sullivan, an international business consulting firm. Getting schooled on technology Long before COVID-19 reached the United States, Henry Community Health was piloting telemedicine through a partnership with the New Castle Community School Corporation, installing the technology at Eastwood Elementary to better connect young students with much-needed medical services. “I think we are a little on the cutting edge, at least in our area,” Sherri Bergum, director of curriculum and elementary programs, said about the Bergum school health partnership. “I think its success has made it clear that this is just the beginning.” The school adopted the technology at the start of the 201920 academic year to lessen the educational gaps some students experience as a result of poor access to health care. In-school telehealth made it possible for students to have a medical appointment with a physician without leaving campus. Dr. Kenton Hilbish, a pediatrician with Henry Community Health, is impressed with the versatility of the virtual exam equipment installed at the school. “Essentially, there’s a camera that the school nurse holds so I can do things like examine a patient’s throat. Different attachments make it possible for me to listen to heartbeats and lung Hilbish

sounds.” According to Hilbish, the technology has made medical visits more accessible to children who might not otherwise get the care they need. “We have a lot of single parents or grandparents raising kids — or families where both parents work outside of the home — who may not be able to leave their jobs to make an appointment,” he said. For Bergum, the technology, which was partially funded through a Rural Health Association grant, makes it possible for educators to focus on education. “The bottom line is: We want to keep kids in school and in the classroom. If students experience chronic illness, those education gaps get wider and wider,” she said. A quick response When news of the pandemic spreading first hit the United States, Henry Community Health was quick to adapt what it had learned from telehealth pilot programs to benefit a larger scale of patient services. “Telehealth makes Spencer social distancing so much easier and safer. Nobody is put in an unsafe position, including the patients and health-care workers,” said Mike Spencer, Henry Community Health chief information officer. Henry Community Health was in its initial stages of launching telehealth Henry County at its facilities but was planning on an Memorial Park adoption timeline of more than a year. “We were just beginning to roll out telehealth provider visits through our secure patient portal,” said Brian Ring, chief operating officer. “We quickly ramped up in just a few short weeks, and by March 23, our providers had the ability to see their patients with a telehealth visit.” Henry Community Health’s leaders recognized the immediate benefit for patients and medical staff during the Coronavirus crisis, but finding the Ring equipment — at a time where schools and businesses were scrambling to purchase any electronic technology available — was a daunting task. “It’s been tough to get all the equipment we needed in the door,” said Spencer. “We’re competing against everybody else.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 11


HOW IS COVID-19 DIFFERENT FROM OTHER VIRUSES? •

• •

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that can cause illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). The name ‘coronavirus’ has to do with what the virus looks like under a microscope. ‘Corona’ means crown. All coronaviruses have a similar structure. They are also enveloped viruses, which means they are able to stick to surfaces, but are also able to be killed with disinfectants. The novel virus that causes COVID-19 is one-nine hundredth of a width of a piece of hair. COVID-19 is likely more contagious than the viruses that cause influenza and common cold because it is new to humans. Humans have no way to prepare for it, and their immune systems are not ready to fight it. This results in the virus causing more cellular damage and producing more inflammatory cells. For people with decreased immunity, due to medications, a specific condition, or from aging, the Cowan resulting COVID-19 disease is more serious. — Brooke Cowan, infection preventionist at Henry Community Health

FROM PAGE 11

Despite the purchasing setbacks, the IT team managed to get the technology up and running at a record pace. At the same time, they worked to train the medical staff on the equipment. “We wanted to take time with each provider and make sure that they felt comfortable,” said Sherry Willis, Director of Information Systems at Henry Community Health. “It’s hard when you take something that is so hands-on and turn it into a Willis virtual world.” Having the equipment up and running for providers was only part of the equation. The Henry Community Health staff had to get its patients, many of whom are senior citizens, ready for the transition away from in-person office visits to videoconferencing sessions on smartphones and tablets. “It could be difficult to explain to some patients who don’t use technology like apps,” Willis said. The health care staff began working closely with patients as they made appointments to explain the process and ease their anxiety. For people uncomfortable with technology, the staff might suggest a telephone appointment instead. “The nurses are spending a lot more time with people on the phone because they have a lot of questions, including questions about the virus,” Dr. Stevenson said. The future is now Social distancing guidelines have made many patients decide to skip medical visits, and Henry Community Health has seen a decline of almost 50 percent of its normal volume of in-person

appointments. “It is important for our patients to know we have always been ready to take care of them. For our patients with chronic conditions or other health problems, if you have forgone a recent visit because of COVID-19, it is very important for you to reconnect with your provider,” Ring said. With the quick adoption of telehealth technology, physicians are able to provide necessary care for patients through virtual appointments. “Telehealth now accounts for about 1/3 to half of all visits,” Spencer said. The Henry Community Health team expects telehealth numbers to grow, especially as more people become comfortable with the technology. Even after social distancing measures are lifted, telehealth is likely here to stay. “I think a lot of good things will come out of this crisis. It really pushed us to go to telehealth,” Dr. Stevenson said. As the providers have become more familiar with the equipment, they are finding new benefits of the technology, including applications for behavioral health, physical therapy and family interaction for isolated hospital patients. “We continue to look for ways to use it. We have really widened our view of what is possible to do through a video visit,” Willis said. Ring sees a bright future for the quickly implemented technology. “I think the situation we are in now will have a lasting impact as it has caused us and our community to experience a new way of providing and receiving care,” he said. “Who knows? It might have taken us five years to get to this point where we are now.” n

‘I think the situation we are in now will have a lasting impact as it has caused us and our community to experience a new way of providing and receiving care.’

— Brian Ring

12 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020


COVID: CHAMBER RESPONSE

LOVE LOCAL community campaign supports businesses through COVID Like elsewhere across the nation and world, the onset of COVID-19 and the resulting quarantines wreaked havoc on commerce as the abrupt halt to business-as-usual gripped communities. The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce acted quickly, collaborating with other agencies to provide information and assistance to area businesses, member and non-member alike. Almost immediately, the Chamber, in partnership with New Castle Main Street: The Heart of New Castle, New Castle-Henry County Economic Development

Gwen Bohm, 3, and Felix Bohm, 6, play on a bridge in Memorial Park.

Corp., Henry County Community Foundation, Henry Community Health, and the East Central Indiana Small Business Development Center, implemented the LOVE LOCAL campaign. LOVE LOCAL is a way to support businesses through telephone and online purchases. Each week, a new shopping category is featured on the Chamber website at nchcchamber.com, where appropriate local businesses are listed. “Local businesses are struggling,” said Corey Murphy, Executive Director of the New Castle-Henry County Economic Development Corporation (EDC). “This offers an avenue for the community to support them financially, and also builds them up emotionally during these difficult times.” LOVE LOCAL also encourages site visitors to reach out to business owners through social media channels, offering words of encouragement. n

Thomas Jobe sprays for algae in the retention pond near Henry County REMC. Ron Lough and Mike Ritchie with their dogs in Baker Park.

HOW YOU CAN ACCESS CHAMBER COVID-19 COMMUNITY IMMUNITY WEBINARS: Throughout the month of April, the Chamber hosted “Community Immunity,” a series of webinars that focused on specific concerns related to COVID-19. While these webinars were presented in real time on the dates noted, YouTubeTvideos are available on the Chamber’s website for viewing. To access: nchcchamber.com; click on the “news” tab at the top of the window, and select video library. Here are the webinars: APRIL 10: Hosted by the Chamber and Whole Heart Communications, focused on creating and posting social media content. The closing of businesses because of the pandemic increased the importance of a social media Ragle presence, and the webinar provided a crash course to business owners on this important tool. Christy Ragle founded Whole Heart Communications in 2014 to serve the unique needs of small businesses and nonprofits.

APRIL 16: Featuring guest presenter Cindi Kiner, of The HR Connection, the webinar covered a wide range of pandemic-related concerns that helped businesses make their way through the maze of recent state and federal governmental changes related to business amid the COVID-19 crisis. Kiner established The HR Connection in Kiner 2006 and is an expert in human resources management.

APRIL 23: With guest presenter Scott Underwood of Indiana Small Business Development Center, was titled, “What’s Next: Post COVID-19 Financials.” The webinar took Underwood a close look at improving financial health to be more able to weather the global economic downturn and prepare for recovery. Underwood and the Indiana Small Business Development Center advises small businesses and entrepreneurs.

APRIL 28: the EDC hosted “Not So Fast: A Webinar to Help You Plan for Reopening,” which offered valuable information to business owners in preparation for the economy’s reopening. Read more about “Not So Fast” in Corey Murphy’s column on page 6.

CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 13


COVID: COMMUNITY RESPONSE

home protocols Stay-at-

bring new experiences, lessons & meaning to the term selfies

14 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020


STAY-AT-HOME

Lara Sullivan | HENRY COUNTY REMC

O

ur co-op was ahead of the curve when it came to telecommuting and virtual meetings,” said Lara Sullivan, Manager of Marketing and Member Services at Henry County REMC. “Over the past couple years, we have implemented new technology and several of us had the capability to work from home before COVID-19 forced the Assessing action.” the situation Just as the unexpected COVID-19 so often was had begun to shut down the world, another unexpected occurred on the a bit of a night of April 8, 2020. Storms roared juggling act. through Indiana causing major power outages throughout the state. “There’s never a convenient time for a power failure,” Sullivan said. “But the frustration from our member-consumers was magnified by the fact that they were following shelter-in-place directives. When we are shut in like this, we rely more than ever on electricity. It’s our contact to the outside world and in some cases our lifeline.” When Mother Nature threw a curveball, REMC went to work. “Many REMC employees pulled an all-nighter. This included REMC line crews, other operations and engineering personnel,

and myself. I was posting hourly updates to our social media pages, trying to keep our member-consumers as informed as possible. I spent the night answering questions and reassuring members our crews were working safely and quickly to meet their needs.” Assessing the situation so often was a bit of a juggling act. “The last thing somebody in the field wants to do is interrupt their work to answer my questions,” Sullivan laughed. “But we have a good team that is patient with one another, and I truly appreciate that.” After power was restored, Sullivan had a few minutes to breathe and take stock. “I learned a lot that night,” she said. “When faced with extremely difficult circumstances, it’s hard to imagine a positive outcome. But when it’s all over, you realize that collaboration and communication can solve almost any problem. Our members were very appreciative and offered much praise during and after the outages.” “When looking at the big picture, I know that we’ll get through this, but it won’t be easy. In the end, working together is how we survive. We must #PowerOn.” n

STAY-AT-HOME

Shonda Kane | CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Shonda Kane in her home office space that doubles as a kitchen.

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or Shonda Kane, the “newish” office manager at the New CastleHenry County Chamber of Commerce, a new job turned into a baptism by fire because of COVID-19. “I started work in January, and immediately became involved with the board and other Chamber members planning the annual dinner, which was slated for March 17,” she said. “We were deep in the final planning stages and, suddenly, everything changed.” Kane was born and raised in Randolph County and spent most of her life in the area, except for a year-long stint in Kansas City, Kansas. She currently lives in Albany, in northern Delaware County. Prior to joining the Chamber staff, she worked for the Delaware County Visitor’s Bureau. But Henry County ‘We were was not new to her. Through a regional deep in the visitor’s bureau organization, she knew her final planning Henry County counterparts. Plus, being a horse enthusiast, she had attended many stages and, events at the Henry County Saddle Club. suddenly, Kane was pleasantly surprised by an everything experience shortly after she started working changed.’ at the Chamber. “I was walking down the street, and someone I didn’t know greeted me with a big smile and a nod,” she said. “That doesn’t happen everywhere. This is a warm, welcoming community.” That kind of welcome carried over in her job, too. “This board is just great,” she said. “Several of them came in to the office just to meet and welcome me.” Kane’s skill set is perfectly suited to the changes required by the pandemic. “I populate the web page and keep up on social media postings, with an emphasis on LOVE LOCAL,” she said, referring to the new campaign hosted on the Chamber website that supports local merchants through the business downturn. “Since the stay-at-home initiatives were put in place we’ve added new tabs to the site to help keep our members informed,” Kane said. “The ‘news’ and ‘video library’ sections of the site are new and need to be updated often.” Kane can make website updates anywhere she has a connection, and that’s important to her. “I help take care of my aging parents who live near me, and I worry about exposing them,” she said. “I am really grateful the board cares about my safety and health and encouraged me to work from home.” n CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 15


STAY-AT-HOME

Doug Meier | STATE FARM

I

have to admit I didn’t deal well initially with the quarantine orders,” says Doug Meier, State Farm agent in New Castle. “But as things progressed, I have been able to see some important silver linings.” Meier and his wife, Wendi, have three children: Corinne, a 17-year-old student at the Indiana Academy at Ball State University in Muncie, and Grace, a 21-year-old Purdue student, are sheltering-in-place at home. The third, 22-yearold Emma, is in graduate school and working in Milwaukee. “We are particularly concerned with older family members who are at greater risk, so we have been keeping a safe distance,” he said. “That’s hard, not being able to give them a hug, but it’s the safe, smart thing to do.” Meier doesn’t have Wi-Fi in his home, so he and the two kids go to the office every day to conduct business and do homework. The office is closed to the public, and Doug reaches out to clients on the phone and through virtual meetings. “It’s been a joy to have the kids with us, but I’m not completely sure they feel that way,” Meier laughed. “But we are Wendi and Doug Meier (in back) with taking advantage of the opportunity to daughters Emma, Corinne and Grace. spend time with them that I know we wouldn’t have gotten otherwise.” The Meier family has spent a lot time together in recent weeks, working on jigsaw puzzles, eating meals, taking walks. “My wife and I have cooked more meals at home in the last month than we probably did all of last year!” Meier is looking forward to re-opening, but with caution. “Common sense should win out. Unfortunately, COVID-19 is here to stay. We will need to adjust to our ‘new normal’ as things progress.” In the end, Meier is trying to make lemonade. “I’m not sure there’s anything more special than hearing your children laughing, giggling and horsing around together,” he said. “It was common when they were 4 and 7, but slowly disappeared as the years passed and our schedules got more hectic. But lately, it seems to be a daily occurrence, and it’s priceless.” n

STAY-AT-HOME

Mark Taylor | CITIZENS STATE BANK

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or Mark Taylor, the COVID-19 pandemic created an opportunity to put his skill set to work in a way that provided badly needed assistance to Henry County businesses. “It was all-hands-on-deck for local bank lenders because of the Federal stimulus programs,” said Taylor, Assistant Vice President at Citizens State Bank. “Much of our waking hours have been spent securing funds for the small-business community, before the well went dry.” “While the work has been allconsuming at times, it made me keenly aware of how difficult it must be for the people working on the front lines in the medical community,” he said. “That gave me a sense of mission: This is the best use of my Lauren, Colin and Mark Taylor spent a of time on their bikes to break the skills to help fight the economic side lot monotony of quarantining. of the battle.” Taylor has been sheltering in place with his children, Lauren, 16, and Colin, 17. Another son, 22-year-old Nicholas, is in Bloomington, where he is a senior in Indiana University’s school of business. “My kids and I had to be creative in ways to escape the house and get physical activity that would apply to all of us,” Taylor said. “Bike riding has been a great solution for us. We’ve had a lot of fun on the Wilbur Wright Trail and the Cardinal Greenway.” Taylor is a Henry County native who has spent most of his life here. He has been in banking for 24 years, with 12 of those at Citizens State Bank. “When something like this occurs, it’s empowering to be in a position to actually help people. And that’s what keeps me going.” n

16 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020

Jeannie Hamblin-Fox was set to meet her new granddaughter in March but postponed it because of the pandemic. Wyatt Fox, shown here, is the daughter of Travis (a Henry County native) and Sarah Fox, and was born in late December in South Carolina.

STAY-AT-HOME

Jeannie Hamblin-Fox |

IVY TECH

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or Jeannie Hamblin-Fox, Henry County Site Director Ivy Tech Community College, the COVID-19 pandemic has presented opportunities in unprecedented ways. “It’s easy to feel discouraged,” said HamblinFox. “When this started, I was worried about the effects on people and our community. In the end, I decided that worrying isn’t helpful. I wanted to take action and figure out how I could help.” She and Ivy Tech have taken action and created a supportive, helpful environment for those working remotely. She is particularly appreciative of the five local Ivy Tech staff who continued to directly serve students so she placed a Friday “treat” on their porches each week as a small thank you. Ivy Tech Henry team responded in kind by keeping her spirits up with daily chat room messages filled with laughter and encouragement to one another. A co-worker in Muncie contacted HamblinFox to discuss the challenge of a college-loaned laptop being delivered to a student living near Rush County. “I was comfortable in serving as a courier from the Muncie Ivy Tech campus directly to the student’s driveway,” Hamblin-Fox said. “I enjoyed a drive on a beautiful Indiana day and helped a student.” Henry County Nursing Program Chair Ashley Reed contacted Hamblin-Fox to ask if the closed campus building could be accessed for pick-up of respirator equipment that she was willing to loan to Henry Community Health. Hamblin-Fox confirmed the approval of the loan with Muncie/Henry County Chancellor Jeff Scott, and then called Hudson Tool Rental to ask for a box truck loan/donation for delivery. Hudson said yes, and Hamblin-Fox was able to continue coordination with Reed, finalizing the delivery to Henry Community Health, a valuable partner. Hamblin-Fox was so thankful for this whole event, because it bolstered up her belief of what entities can do when they work together. Finally, Hamblin-Fox says she also was fortunate to be one of the many community volunteers assisting with packing and delivery of meals for New Castle and South Henry Schools. “We have such a giving community,” she says. “There were many opportunities to stay safe and yet do something small to get involved and be part of that caring Henry County spirit. I am blessed and grateful for many things in my life and this was an opportunity to pay it forward.” n


STAY-AT-HOME

Kim Denney | WESTWOOD ELEMENTARY

A

s with everybody across the world, Kim Denney felt the impact of COVID-19, both professionally and personally. Everything is viewed through the lens of “pre-pandemic” vs. “post-pandemic” and the differences are drastic! “Before the pandemic, I was in my seventh year of teaching fifth-graders at Westwood Elementary,” she said. “My typical day was eight hours at the school, interacting face-to-face with my students and peers.” “Suddenly, I was thrust into the world of e-learning and Zoom meetings. I am learning about Flipgrid, Loom, Screen-O-Matic, Peardeck and all of those fun Google programs,” she said with a chuckle. “I spend hours wading through a knee-deep email inbox, and try to pretend that I am as savvy as my students with all the technology that surrounds us!” Denney transformed her formal dining room into a classroom, complete with document cameras and dry erase boards. And with each day that passes, her adjustment to the “new normal” gets smoother. In fact, she is developing new skills. “Through Facetime meetings (one skill I mastered pre-pandemic) I am learning how to be efficient with my communication,” she said. “And by understanding the challenges my students encounter without the benefit of face-to-face interaction, I have become more creative in helping them succeed.” Denney tries to keep her humor during these trying times. “I realized early on that many of my students have pets that bark during Zoom meetings,” she said. “That made me understand that distractions are all around us, and we need to struggle for focus.” “On the personal side, we are coping as a family,” Denney said. “My husband, Ron, is a pilot for United Airlines, and is grounded because of travel restrictions and stay-at-home directives. It has given us ample time to catch up on projects around the house. And we take LOTS of walks in the neighborhood… something we rarely had the time for before the pandemic.” Their daughter, Courtney, is a fourth-grade teacher at Reagan Elementary in Brownsburg and is distance-teaching as well. She has chosen to hunker down with her parents, sharing the dining room/classroom. “My son, Ryan, lives in Muncie and we are able to spend time with him as well,” she said. “The process hasn’t been easy, but unsure times rarely are,” Denney said. “But we are making the best of the situation, and we are realizing that change is a part of life. There’s no way to know how life will look when this is over, but we will just need to roll with it!” n

Teacher Kim Denney is armed with dry-erase markers, ready to conduct class from her dining room, which as been transformed into a virtual classroom.

‘The process hasn’t been easy, but unsure times rarely are. But we are making the best of the situation, and we are realizing that change is a part of life.’

Email us today: askmuncie@ivytech.edu CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 17


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Ric Barr | Castle Pawn Shop

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RESOURCE Ric Barr, the owner of Castle Pawn Shop, was raised in New SUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. Castle. For 15 years, he lived in Tampa, Florida. During part of ur mission remains the same, but the ETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE.We ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN that time, worked for Armstrong WorldINSURANCE. Industries Wall Division, way we operate today looks different. firstSTRENGTHENING. a plant manager and later as chief estimator for all 50 states MAGAZINE. SOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVEquickly NEWS. adjusted LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER efforts to help members and eight foreign countries. For the last 10 years in Tampa, he and the community with the challenges ROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS.that WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL owned andWORKSHOPS. operated several businesses. He and his family moved COVID-19 has created. back home to New Castle in 2001. He has two daughters and two VENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER While partnerships, communication, and support grandchildren. Ric joined the Chamber Board of Directors in 2005, remainNETWORKING. a focus, the Chamber has had to find differentREFERRALS. WEBSITE. AGAZINE. GROWTH. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. andADVERTISING. has served in numerous roles including various committee INSURANCE. ways to share and deliver information to its members. chair positions, vice president and president in 2015. DEVELOPMENT. OCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC The Chamber team has taken creative measures He is currently the chair of the nominating committee. HAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. and developed forums includingEDUCATIONAL on-line networking

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opportunities, and a YouTube channel for NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC SURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. meetings, HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE

expanded communication. These resources ensure that local businesses continue to have a platform to stay businesses in our community through advocacy. That NOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMANduring RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. connected and support one another this trying is our purpose, and has remained our primary focus. time when meeting faceMAGAZINE. to face mayGROWTH. not be possible. We CONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. ADVERTISING. However, COVID-19 forced usWEBSITE. to improve the way we WORKSHOPS. have also partnered with local, state, and national health meet that goal.LEADERSHIP. Before the pandemic, weCHAMPIONS. sometimes PROMOTING. ARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. BUSINESS agencies to stay informed and haveEVENTS. shared all pertinent became engrossed in the day-to-day duties – policy concerns, information withDEVELOPMENT. members quickly and effectively. The GROWTH.procedures, RENGTHENING. ECONOMIC CHAMBER MAGAZINE. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. fundraising – taking time away from the intended Chamber always keeps a pulse on the needs of the business role ofHUMAN the Chamber. In recent months, Chamber Director Shaun DVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS community and has shown that it is dedicated to providing DuFault and Office Manager NETWORKING. Shonda Kane have focused theirOPPORTUNITIES. time HAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. EDUCATIONAL its members information and resources. on helping businesses through the crisis. In the process, they EFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. INSURANCE. SOCIAL have developed new, more MARKETING. efficient waysKNOWLEDGE. to reach existing and potential members. The LEADERSHIP. boards and members areCHAMPIONS. learning aboutPROMOTING. VENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. BUSINESS new ways to communicate and react quickly. Those skills will STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. enhance the Chamber’s effectiveness in the weeks and months ETWORKING. EDUCATIONALahead OPPORTUNITIES. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. of us. There’s noREFERRALS. way to knowWEBSITE. exactly what the future holds, but is likely that we will encounter difficult circumstances. ARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. By improving our communication, we will be better able to serve E A D E R S H I P. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC our members more effectively, long after the crisis has passed.DEVELOPMENT.

he REFERRALS. Chamber’s role is to support new andWORKSHOPS. existing EVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. MARKETING.

HAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. Rebecca Gonya |EDUCATIONAL Big O TiresOPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. Rebecca Gonya was born in Uvalde,ISSUES. Texas and has lived in SURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC Henry County for 21 years. Rebecca and her husband, Chris, EVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. have owned and operated Big O Tires since 2004, EDUCATIONAL when they

immediatelySOCIAL joined the Chamber. Rebecca and ChrisISSUES. have three NOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. sons: Riley, 25, graduated in May from University of Colorado CONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. Boulder with a law degree. Brenden, 23, graduated from Purdue ARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. in May 2019 with a degree in Unmanned AerialHUMAN Systems.RESOURCE Josh, 15, freshman in high school. Rebecca has served on the Chamber BrownEDUCATIONAL | Hinsey-Brown Funeral Service RENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. Kevin NETWORKING. OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. board for about nine years. She was the president in 2016-17 and Kevin Brown is a New Castle native, who has spent his life in Henry DVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS has held otherMARKETING. leadership roles, including board secretary and County, except for his timeISSUES. in college in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a vice-president, as well as various committee chair positions. CHAMBER licensed funeral director and embalmer, and the president of HinseyHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. She loves to travel and tries to immerse herself in the area’s Brown Funeral Service in New Castle and Knightstown. Kevin and his FERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE NEWS. local culture instead of partaking in the MARKETING. typical “touristy” activiwife of 25 years, Cindy, have two children: Evan (wife,ISSUES. Bethany)POSITIVE and ties. On a rainy day, you might find her curled up on the couch Olivia. They have one grandchild, 6-month-old Ethan. Hinsey-Brown ADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL in her sunroom with a good book, or, weather permitting, sitting opened its doors in 1995, and immediately joined the Chamber. Kevin PPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. SOCIAL EVENTS. HUMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE outside in theWEBSITE. gazebo with a glass of unsweet tea, enjoying the has been on the Chamber’s Board of Directors for about 16 years, and smell and sounds of thePROMOTING. rain with her family. EWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. has served in many leadership roles, including three stints as presiIt might surprise people to know that Rebecca loves nature, dent. On a rainy day, you are likely to findSOCIAL Kevin inEVENTS. the kitchen with RESOURCE DUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE. HUMAN specifically hunting and fishing! music playing and a strong cup of coffee close by, trying out a new SUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER MAGAZINE. GROWTH. recipe. “I am quickly becoming a birder,” Kevin says. “It’s an interest passed down to me fromINSURANCE. my dad.” ETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. SOCIAL EVENTS.

UMAN RESOURCE ISSUES. POSITIVE NEWS. LEADERSHIP. BUSINESS CHAMPIONS. PROMOTING. STRENGTHENING. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. CHAMBER

AGAZINE. GROWTH. NETWORKING. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. REFERRALS. WEBSITE. ADVERTISING. WORKSHOPS. MARKETING. KNOWLEDGE. INSURANCE.


Support local pandemic response and relief efforts with a gift to the

COVID-19 Disaster Relief Fund.

Your donation helps provide grants* to organizations serving vulnerable populations affected by the crisis. Job disruptions Hunger

Make a gift today! Online: www.henrycountycf.org/giving/donate-online/ By mail: PO Box 6006, New Castle, IN 47362

Increased health risks New unmet needs

Henry County

* More than $25,000 in relief funds have been granted to local organizations since March 2020!

TM

Community Foundation

www.henrycountycf.org | 765.529.2235 | 700 S. Memorial Drive | P.O. Box 6006 | New Castle, IN 47362

Our New Castle Attorneys and Staff will be happy to assist you with all your legal needs.

1315 Broad St., New Castle, IN 47362

765.521.0656

David Brock

Jim Millikan

Jon Madison

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STORY.

Everyone has one. Let us help TELL YOURS. thejmetzgergroup@gmail.com | 765.744.4303 CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 19


THE

Chamber WHO WE ARE Your Chamber is your advocate. Your member dues support this essential mission, which is to look out on behalf of the business community. We are a continual source of information about what’s happening locally in the business community but also are a channel into statewide, regional and even national initiatives that may affect the business environment. It is an alliance of businesses and organizations who provide networking opportunities and individual expertise. NCHC Chamber Executive Director Shaun DuFault at the Annual Dinner in 2019.

Chamber Magazine file photo

MYTH

The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce is a city and/ or county government function, and receives public (tax) funds.

FACTS

Your Chamber is a membership organization, and is funded exclusively by members, corporate sponsors and fund-raising events. It is not a governmental function, and is not beholden to any group other than its members. • Government entities (including the City of New Castle) are Chamber members and pay dues like other members, but the city does not oversee any functions of the Chamber. • Each person, business, or non-profit joining the Chamber pays annual dues. In addition, the Chamber budget is supplemented by corporate sponsorships. “We are fortunate to have some very committed corporate sponsors,” said Shaun DuFault, the Chamber’s executive director. “Besides contributing monetarily, their input is immensely helpful. Without their involvement, the Chamber wouldn’t exist.”

20 | CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020


MYTH

The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce is an exclusive group; its events are meant solely for members.

FACTS

All area businesses and individuals are invited to join the Chamber. Membership provides various networking and social opportunities and is an avenue for improvement of the community as a whole. • Chamber events are focused on benefitting member businesses and individuals. Lunches and workshops cover a wide range of topics and provide members networking opportunities and members are encouraged to share success stories and best practices, learn about new ways to retain existing customers and attract new ones, as well as improve communication tactics with the community at large. Other events, like the Annual Dinner and Cash Bonanza are more social, open to anyone and are a great way to get to know the Chamber. “These events require tons of work, but we have a lot fun with them,” DuFault said. • New Chamber members learn quickly that their membership provides some unexpected benefits: Building relationships with other members often affects their bottom line. Board President Chris May points to some specifics. “Many members prefer to purchase goods and services from fellow members when given the choice,” he said. “There’s a sense of solidarity at work here. We support each other and help each other succeed.” • Chamber members value the importance of improving the community as a whole, even outside the boundaries of membership. “Chamber members work tirelessly to create events that benefit everybody in the community,” DuFault said. “We want Henry County to be the best it can be so we are focused on improving quality of life for all residents.” Two examples of the Chamber’s community-wide dedication are the Downtown Christmas Walk, a family friendly event and the Memorial Day Parade that draws thousands of spectators (below).

GOING THE EXTRA MILE. MYTH

The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce is responsible for attracting and developing new businesses in the area.

FACTS

• Your Chamber concentrates on existing area businesses, but it has a role in making the Henry County Community more attractive to potential businesses, as well. • The New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce is tasked primarily with increasing opportunities for its members, which are existing businesses. On the other hand, the attraction of new businesses and increased development for the area falls primarily to the New Castle Henry County Economic Development Corporation. Although these roles are at the base of each organization’s makeup, neither works in a vacuum. In fact, economic development and community improvement is a collaborative process, including not only the Chamber and the EDC, but other groups like the Henry County Visitors Bureau, the Henry County Community Foundation, Henry Community Health, city and county government entities and a wide range of non-profit agencies and the business community as a whole. Through these collaborative efforts, your Chamber helps foster an environment for growth through community improvement. n

Electric cooperatives maintain more miles of power lines per consumer than other types of electric utilities. Even though we serve fewer consumers and acquire less revenue, electric co-ops always go the extra mile to power the communities we service.

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www.hcremc.com CHAMBER MAGAZINE, Spring 2020 | 21


Caring service when it’s needed the most. Honoring your loved ones and celebrating the life you shared are the cornerstones of healing after loss.

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Antolin & Benninger Obstetrics and Gynecology Cambridge City Family Health Partners Henry Community Health Pain Management Henry Community Health Surgical Services Henry County Cardiology Henry County Center for Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Henry County Infectious Disease & Allergy/Immunology New Castle Family & Internal Medicine-Forest Ridge New Castle Family & Internal Medicine-Northfield Park Family and Internal Medicine, Immediate Care, Pediatrics Physical Medicine of East Central Indiana

Cambridge City Primary Care • • • • •

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HENRY COUNTY UNITED WAY OFFERS EMERGENCY GRANTS TO NONPROFITS SERVING STRUGGLING, WORKING FAMILIES DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC United Way of Delaware, Henry & Randolph Counties

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Chamber Magazine of New Castle-Henry County Indiana  

Published twice yearly, Chamber Magazine is the voice of the New Castle-Henry County (Indiana) Chamber of Commerce. The Spring 2020 focuses...

Chamber Magazine of New Castle-Henry County Indiana  

Published twice yearly, Chamber Magazine is the voice of the New Castle-Henry County (Indiana) Chamber of Commerce. The Spring 2020 focuses...

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