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TIMES

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER • 2019

Larry Morgan Racing pg 6

member spotlight Evaluating margins, pg 3 Save energy this holiday season, pg 8

ELECTRIC • NATURAL GAS • PROPANE


TIMES NOVEMBER & DECEMBER • 2019

1500 Granville Road Newark, Ohio 43058 (800) 255-6815

myenergycoop.com feedback@theenergycoop.com

In this issue

Todd Ware President & CEO Gary Baker Director of Marketing & Public Relations

Evaluating margins 3 Cybersecurity Awareness 4

Heather Juzenas Communications Manager

Cover Story 6 Save energy this holiday season 8

Please report any change of email address or phone number to us at (800) 255-6815 or by emailing feedback@theenergycoop.com. The Energy Cooperative Times is the official publication of The Energy Cooperative. This magazine is the bi-monthly communication link between The Energy Cooperative, based in Newark, Ohio, and its 65,000 members.

Director’s Corner 11 Bruce Sumner Memorial Outing 12 Holiday recipes 14 Cover: Photo by Gary Baker

M Y E N E R G Y C2O O P . C O M


Evaluating margins By Todd Ware, President & Chief Executive Officer

natural gas Members

About this time every year, The Energy Cooperative’s management staff begins the budgeting process for the next year. This process involves looking at revenues, operating expenses, and capital expenses. The process also includes reviewing our rates to ensure fixed costs are covered by fixed charges, and variable costs are covered by Todd Ware variable charges. Our goal is for all of our members to share fixed costs equally, even when no energy is being used. If the fixed rate is not high enough, large users pay a disproportionate share of the fixed charges.

Your natural gas bill has four main components: 1. The fixed monthly facility fee covers the cost of providing you with access to the natural gas pipeline system. The cost doesn’t change depending on the amount of gas you use. 2. The infrastructure replacement rider (IRR) is a fixed charge to recover the replacement of aging pipelines to comply with federal and state guidelines. 3. The gas cost is the commodity and transportation cost for the natural gas. 4. The distribution charge recovers variable operating costs based on your natural gas use.

Natural Gas Facilities Fee Adjustment For residential natural gas members, the facilities fee adjusts from $22 to $23 per month effective January 1, 2020. There will be no change to the distribution charge.

After reviewing our current rates, residential electric and natural gas rates will be adjusted effective January 1, 2020.

The cooperative difference To ensure the cooperative’s return on revenue, rates must align with assets and operating costs. Recent member surveys tell us that price, service, and reliability are most important to you. We work hard to control our expenses each day and balance those costs while bringing you reliable energy.

ELECTRIC MEMBERS Your electric bill has three main parts: 1. The fixed monthly facility fee covers the cost of connecting you to the electric grid. This cost doesn’t change depending on the amount of electricity you use each month. 2. Generation & transmission is the cost to get electricity to The Energy Cooperative’s system. This charge is a pass-through cost from our power supplier, Buckeye Power. This charge accounts for more than 50 percent of your electric bill. 3. The distribution energy charge is calculated based on the amount of electricity you use each month.

Each day we look for ways to make our operation more efficient and to be good stewards of each dollar we spend. We don’t want rates to go up and we don’t like applying rate adjustments, but these changes are necessary. The Energy Cooperative Directors and employees are committed to providing you with a good value for the service we provide. After all, we are a cooperative. We exist for our members, not to make a profit for shareholders. That’s a big part of the cooperative difference. If you have questions regarding the adjustments, please contact The Energy Cooperative’s Member Service Department at (800) 255-6815 or visit myenergycoop.com.

Electric Facilities Fee Adjustment For residential electric members, the facilities fee adjusts from $26 to $27 per month effective January 1, 2020. There will be no change to the generation and transmission charge and no change to the distribution energy charge. 3

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Cybersecurity awareness By Pat McGonagle, Vice President & Chief Financial Officer Don’t Fall for Phishing, Vishing and SMishing

Did you know that you are your own first line of defense against any type of cybersecurity threats? Have you been hacked? How would you know? As we enter the online holiday shopping season, it is important to remember cybersecurity attacks can be one click away. It is critical that you remain Pat McGonagle vigilant in protecting your personally identifiable information (PII) online.

Be on the lookout for emails, phone calls and other messages from people attempting to gain access to your information. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Trust your instinct and don’t reply or open attachments in these emails.

Always Think before you click! Do not click links or open attached files in emails or text messages from senders you do not know. Even if you do know the sender, hover over the link and check the sending email address before you click, as someone could be spoofing them.

Ransom-ware, credential theft, phishing emails and other attempts at cyber crime are much more common than you might think. Every password is a possible access point into your systems and devices. There are, however, simple ways to protect your information from cybersecurity threats.

Protect yourself Our personal information is under a constant state of attack in this digital age and this trend shows no signs of slowing down. Practice effective preventive controls to minimize the probability that your data will be breached.

Keep Your Defenses Up

It is always a good practice to remember that you are the first line of defense against cybersecurity threats.

1. Sign up for automatic updates and protect your devices with anti-virus software. Keep software up to date to help block cyber threats. 2. Back up contacts, photos, videos and other mobile data to another device or a cloud service. This is important because if your device is compromised, you must reset it to factory settings. 3. Set your devices to lock after a short time and use strong device passwords. 4. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to ensure the only person with access to your account is you. Use it for email, banking, social media, and any other service that requires you to enter a password. 5. Create strong passwords and keep them private. A poor password, even at nine characters, can be cracked almost instantly. It would take centuries to crack a good password of 12 or more mixed characters. 6. Treat Wi-Fi networks as a potential security risk. Never check financial or other sensitive accounts when using a public Wi-Fi network.

MYENERGYCOOP.COM

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Carbon monoxide safety By Connie Hogue, Director of Human Resources and Safety

Connie Hogue

Low to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning is characterized by: • Headache • Fatigue • Shortness of breath • Nausea • Dizziness.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas produced when vehicles, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, portable generators or furnaces burn fuel. People and animals are at risk when carbon monoxide builds in enclosed spaces. Fatal levels of carbon monoxide can be produced in minutes, even when doors and windows are open.

High-level carbon monoxide poisoning results in: • Mental confusion • Vomiting • Loss of muscular coordination • Loss of consciousness • Death.

TIPS TO PREVENT CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING • • • • • • • • •

Do not run a car in a garage that is attached to a house. This puts you at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning even with the garage door open. Do not use portable, flameless, chemical heaters indoors. Never use a gas oven to heat your home. Never use a generator inside your home, basement, garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door or vent. Have your chimney checked and cleaned every year. Make sure your fireplace damper is open before lighting a fire and well after the fire is extinguished. Install a battery-operated or battery backup carbon monoxide detector in the hallway near each separate sleeping area in your home. Check or replace the battery for each carbon monoxide detector when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. Replace carbon monoxide detectors every five years.

If you experience any of the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, go outside to get fresh air immediately.

WHEN THE CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM SOUNDS The Consumer Product Safety Commission warns that you should never ignore a carbon monoxide alarm. Instead, follow these steps: • Move outside to get fresh air. • Call emergency services, fire department or 9-1-1. • Do a head count to check for everyone. • Do not reenter the premises until emergency responders have given you permission.

Winter is a prime time for carbon monoxide poisoning because people turn on their heating systems and often warm their cars in garages. As the weather turns colder, it’s important to take extra precautions to keep your family safe.

SYMPTOMS OF CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING Everyone is at risk. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) shows infants, the elderly, and people with chronic heart disease, anemia or breathing problems as more prone to illness or death from carbon monoxide poisoning. Symptom severity varies depending on the level of carbon monoxide and duration of exposure. People often mistake mild symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning for the flu.

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LARRY MORGAN RACING From Single Phase To Three Phase At 200 mph By Gary Baker, Director of Marketing & Public Relations Imagine driving a car from Newark, Ohio to Las Vegas, Nevada in less than 9 hours. Or picture yourself driving from Newark to Chicago in 105 minutes. This would be possible only if you drove an average of 200 mph. Most of us will never travel that fast in a car. But Larry Morgan has done it, one-quarter Gary Baker mile at a time, thousands of times. Larry spent 30 years as a National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) Pro-Stock racer and is one of the most successful drivers of all time.

Larry Morgan still enjoys getting behind the wheel and traveling across the country to NHRA races. His major focus, however, is his custom CNC machine shop. Larry Morgan Racing builds racing engine blocks, heads, manifolds and most any custom motor parts. Walking into the business, you are greeted with an impressive number of trophies and awards before heading into the machine shop. Larry earned 10 NHRA Pro Stock victories, 19 NHRA event victories, and 48 NHRA final round appearances.

Larry’s love for machines started long before his professional racing career began. As a young boy, he took apart the engine of a riding lawn mower and completely rebuilt it (with more power). Larry laughed as he told us he rebuilt the motor until it went 30 mph. Larry’s love for speed has served him well—he made a career out of it. Larry Morgan Racing manufactures quality custom parts for pro-stock, pro-mod, pro-nitrous, pro-boost, top sportsman, top dragster, pro extreme and grudge racing.

Here are a few of the many championships Larry Morgan earned as driver: • $25,000 Mr. Gasket Challenge three times. • $50,000 Budweiser Shootout • 2015: Charlotte Four-Wide Nationals winner • 2012: Top ten finish • 2010: Debuted Ford Mustang and reached finals at Summit Nationals • 2009: Raced to Victory at Las Vegas; Posted career-best speed • 2008: Logged three runner-up finishes, including Indianapolis MYENERGYCOOP.COM

• • •

2007: Posted career best time competing in the inaugural Countdown to the Championship. 2006: Runner-up finish at St. Louis and reached three semifinal rounds 2005: Reached semifinal round in Englishtown 2004: No. 1 qualifying position at Atlanta, snapping an 11-race top qualifying streak by Greg Anderson; First top-five points finish since 1993 2002: Won first race, Sonoma, since 1994; earned a $25,000 bonus for winning the Motel 6 “Who Got The Light” award for posting the smallest margin of victory during the season (.0002 seconds) 2001: Debuted the Dodge Neon at Denver.

Dave Elk has worked with Larry for years building engines. He continues to build parts by hand on a manual mill. Larry’s son, Nick Morgan, uses the latest technology to produce high-quality parts. Nick has always been a fixture in Larry Morgan Racing. Larry remembers him getting off the school bus as a little boy and running straight to the shop. He’d see what they were working on, then start projects of his own.

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Pictured from left: Dave Elk, Larry Morgan, Nick Morgan

As an adult, Nick uses high end technology to design custom engine blocks, heads, manifolds, and most any custom motor part. He graduated from COTC, in the CNC machining program. Recently, Larry added two large CNC machines and Nick put his skills to use right away. Each machine is larger than a pickup truck but works much like a big 3D printer. Thanks to Nick’s design work and the new CNC machines, they no longer need to buy parts for their engines. Instead they can make their own custom parts in Newark, Ohio. After buying the large CNC machines, Larry knew he needed to upgrade his electric service to support the new machines. Larry Morgan Racing was using a phase converter to convert single-phase to threephase power on his own and was maxing out the capacity of the equipment. He worked with Josh Filler, Electric Engineering Manager, and John Strathman, Senior Staking Technician, to upgrade his single-phase service to a three-phase service. By upgrading to three-phase service from The Energy Cooperative, Larry Morgan racing can run all their machines at once, achieving higher efficiencies and producing more engine products in less time.

Nick Morgan

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Pictured: Trophies from Larry’s collection Three phase service

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save energy this holiday season TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SUNLIGHT

Are you looking for ways to save money on your utility bill this holiday season? Here are a few tips from the U.S. Department of Energy to help you save energy and money.

Use sunlight to your advantage this winter. Open curtains during the day and allow sunlight to warm your home naturally. Close curtains at night to reduce the chill from cold windows.

PLUG HOLIDAY DECORATIONS INTO POWER STRIPS Even when you aren’t using lights and electronics, they still draw small amounts of energy — at an average cost of $100 a year. Plug your electronics into a power strip and turn it off to reduce your energy bills.

PREPARE YOUR WINDOWS FOR WINTER Weatherizing your windows can reduce drafts, and installing storm windows can cut heat loss through your windows by 25-50 percent.

INSTALL A LIGHT TIMER

MAINTAIN YOUR FIREPLACE

Timer controls allow you turn lights on and off at specific times, while staying in the holiday spirit. Inflatable decorations are often the most expensive to use. A large, animated snow globe can use about 200 watts. As a general rule, the larger the inflatable the more it costs to power.

Proper chimney maintenance -- like sealing your fireplace flue damper, caulking around your hearth, and installing tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system to blow warmed air back into the room -- will help keep warm air in your house and cold air out.

USE LED LIGHTS

INSTALL A PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT

Light up your home with LED lights. They last longer and consume 70 percent less energy than conventional incandescent light strands. It only costs $0.27 to light a 6-foot tree for 12 hours a day for 40 days with LEDs compared to $10 for incandescent lights.

Don’t pay for warm air you’re not using while you’re away for the holidays. A programmable thermostat can automatically lower the temperature, and 10-15 degrees for eight hours can save 5-15 percent a year on heating bills. The key is to set it and forget it.

SAVE ENERGY IN THE KITCHEN

GET A HOME ENERGY AUDIT

Cooking typically accounts for 4.5% of your home’s energy use. During the holidays, that number jumps as high as 15%. Using pots and pans that match the size of the burner can save about $36 a year for an electric range or $18 for gas. And resist the temptation to open the oven door for a peek at your food’s progress — the oven has to work harder each to reheat each time the door is opened. Use the oven light instead.

Give yourself the gift of energy savings by having The Energy Cooperative perform a home energy audit. Our energy advisor will check your home for air leaks, inspect insulation, survey heating and cooling equipment and more. We can also recommend ways to save you money on your utility bill.

Questions?

BUY ENERGY STAR ELECTRONICS Are computers, TVs or other electronics on your wish list this holiday season? Be sure to ask for ENERGY STAR rated home electronics for instant energy savings. Depending on usage, an ENERGY STAR computer can save 30-65 percent more energy compared a computer without this designation. MYENERGYCOOP.COM

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For more information on energy saving tips, or to schedule an energy audit, contact us at 1-800-255-6815. You can also chat with a member service representative from our website at myenergycoop.com.


Space Heater Safety Tips

Space heaters are a great way to warm specific rooms in your home without having to crank up the thermostat, but using space heaters doesn’t come without risk! Use the tips below to keep your home safe.

DO: Keep your space heater at a safe distance (at least 3 feet) from kids, pets and flammable items.

DO: Keep your space heater in low-moisture rooms.

DO: Plug your space heater directly into the wall outlet.

DO: Buy a unit with an automatic shutoff in case the unit tips over, or you forget to shut it off.

DON’T: Leave your space heater unattended. Always unplug it before you leave the house or go to bed.

DO: Always follow the directions and take a broken space heater to a qualified appliance service center. AUTO SHUT OFF

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DON’T: Place your space heater near curtains, clothing, furniture or bedding.

DON’T: Use an extension cord to plug in your space heater. It can cause the heater to overheat, and can be a tripping hazard.

DON’T: Try to repair a broken space heater yourself.

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DON’T: Put your space heater in your bathroom. The moisture can damage the unit, which could cause it to malfunction.

1-800-255-6815


APPLIANCE WORD SEARCH

Did you know major appliances account for a large portion of your home’s energy use? Circle the names of all major appliances in the puzzle below. Use the word bank for clues!

R D M I C R O W A V E Y J W P

E I T V K S I H I O C N A O Q

T S N X G X T P R N M S R Y I

A H C E L T J J C V H E Y G I

E W O H V R Z W O I Y Y N Z Z

H A R U H O G E N R E H S L N

R S B D K R T G D Z V N N X S

E H O P E V M S I A O L I X H

T E C T H A E K T Q T L U X D

A R A U C H H Z I C S E Y I Y

W E I H T C U G O N I X Y H X

H X I O H Q M V N Q F F T R N

C N L Y A A J M E I D N S C G

E C P D K D W N R Q N V S L L

R E F R I G E R A T O R K F C

REFRIGERATOR

DISHWASHER

AIR CONDITIONER

STOVE

WASHING MACHINE

MICROWAVE

HEATER

WATER HEATER

CLOTHES DRYER

OVEN

MYENERGYCOOP.COM

WORD BANK 10


Director’s Corner By Joanne Little, CCD, BL, District 8 Director

Joanne Little

The holidays are a time of year that many of us eagerly anticipate. The season is marked by special foods, seasonal decorations and lots of festivities. We cherish carrying on old family traditions and enjoy creating new ones. For me personally, I look forward to more time spent with family and friends.

Given the hustle and bustle of the season, the holidays can also offer an opportunity to slow down and reflect. As one of your directors at The Energy Cooperative, I am grateful for you, the members of our cooperative.

You see, one of our founding principles is “concern for community.” While our main focus is providing safe, reliable and affordable energy, we want to give back. We want to help our community thrive.

Reflection In looking back at this past year, I’m grateful that we were able to make a positive impact in the community. Through sponsorships in our member communities to programs like Operation Round Up, we value giving back. We were also grateful for the opportunity to host our members at Earth & Energy Day and Kids Day in 2019. Additionally, we continue to work closely with our local high schools to award college scholarships. In 2019, we awarded 16 scholarships to local scholars.

Looking Ahead Looking ahead to 2020, we hope you will share your opinions with us. We recognize our members have a valuable perspective, and that’s why we continually seek your input. Whether through community events, social media channels or the annual meeting, we want to hear from you. We exist for you — the members of the cooperative — and we depend on your feedback. As we prepare for next year, we look forward to the opportunity to serve you and the greater community. On behalf of the The Energy Cooperative family, we hope your holidays are indeed merry and bright!

SAFE DECOR for the holidays

Home fires and electrical accidents typically increase during winter months, so keep the following holiday lighting tips in mind for a safe holiday season.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Carefully inspect all electrical decorations before you use them. Consider purchasing LED lights, which use less energy and run cooler than traditional incandescent lights. Never mount or support light strings in a way that could damage the cord’s insulation. Make sure cords are not pinched in doors, windows or under heavy furniture. Always unplug electrical decorations before replacing bulbs or fuses. 5. Turn off all indoor and outdoor electrical decorations before leaving home or going to sleep. 11

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The Bruce Sumner Memorial golf Outing The Energy Cooperative raised more than $15,000 for its Operation Round Up Foundation at the annual Bruce Sumner Memorial Golf Outing. The outing occurred on Sept. 16 at Moundbuilders Country Club in Newark. The fundraiser is named for The Energy Cooperative’s former vice president and chief operating officer of electric operations. Sumner was passionate about the Operation Round Up Foundation and chaired the golf outing planning committee. He spent countless hours working on the event — and raising many thousands of dollars each year.

On October 8, 2019 The Energy Cooperative donated the proceeds from this outing to the Operation Roundup Foundation. A total of $15, 129 was donated as a result of this outing.

The Energy Cooperative’s Operation Round Up Foundation has donated over $3.5 million to community groups and organizations. Since 2005, our members have rounded up their energy bills to the next dollar to benefit Operation Round Up. Each member donates an average of fifty cents per month, with a maximum donation of $12 per year. Operation Round Up grants are awarded to a group or organization that serves people living in our member communities. Programs of all types apply for funding. To learn more about Operation Round Up Foundation, or apply for grants, visit myenergycoop.com/operation-roundup

Pictured from left: Camilla Potter and Nelson Smith

Pictured from left: Bonnie Sumner and Todd Ware

MYENERGYCOOP.COM

Pictured from left: Bob McGaughy, Todd Ware

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Important Messages for Natural Gas Members The Operation Round Up Foundation awarded $29,925 in October to the following community organizations: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Hospice of Central Ohio for air matt system Hospice of North Central Ohio for weighted blankets Twin Oak Elementary for ELMO document camera Ohio Nature Education toward additional animal enclosures The Main Place, Inc. for laptops Weathervane Playhouse toward new sound system Monroe Township Fire Dept. toward new fire hose Northside Baptist/Upward Basketball toward new gym floor Licking County Historical Society toward storage improvements United Way of Licking County for TV monitor/screen Child Care Resources, Inc. for Smart Board Angels Assisting Felines for beds and supplies Community Roots toward mower.

Do you know an organization that could benefit from an Operation Round Up Grant? The remaining meeting date for 2019 is Dec. 3. Application materials must be received by Nov. 17.

Apply Online Visit myenergycoop.com/operation-roundup to apply for an Operation Round Up grant, or download the application for paper submission.

Scholarship Opportunities Do you know a high school senior looking for scholarship opportunities? They may be eligible to win a children of members scholarship from The Energy Cooperative. Contact your high school guidance counselor for details, or visit myenergycoop.com/youth-programs. Scholarship applications will be available on our website beginning Dec. 6. Applications must be recieved by Friday, Feb. 7 for consideration.

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In accordance with Federal Pipeline Safety Regulations 49 CFR, Part 192.16, The Energy Cooperative is required to inform members that the member shall be responsible for their gas service lines.

Here’s what you need to know 1. The member is responsible for the maintenance and repair of all gas piping from the gas meter to all gas appliances. 2. The member is responsible for the repair/ replacement of the gas service line located on the member’s property from the buried curb valve to the inlet of the gas meter. Buried gas piping that is not maintained may be subject to the potential hazards of corrosion and leakage. 3. For your safety, all buried pipe should be periodically inspected for leaks. If the buried piping is metallic, it should also be periodically inspected for corrosion. If an unsafe condition is found, the gas piping will need to be promptly repaired. 4. When digging near buried gas piping, the piping should be located in advance and the excavation done by hand. As a reminder, any time you are excavating, OHIO811 should be called by simply dialing 811 or 1-800-362-2764 at least 48 hours prior to digging. OHIO811 will notify various utility companies to locate utility lines in the area. 5.  Plumbing and heating contractors can assist in locating, inspecting, and repairing the member’s buried piping. The Federal Department of Transportation (DOT) requires that a DOT-qualified plumbing contractor must be used to repair or replace a member’s buried piping upstream of the meter, including the gas riser attached to the meter set. While this is not required for piping downstream of the meter, The Energy Cooperative strongly recommends a DOTqualified plumber be used for all buried gas piping. 1-800-255-6815


HolidaySubmitted Recipes by our members Yellow squash pudding submitted by Katrina Walker Spinach quiche submitted by Valerie Keaser

Ingredients

4 cups yellow squash - shredded with skin, no seeds 3/4 cup margarine 2 tbs vanilla 1/2 Tbsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp nutmeg 1/4 tsp ginger 1/4 tsp salt 2/3 cup sugar 1 can (12 oz) evaporated milk 4 eggs 1/2 cup flour 1 small package instant vanilla pudding

Ingredients

10 to 20 oz (your preference) frozen chopped spinach (cooked and drained) Dozen eggs 2 cups shredded colby & monterey jack cheese mix 16 oz small curd cottage cheese 1/2 cup flour 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1 stick of completely melted butter

Instructions

Instructions

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Shred yellow squash (leave skin on for nutrition). 3. Place shredded squash, margarine, spices, and salt in medium saucepan on low. 4. Stir and cook mixture until squash is cooked (approx 10 minutes). 5. Add the rest of ingredients, continue stirring until mixed. 6. Pour into greased individual custard cups or use unbaked pie crust. 7. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until set. 8. Sprinkle cinnamon or nutmeg on top before baking if desired.

“This dish is always a huge hit at potlucks. Everyone wants the recipe!” – Valerie Keaser

“This is great with pecan and vanilla ice cream.” – Katrina Walker MYENERGYCOOP.COM

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Beat eggs in large bowl. Add flour, baking powder, salt and stir. All all cheeses and stir. Pour mixture into greased pan. Pour hot butter into mixture. Bake uncovered 375 degrees, then turn oven down to 325 degrees and continue baking for 35 more minutes .

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Happy Holidays from The Energy Cooperative!

Wishing you a merry and bright holiday season!

Energy Remember to decorate your tree with energy-saving Tip LED holiday lights. 15

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1500 Granville Road P.O. Box 4970 Newark, Ohio 43058-4970 1-800-255-6815

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Important phone numbers • •

To report an electric power outage or a downed power line: call 1-888-535-5732. To report a natural gas or propane outage or emergency: 1-800- 255-6815.

Safety Reminders: Safety is always our top priority. • •

If you smell natural gas (rotten eggs), leave the area immediately. Call 911. Then call us at 1-800-255-6815. If you see a downed power line or other electrical hazard call 911. Then call us at 1-800-255-6815. Assume downed power lines are energized and dangerous. Consider any object touching lines energized as well.

Profile for The Energy Cooperative

The Energy Cooperative Times November & December 2019