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Official WLTP Fuel Consumption for the 20MY Discovery Sport range in mpg (1/100km): Combined 28.3 – 47.8 (10.0 – 5.9). NEDCeq CO2 Emissions 185 – 140 Real world figures may differ. CO2 and fuel economy figures may vary according to factors such as driving styles, environmental conditions, load and accessorie view mirror mode at any time. |

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0 g/km. The figures provided are as a result of official manufacturer’s tests in accordance with EU legislation. For comparison purposes only. ies. *Optional feature. If Bifocal or Varifocal users cannot easily adjust focus on the ClearSight digital rear view image, they may revert to rear ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Contents 8 The Primer 12 One Thing Done Well: The Workers Club words by Will Halbert 14 Meet the Makers: Daniel Harrison words by Will Halbert 16 The Leather of Legends words by Will Halbert 19 The Winter Ready Wardrobe words by Will Halbert 21 Tailored Thoughts on Winter Coats words by Matthew Gonzalez 21 A Cut Above words by Ian Harrold

28 Celebrating in Style words by Will Halbert

42 High Spirits: Christmas Sippers words by The Whisky Exchange

30 Time for Reflection words by John Robinson

45 On the Pass with Tommy Banks words by Tommy Banks

33 Whisky Wisdom words by Sukhinder Singh

47 Artisan Eats: Goma Dofu words by Nancy Singleton Hachisu

33 Razor Sharp Skills words by Will Halbert

48 Mixing With: Black Tot Rum words by Will Halbert

35 Below the Belt words by Ben Neuhaus

51 The Recipe: Matty Matheson's Return of the Mac words by Matty Matheson

35 Smoke ‘em if you Got ‘em words by Max Bergius 37 This Guy words by Will Halbert

41 All Bird, no Bullsh*t words by Will Halbert

24 Stone Cold Style words by Will Halbert 27 Barry’s Birthday words by Will Halbert

CONTRIBUTORS Adonis Michael Ben Neuhaus Ben O'Brien Ben Rose Dan Harvey Daniel Harrison Dawn Davies Ian Harrold Jade Holland Cooper Jake O'Brien Murphy Jamie Ferguson John Robinson Jojo Elgarice Matthew Gonzalez

Max Bergius Miles Kenney Róisín Hanlon Suhkinder Singh Tommy Banks Tom Griffiths

web www.essentialjournal.co.uk

engagement that has made our forward march possible. Regardus since day dot, or just now join-

57 A Handsome Home words by Will Halbert 57 Architectural Thoughts On: 2020 words by Roisin Hanlon

41 Grail Pieces words by Jojo Elgarice

'It is your support, interest and

less of whether you've been behind

55 Addressing the Table words by Jake O'Brien Murphy

38 Country Class, City Cool words by Jade Holland Cooper

22 Fashion from the Feet Up words by Will Halbert

52 Espresso Legacy interview by Will Halbert

T

here’s a celebration afoot. This issue not only marks our fiftieth print edition, but also represents our fifth year in publication. No mean feat and ample reason to raise a glass or two to be sure. In truth, it gives us an awful lot to reflect upon. Now, there are those that will argue that to look back is to slow down, to lose focus on the task at hand, but we’re not of that opinion. We like to think that the forward march enjoys renewed momentum when it’s punctuated with the occasional backwards glance. Not because it gives us the opportunity to relive old glories or rest on former laurels. That’s never been our thing. No, we look back every now and again because in doing so, we catch a glimpse of you, our dear friends, at our back.

ing the party, this one's for you.' It is your support, interest, and engagement that has made our forward march possible. Regardless of whether you’ve been behind us since day dot, or just now joining the party, this one’s for you. Thank you. So if you catch us looking back every now and again, know that we are not slowing down. We’re simply taking a second to admire you fine folk. Not for too long, though. Forward march and all that. Enjoy! Will HALBERT Editor

58 Coffee and Counsel words by Adonis Michael

PUBLISHERS Singleton Publishing

PARTNERSHIP MANAGER Elliot Ramsey e.ramsey@singletonpublishing.co.uk

EDITOR Will Halbert w.halbert@singletonpublishing.co.uk

For all advertising enquiries please contact: sales@essentialjournal.co.uk For all other enquiries including guest editorial and feature opportunities please contact: info@essentialjournal.co.uk

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Thomas Sumner t.sumner@singletonpublishing.co.uk

TERMS & CONDITIONS

LEAD DESIGNER - Jennifer Swaby FRONT COVER David Beckham, Tudor Image Courtesy of and Copyrighted to Tudor

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Under no circumstances must any part of this publication be reproduced without prior permission to the publisher. Whilst every effort is taken, the publisher shall not be held responsible for any errors. Furthermore, the publisher shall not be held responsible for any advertising material/content. Please also note that the views and opinions written within this publication do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of the publisher. All prices and details stated within this publication are correct at the time of print, however these are subject to change and the publisher shall not be held responsible for these. Third party contributions own exclusive copyright to their own material that they have submitted as part of the publication. All rights reserved.

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M A K E A S TAT E M E N T THIS PARTY SEASON

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THE PRIMER

Five-in-Five

Where We’ve Been Staying

The Standard, Kings Cross You’ve no doubt heard us wax poetic on the culinary delights on offer at The Standard’s superlative, ground-floor restaurant, Isla. You’ve also doubtless sat politely as we’ve regaled you with stories of the more decadent delights to be found in The Standard’s restaurant bar, Double Standard. But one element we’ve left criminally under-praised is the hotel itself. Allow us to remedy this presently. The experiential value of the newly-opened Kings Cross hotel really can’t be overstated. A stay at The Standard is positively transportive. Not in the sense that the hotel is themed, you understand, but in the sense that each and every room takes you far, far away from your London settings. Thanks to the work of fabled designer Shawn Hausman, each and every room is a veritable feast for the senses; a joyously off-kilter, almost Kubrician feat of interior design. By turns futuristic and oddly classic, a stay at The Standard goes beyond luxury to deliver something closer to a work of art in which you can fall asleep.

[TV] Tell Me Who I Am Tragic tale of rebuilding memories

[Insta] @somewhereiwouldliketolive Curating spaces, designs and landscapes

[Book] Grand Union Dazzling collection of short stories

What We’ve Been Drinking

Lucky Saint Beer Over the last 50 issues, it’s safe to say we’ve done our fair share of drinking. In truth, we enjoy it, in a responsible-until-it-isn’t kind of way. Which is why we’re glad brands like Lucky Saint are around to ensure we can enjoy our beer without the risk of missing any deadlines, birthdays, or teeth. Aside from the fact that Lucky Saint allows us to sensibly maintain our beer-in-hand editorial style, there’s an awful lot to like about the product. The malt-to-hops (Pilsner and Hallertau respectively, for the curious) ratio hits a sweet spot that keeps things light without ever coming of thin. The Bavarian springwater provides a crisp, clean taste while the unfiltered nature of the beer ensures it retains some serious mouthfeel throughout. Lucky Saint is a subtle, rounded lager with a truly surprising depth and last. And for that reason alone, it’s a more-than-worthy addition to the recent spate in superlative no/lo beer options. You can Check out Lucky Saint’s unfiltered 0.5% lager at London drinking institutions The Connaught and Lyaness. Those looking for a quiet night in can also find it in Sainsbury’s. 8

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What we Wish we were Wearing

Barbour x Margaret Howell Nothing is static in the realm of style. Style is, above all, a continuous process of refinement and reiteration. Form follows function follows form follows function; and constant back and forth of influence, innovation and introspection. Never is this ceaseless, forward, handin-hand march of form and function more apparent than in the latest collaboration between outerwear stalwarts Barbour and famed, British designer-cum-brand founder, Margaret Howell. Blending Barbour’s famously staunch utilitarianism with Margaret Howell’s penchant for edgy cuts and fashion-forward silhouettes, the Autumn Winter ‘19 capsule collection brings three new styles to the fore. Taking major cues from Barbour’s rich historical archives, the collection boasts the same fabric, feel and unparalleled construction you’ve come to expect from the South Shield heritage brand, while also managing to carve out a solid niche in more contemporary menswear circles. Sign us up.

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[Podcast] Mortified Guests reading their teenage diaries


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Find out more at johnsmedley.com/discover/legacy

n o s i r r a H l r e e i n n g i a s e D D & r e k a M e r

u t i n r Fu

X y e l d e m S n Joh

View our collections at: 55 Jermyn Street, London, SW1Y 6LX | 24 New Cavendish Street, London, W1G 8TX | 24 Brook Street, London, W1K 5DG | johnsmedley.com ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK |

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140th

BY APPOINTMENT TO HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES MANUFACTURER AND SUPPLIER OF FOOTWEAR CROCKETT & JONES LIMITED, NORTHAMPTON

MADE IN ENGLAND | SINCE 1879

CROCKETTANDJONES.COM

Anniversary Collection


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One Thing Done Well

The Workers Club The Workers Club’s three-piece outerwear system pushes the One Thing Done Well format to kill three birds with one proverbial stone words by WILL HALBERT 12

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he ‘One Thing Done Well’ premise has always been a simple one: Provide a space to celebrate the very best version of something; create a means of diving into the quintessence of a particular brand; and put a spotlight on a particular garment that presents the clearest, strongest visual metaphor of that brand’s overarching philosophy. Easy for the most part. But every so often, a brand like The Workers Club comes along with a collection that is so well-crafted and tightly-edited that choosing a single, stand-out piece proves pretty damn difficult. From their woolen wares to their waxed jackets, Oxford shirts to selvedge denim, TWC has spent the last five years crafting well-made garments that transcend trends to go the (literal and metaphorical) distance. And while opting for a threepiece outerwear system might seem like a slight bending of the ‘One Thing Done Well’ ethos, it does provide the perfect working example of what the brand does best. Comprised of a cotton canvas shell Jacket, a down-filled bomber jacket, and a wool-knit gilet, ‘The Works’ three-piece system combines staunch utilitarian principles with timeless aesthetics. The shell jacket is a water-repellent, wind-resistant, cotton-canvas powerhouse of ruggedly handsome design. The bomber is lightweight, reversible, and purpose built for the infamous unpredictability of the Great British weather. The gilet is a high-spec, minimal little number that boasts an exceptionally soft hand despite its rugged durability. Both the bomber and gilet can be zipped into the shell jacket for a little whatever-the-weather versatility. Sure, there’s an easy metaphor to be had here about ‘The Works’ being a greater-than-the-sum-of-its-parts exercise in fashion gestaltism, but we’re not going to go there. To do so would be to do TWC’s three-piece system a huge disservice. Make no mistake: Together they’re great, but that doesn’t change the fact that all three garments hold their own as standalone pieces, happily going toe-to-toe with the titans of the technical outerwear scene. For all the technical heft and obsessive detailing that define TWC’s three-piece system, however, one of the most impressive aspects of the ensemble is the way in which it deftly navigates the whole gamut of menswear stylistic sensibilities. All three pieces betray a hint of Japanese technicality, a touch of American, post-war, ruggedness, a pinch of Scandinavian minimalism and, dare I say, a mite of British, Mod-esque, elegance. The result is a trio of outerwear pieces that, despite their technical credentials, remain endlessly and effortlessly wearable. Which makes perfect sense, really. Founders Adam and Charlotte have cut their teeth on the tides and trends of the fashion industry for a collective three decades. They have developed a ground-up understanding of how these things work. Which explains why each and every piece in the current TWC lineup not only oozes style, but strikes a future-proof balance between form and function. Ultimately, The Workers Club tells the simple story of well-made goods brought to you by well-versed makers. And while ‘The Works’ is both a solid introduction to the brand and a glowing testament to its standard of engineered excellence, it really only scratches the surface of what The Workers Club has to offer. Which is exactly why we’re looking forward to getting to know TWC a little better over the next few months. EJ theworkersclub.co.uk


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STYLE

Meet The Makers

Daniel Harrison We sit down with designer-maker, QEST scholar, and John Smedley Ambassador, Daniel Harrison to talk bespoke, freestanding and fitted furniture words by WILL HALBERT

How would you describe your craft? I create one-off pieces and I make small batches of bespoke furniture and other items from native and sustainable woods. I work closely with clients to realise their vision and ideas, as well as creating speculative pieces in my own design style. What is your favourite part about what you do? When the designs have been finalised and drawings completed I enjoy being in the workshop, lifting an idea and transforming the concept from the intangible to tangible. How did you begin your career? On leaving school I studied sustainable product design at University. I went on to complete an apprenticeship in staircase manufacture and worked for a joinery company in South Wales. I decided to combine my design skills with my love of making and went on to study Furniture Making and Design at Rycotewood Furniture College, Oxford. I then worked for a bespoke furniture maker in Oxfordshire 14

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before setting up my own business. How long have you been doing it? I began my joinery apprenticeship in 2008 What other craftsmen stand out to you most and why? I admire the work from the Edward Barnsley Workshop. They create beautiful, modern furniture while giving a nod to traditional elements from the Arts & Crafts movement. The ethos of this movement resonates with me – sound construction methods and furniture that is fit for purpose. Did anything in particular inspire you to start your craft? Our local vicar gave me the book ‘A Spirit of Adventure in Craft & Design’ written by John Makepeace. I was working as a joiner at the time and this book opened my eyes for the first time the world of bespoke fine furniture.


THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL X JOHN SMEDLEY

Do you work with any other craftsmen/women to create your products? I almost always work independently and keep as much of the processes in-house as possible. What is the hardest part about what you do? Sometimes, I feel working by myself can be limiting – maybe I could solve problems more quickly if I had peers close-by to ask. Also, when there is a particularly complex task, an extra pair of hands to glue a piece of furniture together would make the job a lot easier; instead I have to be creative and think of ways around a particular problem which can be challenging! What makes your craftsmanship most rewarding? Putting the finishing coat on a piece of furniture after many making hours - seeing the grain come to life, revealing its ultimate beauty and knowing I have honoured the tree from which it came. Where did you learn the skills required for your role? I was taught sustainable product design in Falmouth University and then began workshop training in a local joinery shop in South Wales. I went on to study Furniture Making and Design at Rycotewood Furniture College, before working for a furniture maker in Oxfordshire.

Keeping it Local Based just a short drive from the splendour of both the Brecon Beacons mountain range and the Gower Peninsula coastline in South Wales, Daniel has plenty of incentive to keep things local

N

ot only does Daniel use a combination of traditional hand tools alongside modern digital machinery to help create his collections of contemporary fine furniture, he also endeavours to use native and sustainable woods in the process. In fact, Daniel often uses trees that once stood within a ten mile radius of his studio workshop. He also works closely with local sawmills, and personally selects the timber for his projects. By all accounts, that’s pretty local, and Daniel’s deep respect for wood ensures that its natural beauty is celebrated and lives on in a new form for future generations. In Daniel’s own words: ‘We have been using wood since the dawn of humankind, and today, we can still connect with this most magnificent material. I hope my furniture brings a sense of joy and meaning to others; whether working to a client’s brief or making a new speculative piece, I strive to do justice to the tree from where the wood came.’ EJ

What has been the most important thing you’ve learned during your career so far? Measure twice cut once. Have you had any major pitfalls to overcome to maintain your craft? I set up my business in 2016 under mentorship from my previous employer in Oxfordshire. So far there have been no major pitfalls. Has your craft evolved into other/new skills over time? Over time I have learnt more about different woods and how they behave. New techniques I’ve learnt while furniture making include veneering and laminating, which I now do on a regular basis in my work. How would you describe a day in your role? I wake up early and walk Rowan (our Irish Setter) before having a cup of coffee and either get into the workshop and start on a commission, or if at the design stage, work at the drawing board in my studio. Record keeping is a very important aspect, which I do to track my productivity on time sheets throughout the day. I regularly keep my workspace clean and take four short breaks to keep my mind fresh. At 5pm I take Rowan for a walk either up on the mountain behind the workshop or to the local nature reserve. If there is a deadline I work into the evening or sometimes even later to make sure the project finishes on time. johnsmedley.co.uk/discover/legacy ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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STYLE

The Leather of Legends Not all leathers are created equal. The Crockett & Jones Cordovan Collection puts a superlative spin on an already stellar roster of British-made classics words by WILL HALBERT

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the leather Black Cordovan fitting E last 325

crockettandjones.com

Pembroke

H

ere at Essential Journal, we reserve a well-documented (and frankly justified) disdain for the coyness and coquetry of the understatement. The understatement, after all, is a baseless, bottomed-out currency and we’ve simply no time for it. To say that it’s been a strong year for British heritage brand Crockett & Jones, for example, would be to deal in that said same, worthless currency. So let’s be clear: there’s absolutely nothing understated about Crockett & Jones. Take its Autumn Winter ‘19 lineup, for example. Over the course of the last few months, we’ve marvelled at the moody, midnight majesty of its much-coveted Black Editions. We’ve fawned over the fabled staples that make up the brand’s Main Collection, and we’ve waxed poetic on the peerless craft behind its 140th Anniversary offerings. But even the high-end has its hierarchy. Every road to prestige remains at the mercy of a pecking order. And after having seen Crockett & Jones’ latest Cordovan Collection first hand, it’s safe to say that the British-made bastions of classic style sit proudly at the top of both. For those in need of a catch up, Cordovan is a luxurious and lustrous leather with a finish that, for all its immediate charm, will only get better with age. For all intents and purposes, Cordovan is best considered the single malt Scotch of the leather world. Now, there are only a handful of tanneries with the patience, know-how, and integrity to produce such a fine leather. Chicago’s Horween Leather Company is one such tannery. Founded in 1905, the Horween Leather Company has garnered quite the reputation for its production of top-tier Cordovan. No mean feat, as the production of true Cordovan leather is a painstaking endeavour to say the least. The Horween way demands that a single shell be tanned, shaved, smoothed and dyed by hand, before being treated with vegetable oils over the course of several weeks. The result is a series of rich, whisky-hued leathers that more than match Crockett & Jones’ famously exacting standards. By using Cordovan to re-create a limited collection of the brand’s most-loved styles (the Bradford, the Cavendish, the Pembroke, the Harlech and the Harrogate, to be exact), Crockett & Jones has managed to elevate an already peerless selection of shoes to something more akin to wearable art. And wearable they truly are. Over time, the Cordovan leather will mold to the contours of the wearer’s foot. It will patina in ways totally unique to the individual. Each and every pair will tell a rich story of a life well lived. Boasting an endlessly resoleable, Goodyear welted construction, every pair is tailor made to help you put your best foot forward, every day, for the rest of your life. It’s no exaggeration to suggest that the styles that make up The Cordovan Collection represent the last pair of dress shoes you’ll ever realistically need. To call them by anything less would be a criminal understatement. And you already know how much we dislike those. EJ


the leather Dark Brown Cordovan fitting E last 314

Harvard

the leather Burgundy Cordovan fitting E last 341

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THE LEGEND AMONG ICONS.

Portugieser

into human lifetimes, this model could be

Perpetual Calendar. Ref. 5033: The daring expeditions of the Por tuguese seafarers held out the promise of everlasting glory.

working on its legendary status for eternity.

A worthy legacy of this heroic epoch is the Portugieser Perpetual Calendar. Timelessly elegant, it features trailblazing technology that includes a 7-day automatic movement with Pellaton winding and a power reserve display showing the date until 2499. So converted

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IWC . ENGINEERING DREAMS . SINCE 1868 .

Mechanical movement · Pellaton automatic winding system · IWC-manufactured 52610 calibre · 7-day power reserve with display · Perpetual calendar with displays for the date, day, month, year in four digits and perpetual Moon Phase · Anti-reflective sapphire-glass · See-through sapphire-glass back · Water-resistant 3 bar · Diameter 44.2 mm · Alligator leather strap by Santoni

MANCHESTER – NEWLY DESIGNED SHOWROOM NOW OPEN LIVERPOOL ONE CANARY WHARF WWW.DAVIDMROBINSON.CO.UK

ISSUE 50 2012959_P6YL3_260x365_p_cop_ZS_4c_en_V2.indd 1

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THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL X BEN SHERMAN

The Winter Ready Wardrobe

STYLE

B

ack in August, Ben Sherman’s The Series sought to showcase the stories of three creative individuals and explore the impact of Ben Sherman on their own personal sense of style. The result gave us a glimpse at exactly what Ben Sherman does best: Provide solid style staples for the modern man in all his forms. We caught up with Chris, Luke and Roger once again to see how their winter wardrobes were shaping up as the temperatures start to drop. EJ

Chris Reid, Photographer and Model ‘Ben Sherman is such a classic British brand,’ says photographer and model, Chris Reid. ‘The brand has such a rich heritage in the British fashion scene, one that resonates with so many people from a number of backgrounds.’ His chosen fit is a solid example of that overlapping appeal. By combining relaxed streetwear elements with light sartorial touches, Chris achieves a collegiate cool. The pop of orange from the logo hoodie sets a suitably autumnal tone, while the premium, gingham checked, wool blend coat adds a touch of tailored charm to an otherwise casual look. ‘I wear a lot of clothes with similar colour tones,’ says Chris. ‘So this ensemble fits my style perfectly.’

Luke Campbell, Boxer

From Top Clockwise: Roger Frampton - Movement Coach | Chris Reid - Photographer and Model | Luke Campbell - Boxer

It’s hard to imagine Luke Campbell, one of the most celebrated and successful amateur boxers in British history, finding the time to concern himself with issues of style. And yet here he is making it look easy. This premium, off-white twist on the classic checked shirt sure helps. Cut to a slim mod fit with an Oxford button down collar and mitred cuffs, it pairs perfectly with crisp new denim and boxfresh white sneakers for a touch of sporting sophistication. A ‘ s you can imagine,’ explains Luke, ‘I’m in training gear for six days of the week. It’s only the odd day here and there that I get to wear something else. So when I do, I like looking fresh.’

Roger Frampton, Movement Coach ‘My style is all about having the freedom to move’, says movement coach, Roger Frampton. ‘I always wear footwear that allows me to feel the ground and clothing that doesn’t restrict me. Can my body move freely? Can I sit in a squat? Can I reach my arms over my head? If I can’t, I don’t wear it.’ Which goes a long way to explaining Roger’s choice of outfit: The iconic, Ben Sherman fishtail parka worn atop their classic knitted polo shirt. Style with purpose, this is a classic mod-inspired Ben Sherman combination that boasts form and function an equal measure.

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COLUMN

Tailored Thoughts On:

Winter Coats Nothing says investment piece quite like the winter coat. Matthew Gonzalez talks us through some solid outerwear options set to see us through the next winter (or ten) words by MATTHEW GONZALEZ

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s soon as the clocks went back an hour, our once meandering autumn evenings suddenly became transformed into long winter nights. Along with the darkness comes a gradual drop in temperature forcing us all to repeat the annual tradition of rifling through our wardrobes to pull out our trusty winter coats. There seems to be something about out'One of the best qualerwear that resonates with us all. Personally speaking, it probably makes up about a third of my wardrobe and the same is true for many of my ities of these types of friends. It’s oddly comforting to put on your favourite winter coat. When they are cut well, they can make pretty much anyone look great and on jackets is that they age a more introspective level they tacitly remind us of our place within the natural flow of the changing seasons. With that said, this month we will well. The more you look at a few styles of autumn and winter coats that you should have in your wardrobe this season. Embracing the fact that, for the moment, it beat them up, the more isn’t terribly cold outside, it’s the perfect time to consider some lighter jacket styles you can wear right now. So, for those temperate days that character they accrue.’ you can get away with it, a classic denim jacket or heavy cotton utility coat is the perfect option for going out. Either is great for layering over a brushed cotton button down shirt with workwear-style trousers, or to pair with a classic wooly roll/crew neck jumper and jeans. Depending on your budget you can get something from Abercrombie & Fitch for as little as £100 - £150 or if you prefer something a little higher end, you can opt for Drakes cotton Chore Jacket for around £400 - £600, depending on the material. One of the best qualities of these types of jackets is that they age well. The more you beat them up, the more character they accrue, so it’s a jacket you will end up keeping in your rotation for years to come. As the season progresses and the temperature edges down towards (or past) zero, you are going to have to opt for something a little heavier in the evenings. But these jackets - layered appropriately - can easily be paired with some cashmere lined leather gloves, a scarf, and cap during the day well into the new year. As the evenings get colder and a light layered jacket is no longer enough to keep you warm, it will be time for you to pick up a peacoat. There is arguably no better value for money than buying a good quality peacoat because it is one of the most versatile garments you can own. Peacoats are designed for warmth, but that doesn’t mean you can’t dress it down. If it isn’t freezing outside, you can wear it over a t-shirt with jeans and trainers for a timeless, casual look that won’t see you boiling. Conversely, as the temperature really begins to plummet, you can pair it with a heavy-knit wool jumper, a nice pair of brushed cotton or flannel trousers and boots for a modern, tailored look that isn’t too formal but would work in almost any situation you find yourself in. Good overcoats are all about cut and construction, and peacoats are some of the easiest to wear. They were tailored in a way that almost looks like you are wearing armour which isn’t surprising as they were originally made to keep navy sailors warm when they were at sea. It’s a coat that can be worn with a suit on your commute to work or while hanging out casually on a Sunday afternoon down at the pub. Having one in your closet will mean you will be ready for pretty much any type of weather this season. If you are in the market to pick one up try going vintage. You can find some great pieces that are in very good condition and at a pretty decent price. Otherwise, Ralph Lauren peacoat’s start at about £400, or you can check out Private White VC for about £600. Not a bad price for a coat that you will pretty much be able to wear everyday in autumn and winter for a good few years. I think the reason we tend to like outerwear is because it makes us look quite stoic and resilient whilst also, paradoxically, making helping us to feel protected from the elements of the outside world. There is a very primal quality to wearing something to keep us warm through the winter. Once our coats come out, it is unlikely that we will be putting them away for the next several months. So if you have to wear something to keep warm, make sure that it makes you look your best. EJ

A Cut Above Does the relevance of the last week pale in comparison to the importance of the next? Ian Harrold gives his two cents on looking back and moving forward words by IAN HARROLD

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’ll be honest with you, I’m not a particularly nostalgic person. I see very little use for reflection on old times, and - aside from the odd, wine-fuelled evenings spent reminiscing with close friends - I’m a firm believer that the past belongs firmly in the past. Twice a month, however, I give talks at a local secondary school. Typically, I speak to those that are about to commit to their GCSE options, and I speak to those about to get their results. Both are pretty important junctions in a young person’s life, as they were in mine all those years ago. As these talks are largely based around the way in which I personally navigated the nasty little obstacle course that is the UK educational system, not to mention my experience in running my own business, it’s safe to say that the talks do involve a little retrospection. In truth, it’s pretty much the only time I spend mulling over the past. But it does give me the occasion to dredge some pearls of wisdom from the murky depths of memory, which I think are of use to just about anyone. So here goes: Don’t take yourself too seriously. Life is full of setbacks. They don’t define you, but how you react to them does. You have to learn to roll with things a little, and that comes with being able to laugh at yourself every now and again. Rest assured that things will work out in the long run, but learn to loosen up along the way. Because If you don’t learn to bend, there’s a good chance you’ll break. Get comfortable being uncomfortable. That means challenging your own complacency and being prepared to find other (often longer, often harder) ways around things. There’s no one path for everyone, and it may seem like you’re going against the grain a lot of the time. But trust the process and you won’t go far wrong. And most importantly: Look around you more. I know it sounds like a cliché, but if you don’t stop and look around you every so often, you’ll miss all the fun. Put down the work, drop the phone, and just enjoy being present. Some people are so hung up on the past, or wrapped up in their future, that they forget to just enjoy themselves. Don’t be that guy. And If all else fails? Become a florist. You’ll never make anyone’s day worse by giving them a lovely arrangement of flowers. IH ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Fashion from the Feet Up For the first time in the company’s rich 82-year history, Pantherella have ventured outside of statement socks to produce a range of superlative scarves words by WILL HALBERT

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STYLE

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stablished 1937, Pantherella has been the go-to premium sock for those looking to make a real statement - big or small - for 82 years and counting. As we reported, way back in Issue 32, Pantherella socks are produced in the brand’s fifth-generation, family-owned factory right here in the UK. Famous for its unwavering dedication to the fine craftsmanship and design of luxury socks, Pantherella is now set to mirror this long-standing ethos with an all-new trio of scarves. Having dedicated just two decades shy of a century to the task of producing England’s finest socks, Pantherella has heritage and history in spades. But the real art of Pantherella has always lay in the brand’s knack for striking a balance between the old and the new. Their new line of scarves, the first of its kind for the brand, is a fine case in point. Upholding the company’s dedication to peerless quality, the line of luxury scarves honour the brand’s rich heritage, while also offering something new. Inspired by the Laburnum sock, Pantherella’s Willow scarf, is made of a fine, lightweight gauge wool that proves perfect for those crisp, Autumn days. Knitted from 90% merino wool, the Willow scarf boasts luxurious quality that elevates it from elegant accessory to statement piece.

'The real art of Pantherella has always lay in the brand’s knack for striking a balance between the old and the new. Their new line of scarves is a fine case in point.’ The Elder scarf, on the other hand, is an altogether heavier, chunkier affair for the colder months ahead. Taking cues from the brand’s famous Packington sock, the Elder scarf offers maximum comfort and warmth to its winter weary wearers. And finally, drawing inspiration from the heritage brand’s Waddington sock, the Aspen scarf comes through with a touch of cashmere class, delivering winter-ready style and quality in equal doses. This is a new step for the British heritage brand, but a logical one. And by all accounts, it’s sure to be a step every bit as bold and brazen as Panterella’s now famous foray into statement socks. EJ pantherella.com ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Behind the Lens Ben Rose, Lead Videographer behind this year’s Stand Out campaign, talks us through his personal Iceland highlight reel

Stone Cold Style Tessuti continues to forge its own path and play by its own rules in the latest, sub-zero celebration of their Stand Out campaign

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et it be known that the guys and gals at Tessuti know how to throw a party. Their most recent little soirée was no exception. To many, inviting a host of friends to a top secret location in the heart of Reykjavik for an ice cave rave might sound a little extreme. Ever the experts in ante upping and boundary breaking, however, Tessuti have an uncanny knack for making the extreme feel like the basic, minimum standard. Taking their infamous penchant for stone cold style to new and exciting (not to mention literal) levels, the ice cave rave proved to be a who’s who of handsome faces and long standing, outerwear heroes. With the likes of Moose Knuckles, Parajumpers, Stone Island and Belstaff bringing the heat, there was little sign of the biting cold outside.

'The ice cave rave proved to be who’s who of handsome faces and long standing, outerwear heroes.’ Those in attendance were also treated to some serious musical delights too. Blasting out a signature blend of drum and bass slow jams and electro cuts, Sigma provided the perfect soundtrack to the clandestine evenings high energy and understated elegance. For all involved, it was a high-style, low-temp evening to remember that sent a loudand-clear message to the masses: Never bound by boundaries, Tessuti and its frinds dance to the beat of their own drum. EJ tessuti.co.uk 24

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First off, tell us a little about what you were doing in Iceland. I was fortunate enough to be asked by Tessuti to direct, film and edit their AW19 and Christmas campaign. The concept involved inviting Tessuti’s biggest and best brands along to a secret, underground ice cave for a proper rave up. What are the challenges that go along with shooting in a place like Iceland? It depends where in Iceland you film. We were headed to Iceland for its famously epic landscapes, waterfalls, glaciers, and black sand beaches. For me, the main issue was power. Or rather, a lack of it! We countered this by having a generator present on Day one of filming, so we were able to charge batteries and power our laptops whilst transferring files. Most importantly, we could charge our phones, pretty vital when you’re in the middle of a glazier. Another equally challenging factor of shooting in Iceland is, of course, the weather. It can be sunny, snowy, rainy and windy in the same morning, so keeping equipment safe and dry is a challenge. It’s tough but worth it. And it’s hard to complain when you travel to Iceland specifically for these romantically rugged conditions! Any standout moments, scenes, or views from your trip? There were a lot of stand out moments from the trip, but filming in the ice cave was definitely up there. It was a first for me, and prior to the shoot we were nervous in regard of how the equipment would hold up down there. Luckily as soon as we started filming I forgot about the cold and I was able to stay in the cave for 30 mins at a time, no problem. Any tips or advice for anyone else looking to head out there? I always recommend visiting Iceland in the autumn and winter months. November is an ideal time to visit Iceland, as you’ll have plenty of snow and I think that’s when you really get the essence of the place. I believe it’s more likely that you will see the northern lights at that time of year too. Outside of that, you have to be prepared to hire a car and drive far from Reykjavík to see the epic and dramatic landscapes, waterfalls and glaciers.


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LIFESTYLE

A Word from the Experts:

Ben O'Brien, Barry’s Manchester

Barry’s Birthday As their Manchester suite turns one this December, Barry’s takes a fond look back at its spectacular first year up North

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pening a studio here in Manchester wasn’t inspired by stats or consumer research,’ says Barry’s founder, Sandy Macaskill. ‘We just believe in what we do.’ And what is it that Barry’s does, exactly? Well, for those unlucky few that don’t already know, Barry’s provides a state of the art gym, a tight selection of peerless personal trainers, and a second-to-none fitness community to ensure that you get a workout like no other. Having already taken the world’s fitness scene by storm, Barry’s set up shop in the North’s very own Cottonopolis to continue its quest for inclusive workouts that forge as many friendships as they do physiques. By all accounts, it’s exactly this

'Barry’s set up shop in the North’s very own Cottonopolis to continue its quest for inclusive workouts.’ emphasis on confidence and community that has seen Barry’s revolutionise the fitness industry the world over. And by the looks of things, they’re just getting warmed up. ‘Manchester has a reputation for being a city of spirit and character, gritty determination and comm-unity togetherness’. Sharing the same appreciation for determination and togetherness, it’s safe to say that Barry’s must feel right at home. EJ Barry’s Manchester will be holding a Team Teach Class on Sunday Dec 1st in celebration of their first birthday

LUCKY 7 PROGRAMME OFFERS THE ULTIMATE HOLISTIC FITNESS EXPERIENCE

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ne of the year’s highlights has been The Lucky 7 programme, which comes to a close this month. The Lucky 7 programme goes beyond a simple workout to deliver an all-encompassing wellness experience. Designed to promote a 360 degree approach to fitness - an approach that puts as much emphasis on mental health as it does nutrition and physical fitness - the programme offered seven clients the chance to truly test their fitness mettle. Consisting of five classes a week for eight weeks, not to mention expert wellness and nutrition advice, The Lucky 7 represents a further example of Barry’s passion for going the extra mile.

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t's all about balance. So you can enjoy the festive season whilst still feeling your best if you just consider some small changes. It's just as important for your mental wellbeing as it is for the physical benefits. Enjoy those winter drinks down the pub with friends and mince pies by the fire, but just get a little burn in first. Not only will this stop that holiday, sluggish feeling, it will also get the endorphins flying and you feeling amazing. Here’s a few small steps that can make a big difference: 1 - Walk everywhere. Get a big winter coat and scarf on and enjoy the winter scenes whilst also avoiding the mayhem of public transport. Plus, nothing beats a winter walk in the park. 2 - Stand don't sit. This is such a small change, but can add huge benefits. Not only do you burn more calories, but it's also better for your posture. 3 - For your workouts keep it simple. Unless you have a specific plan in place, think of December as the month of maintenance, it might not be the best time to gain or lose. Keep your workouts up a few times a week, but maybe mix it up. Come and try and Barry's class, do something fun in a group setting so it doesn't feel like work. Get your colleagues down to our Red Room for the Christmas party (and then have drinks later)! Sweatworking is so hot right now. 4 - Dance. If you like to hit the town, or are celebrating a holiday party then get on that dance floor. Dancing helps to burn those liquid calories! 5 - Workout at home. Even if you are just working out in the morning before a day of fun activities and mulled wine, it all counts! Here’s something simple you can try: Choose four or five exercises that you know how to do and work them as a pyramid. For example, 90 sec, 60 sec and 30 sec rounds of each exercise, either running on the spot or burpees or sprints outside. Repeat for four or five rounds. Keep it short and sweet. Mix it up each day with something different for each muscle group. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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cribbled on the world’s pavements and playgrounds alike, the hopscotch formation is as widely recognised as it is wildly reminiscent. The hopscotch is, by turns, a visual ode to childlike joy and a celebration of unfettered creativity. To replicate that said same formation in an awe-inspiring sequence of diamonds is as inspired as it is audacious. But it’s exactly at the intersection between inspiration and audaciousness where family-owned jewelers, David M Robinson, have always excelled. Their 50th Anniversary ‘Hopscotch’ collection is a glowing testament to that very fact. A relatively young member of DMR’s exclusive family of collections, the ‘Hopscotch’ collection was designed in-house back in 2010. With Princess cut diamonds strikingly set in bars of gold, the collection was an instant success with clients seeking a more contemporary, forward thinking suite. Now recognised as one of the brand’s most iconic collections, this year sees the release of an exclusive one-off collection to celebrate DMR’s 50th anniversary.

'Now recognised as one of the brand’s most iconic collections, this year sees the release of an exclusive one-off collection to celebrate DMR’s 50th anniversary.’

Celebrating in Style DMR’s 50th Anniversary ‘Hopscotch’ collection offers a fond callback to one of the family-owned jewelers’ most celebrated collections words by WILL HALBERT 28

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While the suite’s deconstructed charm finds its inspiration in the playground, it was in DMR’s in-house workshop that the collection truly came to life. ‘I was in the playground of my daughter’s school when I first noticed the Hopscotch pattern painted on the ground,’ recalls Managing Director, John Robinson. ‘The shape appealed, but after a discussion in the workshop that morning, we started to break up the symmetry of the pattern to allow it to flow and move - essentially to let it breathe.’ Featuring a necklace, ring and earrings, this anniversary suite was handmade by DMR’s Master Goldsmith Rupert Haworth at DMR’s Liverpool workshop. This one-off statement collection is both a glowing endorsement of the skill and craft behind each and every DMR piece, and a heartfelt celebration of the company’s 50-year heritage. The ‘Hopscotch’ 50th Anniversary Collection will be on display across DMR’s showrooms over the coming months as it visits each of the brand’s four UK showrooms


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Essential Friends From the advice of connoisseurs and collectors, to the insights of artisans and aficionados, we’ve curated a series of interviews, introductions and investigations from Essential Friends old and new

Time for Reflection For half a century, independent jewelers David M Robinson have stood at the forefront of the North West’s luxury sector. We sit down with Managing Director, John Robinson to get to the heart of what sets them apart

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his is David M Robinson’s 50th year in business, as a family owned business, no less. That’s quite an achievement. To what do you owe your success? I know that it sounds like a bit of a cliché, but it really is all about people. It’s as simple as that. We’re a family-owned business, after all. And that family mentality extends inwards as much as it does outwards. We treat our team like family, and they truly believe in what they do. And that feeling of empowerment and engagement is then paid forward in how our team then treat our customers.

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Park and Cartier in Bond Street, it was a real privilege to be acknowledged on a national scale. Winning this award has really reaffirmed that independent businesses like DMR can compete with retail giants, and it stands as a testament to the hard work and craftsmanship that we’ve been refining over the last 50 years. On the subject of watches, how do you explain the lasting appeal of the timepiece in today’s digital climate? A watch is a secret language of sorts: it carries a subtle message the moment you walk into a room. It never goes unnoticed. In a world full of digital distractions, an analogue watch cuts through all the white noise and suggests a certain focus and clarity about its wearer. It shows you’re dead set on the task at hand. There’s a craft element too, of course. That’s an appeal that never seems to wane. People will always want the best of things. And the brands we work with can supply exactly that: the best. So there’s more to a classic watch than it’s visual appeal? Absolutely. There’s so much more to a watch than its visual splendour. It harks back to a more artisanal past, to a time when people spent their days making things by hand and in small batches to sell on to a select, knowing few. Just look at our workshop. There are very few stores in the country that have their own, dedicated workshop, let alone someone like Rupert, our Master Goldsmith, who truly is the best at what he does. The workshop specialises in hand-crafting one-off pieces, unique to the individual. I cannot stress this enough: Those goldsmiths, that workshop, and our commitment to the craft really are at the heart and soul of DMR. The luxury sector can often be an intimidating place. Do you think that DMR’s family-owned, people-forward approach helps people feel more at ease? We conduct business the only way we know how; with honesty and warmth. You can’t be something you’re not, and we believe in being authentic. Everyone that comes through the door gets the red carpet treatment. We’re from humble beginnings ourselves, we started with just our tiny workshop. Our success depended on the good word and goodwill of others. As a result, the entire history of DMR is littered with stories of human kindness, from the customers to us and vice versa. How has the luxury market changed over the years? I think the biggest change has been the increasingly international nature of luxury. People travel now more than ever, and they’re so open to new influences and inspirations from all over the world. This is happening all over the country, but particularly here in Liverpool where the interest in continental luxury has gained momentum since the 1980s. As a city, it’s something of a trend-setter in today’s world. Liverpudlians have an uncanny knack for walking into a boutique store somewhere in Paris or Milan and plucking out something that will go on to be huge back home. We’re soulful people, we have an eye and

an ear for the finer things. So things have changed a lot and they continue to do so. It’s exciting to think about where Liverpool and the rest of the country will be in the next few years. The business has gone from strength to strength over the last 50 years. Any highlights over the last year? This year has been a spectacular year for DMR. Not only have we celebrated our 50th anniversary, but certain items from our jewellery range have been worn by a variety of famous faces. From Tess Daly and Amanda Holden to Nicole Scherzinger, our bespoke, signature pieces are making headlines and this has really worked to solidify our growing reputation as a destination for luxury. Another highlight has to be our victory at this year’s Watchpro awards! Our Manchester showroom won ‘Best Refurbished Store of the Year’, which means an awful lot to us. To go toe to toe with the best of London’s Bond Street and come out on top was a spectacular feeling, and the perfect way to celebrate the reopening of the store. Your victory at the Watchpro awards must have been the best way to round off a spectacular year for DMR. Was it an unexpected win for you? It wasn’t unexpected, per se, but as a family-owned business going against the likes of Bucherer in Hyde

Is there something about the maintenance of a timepiece that contributes to its appeal, too? I certainly think so. It’s the same with a great pair of shoes. You want to maintain them, re-sole them, polish them, have them looking their best at all times. I think that we’re moving past the age of fast fashion now, and consumers are once again motivated by quality. They’re interested in provenance. They want to know how things are made and how long they’re going to last for. If you see your purchase as an investment rather than something disposable, maintaining it becomes paramount. What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned along the way? People always want the best of something. Whatever it is that they’re seeking out, quality trumps disposability, and we’ve seen that first-hand during our many years in this industry. It’s something that extends to our service, too. As I said earlier, the secret to our success has been our mentality. As a family-owned business, our authenticity is what sets us apart from the crowd and we strive to offer the very best in everything we do, from the products we stock to the team who are ready and waiting to greet you at our doors. And finally, to always help others and give back whenever you can. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Book to see an expert today Search ‘Spire Liverpool Hospital’ Call 0151 522 1881 Interest free finance – 0% representative APR available See our website for the exact treatments at each hospital. Timings given are indicative, actual timings may vary based on consultant and tests required.


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Whisky Wisdom

Razor Sharp Skills

The Whisky Exchange founder, Sukhinder Singh, talks investment advice and desert island drams

Hand forging fine, Japanese steel knives from its workshop amongst Peckham's railway arches, Blenheim Forge is a name worth knowing

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he Whisky Exchange turns 20 this year, what would you say is the most important thing you’ve learned in that time? I think that identifying great products and finding a balance when selecting is vital, as each person’s taste is different. How has the world of whisky changed over the years? What do you hope to see from it in the future? The growth of whisky over the last 30 years has been amazing to see, and I am sure it will continue. Whisky is a product that is complex in a way that no other spirit is. There are hundreds of distilleries creating different products that range from elegant and fruity to rich and peaty. There is something for everyone, and that array of flavours will challenge even the most discerning of drinkers. With more distilleries opening each year around the world, there is plenty of excitement to come. How many bottles would you say you had in your own collection? I have over 10,000 bottles in my collection. I fell in love with Scotland and Scotch whisky initially. It was pure, honest, and in some cases available in very small supply. Are there any whiskies in your personal collection that you’re particularly proud of ?

I have some superb old bottles from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s which are very special to me, including an old Glenfiddich bottled around 1903. A rare gem that the distillery does not even possess. Do you have any ‘drams that got away’? Oh yes, a few but fortunately not too many! I remember about 5 years ago, I was bidding in a charity auction against a dear friend for a one-off bottle of Bowmore 1964. It was estimated to achieve £20k, I fought to around £70k and gave up. Do you have any advice for those looking to get into the world of whisky collecting? Always do research about the bottles you are looking to buy. I often see some bottles selling at auction for more than 20%-30% over our website price. I advise people to collect what they like to drink or their favourite distillery. I feel it is best to specialise, collect a particular vintage or distillery and maybe even lost distilleries. And lastly, what would be your desert island dram? This is always the hardest question to answer as there are too many favourites. I would say that currently it would be Speyside 1973. It’s a 45 year old blended malt, bottled by us for The Whisky Show 2019. It’s a lovely, aged malt that oozes class, with aromas of fruitcake, dried mango and baked apples. Still on sale at a steal of a price (£399), as it happens.

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he passion project of friends Jon Warsharsky, James Ross-Harris and Richard Warner, Blenheim Forge is the razor sharp result of a mutual love of metalwork, a collective curiosity for the craft, and a combined quest to create knives of the highest character and performance. Each blade is hand-crafted on bespoke machinery built by Warner himself. With an output of only 40 knives per week, each and every new project is a labour of love, a painstaking and exacting process that can take up to 20 hours to create. The core of each knife is forged from Japanese Aogami carbon steel - also known as 'Blue Paper Steel'. The use of this second-to-none steel is paired with Forge’s unique, metal folding techniques, creating beautiful ripples of steel that have come to define Blenheim Forge's signature aesthetic. A unique handle, created at the forge from woods such as oak and walnut, completes each knife. The materials for the handles are sourced in partnership with the Bermondsey-based Goldfinch ethical furniture and milling company, and are made to reflect Blenheim Forge's belief in timeless design principles. The result is a striking and classic knife made with integrity and respect for the end product - something that's truly built to last. Expect to see more from them in the months to come. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Below the Belt

Smoke ‘em if you Got ‘em

We ask Ben Neuhaus, owner and proprietor of Long Beach menswear store, Snake Oil Provisions, about his dream denim

Max Bergius of The Secret Smokehouse, talks us through

The Fit I only wear slim straight or slim taper fits on account of my short ass legs. I'm about 3/4 torso, so those fits stretch me out and make me look deceptively like a tall drink of water. For the same reason, I opt for hemmed jeans with no break. Cuffing and stacking, in my opinion, work way better on guys with long legs and/ or bowed legs, and I have neither. As for rise, I'm more open minded. I wear some lower rise (i.e. RRL Slim Fits), mid/high rise (i.e. Iron Heart 555's) and some in between (RGT Stanton and Stevenson Overall Big Sur). While rise is negotiable, I have to have a fitted thigh and seat area in the top block. Billowy thighs really bug me out. I can't and I won't. The Fabric As for color, I've been on the black or white/off-white jeans tip over blue. I really love black denim that's designed to fade - literally nothing cooler than a thrashed pair of black jeans. There was about a three year stretch where I only wore black or white jeans and vowed to only wear indigo again if and when we ever stocked RRL. That was a 3 year process to get RRL, and when we got it, I was true to my word and lived in the Indigo Slim Fits, which is still one of my absolute favorite indigo denim fabrics on the planet (it's a proprietary Japanese selvedge that's midweight, very hairy and fades incredibly). As for weights, I tend to gravitate more toward mid-weights (i.e. 13.5oz found on the Stevenson Overall Big Sur or the 15oz found on the RGT Stanton), but the 21oz denim that Iron Heart produces somehow defies all rules of science and reality in that it's so soft, so breathable, and takes very little break in. It never feels heavy or cumbersome when I'm wearing it, even in warm weather. I've always preferred Japanese denim and have found it far more interesting than domestic selvage denim (when it was available in the states). I steer away from fabrics that seem gimmicky to me (super duper heavy weight, kooky warp and weft colors, excessively slubby or textured, etc.). While I'm a sucker for a great vertical fading denim fabric, I never choose a jean for myself or the shop just because of how it fades, what mill it hails from, etc. Fit comes first. As for washes, we are adamantly opposed to washed bottoms. We don't believe in washed men's jeans and take the old school stance that you need to earn it. Rinsed or overdyed is fine but no fake whiskers, honeycombs or other artificial distressing for us. I mean, there's nothing worse than seeing somebody walk down the street with honeycombs half way down their calves.

The Benchmark I thought you'd never ask! Here's my top four, in no particular order: 1. Stevenson Overall Big Sur 2. Iron Heart 555 3. RRL Slim Fit 4. RGT Stanton

the lost art of London style fish smoking

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Best Worn With I pretty much exclusively wear jeans with t-shirts these days. I almost never wear button ups, except for the occasional western shirt. More often than not, I'm wearing jeans with a t-shirt, trucker or leather jacket, and boots. The older and tireder I get, it tends to be what's most comfortable to me to wear all day and stuff I can stand, walk and move a lot in because shop life. Mostly, you'll find me in the oldest, rattiest SOP pocket tee I can find (much to Miranda's chagrin), either my A.P.C. Veste Jacket or Levi's Premium trucker - both of which I love because they're soft, lighter weight, and fit me better than anything else - or my Lær collaboration Modified Classic Moto. I love my Schotts when riding and in winter months, but for everyday wear, the Lær is super comfortable and easy to move in. Footwear varies a lot. Most days it's boots (Lucchese Jonah Boots or RRL Engineer Boots lately) or Vans Vault slip-ons or Air Jordan 1's on sneaker days. I start my day and end it in a RRL cardigan, because I'm basically Mr. Rogers.

irst off, what's your story? How did you get into smoking fish? And where did you learn your craft? I learnt it all by trial and error and mucking about as a kid growing up. I’ve since dusted down what I knew and tweaked, refined and obsessed about producing the best I could. It’s been humbling that people like it and even buy it. What made you decide to set up shop in Hackney? Does the area have much of a tradition for smoking fish? It all evolved from my garden in Stepney! Little did I know the rich history of smokehouses that once were in the area. I went to the local archives to research the history and it was bonkers to find that circa 1930 there were more than 50 fishmongers and smokehouses in the E1 postcode alone. Added to that, there was a Protected Geographical Indicator for London Cured Smoked Salmon that was about to be approved, meaning that you had to produce smoked salmon to an exact spec in a geographical area. It just so happened, I was already producing the spec in the area (Tower Hamlets, Newham and Hackney). After outgrowing the shed in the garden, I found a light industrial usage arch by London Fields and the rest is history. What sets your smoked fish apart? I guess we don’t cut corners and we love what we do. We’re not reinventing the wheel here, but doing one thing well is important to us. We seem to be doing something right, if the feedback from chefs, restaurants and hotels are anything to go by. The sheer love we get back from all our returning customers is also a huge encouragement.

@snakeoilprovisions

Smoking fish isn’t exactly a common skill, can you talk us through the process a little? Smoking fish is really simple and has been a way of preserving food for thousands of years - it involves three elements: Fish, cure and smoke. Filleting the fish is the hardest skill, and one that takes years to master. I used to be good at filleting, but like anything in life, you need to practice. The lads take the piss if I go anywhere near the block to fillet nowadays. The poor fish looks like it’s been hacked to death! So I leave it to them, the experts, now. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL

This Guy Profiling male style icons from all corners of the fashion industry, Jamie Ferguson’s This Guy offers both a beautiful photographic collection and a heartfelt celebration of modern menswear

How important is it for you to respect traditional methods when preparing fish? How does this affect the final product? It’s hugely important to respect tradition. Moreso for the skills and techniques, as they certainly imparts something special on the product, owing to the respect you have given the fish. Big modern smokehouses skip that and fire out average smoked fish. Where do you source your produce from? How important is the idea of sustainability to you? This is such a hot topic and not to be taken lightly! We care, and we’re trying. Commerce sadly gets in the way as well as tipping points. We have been huge advocates of sustainability since day one. It’s hard to source ethical elements, big businesses who make huge amounts of money don’t want to transition quickly, but it’s happening, and huge powers behind the scenes are investing millions to make this happen, which is encouraging. In terms of fish, we source high welfare, RSPCA-assured fish, but we do not believe this is the answer. Farmed fish producers need to be pushed into doing more, if they are then we will see the sloppy legislation that’s in place being updated and everyone accounting for their actions. We have been working with a Recirculating Aquaculture System [RAS] producer for the last 6 months. RAS-farmed fish are grown on land so there is NO marine aquaculture issues. The production

needs tweaking and quality is paramount, when this happens the consumer will have consistency. As for packaging: we are working with Fortnum & Mason on finding a solution for our packaging, this is not common knowledge but they are HUGE advocates of seeing this change, like us. We’re small fry (pardon the pun), so our voice is not nearly as powerful as theirs so we’re working closely with them to see what materials work. And then there’s our van. Our delivery van is an all-electric, zero-emission van and we have done every delivery in it here in London. Do you think we’re seeing a renewed interest in the idea of craft? Are people starting to shop local again? The renewed interest in craft and shopping local has been bubbling away for a while now. From our stance, it’s so brilliant and humbling to see people support us and return week after week to buy their smoked fish. How would you sum up your craft in three words? Fish curers & smokers. I might be cheating a little there. And lastly, any serving suggestions for your fish? Keep it really simple and let the flavours swirl around your mouth. There’s no need for lemon, capers or the usual, sneaky ways of disguising the unsavoury flavours of overproduced, smoked products you buy in a supermarket.

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e last caught up with intrepid menswear photographer, Jamie Ferguson, back in April as part of our social media special (Issue 44). He’s since gone and released a rather wonderful little book by the name of This Guy: Portraits of Modern Men’s Style. Replete with the exceptional imagery you’ve no doubt come to expect from Ferguson, there’s a whole lot to love here. Not only does This Guy chronicle some truly spectacular styles from London, Paris, New York, Stockholm, Tokyo and Rome, the collection also looks to delve into the lives of the men responsible for them. A profound exploration of the many figures of men’s fashion that has the added bonus of being seriously easy on the eye, This Guy is by turns an invaluable reference point and a stunning visual feast for aspiring fashionistas and budding photographers alike. EJ This Guy by Jamie Ferguson (Hardie Grant, £30), out now. Photography by Jamie Ferguson @jfk_man ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL X HOLLAND COOPER

Country Class, City Cool Over the last decade, Holland Cooper has become a true celebration of Great British excellence. We sit down with founder, Jade Holland Cooper, to talk about the business of fashion

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irstly, tell us a little about yourself and the inspiration behind Holland Cooper. I started the business 11 years ago -which feels like a hundred years ago but there you go! I started the brand mostly because I saw a real gap in the market for luxury, country-inspired clothing. I was going to loads of events during my time at the Royal Agricultural College and I found myself so frustrated by the lack of fashionable and feminine styles available for such events. That’s really why I started the business. I left the RAC after a year and a half and jumped straight into this. I’ve never looked back. How have things evolved for Holland Cooper since then? I think, back then, you would have seen lots more tweed in our lineup! I started out designing mini skirts. That quickly turned into coats and more tailored pieces. I was really trying to strike a balance between the older, more affluent consumer and the younger, more style-conscious consumer. I never wanted to alienate people, I love that Holland Cooper appeals to such a wide audience. One thing I’ve never compromised on is the premium element of the brand. I’ve always championed the more luxurious side of Holland Cooper. All of our tailoring and tweed, for example, is done right here in the UK. It’s a real labour of love. But these are truly premium products. Do you think we are seeing a renewed interest in questions of provence nowadays? I think people are far more interested in the process behind their garments nowadays, and I feel that people are willing to invest more in quality goods. We’re seeing that interest amongst a younger audience too, which is really inspiring. We aim for affordable luxury made right here in the UK, something that we were constantly told was impossible when we started out. I’m delighted to have proved those people wrong. We have some incredible mills and a really strong contingent of talented craftspeople that we now work alongside. I feel very fortunate to be able to work so closely with them. Holland Cooper operates at a pretty interesting intersection between country sophistication and city sleek. Was that a conscious choice? It was pretty natural, to be honest. Ultimately, I wanted to design products that I would wear personally. So there’s an all-encompassing, lifestyle element at play. It’s great to see that people from all walks of life can get be-

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hind our product and wear it in their own, unique way. How has Instagram changed the game for Holland Cooper? Social media was far less prominent when we started out, so we depended on country shows to get out name out there. It was an important way to get your product directly in front of people to get valuable feedback. It was an amazing journey to platform a brand in a time before social media.That said, Instagram has been a wonderful discovery. The beauty of the platform lies in the way that it lets a brand tell its story in an honest and organic way. For us, it’s been a great way to let our customers get a closer look at what we do. It’s also great for emerging brands, and it allows you to get your message out there at a low cost. And of course, it lets us see how people wear our products in new and interesting ways! Outerwear also plays a large part in your AW19 lineup. Can you talk us through any of your favourite pieces? The Aspen padded jacket is close to my heart. It was inspired by my time skiing. It’s the kind of jacket I wish I’d always had whilst skiing myself, to be honest. The cinched in sides, the gold hardware, and the elegant, flattering silhouette are all features that I’m really proud

of. The cosy faux fur and biodegradable eco-fill are real bonuses too, as they allow us to implement a more sustainable approach to our clothing. As with all of our outerwear, the Aspen boasts a feminine, tailored cut and a luxurious feel that’s perfect for the colder weather. And finally, do you have any advice for those looking to make it in the fashion industry? Don’t be afraid to take a different path. There’s no one way into fashion. You don’t have to be university trained, the only thing you do need is a willingness to work for your dream. It’s a relentless, 24/7 endeavour, and if you can brave that then half the battle is won. Anything in life is possible if you’re prepared to work for it. So many people are afraid to take a step off the beaten path, but I can’t recommend it enough. At the end of the day, if something doesn’t work it doesn’t work. You learn from it and you move on to something else, but the most important thing is to give it a shot in the first place. If you believe in yourself and your ability, then go for it. EJ hollandcooper.com Featured below: Aspen Jacket, £349. Available to buy in Tessuti and online.


CHRISTMAS

at Liverpool Philharmonic

Film

Film

Tuesday 10 December 7.30pm

Tuesday 24 December 11am & 2pm

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Clare Teal with Guy Barker – In the Christmas Mood

Ghostbusters: Film with Live Orchestra (cert PG)

Elf (cert PG)

Wednesday 11 December 7.30pm Family Concert

Sing-along with Santa Saturday 14 December 11.30am & 2.30pm Sunday 15 December 11.30am & 2.30pm

It’s a Wonderful Life (cert U)

Saturday 28 December 7.30pm Sunday 29 December 7.30pm Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Messiah

Saturday 4 January 7pm

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Spirit of Christmas Saturday 14 December 7.30pm Tuesday 17 December 7.30pm Wednesday 18 December 7.30pm Friday 20 December 7.30pm Saturday 21 December 7.30pm Sunday 22 December 2.30pm

Box Office 0151 709 3789 liverpoolphil.com LiverpoolPhilharmonic liverpoolphil liverpool_philharmonic

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CHRISTMAS at Music Room

An Audience With Connie Lush

Plus support Satin Beige Chousmer Friday 6 December 8pm

Awake, Arise – A Christmas Show For Our Times

Featuring Lady Maisery, Jimmy Aldridge and Sid Goldsmith

Connie Lush

Monday 16 December 8pm

Saturday 7 December 8pm

Baked A La Ska: Ska of Wonder

Plus special guest Thomas Lang

Christmas Tour

FARA

Monday 23 December 8pm

Box Office 0151 709 3789 liverpoolphil.com

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LiverpoolPhilharmonic liverpoolphil liverpool_philharmonic

Image Connie Lush © Mark McNulty

Tuesday 10 December 8pm


THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL

All Bird, no Bullsh*t We catch up with nose-to-tail pioneer, Tom Griffiths, ahead of the opening of his latest venture, Good Birds by Flank

Grail Pieces Jojo Elgarice of Jojo’s General Store gives us his top three vintage finds from the last year

1977 Seditionaries Parachute Shirt Designed by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood in the golden era of punk, this was a really scarce find. Growing up knowing both my mother and grandmother were influenced by punk, I have always had a fascination with this kind of gear. I suppose - like most things from that movement - not much of it survived. So any originals really are like hen’s teeth.

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ince its opening, Tom Griffith’s open-flame, noseto-tail market set up has espoused a no-nonsense yet wholly mindful means of meat consumption. As of this month, Tom and co. will be spreading their wings and taking this said-same sustainable ethos to the West End’s Market Hall in the form of Good Birds by Flank. As the name suggests, the menu will mirror the same food-based philosophies as Flank, but with a particular focus on celebrating the entirety of the humble chicken. Make no mistake, though, this isn’t some fancy, high highfalutin’ food flex. This is down and dirty, livefire rotisserie, expertly executed to you rock your world. Think superlative sauces and slow-cooked birds set to strip away with any restaurant pretense and simply skip to the good bit: the food. ‘Good Birds came from my desire to cook food for the accessible market, but to do it really well,’ Chef Director Tom Griffiths revealed when we caught up with him this month. ‘You’re not about to find foraged sea daisy with ant crumbs and fermented rose hips on the menu. I like to cook food that chefs actually eat on

their day off.’ That’s not to say that Tom and the gang are flying in blind (which would come dangerously close to a terrible, terrible pun if chickens could actually fly). Good Birds is the end result of some serious research. ‘I spent some time at Stone’s Farm, learning about whole-use, organic chickens in order to figure out how to make the most of them. I’ve always been a fan of grilled chicken, so we’re using Good Birds as an opportunity to take things to the next level!’ And just how much of the bird does Tom’s nose-to-tail approach make use of, you ask? All of it. ‘We will be using everything,’ explained Tom. ‘Even the feet in the gravy! I’m also really proud of the sauces at good birds - they’re really special, and the way we cook the birds makes for some incredible flavours - we only cook over fire using a custom-built rotisserie. Very exciting times indeed!’. EJ Good Birds From Flank will open at Market Hall West End this month @goodbirdslondon @flanklondon

Edwardian Motoring Coat This is an amazing piece of early British kit from the dawn of motoring. It’s made from a soft calf leather with horn buttons and a single-breasted front opening and it’s lined with cotton. This piece would have been made bespoke for some very lucky driver at the beginning of the 1900s.

1960s Belstaff Trialmaster Suit (in green) I’ve found quite a few of these over the years, but this one has a really special feel to it. The wax has just started to break in but still retains that amazing vibrant green colour. The first suits in colours (red & green) were only issued to trials riders. So as you can imagine, they tend to surface much less often. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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DRINKING

THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL X THE WHISKY EXCHANGE

Bricks & Mortar Magic

High Spirit Spotlight:

Christmas Sippers Christmas drinks unwrapped by The Whisky Exchange

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he Christmas countdown has officially begun and arrangements and preparations need to be made. Drinks for you and your guests are at the top of your list (at least they should be), and The Whisky Exchange suggests you forget the egg-nog and look for something a bit different. Here’s the team’s pick of the best drinks to serve throughout the day. TWE

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ound in both Covent Garden and on Great Portland Street, The Whisky Exchange stores are a true haven for discerning drinkers in the heart of London. As of December, you’ll also be able to check out our new shop near London Bridge. Across all of our stores this Christmas, you can find exclusive bottles you can’t find anywhere else, hear from knowledgeable staff to help you find the perfect gift, and discover exclusive services such as: Engraving Ask the staff in store about engraving to create your own personalised bottle.

Fill your Own For a special gift – for yourself or someone else – fill your own bottle of whisky or rum, available in both 20cl and 50cl sizes.

The Bottle to Give as a Gift Christmas Malt 2019 70cl / 52.2% / £56.95 The Whisky Exchange has bottled an exclusive Christmas Malt for 2019, set to bring festive joy and Christmas spirit wherever and whenever it’s poured. This fine Christmas Malt has been distilled in Speyside, and was bottled after 10 years of maturation in ex-bourbon and ex-sherry casks. It’s full of Christmas flavour with a core of fruit and festive spice. A perfect gift for any whisky-lover.

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The Bottle to Serve on Arrival Agrapart & Fils Complantee Grand Cru NV, Extra Brut 75cl / 12% / £67.75 Pascal Agrapart owns vineyards in the beautiful Côte des Blancs which he farms in harmony with the land, using no artificial chemical treatments. This is a blend of five grape varieties coming from a tiny plot of vines. It has citrus, pepper and a distinct chalky character which really shows the wine’s terroir. Impress your guests as soon as they arrive by celebrating with top-class bubbles.

The Bottle to Follow Dinner Hine Antique XO Cognac 70cl / 40% / £125

The Bottle to Take as the Guest Cocchi Barolo Chinato 50cl / 16.5% / £35.75

Hine Antique is a combination of more than 40 eaux-de-vie from Cognac’s prestigious Grande Champagne region, blended to a recipe created nearly 100 years ago. After this prolonged ageing, the palate is subtle, delicate and guaranteed to delight the most discerning of cognac aficionados. With hints of chocolate, baked apple, and gentle aromas of spices and liquorice, this is ideal for serving after dinner – enjoy festive tradition in style.

Absolutely packed with flavour, this aromatised wine starts out as the finest Piedmont Barolo which is then infused with herbs and spices – including quinine bark, rhubarb and cardamom – before ageing to intensify the flavours. You’ll be the host’s favourite guest if you turn up with a bottle and some dark chocolate. Just make sure they open it on the night and don’t keep it all for themselves!

Tasting Flights Tasting flights are a fun and informative way to learn about your drink of choice, available exclusively in our Great Portland Street shop any day of the week. Pop in to explore the differences between Japanese and Scotch whiskies; Cognac and Armagnac; or even Tequila or Mescal. For details, please contact the team at the shop or email tastings@ thewhiskyexchange.com


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visit la marzocco in london & leeds whether it's an espresso machine for your coffee shop, office or home; the doors at la marzocco uk & ireland are open to come and meet the team. contact us today: la marzocco uk & ireland 6 willow street london, ec2a 4bh t. +44 207 253 1644

la marzocco local suite l3.03, the leeming building, leeds, ls2 7jf t. +44 113 243 6672 info.uk@lamarzocco.com

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@lamarzoccouk


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COLUMN

On the Pass with

Tommy Banks A little patience goes a long way. Tommy Banks serves up a celebration of those who, despite their busy lives, have all the time in the world for others words by TOMMY BANKS

Find out more about Tommy’s food online at: blackswanoldstead.co.uk | rootsyork.com

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he somewhat celebratory, reflective nature of this issue has given me a little pause for thought. I find myself thinking about some of the people I feel genuinely lucky to have met over the course of my career so far. There are people who enjoy a certain popularity in particular circles, but might be totally unknown in others. More than anything, this is a small celebration of the people that have had - and in many cases continue to have - a great impact on me. Josh Eggleston is a chef based in Bristol. He owns the Pony and Trap in Chew Magna (one of the few pubs in Britain to hold a Michelin star), and five other businesses (not least of which is Salt and Malt in Bristol, which puts out some incredible fish and chips). How the guy oversees six restaurants and somehow still finds the time to play badminton, do a boatload of charity work and take my calls when I’m looking for advice, I’ll never know. But I’m both grateful for - and inspired by - the time he manages to carve out for people. Mitch, Jack and Simon, the family behind TRUEFoods have been a real source of inspiration, too. These guys are genuinely the unsung heroes of the culinary world. They create bespoke stocks that are now used up and down the country (and even in the US) in a number of Michelin-starred restaurants. Stock can be the very foundation of a dish, and chefs typically insist on making their own. The fact that so many chefs trust TRUEFoods is a real testament to the quality of their product. I’m only an irregular customer of theirs, but they’re so generous with their time it’s unreal. I caught up with them after a holiday recently, and we must have chatted for a good four or five hours. The fact that they would make so much time for a relatively small customer is amazing. Then there’s Thomas Keller, the three Michelin-starred chef behind The French Laundry. He ate at the Black Swan earlier this year. He could have just eaten and left. But instead, he came into the kitchen, took photos with the chefs, and gave out fistbumps and autographs galore. In a world of inflated egos, it not only showed a real touch of class on his part, but by staying and spending that time with the staff, he went beyond being polite to become a real source of inspiration for those working in the kitchen. I find myself thinking of Andrew Fairlie too, who sadly passed away last year. I met him some three years ago whilst filming for Master Chef. Post-shoot, I found myself sitting at the hotel bar with him absolutely wracking his brains. Even after a long day of filming, he still showed a genuine interest in what I had to say, and a great courteousness when answering my endless barrage of questions. He genuinely inspired something in me, I aspire to show that same patience and courteousness to others as a result of his kindness. I guess the unifying theme here is time, which makes sense. At the end of the day, the measure of a man is not found in his list of accolades and achievements. It’s determined by the time he makes for others. It’s no coincidence, then, that those I admire and respect the most are those who have managed to make time for relative strangers despite their ridiculously busy lives. In all honesty, I still struggle to follow suit. I still find myself cutting conversations short every now and again, or trying to get out of certain situations because there’s somewhere else I need to be. But I try to check myself on it as much as possible as a direct result of the wonderful people I’ve mentioned. You never know quite what impact you might have on someone just by giving them a little of your time. We’re all living such busy lives nowadays, we’re all so driven and switched on that the personal side of business, and indeed the personal side of life, often gets forgotten about. When you really think about it, time is the most valuable currency of them all. To invest a little more of that time in those around you can really pay off in some incredible ways. TB

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DINING

Shiro Dashi MAKES 750 ML (25½ FL OZ/3 CUPS) 20 cm (8 in) piece of konbu, weighing about 20 g (¾ oz) 60 g (2 oz) freshly shaved katsuobushi or hanakatsuo

Artisan Eats:

GOMA DOFU From Food Artisans of Japan by Nancy Singleton Hachisu (Hardie Grant, £25)

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cornerstone of temple food, goma dofu is deceptively difficult to prepare well. The key to success is a zealous (and long) stirring process that is not for the faint of heart, so the job given to new acolytes at Zen Buddhist temples. Nonetheless, wellmade goma dofu is sublime; so worth the effort. Goma dofu can be served with a tiny drizzle of shoyu if not serving on a zensai plate with other preparations. EJ

1 Soak the konbu overnight if possible, or at least for a few hours, in a medium pot with 1 liter (34 fl oz/4 cups) cold water. Bring almost to a boil over medium heat. Just before the water reaches boiling, remove the konbu. 2 Stir in the katsuobushi and simmer for 10 minutes (increase the simmer time to 15 minutes if making larger batches). Strain through a sieve lined with muslin (cheesecloth) or an unbleached coffee filter. You can use the konbu and katsuobushi for a second dashi or another dish, or discard. 3 Store the dashi refrigerated for 1-2 days, but best use as quickly as possible.

MAKES 8–12 SMALL SQUARES

Fiddlehead Ferns with Smashed Tofu

100 g (3½ oz) Japanese sesame paste 25 g (1 oz) sesame seeds the same color as the paste, finely ground (optional) 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) Shiro Dashi (see below) 50 g (1¾ oz) kudzu powder (kuzuko), well crushed 1 teaspoon freshly grated wasabi, for serving

SERVES 4 Fiddlehead fern is a delicate mountain vegetable that appears in the spring. Although not all fiddleheads need their natural bitterness (aku) removed by soaking in ash, Kanji Nakatani performs this step here. Simply use hardwood ash from a fireplace.

1 Put the sesame paste and ground seeds, if using, in a single layer of muslin (cheesecloth) and twist up to make a bundle. Tie well with a piece of kitchen twine. 2 Heat the dashi in a medium saucepan over low heat and drop in the bundle of sesame paste. Heat slowly to melt out the sesame paste and extract flavor from the ground sesame seeds. Press down on the bundle with a spoon so that all the paste mixes into the dashi and only the seed solids remain. Remove the bundle, squeeze it one last time into the pan, and discard the contents. 3 Stir a little of the sesame dashi into the kudzu powder in a small bowl, to dissolve the powder and emulsify. Scrape back into the saucepan and stir madly over low heat as the mixture thickens and becomes glossy and extremely sticky. This will take a good 15 minutes of stirring continuously and strenuously. By the end, the mixture will almost have a life of its own as it lifts out of the pan.

Photography © Kenta Izumi and Kenji Miura

4 Scrape into a 10 x 20cm (4 x 8 in) loaf pan and cool to room temperature. Chill for 2 hours before cutting into small squares and serving with a dab of wasabi as a small bite before a meal. Keeps for about 3 or 4 days, if refrigerated.

small handful of hardwood ash 2 small bunches fiddlehead ferns (about 250 g/9 oz) 300 g momendofu or Japanese style soft block tofu ⅛ teaspoon fine sea salt ½ tablespoon fine white Japanese sugar ( johakuto) 1 Combine the ash and fiddleheads in a medium saucepan and cover with boiling water. Place a lid on the pan and let cool to room temperature. Soak overnight. 2 Discard the ash water and rinse the fiddleheads well, removing all traces of ash. Clean the pan and fill with cold water. Drop in the fiddleheads and leave to soak for another 4 hours or more. 3 Drain, pat the fiddleheads dry in a clean dish towel, and chop finely. Put the tofu in a fine sieve set above a bowl. Place a small saucepan half full of water on top of the tofu and set aside for 20 minutes, allowing the tofu to express excess water. 5 Drop the drained tofu into a Japanese grinding bowl (suribachi) and smash it to a smooth paste. Stir the salt and sugar into the tofu, and fold in threequarters of the chopped fiddlehead. 6 Serve in small mounds garnished with the remaining fiddlehead, on a zensai plate or as a first course. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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DRINKING

THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL

Mixing With:

Black Tot Rum Inspired by more than three centuries of naval tradition, Black Tot rum is a modern take on a classic rum style. We ask a few industry experts just how to serve it

words by WILL HALBERT

Unhindered Created by Pippa Guy (The Savoy’s America Bar) A straight-up bruiser of a cocktail, Pippa Guy’s Unhindered plays with Black Tot's bittersweet, blackcoffee-and-dark-chocolate palate to remarkable effect. By turns a kiss on the lips and a slap in the face, we can’t get enough of it. What’s in it? 40ml Black Tot Rum 20ml Cynar 20ml Oloroso sherry 3 dashes Angostura bitters How’s it served? In a chilled coupette and garnished with an orange peel How’s it made? Add all ingredients to mixing glass filled with ice. Stir. Strain into a chilled coupette and garnish with orange.

In the Mix: Black Tot Inspired by tradition, unhindered by convention Fruity, enticing, and full of character, Black Tot Rum boasts a rich, golden marriage of fruity Barbadian, full bodied Guyanese and vibrant Jamaican Rums that warms the soul. Each sip releases the richness of tropical fruits, the sweetness of Caribbean cakes, a lacing of intense espresso, and a finish of sweet spices. And it just so happens to make a mean cocktail, too. As a matter of fact, here’s three we prepared earlier. And by ‘we’, we mean people with a command of the cocktail craft entirely superior to our own. Bottoms up. EJ

Right Hand Originally created by Michael McIlroy at Milk & Honey. Given the Black Tot Twist by Speciality Drink’s Rum Ambassador, Dean MacGregor The Negroni is a cocktail institution so imposing and monolithic in its classic status that few people dare to mess with its core components. Which is a shame, for as the Right Hand proves, swapping out the gin for a little Black Tot leaves you with vastly more nuanced and balanced cocktail. What’s in it? 40ml Black Tot Rum 20ml Sweet Vermouth (Cocchi Torino) 20ml Campari How’s it served? Over ice in an old fashioned glass. Garnish an orange. How’s it made? Add all ingredients into a mixing glass filled with ice. Stir and strain into an old fashioned glass filled with ice and garnish with an orange slice.

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Devil’s Cup Created by Speciality Brand’s Head of Creativity & Drinks, Jon Lister Now, Coffee and rum are familiar bedfellows, but tonic? Tonic makes things interesting. Far more approachable than you might first expect, tonic water and cold brew coffee prove to be the perfect combo for teasing out the subtle cinnamon and anise qualities that lie at the heart of Black Tot. What’s in it? 60ml Black Tot 15ml Velvet falernum (coconut infused) 50ml Tonic water 60ml Cold brew coffee How’s it served? In a highball glass. Over ice. Garnished with coconut chips. How’s it made? Simply add all ingredients to a highball glass and fill with ice, then garnish and enjoy.


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t s a f k a e r B of e The Hom An independent, family owned restaurant delivering an authentic American-Canadian Breakfast & Brunch menu Dump Trump

THIS CHRISTMAS MOOSE IS HEADING TO LEEDS! OPENING DECEMBER ʻ19

PICCADILLY, MANCHESTER Piccadilly Approach Manchester, M1 2GH

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YORK ST, MANCHESTER 20 York St, York House Manchester, M2 3BB

DALE ST, LIVERPOOL 6 Dale St Liverpool, L2 4TQ

HOPE ST, LIVERPOOL 88 Federation House, Hope St Liverpool, L1 9BW

moosecoffee.co - @moosecoffee

CROSBY, LIVERPOOL 157 College Rd, Crosby Liverpool, L23 3AS

BOND COURT, LEEDS Unit 2, Bond Court Leeds, LS1 2JZ


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RECIPE

The Recipe:

Matty Matheson’s Return of the Mac Compliments of Black Axe Mangal (Phaidon), available now

T

he much-anticipated first cookbook from one of London's most-loved cult restaurants, Chef Lee Tiernan's Black Axe Mangal is a sensual riot, combining innovative open-fire cooking and underused ingredients with a bold aesthetic, influenced by his love of music and skate culture. This, the London restaurant’s first cookbook, brings together Tiernan’s signature recipes - including Pig's Cheek and Prune Doughnuts, Squid Ink Flatbreads with Smoked Cod’s Roe and Shrimp-encrusted Pigs' Tails - along with step-by-step instructions for the three fundamentals of Black Axe Mangal cooking: bread, smoking and grilling. The two busiest and most fun nights in BAM’s history to date are the collaborative dinners we did with our brother Matty, who is humble, subtle and wise in equal measure. This tastes like a Big Mac 2.0, and I can’t get enough of it. It’s remarkably easy to recreate this at home. EJ

Essential equipment pizza oven, pizza stone or cast-iron frying pan (skillet) 2 pizza peels Makes 8 1 tablespoon beef dripping 600 g/1 lb 5 oz fatty minced (ground) beef (ask your butcher for aged beef if possible) 240 ml (8 fl oz/1 cup) chicken or beef stock (broth) ½ x quantity Flatbread Dough melted butter, for brushing 4 tablespoons sesame seeds 16 slices American cheese 400 g/1 lb firm mozzarella cheese, grated 1 x 340-g/12-oz jar gherkin (dill pickle) slices 1 onion, thinly sliced large handful finely shredded iceberg lettuce salt and freshly ground black pepper For the burger sauce 100 g (3½ oz/⅓ cup) French’s mustard 4 tablespoons Heinz Ketchup 4 tablespoons Hellmann’s Mayonnaise 1 tablespoon diced shallot 1 tablespoon diced gherkins

Black Axe Mangal (Phaidon) is available now

Method 1 First, prepare the beef. Heat a frying pan (skillet) over a medium heat and melt the dripping in the pan, or if yo,u can’t get hold of any, use vegetable oil. Fry the minced (ground) beef, breaking up any big clumps, and season well with salt. When the beef has taken on a little colour, about 3–5 minutes, add the stock (broth). Simmer the beef gently for 15 minutes. 2 Allow to cool. At this point, you can store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator to use later, or cook straight away. 3 To make the burger sauce, whisk all the ingredients together in a small bowl. 4 Pat out the first piece of Flatbread Dough. Cover the perimeter of the bread with melted butter and scatter a liberal amount of sesame seeds over the butter. 5 Spoon some of the meat over the first pizza base; it’s an idea to pat the meat down ever so gently, just to secure it to the dough, as this will stop you losing some of it when you transfer the bread to the oven. 6 Place the bread close to the flame in the oven. When one side of the bread starts to blister and colour, turn the bread 180 degrees and cook until golden and blistered on the other side, around 3–5 minutes. 7 Pull the bread to the mouth of the oven, place 2 slices of American cheese on the pizza and a smattering of grated mozzarella. Return to the oven to melt briefly – personally, I avoid any colouring of the cheese whatsoever. When the cheese has melted, retrieve the pizza from the oven. Apply lashings of burger sauce and gherkin (dill pickle) slices and a smattering of sliced white onion. Finish with a pile of iceberg lettuce. Repeat with the rest of the dough and ingredients. 8 I fold this pizza in half and eat in one sitting, oblivious to anyone else in my presence, but you can be polite and cut it into slices to share round while you are waiting for the rest of the pizzas to cook, if you are of a generous nature. Have lots of paper napkins ready to wipe burger sauce from your chin. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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LIFESTYLE

Espresso Legacy Part museum, part cultural project, La Marzocco’s newly-opened Accademia del Caffè Espresso provides an all-important hub for research, innovation and sustainability in the ever changing world of coffee

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words by WILL HALBERT


THE ESSENTIAL JOURNAL X LA MARZOCCO

P

ian di San Bartolo, Florence 1960. La Marzocco officially opens the doors of its new headquarters. Alive with the hustle and bustle of its workers, the headquarters was always considered to be more of a workshop than a typical ‘officina’. A meeting place of likeminded artists, artisans, and aficionados, the site offered the perfect architectural representation of La Marzocco’s communal, convivial philosophy. Fast forward 60 years and it’s safe to say that said same philosophy remains. And while the company’s headquarters has relocated to Scarperia, The Pian di San Bartolo site continues to uphold La Marzocco’s values under a new name: Accademia del Caffè espresso. Re-opening its doors for the first time last month since La Marzocco’s move in 2009, the Accademia del Caffè espresso now stands as an awe-inspiring monument to the company’s past, and an exhilarating glimpse into the company’s glowing future.

‘La Marzocco seeks to unite people across generational and geographical gaps to further our understanding of espresso.’ The site finds itself reimagined as a global education and innovation center. A sensitive, loving restoration ensures that the original structure and architectural design of the site remains, but Accademia oozes a modern style and sophistication that’s perfect for the task at hand. La Marzocco seeks to unite people across generational and geographical gaps to further our understanding of all things espresso. Think lecture rooms and brewing facilities, cupping areas and even a well-stocked library. Bottom line? Accademia del Caffè espresso isn’t just a visual ode to the company’s rich heritage, nor is is an architectural vanity project. Instead, this is a heartfelt attempt to bring people together over a love of coffee, a thirst for knowledge, and a hunger for progress. In La Marzocco’s own words: ‘The desire is to diminish the distance between the past, the present and the future, as well as between art and science, craftsmanship and technology.’ In other words, this is art, science, and history, all brought together over a good cup of coffee, which, when you think about it, is exactly what La Marzocco have done best for over 90 years. EJ

First off, tell us a little about the team at the Accademia. Our powerful team is composed of the general manager, Marta Kokosar, who has been in charge of this project for over 5 years. Then there’s Eleonora Angela Maria Ignazzi as the Content Curator, Silvia Bartoloni as Alliance Coordinator, Massimo Battaglia as Head of Education supported by Gianni Tratzi as Coffee Specialist and Stefano della Pietra who is the Head of Custom and Innovation workshop of the Accademia. Stefano is supported by our most talented experimental artisans Lorenzo Santoni, Lorenzo Carcasci and Marco Toscani. How does the Accademia tie in with La Marzocco’s wider ethos and philosophy? Accademia and La Marzocco shares and fosters the same values and visions: The importance of human relationships; the attention to detail and scientific research and innovation; a fundamental focus on sustainability and the upcoming challenges of the coffee world. While La Marzocco focuses on pursuing excellence in hand-made, espresso coffee machines, Accademia aims to create a space where a number of topics can be discussed and openly shared. A place that takes into account each and every step of the process, from the origin of the coffee to the final result in your cup. What can we expect to find once inside the Accademia? Accademia has two levels. On the street level, the area is dedicated to the research and innovation workshop that will focus more on the machine technology and high-end engineering customization. The upper floor has three main areas. One area is dedicated to our history and heritage that and includes a temporary exhibition area. It’s a modern and modular museum that’s currently showcasing our iconic machines and the tech behind them. Then there’s the core area, dedicated to coffee. Found at the centre of the building, it’s equipped with a coffee plantation over five metres high. It’s dedicated to exploring the genetics of coffee, its botanical elements and notions and, of course, the climate emergency challenges that coffee currently faces. Lastly, we have an educational area complete with a dedicated roasting lab, sensory and cupping lab, conference room, and a beautiful common area for workshops and events!

whereby brilliant minds are put together to share their ideas. The Accademia will also offer a fully immersive program that will allow students to experience the factory, and some other wonderful aspects of the region. Can you tell us a little about the first exhibition, Genius Loci? True to its meaning ‘Genius Loci’ is a celebration of the spirit of this place, La Marzocco’s old ‘Officina’. After all, this building was the first La Marzocco factory, operating from 1959 until 2009. The peculiarity of the architectural structure blends perfectly with the fascinating atmosphere of the interiors. We have decided to let the main characters of the history of this place speak; this is why the exhibition is made up of testimonies from the people that used to work here. Plus, we have recreated an original workstation with an original wood bench and tools from the ‘50s and ‘60s. Here, you can almost experience the space as it was when it was fully operating! Can you tell us about any upcoming events set to be held at the Accademia? In the following couple of months, we will test the space and use all the feedback and comments received during our week of preview to make adjustments and edits. We are really thankful to all those who came by and left us with some brilliant thoughts and ideas! After that, we’ll open to the public (sometime around spring 2020), and we will begin offering educational courses and staging various different events. And finally, what’s the story behind that rather lovely Alfa Romeo we caught a glimpse of inside? Ah! Of course, it’s a love story! But it’s also a story of innovative thinking. Back in the day, the van was used by the Bambi brothers [La Marzocco’s founders] to navigate the streets of Florence to showcase the latest machines, which happened to be installed in the back of the van! It’s a visual callback to the love and passion for what we do and the territory to which we belong. That passion still drives us, although now our territory now spreads beyond the streets of Florence!

Why is the level of coffee knowledge offered by the Accademia so important today? As said before, we aim to become an open platform for research and exchange, with the possibilities of sharing different point of views. Only this kind of open attitude, we believe, can allow us to offer a level of education that encompasses a variety of topics in an inclusive way. We take the same approach as a Platoon school, ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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WHAT DAY IS IT? 26TH - 31ST DECEMBER 2019

ANTI SOCIAL JAZZ CLUB BEST OF 2019 - JOE GODDARD (HOT CHIP) LOST ART SOUNDSYSTEM - PUB TROPICANA : ULTIMATE 80S PARTY NEW YEEZY EVE - WAVERTREE WORLDWIDE TAKEOVER

40 SLATER STREET, LIVERPOOL. L1 4BX THEMERCHANTLIVERPOOL.CO.UK

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Addressing the Table In a bar scene awash in a sea of themed bars and overwrought, overplayed concepts, a little low-key, of-its-place, authenticity goes a long, long way words by JAKE O’BRIEN MURPHY

@jakeobrienmurphy

COLUMN

D

o you know what Irn Bru is? It is three cheers to weirdness; it is looking out the window to find a zebra eating your flower beds for breakfast. It is a tartan-rigged Weegie with a mouth full of pennies whispering nonsense poems into a bagpipe. It is holy sacrament and industrial lubricant. Like placing your sensory organs into a nuclear-powered microwave on high. Modern art on your eyelids. It is wet sunshine. Hammer on steel, liquified lug nuts, a bioluminescent flavour paradox more reminiscent of the floor of a metal foundry than a carbonated refreshment. A drink that defies any definition; the steampunk techno-mages that engineer it had to disembowel language to even name the stuff. Most of all though? It is a product of a specific place. It is as Scottish as red hair, referendums, Robert Burns, Tennents, smoked salmon, alcoholism, kilts, pakora, peat, claymores, Nessy and shortbread. Stashed away in Glasgow’s Theatre District; behind the hallowed walls of 154 Hope Street, sits quite possibly the greatest pub to orbit the sun. Now, everyone with a heartbeat and a haircut has a constitutional right to free speech and to the comfort of their favourite pub. So before you jump down my throat - I’m not saying you are wrong to think some other boozer is best. I’m just saying you clearly haven’t been to the Potstill yet. This place is viewing egalitarianism through the bottom of a glass. They have curated a whisky collection that explores the breadth and depth of human possibility. There is a scene from the first Harry Potter film that always springs to mind when I visit. In the cack-handed care of a half-giant groundskeeper with a predilection for hooch and the black market import and export of endangered animals, Harry is taken to visits Ollivander’s Wand Shop. Inside, Harry stands amongst the cobwebs and shadows of the teaming jumble of boxed wands. Ollivander, played rather convincingly by a hexed piece of deli meat shaped like John Hurt knows his inventory in microscopic detail. He croaks Harry through the specifics until, ultimately, the wand chooses its new owner. The story follows on from here; there’s a snake in the toilet, a fair few children die, OFSTED are never called and Dumbledore is posthumously outed by a compassionate billionaire who can’t leave well enough alone. The Potstill brings that scene to mind because of the offhand brilliance of the staff. They have an otherworldly capability to pluck incredible whisky esoterica from vast libraries of knowledge they have amassed on the subject of pottables. Passion is as abundant as the bottles; they’ll gesture to the small fortune behind them and launch into an oral history of Scotland, malt men, coopers, distillers, blender and the distilleries. They can look a couple in the eye and divine the first dram they should have on becoming parents, read the weather lines of a hand and pour a symphony. Their knowledge is not just impressive, it is important. To the Scots, Whisky is liquid identity. I will never tire of the awe that a conversation with these men and women brings. If it is worth having; they’ve got it. Particular bottles were put into the barrel during a time when the United Kingdom was frantically trying to gain access to the European Union, imagine that! The shelves creek under sippable history. Across the room, happy customers harmonise in conviviality and liquor. The last time I was fortunate enough to be tucked into a corner table of the Potstill, dram in hand wearing pink cheeks and a contented smile, a friend of mine pointed to at the bar: ‘Di ye see tha?’ And right there, in its rightful place amongst the highlands, the lowlands, the speysides and the islays, was a single can of IRN BRU. ‘Original recipe; all the sugar. Properly Scottish.” Properly. JOM ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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NOT JUST A BARBERS...

attitude

66 Rose Lane, Liverpool L18 0151 724 5277

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attitude TOPMAN Church Street, Liverpool1 0151 709 1844 (opt 6)

SHOP OR BOOK ONLINE AT www.attitudemenshair.co.uk


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CULTURE

Architectural Thoughts On:

2020

Róisín Hanlon offers up a roundup of architectural delights to look out for in the year to come words by RÓISÍN HANLON

A Handsome Home A Handsome Home Schuchard House, Stan Symonds, Seaforth, Sydney, New South Wales (AU), 1963. An excerpt from Atlas of Mid-Century Modern Houses (Phaidon, out now)

‘I

like things not to have a beginning and an end,’ said Stan Symonds, an Australian architect obsessed with circular forms and curving walls. Symonds studied at the Sydney Technical College and worked for a number of architectural firms in the city before founding his own practice. Many of his projects featured circular forms of one kind or another, including his Dome House in Seaforth (1963). Just a year later, Symonds completed a striking house nearby for John and Margaret Schuchard that has also been known as the ‘Space House’ or ‘Spaceship’; the Schuchards wanted a design that would impress. The building, resembling a lookout station or observation post, sits on a steep hill with panoramic

'The building, resembling a lookout station or observation post, sits on a steep hill with panoramic views.’ views out across Middle Harbour. The house mushrooms upwards and thrusts outwards at one and the same time, like the rounded bow of a ship emerging from the rock. From an entry plinth at ground level, a spiral stair-caseclimbs to the two levels above, culminating in a living room with floor-to-ceiling glass that faces the water; the dining area and kitchen sit to the rear. Striking, sinuous and futuristic, the dwelling has been compared to the Californian hillside homes of John Lautner. EJ

Atlas of Mid-Century Modern Houses (Phaidon, out now)

Tokyo 2020 The Olympic Games can usually be relied upon to generate exciting new architecture. Many buildings are currently under construction in Tokyo now, for use in this summer’s games. The main Olympic Stadium is a sweeping oval structure designed by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. The form is made of timber and steel lattice and the exterior is planted with trees to reference the surrounding park. There has been some controversy over this project, including similarities to the previous Zaha Hadid scheme and the use of timber from ethically-questionable sources. Elsewhere the Ariake Arena by Kume Sekkei will house Volleyball and Wheelchair basketball in its harbour-side wavelike form. Alongside the new landmark stadia, Tokyo is making use of many existing buildings, including some from the previous 1964 Summer Olympics. Check out Nippon Budokan by Mamoru Tamada, which is essentially a Japanese temple re-imagined in Brutalist concrete. Venice Biennale Every other year the Venice Biennale switches between art and architecture. 2020 is an architectural year with the theme of ‘How Will We Live Together?’ Curator Hashim Sarkis says this theme is about calling on architects to imagine a ‘new spatial contract’ – to consider generous spaces allowing people to live together. The concept of ‘togetherness of people’ ranges from family units, through to communities, and up to humanity as a whole. Housing, spatial identity and climate change will all be themes likely to feature heavily. This year Britain will be represented by ‘The Garden of Privatised Delights’. Curated by Manijeh Verghese and Madeleine Kessler, this piece will explore the growing privatisation of public spaces such as high streets and playgrounds. London Design Biennale This September will see the third instalment of the London Design Biennale at Somerset House. Similarly to the Venice Biennale international designers, architects and curators are invited to create a national pavilion or exhibition responding to the theme. 2020’s theme of Resonance was chosen by curator Es Devlin ‘We live in an age of hyper resonance, the consequences of which are both exhilarating and devastating. Everything we design and everything we produce resonates.’ Devlin is an artist and designer who has worked across a range of fields and disciplines including her Fifth Lion sculpture in Trafalgar square for the 2012 Olympic Games closing ceremony. ESSENTIALJOURNAL.CO.UK

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Coffee and Counsel

Adonis Michael It’s one of the most important elements of running a business, and one of the greatest factors in its growth and success. That’s right, Adonis Michael talks the science of hiring and firing words by ADONIS MICHAEL

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teve Jobs famously had an ego bigger than the GDP of most countries, but he definitely understood his place when it came to recruitment when he said, ‘it doesn’t make sense to hire smart people and tell them what to do; we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do. Undoubtedly, he was a genius. But maybe one of his greatest insights was exactly this. And he’s not the only one. Richard Branson, In his book The Virgin Way: Everything I know about Leadership ( well worth a read incidentally, I cheated and listened to the audiobook) stresses the importance of hiring the right people by urging entrepreneurs to get their hands dirty. He, like Google CEO Larry Page, insists on being involved with all senior-level hiring decisions even when it means flying those candidates out to Necker Island for an interview. I’m sure they weren’t complaining, even if they didn’t get the gig! I can understand how some may see the recruitment process as an inconvenience, but dedicating time and resources to this is worth every second and can make the difference between the success or failure of a business. The employees are the business’ most valuable and important asset, and with football clubs, for example, the players even sit on the clubs balance sheet as an asset. If only that was the case with other businesses, company accounts would quickly look a whole lot healthier, that’s for sure, I wonder what value I would have on my own company balance sheet, or would I be a

‘I’ve been very lucky in that my personnel are some of the best in their field. But we didn’t get it right every time.’

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liability? Gulp, moving swiftly on. Okay, so you get the message: You take part in the hiring. But this is just the beginning. What are you looking for and how do you spot an Andy Robertson from a Jack Rodwell? Well, I wish I had the answer. All I can say is that I’ve been very lucky in that my personnel are some of the best in their field. But we didn’t get it right every time, let me tell you. What I’ve learnt is that there are always a number of people who have the requisite qualifications and credentials to do the job you need. I take this as a given, and that that gets you from the shredder to the desk. But sometimes even the person with the most glittering of CVs can’t cut it when it comes to the crunch. So that’s not enough. Once you get to the interview, the difference between a ‘sorry, you’ve been unsuccessful’ and a ‘we are delighted to offer you the position” isn’t those three As at A level, nor is it the University debating Prize. For me, it’s personality. And I don’t mean cracking a few jokes. How does that individual come across? How would they fit in with the team? Would they be happy in your environment? Do they have the right character? Of course, this is all about judgment. There is no formula. And then as Steve Jobs says, you have to let people flourish and listen to what they have to tell you. That’s why you’re paying them, after all. When you get this right, it’s wonderful. The stars align and everything runs like clockwork. Your business has just grown stronger. But what about if you hire a dud, a rogue who starts upsetting the apple cart? A wolf in sheep’s clothing, or a maverick you can’t contain? Well, this is where things can start getting a little tricky, and it’s always wise to take some legal advice before you take any action. As it happens, I may know someone you could call for that. AM


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0151 958 0808 info@mrblaw.co.uk

The Royal Liver Building Pier Head, Liverpool, L3 1HU michaelrosebaylis.co.uk

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ISSUE 50

Profile for The Essential Journal

Issue 50 - The Anniversary Edition  

Issue 50 - The Anniversary Edition