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‘hood

September 2012

parent • child • family

TM

www.thehoodmagazine.com

BACK TO SCHOOL It’s that time! Sioux Empire’s Parenting Resource


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contents

September 2012

baby 5 The baby brain

Children learn when they are loved. Interaction with caring adults is at the core of baby brain development

6 Sight sound movement

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Learn about baby’s eye sight development over first few months

child 8 Early development Read the sponsored feature story highlighting Good Shepherd Lutherans new “Early Childhood Center.”

23 Dedication pays off

Hear from 2 local teens that share how gymnastics is a motivator & esteem builder

37 Back to school vaccinations

Does your child need back to school vaccinations? Turn to page 37 to find out

parent 24 Saving for education

Simple ways to get started on an education fund

local 16 Teacher spotlights

Meet 4 local teachers as they describe the rewards of their job and share advice for parents

27 Extracurricular burnout

Avoid excess stress from participating in too many activities

27 Stress-free

school year

Tips to start the school year off on the right foot can help minimize a child’s stress

38 Before and after school care

Quality OST programs keep kids safe, provide learning opportunities that improve student grades

family 13 Back to school jitters

Help your child ease into the transition with a few simple tips

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3

34 Effective

communication with teachers

Keep those lines of communication open

13 in every issue 4 Welcome 20 Calendar of Events 10 Kara’s Kreative 29 Menu Planning 36 Business Directory


welcome

BACK TO SCHOOL

Photo courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

TM

Can you Believe it? Our official Back to School Issue is here! We hope you have FULLY enjoyed the break with your children and that your family has left no summer stone unturned as we prepare to change seasons yet again. A new school year always brings with it the excitement of a new teacher, new classroom, new group of peers and a whole set of new possibilities. Let us all be refreshed and renewed as we walk into this new school year. For you and your children, make it the best one yet. n

‘HOOD EVENTS

Coloring Contest WINNERS!

CANTON CAR SHOW

STATE FAIR

Publisher Steffanie Liston-Holtrop Hoodlum Productions, LLC 605-366-1479 steff@thehoodmagazine.com Design Director Ally Vogel 605-759-5615 ally@vogeldesignshop.com Editor/Content Coordinator Taryn Sonnenfeld taryn@thehoodmagazine.com Assistant Copy Editor Hannah Weise Market Research Hannah Goemaat Contributing Graphic Design Chris Langner Contributing Photographer Kristi Shanks Photography Contributing Writers Steffanie Spaan, Heather DeWit, Ashley Sandborn, Hannah Weise, Karla Johnson, Dr. Ellie Bunde, Judy Francis, Shaina Herrmann, Richard E. Bavaria, Ph.D. Creative Ideas Director Kara Weber Account Executive Kelli Johnson

Junior Miss Canton 2012 – Madison Fossum and coloring contest winner Kennedy Fossum. (Other 2 winners were not present at ceremony)

605-366-9357

William L., age 2

Kiley B., age 4

kelli@thehoodmagazine.com Website Connie Miles Cover photo Kristi Shanks Photography Reproduction or use of the contents of this magazine is prohibited.

Marilyn K., age 4

NEXT MONTH

Alie W., age 7

Payton S., age 10

The Working Parent

In a world where the economy is questionable and the cost to raise a child, (roughly $300,000) is ever growing...2 working parents are the norm, not the exception. Join us as we give you all the resources you will need as a working parent in our community. Trust us, there are many. You are not alone. We are all in this thing together!

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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com

‘Hood Magazine is published 9 times a year by Hoodlum Production, LLC and strives to publish only accurate information, however Hoodlum Production, LLC cannot be held responsible for consequences resulting from errors or omissions. All material in this magazine is the property of Hoodlum Production, LLC and cannot be reproduced without permission of the publisher. We welcome article proposals, story suggestions and unsolicited articles and will consider all submissions for publication. Please send your thoughts, ideas and submissions to Hoodlums@thehoodmagazine.com. Magazine feedback and advertising and marketing inquiries to steff@thehoodmagazine.com. ©2012 Hoodlum Production, LLC All Rights Reserved.


Photos courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

baby 5

baby

The Baby Brain

by Heather DeWit, LSS

They have ten little fingers, ten tiny toes and one amazing brain! As parents, we find ourselves bombarded with tips on how to make our baby the smartest, healthiest, most polite, most creative, best kid around. We are told what they should eat, what they shouldn’t eat, which toys to buy, what to listen to, what they should watch, and so much more. All of this information is important, and as parents we are responsible for sifting through the hype and determining the very best for our bundle of joy. However, research and experience seem to clearly point in one direction – relationships. Children learn when they are loved. Interaction with caring adults is at the core of baby brain development. Isn’t it wonderful that what babies need most is both free and fun for the parents? continued next page September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


baby

The Baby Brain (continued) Michele, Lead Infant Teacher at the Lutheran Social Services Southern Hills Infant and Toddler Enrichment Program plans weekly baby brain builders for her class including the following activities that you can try at home. Michele uses a weekly theme to inspire creativity and keep activities fresh. This week is “If You’re Happy and You Know It.” Note that the key to these activities is interaction with caring adults.

Language Development Use sign language for words that baby is exposed to daily like “more” or “bottle.” Talk with baby about what is happening such as diaper changes, buckling the car seat, eating, rocking, etc. Read books with baby that show babies and emotion. There are many baby books that are filled with faces. There are even wonderful books featuring the “Happy and You know It” song.

a-boo” with baby to show them that you are still there even when they can’t see you.

Social and Emotional Development Play “follow the leader” face to face with baby. Copy their sweet and silly expressions. Say “we are making a happy face” and smile at baby. Say “this is a sad face” and make a sad face at baby for a few seconds. Always end with a smile! Be sure to give baby quiet time and space to rest and become refreshed for more learning.

Fine Motor Development Encourage little ones to hold rattles or small toys. Talk with baby about the different textures of toys, blankets, grass and other items in their world. Say “your blanket is soft.”

Gross Motor Development

Cognitive Development Sing “If You’re Happy And You Know It” and help baby to clap his or her hands, wiggle toes, blow a kiss, etc. Play “peek-

While singing and playing with baby, encourage them to reach up toward you and toward toys. Lay on the floor by baby to encourage them during “tummy time.” n

by Judy Francis, Kids Stuff Super Store

Sight * Sound * Movement Baby’s eye sight is very limited at birth and develops fully over a 6 to 8 month period.

• Birth: Can see 8-12 inches. Can detect some light and movement, but it is limited.

• 1 month: Can track movement and consistently focus both eyes.

• 2 months: While babies can see some color from

birth, it is hard to distinguish different tones. They prefer Black and White or High Contrast while starting to distinguish colors and textures.

Try to choose toys that aid in development.

Sight: Black and White Sound: Crinkle Baby Paper Movement: Lamaze “Easy to Hold” Rattle

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• 4 months: Beginning to develop depth perception and motor skills allowing them to hold and shake different objects.

Information taken from BabyCenter Developmental Milestones.


Photo courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

child 7

child

Back to School Success! A better school year starts with Sylvan. As you’re ramping up for another school year of homework and studying, are you hoping for the best but dreading the worst? You’re not alone. Do your family a favor and let Sylvan’s proven tutoring approach help your child achieve better results this school year!

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TAILORED TUTORING PROGRAMS FOR PRE-K THROUGH COLLEGE PREP IN READING, MATH, WRITING, STUDY SKILLS AND ACT PREP September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


Early Childhood Center Good Shepherd Lutheran Church & School, located at 4800 Southeastern Avenue, Sioux Falls, has been busy with the construction of their soon-to-be open and operating brand new “Early Childhood Center.” We spoke with Rachel Nass, the Center Director, about all that Good Shepherd is doing and will be offering the community and its families.

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Sponsored Feature Story

Photos courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

child

You have a new program and/or new addition, is that correct? What does your organization offer? For what age groups? This is a new ministry area for Good Shepherd Lutheran. The church and the elementary school, serving students preschool through eighth grade, existed, but Good Shepherd has planned for three years for the new growth in their ministry - for this wonderful new building and early childhood center. The new center will provide Christian education and care for children, ages 4 weeks to 5 years old. There are six classrooms and each classroom has a storefront in the town square. The Bread of Life Bakery is home to the infants age four weeks through the crawling stage. In Noah’s Ark Pet Store, mobile infants will be exploring the room - from crawlers to walkers. The Christian Soldiers Toy Store is the toddlers’ next step and is the learning place for children who are steady on their feet through two years old. Two year olds learn and continue their development in the Milk and Honey Ice Cream Shop where they prepare to enter one of our two preschool classrooms, Sweet Treats Candy Store or The Good Book Bookstore. Each preschool classroom is a mixed age three to five year old setting, providing the best educational and social foundations for children. The younger children learn from the older children and the older children have concepts reinforced, as they are the teachers.


child 9

Likewise social foundations begin as older children learn patience when playing and interacting with younger children and younger children learn determination as they strive to achieve what the older children are doing. Just as adults do not live or work with one age group, children in our preschool learn how to work together with others of different age and ability. When does enrollment start? We have already begun enrollment and encourage those who are interested in Good Shepherd Early Childhood Center to call soon to enroll as there are openings left in each age group, but spots are filling quickly. (605) 371-0047 What is your organization’s mission? Our center’s mission statement is reaching children and families with God’s truth: spiritually, mentally, physically and socially. Besides the obvious fact that we are a Christian based center I believe what makes Good Shepherd Early Childhood Center unique is the focus on a partnership with parents. No one knows a child better than their parent, at Good Shepherd Early Childhood Center we embrace this and encourage parents to tell us all about their child so we know their child and can then provide the best care possible. In the same way we wish to offer support to parents. If they have questions such as - What is typical development? How do I stop undesirable

behavior? How can I get my child to be potty trained? - We are there to help. We also accept children where they are at and work with what they are comfortable with - allowing cloth diapers and working with potty training into the preschool classroom if it is developmentally appropriate. Describe a typical day in the life of a child at Good Shepherd. Good Shepherd Early Childhood Center maintains a child-centered approach to learning. The infant rooms feature eating and sleeping on demand and activities planned around each infant’s individual schedule. Daily activities will include being held while a teacher reads books and sings songs, spending time on the floor reaching for toys and exercising using large muscle control, holding objects to encourage the fine muscles in the hand to develop, and other activities that are individualized to each child’s developmental level.

social-emotional foundations, and kindergarten readiness skills. Children are immersed in the written word from labels in the classroom to quality children’s literature being read in the morning and the afternoon. Problem solving skills are taught as teachers mediate disagreements and encourage children to use words to find solutions to problems, such as taking turns with a sought after toy in the classroom. When preschoolers graduate it is our hope that they know their letters, colors, shapes, numbers, etc., but also that they have social skills to work together with others who may have different levels of ability, and finally, possess a love of learning. n

The toddler rooms begin to feature a daily routine that all children follow. Routine becomes calming to the children, as they know what to expect next and look forward to the different parts of the day (snack, outside time, morning stories, etc.) Our preschool program focuses on fostering young readers, building September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


child

by Kara Weber, Creative Ideas Director, ‘Hood Magazine

Back-to-School

Loose Leaf Paper T-shirt

Start this year in style and score some extra teacher points with this loose-leaf paper T-shirt. Stripes are in, and making this awesome addition to your child’s wardrobe is easier and cheaper than you think. Students of any age (even teens) can rock this style, and have a blast making it!

What you need:

White T-shirt Red Sharpie Marker Blue Sharpie Marker Yard Stick or other Ruler Cardboard or Paper Grocery Bag

Get started:

1. Pre-wash and dry your shirt. This will help the marker stay on longer without washing out. 2. Lay your shirt out flat. Put a piece of cardboard or an empty paper grocery sack inside to prevent marker from bleeding though to the back of the shirt. 3. Start your top blue line a couple of ruler widths from the bottom armpit sleeve of your shirt. 4. Use the width of your ruler to keep the distance equal between your lines. 5. Continue blue lines across the shirt until you get to the bottom of the shirt. 6. Midway between your collar and sleeve use your ruler and red sharpie permanent marker to make a vertical line from your shoulder seam to the bottom of the shirt. 7. Rock your new back-to-school look. You could also use a black sharpie at this point to write a message on your paper like “Too cool for school!” Or just leave it plain like ours.

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• Social Skills • Feeding and Swallowing • Oral Motor Skills • Disorders of Voice • Fine Motor • Gross Motor • Consultations • Schools • Evaulations

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Free Speech and Language Screenings!

Domestic Infant Adoption Bethany Christian Services has been protecting and enhancing the lives of children and families through quality adoption and social services since 1944. Learn more at www.bethany.org.

Every Thursday at Midwest Ear Nose and Throat 8-10 am To schedule a screening call 275.1205

Special Services for Special Children © 2010 Bethany Christian Services

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SPOOKY SCIENCE NIGHT THEME ANNOUNCED SOON!

OCT. 19 & 20 • 5 - 8:30 p.m. September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


Photo courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

family 13

family Back to School Jitters

by Heather DeWit, LSS

We held hands tightly on the walk toward the school building. A look in her eyes told me that she knew this would be good. I would learn so much! What if there were bullies? What if the new school clothes we picked were the wrong ones? What if the teacher wasn’t nice? The tears were welling up in my eyes but she just gave my hand a squeeze to let me know it would be ok. The doors looked so heavy. I just couldn’t imagine being apart for so many hours. Summer had been so fun with swimming, playing and chasing fireflies after dark. How could I get used to these early

mornings? As we got closer I just wanted to turn around and go back home. Maybe we could curl up together and read a book and pretend “back to school” never happened. Somehow we managed to hug, say goodbye, hug again and after she pulled her hand from mine I watched her run toward the line of other excited kids. Their new outfits and backpacks all held the promise of a new school year. I stood for a moment, wishing I could bring her back over for one more hug. Instead, I forced myself to be proud of her independence, walk away and head to work.

continued next page September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


family

Back to School Jitters (continued)

I can’t imagine I’m alone in my struggle as I bring my child to a place where I have little control. I have to believe a little anxiety from parents and kids during a transition is pretty normal. However, my first tip for easing your child’s “back to school” jitters is one I need to follow myself. Find ways to manage your own anxiety about sending your child to school. Look at the bright side and cling to the thrill of a new year of learning and growth. Excitement is contagious. Pass it to your child. Find what makes these days ok for you and embrace that for your child. To prevent some of the stress of back to school time, try to help your child ease into the transition with a few simple tips:

1. Focus on the fun. Help your child to remember what they love about school (or to think about what they will love if they are starting a new school.) 2. Reconnect with “school friends.” Schedule play dates, emails,

letters or phone calls for your child to connect with the peers they will be seeing again in school.

3. Find comfort in familiarity.

Play at the playground at school. Walk around and look at the windows to remember what classrooms look like.

4. Make the teacher an ally in your child’s eyes. Have your child

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mail a letter, note, poem or photo to their teacher to help them look forward to the upcoming relationship.

5. Refresh your memory. Review school rules and policies to be sure you and your child know what to expect. Plan for lunches, wardrobe, activities and learning. 6. Plan for success. Create systems that allow your child to feel comfortable.

7. Consistent sleep routines. Start transitioning back to school year bed times and wake up times at least a few weeks prior to school starting. Kids ages 5 to 12 need 11 hours of sleep. More than anything, the key to making both you and your child more comfortable is talking. Ask your child how they are feeling, make space for silence, give them the one on one time they crave. Talk with your child about what they can expect, what they are worried about, solutions to problems they are anticipating and what they are most looking forward to. My kids love hearing my husband’s and my childhood memories of back to school adventures. These talks have become a beautiful fall tradition for us. We laugh and sometimes we cry, but mostly we talk and spend time together anticipating new crayons, new friends, new teachers and a new year! n


by Stephanie Spaan, Excel Achievement Learning Center

How to create effective

communication with teachers

Remember that your child’s teacher has several students to watch over. If your child has special needs, it is imperative that you communicate these with the teacher at the start of the school year. Sitting down with your child’s teacher at the beginning of the year and letting him/her know of these needs can make the year go smoothly for all involved. Remember that teachers are very busy and get very few breaks during the day. Teachers arrive early in the morning and are with children all day long. After school hours is the time that teachers use to plan creative and engaging lessons for their students. While most teachers are more than willing to meet with a parent who has an

appointment after school, it is very important to be conscientious of this time. Emailing is often the best way to communicate as teachers often can’t get to a phone during the day. Between teaching and other child related duties, it is very difficult for a teacher to take a call during the day. If your information can be e-mailed, many teachers have indicated that this is their preferred form of parent communication.

family

Next to parents, classroom teachers spend more time with our children than any other adult in their lives. A teacher’s role is extremely important and influential; therefore, it is so important that we as parents are able to build a positive relationship with them. Here are a few tips to keep those lines of communication open…

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Teachers love children, which is why they have chosen this profession. As sometimes things happen that we as parents may disagree with, I find that it is important to remember that an action was probably taken with the best of intentions. Keeping this in mind can help parents to approach a teacher positively as they ask questions about an event that took place during the day. And finally, showing appreciation for all that your child’s teacher does in a day is a great way to build a relationship. Just like everyone else, a teacher likes to hear what he/she has done well. A simple e-mail, a special note, or even a little gift can go a long way! n

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


local

teacher spotlights

Interviews by Hannah Weise

Terry Gerber Family includes wife Julie, and daughters Lydia (13), & Laura (11)

Why did you become an educator? I taught secondary science (physical science and biology). Being a science teacher was such a good fit for me personally because I enjoy working with students and watching them learn through investigating and discovery. I am currently the Superintendent of Schools. Although I no longer work directly with students, I work closely with the people who do, and I enjoy being a part of the team. What is the most rewarding part? The most rewarding part of my job is seeing my students grow physically, emotionally and academically. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping a child discover what they are good at and then watching them have success. What is the most challenging part? The concern that I hear most often from my teaching staff is a lack of time to cover all of the content (state and federal curriculum). How do you balance being an educator and a parent? A parent is a teacher. In fact, a parent is the most important teacher in his or her child’s life. The only thing that really needs balancing for any parent is time with his or her own children.

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What are the best ways for parents and teachers to communicate with each other? How parents and teachers communicate (faceto-face, phone call, email, etc.) is not nearly as important as when parents and teachers communicate. It’s important for teachers and parents to communicate with each other as soon as they have a concern and not wait until the situation escalates. Are there any common communication problems or mistakes parents should try to avoid? The most common communication problem is failing to communicate with each other. Too often, parents and teachers avoid talking to each other because it may be a difficult conversation. How can parents best support their schoolage children? Parents can best support their school-age child by being involved in their child’s education. A few examples include: • Showing interest in school activities and school work • Having clear expectations set for academic achievement • Monitoring grades online • Providing time and space for daily studies • Attending conferences


Why did you become an educator? I love children and I love history, so teaching was a natural way to put those two things together. I teach 6th and 7th grade social studies at Canton Middle School. What is the most rewarding part? Instilling in children the love of history and learning. What is the most challenging part? Finding the time to teach the way I want to. Teaching effectively and in a way that’s best for each student takes considerably more than 40 hours a week.

what is going on in their child’s life. It may be embarrassing for parents to admit that they are going through a divorce or dealing with a drug or alcohol problem, but information about a child’s home life can help teachers better understand and help their child. How can parents best support their school-age children? Show an interest in what your child is learning at school. Talk positively about school, and emphasize the importance of getting a good education and how it affects his or her future.

local

Next to parents, there aren’t a whole lot of people who have quite the influence that teachers have. In some instances or in certain seasons, they spend more time with your child than you do! Just as with any relationship, communication is key. This month we wanted to give you a new perspective and provide some great tools in creating a great relationship with your child’s teacher. Who better to tell you how to do that than the teachers themselves! Get to know these local educators, then make it a goal to get to know that special person in your child’s life.

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Robyn Ventura Family includes husband Tony (not pictured), and son Colton (7)

How do you balance being an educator and a parent? I find it extremely difficult to balance teaching and parenting. My son often seems to be on the losing end as I find myself making the difficult choice of putting my child after my students and all the responsibilities that go with teaching them. What are the best ways for parents and teachers to communicate with each other? I prefer email because it is rapid, and I can have a few conversations in a day with a parent if needed. Are there any common communication problems or mistakes parents should try to avoid? Parents sometimes only hear one side of a situation and make up their mind before they get the rest of the story. It would be beneficial for them to hear all sides and to remember that teachers are there to help. Parents need to be open and honest about

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


local

teacher spotlights (continued)

Sheremy Haas Family includes husband Ryan, and children Samara (6), Sajen (2)

Why did you become an educator? I have always had a passion and interest in working with young children. As a child, I was positively influenced by a teacher that inspired me and set a spark in me to want to change or enhance lives. I am now a kindergarten teacher at Harvey Dunn Elementary. What is the most rewarding part? The most rewarding part of teaching is the relationships and connections that occur between all involved. Seeing the marked growth in students from what I’ve taught them as well as the love and appreciation from students, staff, and parents when I’ve done my best job is also very rewarding! What is the most challenging part? The most challenging part of teaching is making sure that our students are prepared to compete globally within our 21st century classrooms. With all of the different needs, it is imperative to make sure that we are sensitive to meeting those needs. Teachers not only teach a curriculum, but also play the parts of nurses, recess monitors, social workers, counselors, secretaries and copy machine mechanics to name a few. How do you balance being an educator and a parent? I believe that family should always come first, but in saying that, my students and co-workers are a second family to me. I don’t know that I have the balancing act down when it comes to the two. I learn so much about my family from the experiences that I have in my profession. My family life and daily lessons from raising my two children teach me how to be gracious and humble with my students. So many of my family life and experiences carry over to my job.

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What are the best ways for parents and teachers to communicate with each other? Attending open house at the beginning of the school year is essential to determine the best ways to communicate with the classroom teacher. I believe that teachers should strive to use a variety of effective strategies to make communication with parents as informative and interactive as possible. Phone calls, e-mails, handwritten notes, face to face conferences, and volunteering in the classroom are all great ways to communicate, but many teachers and parents prefer to use websites to give parents a glimpse into the daily routine and life of the classroom. Teachers love having parent volunteers, but many parents are working and are too busy to come volunteer. The next best thing is to have a website where parents can be well-informed. Are there any common communication problems or mistakes parents should try to avoid? Parents should never feel guilty or hesitate to ask questions. Parents should know that every positive interchange will serve to increase trust and build stronger relationships. Parents should always feel comfortable asking questions when they need more information. How can parents best support their school-age children? Parents can best support their children by being enthusiastic and cheerleaders towards their self-esteem and learning! Attitude is everything, and it can be contagious. It is also important to get to know your child’s teachers and what they expect. Keeping teachers informed about important issues at home is a good idea to give the teacher an insight to any changes that may influence how your child does in school.


What is the most rewarding part? By far the most rewarding part of my job is seeing students developing academically and personally. Nothing is more rewarding than knowing that you are helping to open doors for them in the future and working to make our world a better place. This allows me to get up every morning and not dread what the day has in store, which is always interesting! What is the most challenging part? When you hope to make a difference in student’s lives, it can be draining when they make poor decisions that affect them academically or personally. Much like parenting, you want what is best for them, and it can be frustrating when they can’t see that. All you can do is continue to be there for them, help them understand that they matter to you, and affirm that you are always willing to help.

Are there any common communication problems or mistakes parents should try to avoid? Email may be the most convenient method of communication, but it is limited in its ability to handle difficult situations. If a parent has a concern, it is always best to try and meet with the teacher. We schedule parentteacher conferences twice a year, but this doesn’t mean that parents and teachers can’t meet more than that!

local

Why did you become an educator? While studying at the University of Sioux Falls, I was recruited to help coach youth soccer and basketball. I found that I really enjoyed working with young people and sought out opportunities to work in after-school programs and summer camps. It was there I decided I wanted to dedicate myself to making a difference in the lives of youth. I have had the opportunity to do that in the area of Social Studies at both the Middle School and High School level. I always believed that teaching in a classroom allowed me to positively affect the students in my class, but that if I was an administrator, I could have an impact on an entire school. That is what drew me to my current role as a Middle School and High School Principal.

How can parents best support their school-age children? The best way for parents to support their Middle School or High School student is by working to stay in touch as much as possible with what their student is learning each day. When you ask your child what he or she did at school today and your child claims “nothing”, he or she is trying to brush you off. Dig deeper and ask your children questions about favorite parts of their day and why it was enjoyable. Also, help encourage your student to take risks and become involved in activities at school. An involved student is usually an engaged student who enjoys coming to school and seeks to do his or her best. There are so many diverse activities in our schools that there is truly something for everyone!

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Russ Townsend Family includes wife Kristen, and children Emerson (7), Alaina (5)

How do you balance being an educator and a parent? My wife Kristen and my daughters have always been very supportive, and we work to have as much time together as possible. We love being at student activities together, and my kids have come to idolize a number of the older students that they have had the opportunity to spend time with. What are the best ways for parents and teachers to communicate with each other? The most convenient way for parents and teachers to communicate is by email. However, parents must know that a highly effective teacher is typically engaged in lessons and may not get to reading emails until late in the day.

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


fun

What to Do?

fridge magnet here

Do want to see YOUR event listed HERE? Email us at: events@thehoodmagazine.com Please note that all events are current as of press date. The Hood Magazine publishes the most recent information provided. Please remember to call ahead to confirm event details.

Preschool

Elementary

Middle School

All Age Groups

Saturday, Sept 1 9am-12pm..................................................................................................................Kids Workshop, Home Depot, ages 5-12 10:15am-11am................................................................Story Time, Washington Pavilion, ages pre-K (preregistration required)

Tuesday, Sept 4 10am - 11:30am.............................................................................................................Moms and Tots Tuesdays, Legacy Park 10am-11am..................................................................................................................................Storytime, Child’s Play Toys

Wednesday, Sept 5 10:30am-11:30am.........................................................................................................Llama Llama Storytime, Barnes & Noble

Thursday, Sept 6 8am-10am.............................................................................................. Free Speech and Language Screenings, Theratime Inc.

Friday, Sept 7 10am-8pm............................................................................................................................First Friday, Downtown Sioux Falls 5pm-8pm.........................................................................................................................Free First Friday, Washington Pavilion 6pm-8pm.............................................................................Animals on the Amphitheater, Downtown Riverfront Amphitheater 7pm-10pm.............................................Kids’ Night Out, Star Performance Complex, ages 3+, $15/child (preregistration required) 7:30pm-8:30pm............................................................................................................Arthur Visits Storytime, Barnes & Noble

Saturday, Sept 8 9am-5pm...........................................................................................49th Annual Sidewalk Arts Festival, Downtown Sioux Falls 10am-11am..................................................................................................................Chuck E. Roller Build and Grow, Lowe’s 10:15am-11am..................................................................Story Time, Washington Pavilion, ages pre-K (preregistration required)

Monday, Sept 10 10:15am - 10:50am...................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Oak View Library 1:30pm-2:05pm........................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Oak View Library

Tuesday, Sept 11 10am - 11:30am.............................................................................................................Moms and Tots Tuesdays, Legacy Park 10am-11am....................................................................................................................................Storytime, Child’s Play Toys 10:15am-10:50am...........................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Main Library 1:pm-1:35pm...................................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Main Library

Wednesday, Sept 12 10:15am-10:50am.........................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Caille Library 10:30am-11:30am...............................................................................................................Clifford Storytime, Barnes & Noble 1pm-1:35pm..................................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Caille Library

Thursday, Sept 13 8am-10am.............................................................................................. Free Speech and Language Screenings, Theratime Inc. 10:15am-10:50am.....................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Ronning Library

Friday, Sept 14 10:15am-10:50am.....................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Brandon Library

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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


Preschool

Elementary

Middle School

All Ages

6pm-8pm...........................................................................................Touch a Truck and Other Things That Roll, Harmodon Park 7pm-10pm..........................................Kids’ Night Out, Star Performance Complex, ages 3+, $15/child (preregistration required) 7:30pm-8:30pm.........................................................................American Girl Event, Barnes & Noble (preregistration required)

Saturday, Sept 15 All Day................................................................................................................................................Apple Festival, Harrisburg

10:15am-11am..................................................................Story Time, Washington Pavilion, ages pre-K (preregistration required) 11am-11:35am................................................................................................................................Puppet Show, Main Library 7:30pm-9pm.............................Sounds of SD presents Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” Washington Pavilion, Tickets $17.50-$42.50

Sunday, Sept 16 12pm-5pm...........................................................................................................................Apple Fest, Country Apple Orchard 7:30pm-9pm.............................Sounds of SD presents Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” Washington Pavilion, Tickets $17.50-$42.50

Monday, Sept 17 10:05am-10:30am.....................................................................................................ToddlerTime, Oak View Library, 2 year olds 10:45am-11:20am..............................................................................................................Family Storytime, Oak View Library

Tuesday, Sept 18 9:15am-9:40am.............................................................................................................ToddlerTime, Main Library, 2 year olds 10am - 11:30am.............................................................................................................Moms and Tots Tuesdays, Legacy Park 10am-11am....................................................................................................................................Storytime, Child’s Play Toys 6pm-7pm................................................................................Vegan Dee-lights Cooking Class, Museum of Visual Materials, $5

Wednesday, Sept 19 10:30am-11:30am.....................................................................................................Sesame Street Storytime, Barnes & Noble 6pm-7pm......................................................................................Co-op Cooking with Friends, Museum of Visual Materials, $20

Thursday, Sept 20 8am-10am.............................................................................................. Free Speech and Language Screenings, Theratime Inc.

Friday, Sept 21 5pm-9pm.........................................................................................Yogi Bear’s “Corn”-ucopia of Fun, Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park 7pm-10pm..........................................Kids’ Night Out, Star Performance Complex, ages 3+, $15/child (preregistration required) 7:30pm-8:30pm......................................................................................................................Olivia Storytime, Barnes & Noble

Saturday, Sept 22 10:15am-11am...................................................................Story Time, Washington Pavilion, ages pre-K (preregistration required) 12pm-9pm.........................................................................................Yogi Bear’s “Corn”-ucopia of Fun,Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park

Sunday, Sept 23 1pm-5pm.........................................................................................Yogi Bear’s “Corn”-ucopia of Fun, Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park

Monday, Sept 24 10:05am-10:30am.....................................................................................................ToddlerTime, Oak View Library, 2 year olds

Monday, Sept 25 9:15am-9:40am..........................................................................................................ToddlerTime, Main Library, 2 year olds 10am - 11:30am............................................................................................................Moms and Tots Tuesdays, Legacy Park 10am-11am....................................................................................................................................Storytime, Child’s Play Toys

Thursday, Sept 27 8am-10am.............................................................................................. Free Speech and Language Screenings, Theratime Inc.

Friday, Sept 28 7pm-10pm..........................................Kids’ Night Out, Star Performance Complex, ages 3+, $15/child (preregistration required) 7:30pm-8:30pm............................................................................................................Fall Festival Storytime, Barnes & Noble

Saturday, Sept 29 10:15am-11am...................................................................Story Time, Washington Pavilion, ages pre-K (preregistration required)

21 WOW! Check out our online calendar for additional events! You can NOW sync your calendar with ours, check out our website under calendar for details.

10am-2pm.........................................................................................................................Model Train Exhibit, Ronning Library

fun

10am-5pm..........................................................................................................................Apple Fest, Country Apple Orchard

* Asterisks indicates the event repeats multiple days... same time

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


Family Connection Welcomes Miss America and Children’s Advocate Laura Kaeppelar Thursday, November 15th Holiday Inn City Centre 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm $40 per ticket for event

Bring your child for a fun family night out! Purchase tickets through the Family Connection website at: www.sdfamilyconnection.org or by calling Family Connection at: (605) 357-0777

Tutoring with Results!

Get your child to grade level and beyond in just a few months. Stay tuned to the Mix 97.3 at 8:20am to hear this week’s Tuesday Tip from the teacher.

For specific questions about your child’s learning style, e-mail stephanie@letslearnnow.com

Excel Achievement Center 5016 S. Bur Oak Pl., Sioux Falls, SD 57108 605.988.0900 www.excelachievement.com


Dedication Pays Off fun

The Olympics in London may be over but the training is just beginning for some in the Sioux Falls area. All-American Gymnastics Academy in Sioux Falls is producing dedicated, hard-working gymnasts every day and we were able to speak with two of them, Sarah Quinlivan and Randina Friestad. Looking for a motivator or esteem builder for your child? These girls would encourage you to give Gymnastics a try!

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ivan l n i u Q h a r a S 17 years old

Gymnastics has taught me about setting goals as well as time management and responsibility. My short-term goal is to make it to level 10 nationals this up coming year and my long-term goal is to go to college and compete with their gymnastics.

I have always been extremely dedicated to gymnastics over the years. I dedicate 20 hours of practice a week to gymnastics as well as volunteer for the Special Olympics. This has left me little time for school activities, but it is definitely worth it. I do not do any other sports outside of my chosen sport, but I have made so many wonderful life long friends and my coaches are mentors that I will never forget. Gymnastics has helped me believe I can achieve anything that I set my mind to. I would definitely recommend gymnastics for kids. It’s a lot of hard work, but super fun and it all pays off.

Randina Fri estad 17 years old

Gymnastics is the hardest sport I have ever participated in. It teaches you to work hard to achieve goals and to never give up in the sport and in life. As a gymnast, failing (which usually involves falling) happens many times a day, but no matter what, you have to persevere through fear and mentally challenging situations so that you can push to new highs and have success. One tool that is used in gymnastics is goal setting (which is also helpful to use in life). My long term goal is to compete in college gymnastics, but to get there some of my short term goals must be met first, like getting a release move on bars, or getting a new series on beam. Gymnastics is my favorite sport, but it does come with a price. During a normal school week, our highest-level group works out about twenty hours a week and we have homework on top of that. It’s hard to keep up with our busy lifestyles when we get up

at 7am, get off of school around 3:15pm and go to gymnastics from 4 to 8pm. Makes me tired just thinking about it, but personally I think it’s worth it. When we go to competitions in different states and have fun competing on the floor with other teams, parents, and spectators it makes me so excited and glad that I stuck with gymnastics even when it got hard. Gymnastics has helped me mature as a person and helped me to believe in myself and people around me, not to mention how gymnastics has taught me to handle my time so that I can have all my homework done before going to bed at a reasonable time. I would recommend finding a sport that you truly love every time you go to a practice, and even when times get tough, stick with it! In the end you will be glad you did! n September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


All American Gymnastics Academy www.allamericangymnastics.com ALL RATES INCLUDE TAX

Fall Schedule: August 27 December 15

MONDAY

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY PRE-SCHOOL

LITTLE ALL STARS

10:00-10:50

Walking to 6 years Punch Cards must be purchased (10 punches per card) do not expire 1 Card: $75 or 2 Cards: $130

LITTLE DIPPERS

The annual registration fee is $25.00 for the first child and $14.00 for each additional family member.

3-5 yr old & potty trained 1 Class/week Cost: $65/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $113.75/mo

10:00 - 10:50 11:00 - 11:50 5:00-5:50 6:00 - 6:50

10:00-10:50 11:00-11:50 4:00-4:50 5:00-5:50 6:00-6:50 7:00-7:50

11:00-11:50 1:00-1:50 4:00-4:50 6:00-6:50

The fee is due from new and returning families at the beginning of the member’s year and is nonrefundable.

BIG DIPPERS

10:00-11:00 5:00-6:00 6:10-7:10

10:00-11:00 6:00-7:00

11:00-12:00 1:00-2:00 5:00-6:00 6:10-7:10

TUMBLING TYKES

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00

FREE “AAGA” T-Shirt with each child’s paid annual fee!!

1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo 1 Class/week Cost: $40/mo

RECREATIONAL BEGINNERS 6-12 yr. old

1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo

4:00-5:00 5:10-6:10 6:20-7:20 7:30-8:30

BEGINNER BOYS 6-12 yr. old

5:10-6:10

1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo

4:00-5:00

ADVANCED I

4:00-5:00 5:10-6:10 6:20-7:20

INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED BOYS

5:10-6:10

ADVANCED II

3:30-5:00 6:00-7:30

JR & SR HIGH GYM

7:30-9:00

BEGINNER TUMBLE

4:00-5:00

4:00-5:00

INTERMEDIDATE/ ADVANCED TUMBLE

4:00-5:00 (INT ONLY) 7:00-8:00 (ADV ONLY) 8:00-9:00 (ADV/JR/SR HIGH)

5:00-6:00 (INT ONLY) 8:00-9:00 (JR/SR HIGH)

Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo

5:00-6:00 6:10-7:10

6:20-7:20

6:10-7:10

Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $96/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $153.60/mo Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $96/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $153.60/mo

3:30-5:00 5:30-7:00

TUMBLE/PETITE ELITE 1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo

Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $69/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $120.75/mo

PETITE ELITE

3:30-5:00 5:15-6:45

Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $96/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $153.60/mo

PRE TEAM

Evaluation Required 1 Class/week Cost: $115/mo 2 Class/week Cost: $184/mo

5:00-7:00

5:15-6:45

3:30-5:30


Largest Birthday Party Facility in town! 23,000 square feet of jumping, bouncing, inflatable fun - all to yourself!

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

10:00-10:50

6:00-6:50

9:00-9:50

Birthday Parties/Facility Rentals For 1 hour and 45 minutes...AAGA is all yours! Your private party will have 1 hour in the gym with up to 7 Inflatables! • Access to select gymnastics equipment • Safety foam pit • In-Ground trampolines and much more! • 4 5 minutes in a party room to enjoy cake, food, or anything you choose to bring. (A refrigerator and freezer is available for your convenience). Don’t worry about clean up, we will do that for you! • A n AAGA staff member for your party to ensure safety and fun! This is all yours for $165 plus tax. You may bring up to 12 children and if more than 12 children attend, it’s only $5 for each additional child.

11:00-11:50 1:00-1:50 4:00-4:50 5:00-5:50 6:00-6:50 7:00-7:50

10:00-10:50 11:00-11:50

11:00-12:00 1:00-2:00 6:00-7:00

11:00-12:00

AAGA is also available to rent for your group event! You can rent AAGA for 2-3 hours and have the place all to yourselves! No group is too small! Smaller groups will get a discounted rate. Call for more information!

Open Gym Ages 6-18

$10 per hour Punch Cards available

Wednesday 6:00-7:00pm Saturday 11:00-12:00 4:00-5:00 5:10-6:10 6:20-7:20 7:30-8:30

10:00-11:00

4:00-5:00

10:00-11:00

11:00-12:00

5:10-6:10

11:00-12:00

Go to our website at

www.allamericangymnastics.com for more information and to view a birthday party video! 7:30-9:00

Don’t forget to find us on Facebook!

$25 off Inflatable Birthday Party!

3:30-5:00 6:00-7:30

4:30-6:30

Not valid with other offers or discounts. Expires January 31, 2013


parent

for Your Child’s Education

“Paying off debt

helped us buy our home and even start saving for

our future.”

At CCCS, we provide a wide variety of counseling and education opportunities to help you become a better money manager: • credit card debt • money management • medical bills • debt management • effective use of credit • student loans • bankruptcy counseling • homeownership resources • pre-purchase counseling • mortgage delinquency • foreclosure prevention

by Shaina Herrmann, shainasdeals.com

Saving for your child’s education gives you an enormous sense of security knowing that your child will have some (if not all) of their expenses taken care of when they enter college or the workforce. While starting a fund may seem daunting, there truly are many simple ways to get started!

529 College Savings Plans

These plans offer you a way to save and invest with various tax advantages. There are a number of investment options available with this plan. As with any investment option, always be sure to be well aware of all rules, expenses, and penalties that may be associated with your savings plans. www.collegeaccess529.com

Coverdell ESA

If you are looking for a plan with more investment options, look into the Coverdell Education Savings Account (CESA). There are some income restrictions and a $2000 limit on how much you can place in your account per year. The money placed in this account may only be used for educational purposes.

Gerber College Plan

Another simple way to save money for college is to use the Gerber Plan. This is a low-risk option that means you won’t earn much interest over time but you will have money saved for your child. You choose how much you want your payout to be (between $10,000 and $150,000) and you decide when you want to withdraw the educational funds (between 10 and 20 years). You follow a monthly payment plan to achieve your goal! gerberlife.com

Upromise provides a number of 529 plans as well as offering a cash-back college savings plan that is available to anyone! You will earn money back on your everyday purchases that can be used to pay for college. www.upromise.com 605-330-2700 • 888-258-2227 cccs@LsssD.org www.LsssD.org

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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com

Please contact a financial advisor for any additional information regarding your child’s college savings fund. n


Extracurricular

parent

BURNOUT by Hannah Weise

The list of extracurricular activities vying for our children’s attention and commitment is endless: play dates, band, football, dance, piano lessons, softball, etc. Being well-rounded and balancing many activities is something we often pride ourselves in as adults, but is it healthy for children to attempt the same? Participating in too many activities leads to excess stress, and this stress can often lead to extracurricular burnout. What are some signs of extracurricular burnout? Signs of extracurricular burnout include moodiness, lack of enthusiasm where there used to be excitement (especially in regards to a particular activity), unusually low grades, and behavioral changes. How can I help prevent extracurricular burnout? While participation in organized activities is one way to keep children busy and out of trouble, not all kids can excel in extracurricular activities and academics. Each child handles a busy schedule differently, and trying to balance too many activities often means that none of them can be fully enjoyed. It is essential for children to have free time to rest and recuperate. Family time is just as important as any extracurricular, and spending time together outside of activities offers the whole family a chance for some downtime. When every minute of every day is scheduled, this time does not exist for you or your child. Consider this: if you are stressed about getting your child to all of his or her activities, your child is probably stressed too. When should I cut down on my child’s activities? A child should only participate in an activity if he or she enjoys it. Period. However, sometimes well-meaning

encouragement from adults and peers can turn into pressure to perform. If your child seems moody or stressed, ask him about it. Is your child participating in activities because it’s fun, or because she thinks it is expected of her? One way to check if your child is overscheduled is to post a calendar with everyone’s daily schedules written out. If there is no room for downtime, then at least one activity should be removed from the schedule.

27

What if my child likes participating in several different activities? If your child expresses interest in participating in many activities at once, consider limiting the number of activities he or she can be a part of at one time. If your child is worried about letting down an adult or peers in the activity, allow yourself to be the scapegoat, taking the blame for your child’s withdrawal. If your child is interested in sports, limit his or her participation to one sport per season. A rule of thumb to ponder is only one sport, one artistic or musical activity, and one social activity at a time. With one activity in each of these areas, the chances of overlap are diminished. The bottom line is that balance and moderation are essential. Too many activities stress out children and adults alike. It’s okay not to have a full schedule. In fact, free time allows your child to devote time to exactly what he or she wants to do. It can even stimulate creativity and lower stress. Watch for the signs of extracurricular burnout in your children and in yourself, and remember that just because an activity fits in the schedule doesn’t mean it belongs in your family. n

each

School Specials Nov.

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


“A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.” - Thomas Carlyle

Join the fun! Find a sign up event near you at gsdakotahorizons.org 3109 South Carolyn Ave. Sioux Falls, SD 57106

(605) 361-8636

Travel Camp Events Cookies Troop

Children’s Care Education Services Building Skills for Independence Our year-around program is offered to children up to age 21 with early childhood, elementary, middle school, high school, and transition-to-adulthood specialized classrooms. Students with a range of intellectual, physical, medical, communication, and behavioral needs receive special education and related services using evidence-based strategies. We offer more resources than any other program in the region!

For details, contact our Intake Specialist at (605) 444-9550.

• Educational evaluations and • Transition back to customized education recommendations home school district • Certified Special Education teachers • Approved provider of and highly trained teaching assistants special education by SD Department of Education • Individualized planning and instruction • Full Interdisciplinary Team • Intensive student-teacher ratios

CHILDREN ’S CARE HOSPITAL & SCHOOL 2501 W. 26th St., Sioux Falls, SD 57105-2498 (605) 444-9500 www.cchs.org

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July/August 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


SHOPPING LIST (by recipe)

Dinner Recipes & Dessert Recipes check if adding to list

check if adding to list

check if adding to list

Dinner Recipes

1 lb. skinless, boneless chicken breast, diced 1 (1.27 oz.) packet fajita seasoning 1 tbsp. vegetable oil 2 green bell peppers, chopped 2 red bell peppers, chopped 1 onion, chopped 10 (10 in.) flour tortillas 1 (8 oz.) pkg shredded Cheddar cheese 1 tbsp. bacon bits 1 (8 oz.) pkg shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Pizza Pinwheels

o u t ffo o k i nngg tteeaarr out orr schooppi

1 (8 ounce) can refrigerated crescent roll dough 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese 24 slices pepperoni 1 (14 oz.) can pizza sauce

Snack Recipes 2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1/2 c. seasoned dry bread crumbs 1/8 tsp. ground black pepper 2 tbsp. grated Parmesan cheese 2 egg whites

nies n u F h Lunc day by including a

d’s your chil Brighten ith their lunch. w fun joke ide? ations h d! lm a d ’t n otte ca Q: Why they’re always sp H e s Ha! a! A: Becau

Ha!

1/2 c. creamy salad dressing 1/4 c. plain yogurt 1 tsp. ground cumin salt and pepper to taste 1 tbsp. butter 1/2 c. couscous 1 c. water 1 red onion, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1/3 c. chopped parsley 1/3 c. raisins 1/3 c. toasted and sliced almonds 1/2 c. canned chickpeas, drained

Beef and Broccoli

Chicken and Melon Salad

Quick Single Serving Chocolate Brownie

Fresh Fruit and Yogurt Ice Pops

Playground Granola Bars

Whole Wheat Blueberry Muffins

1 lb. ground beef, browned 4 c. frozen broccoli 2 (4 oz.) cans mushrooms 1 c. water ½ tsp. ground ginger 3 pkgs. Ramen noodles, beef flavor 1 tbsp. soy sauce ½ tsp. dark sesame oil

1 tbsp. whole wheat flour 1 tbsp. sugar (do not substitute) 1 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa a pinch of baking soda a pinch of salt 1 tbsp. of low fat vanilla yogurt, add more if needed to blend the mixture

Baked Zucchini Chips

Yummy Couscous Salad

2 c. rolled oats 3/4 c. packed brown sugar 1/2 c. wheat germ 3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 c. all-purpose flour 3/4 c. raisins (optional) 3/4 tsp. salt 1/2 c. honey 1 egg, beaten 1/2 c. vegetable oil 2 tsp. vanilla extract

eats

Chicken Quesadillas

29

1 honeydew melon 6 c. cubed, cooked chicken meat 2 c. chopped celery 2 c. seedless grapes 1 (8 oz.) can sliced water chestnuts 1/2 c. sour cream 1/2 c. plain yogurt 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder salt and pepper to taste

2 c. fresh blueberries, raspberries, strawberries and sliced bananas, mixed 2 c. plain or vanilla yogurt 1/4 c. white sugar 8 small paper cups 8 popsicle sticks

1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour 3/4 c. white sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. baking powder 1/3 c. vegetable oil 1 egg 1/3 c. milk 1/2 c. unsweetened applesauce 1 pint fresh blueberries

Ha!

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


eats

Dinner Recipes Chicken Quesadillas P h ot o v i a w w w. t h e - g i r l - w h o - at e - e v e r y t h i n g . c om

Ingredients 1 lb. skinless, boneless chicken breast, diced 1 (1.27 oz.) packet fajita seasoning 1 tbsp. vegetable oil 2 green bell peppers, chopped 2 red bell peppers, chopped 1 onion, chopped 10 (10 in.) flour tortillas 1 (8 oz.) package shredded Cheddar cheese 1 tbsp. bacon bits 1 (8 oz.) package shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Directions

Preheat the broiler. Grease a baking sheet. Toss the chicken with the fajita seasoning, then spread onto the baking sheet. Place under the broiler and cook until the chicken pieces are no longer pink in the center, about 5 minutes. Preheat oven to 350째F. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the green bell peppers, red bell peppers, onion, and chicken. Cook and stir until the vegetables have softened, about 10 minutes. Layer half of each tortilla with the chicken and vegetable mixture, then sprinkle with the Cheddar cheese, bacon bits, and Monterey Jack. Fold the tortillas in half and place onto a baking sheet. Bake quesadillas in the preheated oven until the cheeses have melted, about 10 minutes.

Yummy Couscous Salad Ingredients 1/2 c. creamy salad dressing 1/4 c. plain yogurt 1 tsp. ground cumin salt and pepper to taste 1 tbsp. butter 1/2 c. couscous 1 c. water 1 red onion, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1/3 c. chopped parsley

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Ingredients 1 (8 oz.) can refrigerated crescent roll dough 2 c. shredded mozzarella cheese 24 slices pepperoni 1 (14 oz.) can pizza sauce

Directions

Preheat oven to 375째F. On a large baking sheet, pinch the 8 crescent roll dough triangles into 4 rectangles. Layer each rectangle with 6 slices of pepperoni and even amounts of mozzarella cheese. Roll tightly lengthwise and slice each into 4 or more pieces. Bake in the preheated oven until golden brown, about 12 minutes. Serve with pizza sauce for dipping.

1/3 c. raisins 1/3 c. toasted and sliced almonds 1/2 c. canned chickpeas, drained

Directions

In a medium bowl, blend creamy salad dressing, yogurt, cumin, salt and pepper. Cover, and place in the refrigerator 1 hour, or until chilled. Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir in couscous, and coat with butter. Stir in water,

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com

reduce heat, and a simmer covered about 5-10 minutes, until all water is absorbed. Mix couscous, red onion, red bell pepper, parsley, raisins, almonds and chickpeas into the creamy salad dressing mixture. Cover, and chill in the refrigerator until serving.


Dinner Recipes ctd. Beef and Broccoli Ingredients

eats

1 lb. ground beef, browned 4 c. frozen broccoli 2 (4 oz.) cans mushrooms 1 c. water ½ tsp. ground ginger 3 pkgs. Ramen noodles, beef flavor 1 tbsp. soy sauce ½ tsp. dark sesame oil

31 P h ot o v i a w w w. b a b b l e . c om

Directions

Place beef, broccoli, mushrooms, water, ginger and seasoning packet from Ramen noodles in a large skillet. Bring to boil and simmer for 5 min. Break up noodles and add to skillet. Simmer uncovered for 5 min., until noodles are tender. Add soy sauce and sesame oil. Note: This recipe can also be made with chicken or pork.

Ingredients 1 tbsp. whole wheat flour

Chicken and Melon Salad Ingredients

1 honeydew melon 6 c. cubed, cooked chicken meat 2 c. chopped celery 2 c. seedless grapes 1 (8 oz.) can sliced water chestnuts 1/2 c. sour cream 1/2 c. plain yogurt 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Cut melon in half, and remove seeds. With a melon baller, scoop out melon balls; place in a large salad bowl. Add chicken, celery, and grapes to melon. Add water chestnuts if desired. In a small bowl mix together, sour cream, yogurt, and curry powder. Gently stir into salad. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve.

1 tbsp. sugar (do not substitute) 1 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa a pinch of baking soda a pinch of salt 1 tbsp. of low fat vanilla yogurt (add more if needed to blend the mixture)

Directions

Mix it all up, pop it in the microwave for just over a minute. Top with a scoop of icecream and enjoy!

Snack Recipes Fresh Fruit and Yogurt Ice Pops Ingredients 2 c. fresh blueberries, raspberries, strawberries and sliced bananas, mixed 2 c. plain or vanilla yogurt 1/4 c. white sugar 8 small paper cups 8 popsicle sticks

Directions Place the mixed blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, sliced bananas, yogurt, and sugar into a blender. Cover, and blend until fruit is chunky or smooth, as desired. Fill paper cups 3/4 full with fruit mixture. Cover the top of each cup with a strip of aluminum foil. Poke a popsicle stick through the center of the foil on each cup. Place the cups in the freezer for at least 5 hours. To serve, remove foil and peel off the

paper cup. September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


eats

Snack Recipes Playground Granola Bars Ingredients 2 c. rolled oats 3/4 c. packed brown sugar 1/2 c. wheat germ 3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 c. all-purpose flour 3/4 c. raisins (optional) 3/4 tsp. salt 1/2 c. honey 1 egg, beaten 1/2 c. vegetable oil 2 tsp. vanilla extract

Directions

Ingredients

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Generously grease a 9x13 inch baking pan. In a large bowl, mix together the oats, brown sugar, wheat germ, cinnamon, flour, raisins and salt. Make a well in the center, and pour in the honey, egg, oil and vanilla. Mix well using your hands. Pat the mixture evenly into the prepared pan. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes in the preheated oven, until the bars begin to turn golden at the edges. Cool for 5 minutes, then cut into bars while still warm. Do not allow the bars to cool completely before cutting, or they will be too hard to cut.

Ingredients 1 1/2 c. whole wheat flour 3/4 c. white sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. baking powder 1/3 c. vegetable oil 1 egg 1/3 c. milk 1/2 c. unsweetened applesauce 1 pint fresh blueberries

Directions

1/2 c. seasoned dry bread crumbs 1/8 tsp. ground black pepper 2 tbsp. grated Parmesan cheese 2 egg whites

Directions

Preheat the oven to 475°F. In one small bowl, stir together the bread crumbs, pepper and Parmesan cheese. Place the egg whites in a separate bowl. Dip zucchini slices into the egg whites, then coat the breadcrumb mixture. Place on a greased baking sheet. Bake for 5 minutes in the preheated oven, then turn over and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes, until browned and crispy.

sugar, salt, and baking powder in a large bowl. Whisk vegetable oil, egg, milk, and applesauce together in a separate bowl until smooth, and stir the liquid ingredients into the flour mixture until moistened. Lightly stir in the blueberries. Spoon the batter into the prepared muffin cups, filling them 2/3 full. Bake muffins in the preheated oven until they rise and the tops are golden brown, about 20 minutes. A toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin should come out clean.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Grease 12 muffin cups, or line with paper liners. Whisk together the flour,

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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com

Do you want to see your recipe in ‘Hood Magazine?

Submit your recipe via facebook or email us at hoodlums@thehoodmagazine.com

P h ot o v i a w w w. m r s s e a m on s t e r. b l o g s p ot . c om

Whole Wheat Blueberry Muffins

2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices


2School

Back

Afterschool Enrichment Program Youth Enrichment Services stimulates children’s learning while providing a fun environment. All of our activities are age appropriate and are designed to help your child feel comfortable, learn and grow. Kindergarten- 5th Grade Enroll Your 605. School Age Child Now: 338.8061

Youth Enrichment Services is a brand under Boys & Girls Clubs of the Sioux Empire

We provide Afterschool Enrichment at the following locations: Sioux Falls

14th Street Learning Center Eastside Learning Center* Hillcrest Methodist Church Kiwanis Avenue Learning Center

Brandon

Brandon Elementary Robert Bennis Elementary* Fred Assam Elementary

Harrisburg

Explorer Elementary* Journey Elementary* *Before School Program Available

Transportation Available Call 605.338.8061 for details!

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Grooming For people who Boarding love their pets! Daycare Our store offers a variety Obedience Training of services including:

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Open Aug 25 through Oct 31 Apple Festival

Sept 15 & 16 Two Performances by Phil Baker each day

Harvest Festival Oct 6 & 7 Giant Pumpkin Weigh off on Sat.

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Apple pie, apple turnovers, caramel apples, apple cider and apple salsa. And we will have pumpkins later in the season as well.

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Pick ’em yourself or buy them already bagged!

BIG O’s Pork Loin sandwiches and our famous Apple Brats every weekend at our new Food Shack.

Located 4.5 miles south of Sioux Falls on Minnesota Avenue

Call (605) 743-2424 to schedule family events and field trips www.countryappleorchard.com

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


Photo courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

parent

Kickoff a Stress-Free School Year

by Richard E. Bavaria, Ph.D., Sylvan Learning

For many children, the first day of school doesn’t only mean new teachers and new friends – it can also be a source of anxiety with homework assignments and tests just around the corner. Starting the school year off on the right foot can help minimize a child’s stress level throughout the year. Parents can help their children prepare for the transition to the next grade level and the return to school by encouraging a structured routine from day-one and staying actively involved in their child’s education.

At LSS,

Back-to-School Tips: • G  et back in the routine. Ease transition from lazy summer days to the structure of the school year by re-establishing bedtime, mealtime, reading and homework routines. Talk with your child about the importance of these routines and how they help ensure that he is not overtired or overly anxious about schoolwork or the next day of school.

learning is fun.

We’re growing, just like our students. LSS will open an expanded state-of-the-art facility at our Southern Hills location in May 2012. We will offer: • Expanded infant toddler enrichment for children ages 4 weeks to 3 years • Expanded full or half-day preschool • Expanded summer and afterschool programming with pickup from John Harris, Harvey Dunn and Rosa Parks

Call Now! Enrollment is limited.

(605) 371-8770 • www.Childcare.LssSD.org

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September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


• D  evelop a relationship with your child’s teacher. Take the time to meet your child’s teachers at the beginning of the school year. Teachers can be the best source for information about your child’s scholastic performance and they can recommend ways to help your child or resolve any difficulties he or she is having in the classroom. • H  omework routine and place. Designate a specific time and place for homework time and help your child discover a regular, quiet place where he can study. Make sure that the area is free from potential distractions and that study tools are at your child’s fingertips to keep him focused on homework and studying. • S  tay on schedule. Your child should keep a schedule of all classes, assignments and key dates, such as project deadlines and test dates. As part of that schedule, she should include specific times for studying, projects and extracurricular activities. The more thorough the schedule, the more efficient your child will be. Organization minimizes late nights completing homework assignments, cramming for tests at the last minute and can ultimately reduce student anxiety about school. • E mphasize organization. For some students, having color-coded binders for each subject helps them stay on track throughout the school year. Keeping notes organized helps test preparation later in the year, so work with your child to determine the best method for him. • E ncourage learning at home. Promoting learning outside of the classroom helps children perform better in school. To nurture reading skills spend at least one hour per week – 10 to 15 minutes a day – reading with your child. To enhance math proficiency, try allowing your child to help plan the next family trip and encourage him to compute miles, cost of gas, expenses for food, hotel and entertainment.

Transition Year Back-to-School Tips: (Children Starting Kindergarten, First Grade, Middle School or High School) • V  isit the school. If your child is changing schools in the fall, make a special trip together to visit the school before the first day of classes. Checking out the new classroom and the new teacher before school starts will help ease feelings of anxiety and help get your child into his or academic routine. If it’s available, review the class schedule with your child and prepare him for the new grade.

parent

• S  et education goals. Help your child set goals at the very beginning of the year. Whether it is striving for an A in reading, handing in all homework on time or preparing for tests well in advance, setting goals can help set the routine for the new year.

35

• D  iscuss changes in routine. Talk with your child about how the routine for her new school may differ from the previous year. It can be difficult for children to adjust to changes in schedules and workloads. Explain how her schedule may differ from last year. Will there be more homework assignments? Does she have to wake up earlier? Will she have more than one teacher this year? • P  rovide extra support. When starting the new school year, especially if it’s a transition year, a little extra support can’t hurt. Talk with your child about her fears regarding school and maintain an open dialogue throughout the year. Discuss what subjects she’s anticipating and any areas she finds particularly challenging. Don’t forget to talk about homework and tests. • T ransition into kindergarten. Kindergarten is your child’s introduction to elementary school and a first opportunity to learn basic math and reading skills, not to mention a first look at routines and expectations of group learning. As a parent, you are your child’s first teacher. The skills that he learns from you – how to get along with others, follow directions and listen to directions – will help him start the year off right. • T ransition into middle school and high school. Transitioning from elementary to middle school and from middle school to high school brings many questions and concerns. Organization becomes even more important in middle school and high school when your child must keep track of multiple subjects, homework, teachers, classrooms and books. You can help him to reduce stress by giving him a calendar/planner to help him organize these new items and encouraging him to build good study habits. n September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


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36


Does My Preteen or Teen Still Need Shots? by Dr. Ellie Bunde, MD, Center for Family Medicine

All children over 6 months old should get a yearly flu vaccine. Some children under age 9 may need more than one dose; check with your child’s doctor to see if he/she needs more than one dose. The Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diptheria and pertussis), HPV (human papilloma virus, 3 doses) and MCV (meningococcal conjugate vaccine) should be given when kids are 11-12 years old. If your child hasn’t received any or all doses of the tdap series, all or you don’t know if they’ve received the Tdap series, your child needs a single dose between ages 7-10, the CDC recommends. Children who live on a farm may be at increased risk for tetanus, which is a bacteria that lives in the soil and can enter the body through an open cut or wound. Pertussis is whooping cough, which has resurfaced in recent years. The HPV vaccine is recommended for girls ages 11-12. It is recommended that all girls ages 11-26 be vaccinated with the 3 dose series to prevent genital warts and anal cancer. This vaccine is now licensed and safe for boys and men ages 9-26, according to the CDC. You should talk to your child’s doctor about this vaccine. The MCV is recommended for children ages 11-12 with a booster at age 16. Teens who got the MCV for the first time between 13-15 still need a one-time booster between 1618. If your teen missed this and will be going away to college or serving in

the military, talk to your doctor about getting it. MCV prevents bacterial meningitis, an infection around the brain and spinal cord. This is spread by coughing, sneezing or kissing, and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, confusion, sensitivity to light and neck pain. About 1 in 10 people who get Meningitis, die from it. Those who survive may lose limbs, go deaf, suffer seizures or stroke or become developmentally disabled. Anyone can get meningitis but preteens, adolescents and college students living in dorms are at an increased risk.

Teens 13-18 may need to catch up on vaccines missed when they were preteens and may also need a booster of a vaccine that requires more than one dose to be effective. These vaccines not only protect the child, but also their friends and family.

child

Back to school usually means a school or sports physical for most teens and preteens. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as children get older their protection from many childhood vaccinations begins to wear off. Also, older children can face other disease risks. Four vaccinations are recommended for preteens and teens.

For the CDC’s full recommendations on immunizations for children ages 7-18 go to the CDC’s website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/who/ teens/downloads/parent-versionschedule-7-18yrs.pdf. n

37

ar! e y f o e That tim

by Ashley Sandborn, Avera Mckennan

Back-to-School Vaccinations & Physicals Here we are, starting another school year, which means it’s time to start thinking about when to schedule your child’s yearly physical and vaccinations. The last few weeks of summer can be very hectic, and parents oftentimes don’t realize until the last minute that their child needs a physical or a shot before school starts. Dr. Kara Bruning, pediatrician at Avera Medical Group McGreevy Pediatrics South, says this stressful situation can be avoided by scheduling your child’s physical early. “It’s important that parents make appointments for their children as soon as possible,” she says. “Appointments fill up quickly. We have parents call us in a panic every year because their child needs shots so they can get into school.” Children are required to undergo physicals and certain immunizations to attend kindergarten. Minimum immunization requirements for children entering school for the first time are:

• Four or more doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccine • Four or more doses of poliovirus vaccine • Two doses of a measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine or submit serological evidence of immunity • Two doses of varicella vaccine “Other vaccines are recommended such as Hib, Hep A, Hep B, and pneumococcal, but are not required at this point,” notes Dr. Bruning. “Schools also do not require additional vaccines at the 11- or 12-year-old visit, but HPV, meningitis, and Tdap are highly recommended.” Make sure to put back-to-school shots on the to-do list, and make an appointment with your family health care provider as soon as possible. Physical exams and immunizations are not only required, they also help ensure your child is developmentally and physically ready for school and sports. n

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com


by Karla Johnson, YWCA

Before & After School

Common elements of successful out-ofschool time programs include:

• Strong management, quality staff • Low staff-to-student ratio (1:15) • Attention to students’ safety, health and nutrition • Strong family involvement • Enriching learning opportunities • Links with school curriculum and school teachers • Evaluation of program effectiveness • A clear mission • A supportive emotional climate • Collaborative partnerships with the community and law enforcement

Parents have been challenged for decades with providing a safe place with positive activities and adult supervision for their children when school is not in session. Years ago the majority of families had one parent at home, caring for children full-time, while the other parent provided financial support. Today that is not the case, and the state of South Dakota has one of the highest percentages of dual-career families in the nation.

According to South Dakota Kids Count Data Center, 86% of South Dakota women with school-age children are in the labor force, and 72% of school-age children have all available parents in the labor force. These dramatic statistics indicate that in South Dakota, Out-of-School Time (OST) programs play a vital role in the daily lives of children and their parents.

OST programs offer parents a place for their school-age students before-school, after-school, and during holiday breaks, teacher in-service days, and summer breaks. Quality OST programs keep kids safe, provide learning opportunities that improve student grades and test performance, provide opportunities for sharing and socialization, promote healthy lifestyles through physical activity, and teach kids to make healthy choices in their lives. Sioux Falls parents are blessed with many quality OST options! Every public and private elementary school in Sioux Falls has an OST program as well as several nonprofit agency programs that transport children to/from elementary schools daily. Nearby communities of Brandon, Harrisburg and Tea also have OST programs for their students. If you are a working parent looking for before- and after-school alternatives, dial 211 to reach the Helpline Center, or go to The South Dakota Afterschool Partnership provider directory by logging on to http://sdafterschool.org. (The directory search is located on the right hand corner of the page.) All programs that provide regular (not drop-in) care are required to be licensed by the State of South Dakota Department of Social Services. Licensing standards help assure the health and safety of children. To learn more visit the Department of Social Services, visit http://dss.sd.gov/childcare/ licensing. n

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA DEVELOPING THE LEADERS OFOF AMERICA BOY SCOUTS AMERICA BOYOF SCOUTS TOMORROW JOIN AT ANY TIME! BeAScout.org today to learn DEVELOPINGVisit THE LEADERS OF more. OR Contact the Sioux Council, BSA at: Cub Scouts: 1st - 5th Boy Scouts: Ages 11 - 18 Prepared. ForGrade Life. TOMORROW (605) 361-2697 TM

Venturing (co-ed): Ages 14 - 20

Cub Scouts: 1st - 5th Grade Boy - 18 BoyScouts: Scouts:Ages Ages 11 11-18 Venturing (co-ed): Ages 14 - 20 (co-ed): Ages 14 - 20 Venturing/Exploring

Scouts: Join atCub any time!1st - 5th Grade

JOIN SCOUTING TODAY!!!

JOIN SCOUTING TODAY!!!

Sioux Council: (605) 361-2697 ~ Sioux.Council@Scouting.org ~ www.beascout.org

38 |

September 2012 | thehoodmagazine.com Sioux Council: (605) 361-2697 ~ Sioux.Council@Scouting.org ~ www.beascout.org

Photo courtesy of Kristi Shanks Photography

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Social Skills Groups for Children! Many children have a difficult time with socialization, group activities, and social events. If your child is having a difficult time fitting in, a social group may help. This group will enhance your child’s social awareness and skill level by teaching social skills, social strategies and incorporating these acquired skills into real-life situations. Tuesdays for 10 weeks • 4:30-5:30 p.m. Fall 2012 Session: September 18 to November 20 Winter 2013 Session: January 8 to March 12 *insurance coverage not applicable

For details or to register, call (605) 444-9700 (New phone number!)

REHABILITATION CENTER

1020 W. 18th St., Sioux Falls, SD 57104

www.cchs.org

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The Hood Magazine September 2012  

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