Page 1

TIMES NOVEMBER & DECEMBER • 2018

FOCUSED ON SAFETY, RELIABILITY, AND SUPPLY Natural Gas Pipeline Replacement

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE: pg 3 • PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE pg 4 • LIGHTING UP NORTH CAROLINA pg 8 • DIRECTOR’S CORNER pg 11 • PROPANE PRICES pg 14 • MESSAGE FROM MEMBER SERVICE

ELECTRIC • NATURAL GAS • PROPANE


THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE

TIMES

1500 GRANVILLE ROAD NEWARK, OHIO 43058 (800) 255-6815

WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM FEEDBACK@THEENERGYCOOP.COM

TODD WARE PRESIDENT & CEO GARY BAKER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS HEATHER JUZENAS COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER COOPERATIVE MEMBERS – PLEASE REPORT ANY CHANGE OF EMAIL ADDRESS OR PHONE NUMBER TO US AT (800) 255-6815 OR FEEDBACK@THEENERGYCOOP.COM. THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES IS THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE. WITH A CIRCULATION OF MORE THAN 63,000. THIS MAGAZINE IS THE BI-MONTHLY COMMUNICATION LINK BETWEEN THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE BASED IN NEWARK, OHIO, AND ITS MEMBERS.

2

WHAT’S INSIDE: 3•

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE Your Membership Matters

4•

LIGHTING UP NORTH CAROLINA Learn how our crews helped restore power after Hurricane Florence.

6•

COVER STORY Natural gas pipeline replacement improves reliability and supply.

8•

DIRECTOR’S CORNER District 1 Director, Don Hawk discusses member engagement in our cooperative.

9 • TEACHING CHILDREN ENERGY EFFICIENCY Practical tips for teaching children how to reduce their energy consumption. 10 • STRATEGIES FOR STRESS Helpful tips to handle stress this holiday season. 11 • FINANCIAL CORNER Propane members noticed an increase in their rates this year. Here’s why. 12 • OPERATION ROUND UP Operation Round Up Foundation awards $41,488 in October. 14 • MESSAGES FROM MEMBER SERVICE We identified the questions you ask most often, and answered them. 15 • FEATURED RECIPE CONTEST Sandy Drenning of Mount Vernon, Ohio shares her recipe for cranberry pie.

Holiday Hours: All offices of The Energy Cooperative will be closed on Thursday, November 22, Friday, November 23, Monday December 24, Tuesday, December 25 and Tuesday January 1 to observe the holidays. In case of an outage or emergency, call (800) 2556815. Service personnel are on call 24/7/365.

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


President’s Message

YOUR MEMBERSHIP MATTERS

BY TODD WARE, PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

I generally use this space to provide updates on new projects, or report the progress of our ongoing initiatives. It is important members understand our priorities, progress, and challenges. It is equally important, however, that as members of The Energy Cooperative, Todd Ware you understand how your membership positively effects the communities in which we all belong. As part of the cooperative business model, one of our core principles is “Concern for Community”. While our priority is to provide safe, reliable and affordable energy, we also view our role in the community as a catalyst for good. We are purposeful in partnering with local groups such as The United Way, local foundations, and other programs. The Energy Cooperative invests in local communities where our members live and work. We award college scholarships; donate to schools and community organizations; are active in community events; and support the Operation Round Up Foundation which recently celebrated more than $3,000,000 in donations to our member communities. Ultimately, the larger community benefits from these programs because of our members. You empower us to be our best. Each time you round up a utility bill, alert us to problems, or provide suggestions to our employees, we are able to improve operations and better serve our entire membership. WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

We continue to explore new ways to connect with our members. We are launching a new website this month to support member engagement. Additionally, we are exploring outage notifications; text messaging options; a live chat feature on our website, and online voting capabilities for Board of Directors elections. Our employees appreciate the countless acts of kindness they receive when working in your backyard, especially during severe weather and dangerous conditions. We are thankful for your patience and consideration as we restore power during challenging situations, or respond to emergencies. Your cooperative was originally established in 1936 by a group of local farmers who were determined to bring electricity to an area where no one else would. We became The Energy Cooperative in 1998 with the addition of National Gas and Oil Company and its subsidiaries. With deep roots in the communities we serve, we strive to make our corner of the world a better place. Your membership makes this possible. Gratefully,

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

3


LIGHTING UP NORTH CAROLINA Hurricane Florence Power Restoration

Fifty-four linemen from twelve Ohio electric cooperatives spent a week assisting with power restoration for South River EMC and Lumbee River EMC in North Carolina, two cooperatives severely impacted by Hurricane Florence. The Energy Cooperative sent crew leader Terry Erwin, and Linemen Trevor Berry; Marcus Gause; and John Wilson (pictured above). Our crew departed Utica very early on a Saturday morning heading to Lumbee River EMC. They left with a bucket truck, a digger derrick and a pole trailer. When our crew arrived at Lumbee River, 35,000 of their 60,000 members were in the dark. While the restoration process in other areas of the state seemed relatively straight forward, Lumbee River faced considerable adversity as flooding in the area worsened.

THE FLOODING WAS DEVASTATING. MANY ROADWAYS WERE CLOSED, AND CREWS HAD TO FIND ALTERNATE ROUTES TO ACCESS THE WORK SITES TO RESTORE POWER. Lumbee River’s outage management system, automated meter infrastructure, and SCADA systems were also initially offline.

4

This created difficulty obtaining the precise number and location of outages. By Tuesday, Lumbee River’s outage map stood at 10,964 members without power (less than 20% of their total membership). In addition to the difficulties created by flooded roads, fuel scarcity created a significant hurdle. Many gas stations ran out of diesel fuel, and others were only able to accept cash (due to the widespread internet outages). Layered on top of those difficult conditions were temperatures in the mid-90s with very high humidity. Throughout the restoration effort, Ohio linemen were commended for their adherence to high safety standards. Our crews did not deviate from our normal work practices. Safety is always number one, regardless if we are working at home or restoring power in another part of the country. By late Thursday evening, Lumbee River’s outages were down to a manageable level, and Ohio’s crews were notified they would be released the next morning. By 7:30 a.m. on Friday, all Ohio linemen assisting Lumbee River had departed for home. After working sixteen-hour days for the entire week, our crew was more than ready to arrive home to their families. The Energy Cooperative thanks our crew for their hard work and diligence in North Carolina, and know Lumbee River’s members appreciate having their lights turned back on!

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


Powering Up After an Outage When the power goes out, we expect it to be restored within a few hours. But when a major storm or natural disaster causes widespread damage, extended outages may result. Our line crews work long, hard hours to restore service safely to the greatest number of consumers in the shortest time possible. Here’s what’s going on if you find yourself in the dark:

1. High-Voltage Transmission Lines: Transmission towers and cables that supply power to transmission substations (and thousands of members) rarely fail. But when damaged, these facilities must be repaired before other parts of the system can operate.

2. Distribution Substation: A substation can serve hundreds or thousands of consumers. When a major outage occurs, line crews inspect substations to determine if problems stem from transmission lines feeding into the substation, the substation itself or if problems exist further down the line.

3. Main Distribution Lines: If the problem cannot be isolated at a distribution substation, distribution lines are checked. These lines carry power to large groups of consumers in communities or housing developments.

4. Tap Lines: If local outages persist, supply lines (also known as tap lines) are inspected. These lines deliver power to transformers, either mounted on poles or placed on pads for underground service, outside businesses, schools and homes.

5. Individual Homes: If your home remains without power, the service line between a transformer and your residence may need to be repaired. Always call to report an outage to help line crews isolate local issues. WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

5


Focused on Reliability, NATURAL GAS BY DAN MCVEY,

The Energy Cooperative provides natural gas service to more than 35,000 residential and commercial members within a seven-county area. This service is provided through a network of 150 miles of transmission pipeline; three underground gas storage fields; and nearly 1,000 miles of distribution pipeline. We are committed to providing our members with safe and reliable service. Our natural gas pipeline replacement efforts address aged or inadequate infrastructure. Part of this commitment includes a recent project near the Heath-Newark Licking County Port Authority to upgrade and relocate a bare steel pipeline that was installed in 1965 (53 years ago). We removed approximately 5,700-feet of 8-inch and 10-inch bare steel pipe. We then relocated the pipeline and replaced it with a single 10-inch coated steel that is cathodically protected to prevent corrosion. The pipeline was relocated because its location inhibited potential development of property owned by the Port Authority and the corresponding industrial park. The pipeline’s new location on the western edge of James Parkway allows for improved industrial development within the park. Dan McVey

The project was completed in two phases over a period of one year, and required regulatory approval from the Ohio Power Siting Board.

6

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


NATURAL GAS SAFETY NOTICE In accordance with Federal Pipeline Safety Regulations 49 CFR, Part 192.16, The Energy Cooperative (TEC) is required to inform members that the member shall be responsible for their gas service lines.

Safety, And Supply

PIPELINE REPLACEMENT

VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER – GAS OPERATIONS While most of the installation was done using conventional methods, completing the project involved a challenging 750 foot horizontal bore for the installation beneath Ramp Creek (pictured above). The new section of pipeline is designed for a Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (“MAOP”) of 275 pounds per square inch (psig) and was pressure tested in place to ensure integrity. This increased operating pressure allows us to deliver greater volumes of natural gas to the Licking County area when demand is high. The Energy Cooperative worked closely with the Port Authority to determine the pipeline’s new location and maintain service to existing consumers while work was underway. The success of this project is the result of thoughtful planning by our legal and engineering personnel as well as skillful work by everyone on the job site. The new pipeline is now flowing natural gas to our members, and is safely increasing our reliability, and supply.

WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

Here’s what you need to know: The member is responsible for the maintenance and repair of all gas piping from the gas meter to all gas appliances. • The member is responsible for the repair/replacement of the gas service line located on the member’s property from the buried curb valve to the inlet of the gas meter. Buried gas piping that is not maintained may be subject to the potential hazards of corrosion and leakage. • For your safety, all buried pipe should be periodically inspected for leaks. If the buried piping is metallic, it should also be periodically inspected for corrosion. If an unsafe condition is found, the gas piping will need to be promptly repaired. • When digging near buried gas piping, the piping should be located in advance and the excavation done by hand. As a reminder, any time a member is excavating, Ohio 811 should be called by simply dialing 811 or 1-800-362-2764 at least 48 hours prior to digging. Ohio 811 will notify various utility companies to locate utilities lines in the area. • Plumbing and heating contractors can assist in locating, inspecting, and repairing the member’s buried piping. The Federal Department of Transportation (DOT) requires that a DOT-qualified plumbing contractor must be used to repair or replace a member’s buried piping upstream of the meter, including the gas riser attached to the meter set. While this is not required for piping downstream of the meter, TEC strongly recommends a DOT-qualified plumber be used for all buried gas piping. For further information, please call our Member Service Department at (800) 255-6815.

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

7


DIRECTOR’S CORNER WE ARE A COOPERATIVE BY DONALD HAWK, DISTRICT 1 DIRECTOR, CCD, BL

Cooperatives are as local and community centered as they come. As one of the Directors of our cooperative, I am proud to be part of an organization that serves the communities in which we all live. Being a member of The Energy Cooperative is more than knowing Donald Hawk there are people working to bring you safe, reliable, and affordable energy. Being part of a cooperative is an investment in your community. The Energy Cooperative is owned by its members. We have a vested interest in making sure our communities are prosperous. We support your community by investing in economic development, supporting community organizations, and partnering with our members to fund Operation Round Up. The Operation Round Up Foundation is funded each time our members round their utility bills up to the next full dollar amount. As a participant in Operation Round Up, I look at the dollars invested in my community of Knox County. The Operation Round Up Foundation supported capital efforts at The Sanctuary of Danville, Knox Co. Agricultural Museum, and Knox County schools. The list of Round Up grant recipients goes far beyond organizations in my hometown. Operation Round Up supports all our member communities. The full list of agencies and

organizations who have received Operation Round Up grants is on our website. Take a look to see how your money makes a difference and encourage your neighbors to apply! Being one of your cooperative directors is both an honor and responsibility. I have lived on our cooperative lines all my life and have seen firsthand the tremendous improvement in reliability over the years. My father used to say, “when two clouds get together the lights go out”. Thankfully through the great work of our Right of Way (ROW) crews, and the entire electric team, outages today are few and far between. Watching my local electric cooperative grow into The Energy Cooperative has been impressive. For the past twenty years we have provided electric, natural gas and propane to our 63,000+ members. As a cooperative director, there is always a need to plan for the future of this organization. Be assured that we are working with the future in mind. It is my hope that you view The Energy Cooperative as more than one of your utility providers. We are a local business who supports and engages in your community.

CALL US AT (800) 255-6815 IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT HOW WE KEEP THE LIGHTS ON; THE HEAT FLOWING; AND OUR TRUCKS HEADING YOUR WAY. WE ARE PROUD TO BE A PART OF THIS COMMUNITY, AND HOPE YOU FEEL THE SAME WAY.

METER TAMPERING IS DANGEROUS & ILLEGAL Meter tampering and unauthorized use of electricity or natural gas is extremely dangerous and can cause serious injury or death.

Those who tamper with meters to get “free” energy drive up energy costs for other members.

Tampering with gas or electric meters is both dangerous and a crime. Tampering is interfering with, damaging, or bypassing a meter or service equipment to reduce metered amounts of electricity, natural gas, or propane. Proof of tampering or reconnecting a meter can result in criminal charges against the member associated with that meter being fined and/or imprisoned, as well as financial responsibility for energy used and damages or loss, including death or injury, caused by improper use of the meter or other equipment. Improper meter connections can cause fire. Public exposure due to improperly sealed meters is a major safety concern for utility employees and the public, especially children. Energy theft affects all members of the Cooperative. Theft of electricity, natural gas, or propane is stealing from honest, paying consumers.

At The Energy Cooperative, we take meter tampering and energy theft seriously and train our personnel to stop energy thieves. You can help, too.

8

If you suspect or witness someone tampering with their meter, or using electricity, natural gas, or propane without authorization, please contact us immediately at (800) 255-6815 or fill out the anonymous form on our website.

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


TEACHING CHILDREN ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENCY Electronic and mobile devices, televisions, computers and gaming stations have become ubiquitous fixtures in our homes, particularly those with children. Consumer electronics coupled with the proliferation of smart home appliances, technology and electric vehicles have slowly but steadily changed our homes and lifestyles. This ever-connected world is the modern environment in which children are growing up. Teaching youngsters to save energy is an important life lesson, especially because our lifestyles are increasingly reliant on technology and in turn, energy consumption.

EXPLAIN THE WHY As most parents can attest, convincing kids to care about energy efficiency is a hard sell. Parents need to explain why it’s important to save energy and how it benefits the child – otherwise they will not understand the need to change their habits and will be less motivated to do so. In the simplest terms, less money spent on an electric bill can mean more money used for fun activities (that’s something children can relate to). Less tangible, but just as important, using less energy means running your home more efficiently, conserving natural resources and helping the environment.

LEARN BY DOING Saving energy is an abstract concept for children. For this reason it is important to be specific about energy efficiency actions and set a positive example. Children learn by observing what their parents do. When you turn off the lights or unplug the phone charger, they will notice.

TRY THESE ACTIVITIES

If age appropriate, have them create a list. Ask which gadgets and appliances could be turned off or unplugged to save power every day. For older children, show them how to program the smart thermostat and appliances. Shop with them for LED lights and discuss ENERGY STAR-rated appliances. Show them the electric bill so they can see the costs, energy use and how their actions impact the bill. Kids of all ages can learn a few simple energy-saving habits that can last a lifetime: • •

Turn off lights, devices, computers and video consoles when not in use. Open blinds and curtains during winter days to let warm sunlight in and close them during summer days to keep your home cooler. If your children are old enough to run the dishwasher or wash their own clothes, teach them to run these appliances with a full load during off-peak energy hours.

MAKE A LASTING IMPACT Teaching your children about saving energy is not only a creative way to spend time with them; it helps your home to be more energy efficient and can instill good habits that will benefit your child long into adulthood.

For younger kids, turn energy efficiency into a “treasure hunt” game to locate all the things in your home that use electricity. Depending on the age of the children, challenge them to count and group the items into categories: electronics, appliances, lights, etc.

WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

9


STRATEGIES FOR STRESS BY CONNIE HOGUE, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES & SAFETY

Connie Hogue

Competing priorities like work, family and other responsibilities can leave you little time to focus on your state of mind. Many people experience stress due to the demands of modern life; especially during the holidays. Ignoring stress can result in physical and mental consequences such as fatigue unstable relationships, substance abuse and depression.

WAYS TO RELIEVE STRESS CHANGE YOUR DIET. Rather than turning to traditional comfort foods when you are stressed, choose healthier options. Foods such as fatty fish, carrots and nuts are known to reduce stress levels. Drinking tea can also help calm your nerves. GET ACTIVE. Many people find it useful to go on a run or walk to clear their mind. Any type of exercise can reduce stress as your brain releases endorphins and dopamine, which can increase happiness. GET INVOLVED. Donate your spare time to helping

your community, and increase your impact by bringing a friend or family member along. Volunteer at a local soup kitchen, visit a local animal shelter, or help people in your community who may need an extra hand. These simple acts can brighten someone’s day, as well as your own.

FIND SUPPORT. It’s important to share your problems

with others rather than keep them bottled inside. Depending on the issue you are facing, talk to a trusted friend or family member.

10

Exploring group counseling provides an opportunity to benefit from speaking with others who are facing similar challenges.

ORGANIZE YOUR LIVING SPACE. Living in an unorganized environment can create stress if things like laundry or dishes pile up to the point of being overwhelming. Find the time to organize your living space and live a less cluttered life. SPEAK TO YOUR DOCTOR. Stress and depression are major health issues, and it’s important to get professional medical help when you need it. Over 40 million adults in the United States suffer from anxiety, and over 16 million suffer from depression. COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Pathways of Central Ohio is a private, non-profit social service agency serving Licking, Knox, Richland, Muskingum, Perry and Morgan Counties. They are certified by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and are nationally accredited by the Alliance of Information and Referral Services.

PATHWAYS HAS A CRISIS HOTLINE TO CONNECT RESIDENTS WITH SOCIAL, HUMAN AND GOVERNMENTAL SERVICES. 2-1-1 IS A SIMPLE, EASY-TO-REMEMBER NUMBER THAT CONNECTS YOU TO HELP AND INFORMATION IN LICKING, KNOX, MUSKINGUM, PERRY, MORGAN, AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES. YOU CAN ALSO REACH PATHWAY’S CRISIS HOTLINE BY TEXTING YOUR ZIP CODE TO 898211 (LICKING AND KNOX COUNTY ONLY).

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


FINANCIAL CORNER

BY PAT MCGONAGLE, VICE PRESIDENT & CFO

About 5% of households in the United States (U.S.) heat primarily with propane. The U.S. Energy Information Administration Pat McGonagle (EIA) expects average household bills for those propane consumers will rise this winter because of higher forecast energy prices. Temperatures for the winter of 2018–19 are expected to be similar to last winter suggesting consumption will remain in line with last year. (For this outlook, EIA defines the winter season as the period from October through March.)

WHAT ARE THE FACTORS CAUSING THE INCREASE IN PROPANE PRICES IN 2018? The major factors causing the increase is the price of crude oil and exports. The EIA forecasts that the Brent crude oil price, which is the most significant crude oil price in determining U.S. petroleum product prices, will average $79/barrel (b) this winter, which is $15/b (36 cents/gal) higher than last winter. Brent crude oil prices this winter are forecast to be higher than last winter as a result of gradually tightening global oil balances and concerns over potential supply disruptions in the coming months. Propane inventories typically build between April and October and begin drawing down in late-September or October as temperatures begin to drop. U.S. propane inventories at the end of September were 8% lower than the previous five-year average for that time of year. The low inventories are primarily the result of strong global demand for WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

Propane Safety

PROPANE PRICES

propane. The price spread between U.S. propane and overseas markets widened during the current year meaning producers can gain a greater advantage in 2018 exporting U.S. propane. Although early forecast for this winter indicate temperatures could be close to levels from both last winter and the typical winter from the past 10 years, recent winters provide a reminder that weather can be unpredictable. The winters of 2013–14 and 2014–15 were generally colder than normal, but the winters of 2015–16 and 2016–17 were much warmer than normal. Fuel expenditures for individual households are highly dependent on the size and energy efficiency of individual homes and their heating equipment, along with thermostat settings, local weather conditions, and market size. Please visit our website at theenergycoop.com to review our energy savings tips before winter weather arrives.

HOW WE PRICE PROPANE NGO Propane adheres to a detailed planning model throughout the year. The Cooperative works with two suppliers to secure both price and physical transportation of the product throughout the summer months to ensure we can meet our members needs during the upcoming winter season. We continue to focus on providing affordable fixed-price propane with metered service. Our metering option allows members to pay for only the propane they use each month and avoid costly tank refills.

• •

• • •

Know what leaking propane smells like – rotten eggs. If you smell a leak, immediately evacuate everyone and call The Energy Cooperative at 800/255-6815 (24 hours a day) or the fire department from your neighbor’s phone. DO NOT remain in the building, use the telephone or light switches, or try to determine the source of the leak. Know where gas service lines are on your property. You can buy propane leak detectors, similar to carbon monoxide detectors. Water can damage the internal safety mechanism in the gas controls of an appliance. If you suspect that your appliance gas controls may have gotten wet (because of flooding, for example), have a trained technician replace them immediately.

HEATING APPLIANCES

All furnaces collect lint and dirt and should be cleaned regularly. Contact your heating contractor for information on proper cleaning, and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

WATER HEATERS

Drain your tank periodically (until water runs clean - usually 2 to 3 gallons) to get rid of sediment buildup on the bottom of the tank.

GAS RANGES

Have your gas stove serviced if the burner flame is not blue. A blue flame is good; a yellow flame means air inlets are clogged or burners need adjustment. Contact your heating contractor or appliance repairman immediately. Do not cover the oven bottom with foil – that can stop air circulation. Never use gas ranges for home heating.

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

11


OPERATION ROUND UP GOLF OUTING $16,048 Raised! On a beautiful Thursday in September, over 100 golfers participated in the six annual Bruce Sumner Memorial benefiting The Energy Cooperative Operation Round Up Foundation. Operation Round Up is a community service program of its member-owners. Members “round up” their utility bills to the next dollar. That amount is donated to groups in The Energy Cooperative’s service area who meet funding criteria.

Since its inception, Operation Round Up has granted more than $3 million to our community. Those funds have gone to numerous charitable organizations in our service territory. Funds raised during the golf outing go specifically toward college scholarships for high school and college students. Thank you to all participants and sponsors for your generous support!

Makes cents for our community. In October of 2018, The Energy Cooperative Operation Round Up Foundation, Inc. awarded $41,488 to the following community groups in our service area: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Pathways of Central Ohio computers for 211 Crisis Hotline. Danville Local Schools towards playground renovation. Muskingum Valley ESC for iPads for student use. Save A Warrior for a renovation at Warrior Village. Licking County ESC for Chromebooks for student use. Larry Miller Inter. School for supplies for learning space. St. Francis Boy Scout Troop 4008 for tents for camping. Granville HS Arts Boosters towards sound equipment. United Way of Licking Co. for a telephone system. Heath HS Athletic Boosters towards synthetic turf. Genesis Community Ambulance towards heart monitors. Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland for equipment. For more information on the Operation Round Up Foundation, Inc. or for a grant application visit TheEnergyCoop.com.

12

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018

(800) 255-6815


Looking to save money this holiday season? Are you in the market for a new refridgerator or freezer? Check out our appliance rebates for up to $400 at theenergycoop.com. Rebates are available to residential electric cooperative members only who replace existing refrigerators or stand-alone freezers with a qualifying new ENERGY STAR®-listed appliance and recycle the older unit being replaced. For details and conditions visit our website or call our Member Service Department at (800) 255-6815. Our natural gas and propane members should contact their electric company to inquire about energy star rebates.

DO YOU KNOW A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT? We have programs available for high school students whose parents or guardians are members of The Energy Cooperative. The Energy Cooperative and Operation Round Up provide scholarship programs. Scholarships are awarded to high school seniors whose parent(s) or legal guardian(s) are members of the Cooperative receiving electric, natural gas or propane services. Each December, information is mailed to guidance counselors at the high schools in the Cooperative’s service territory. The scholarships are awarded at the annual meeting held in May. In addition, The Energy Cooperative commits to sponsoring one or two high school sophomores or juniors whose parent(s) or legal guardian(s) are members of the Cooperative and receive electric, natural gas, or propane services to participate in the Youth Tour. The Youth Tour is an all-expenses paid, week-long trip by bus to Washington, DC, which will take place in June, 2019. For more information visit our website at theenergycoop.com or call (800) 255-6815, extension 1199.

Ask Your School Guidance Counselor for Details and an Application! WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

13


Message from Member Service Our Member Service team compiled a list of the most frequently asked questions you ask us. Here are a few of them. QUESTION: WHY DO MEMBER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES NO LONGER ACCEPT MY BILL PAYMENT OVER THE PHONE? ANSWER: Security standards (specifically, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards) prohibit our member service representatives from taking your credit card information over the phone. These standards are designed to ensure companies who accept, process, store, or transmit credit card information do so in a secure environment. Because we record our phone calls for quality assurance, we are no longer able to accept credit card payments in this way. Be assured, however, there are many other ways to pay your bill. • BY MAIL: Use the return envelope provided with your monthly bill to send payment. • BY TELEPHONE: Electronic checks, debit cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards are accepted through our automated payment system by calling (800) 255-6815 and selecting option 2. • ONLINE: Visit theenergycoop.com and click Pay My Bill with SmartHub. Allow two business days for your payment to post to your account. • AUTOMATIC WITHDRAWAL: Visit theenergycoop.com to download the application or call (800) 255-6815. • IN PERSON: Bills may be paid at the main office located at 1500 Granville Road, Newark, Ohio, Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. (except for certain holidays). • NIGHT DROP-BOXES LOCATED AT TWO LOCATIONS: We accept payment at our Newark office at 1500 Granville Road, inside the member service entrance on the west side of the building or at our Utica Service Center at 11339 Mt. Vernon Road, Utica, Ohio on the north side of the building. (Payment should include a copy of the bill or account number with the check or cash payment the name on the account and service location.)

14

Questions? Call us at (800)255-6815. QUESTION: WHY AM I CHARGED A FACILITY FEE WHEN I DON’T USE ANY NATURAL GAS, ELECTRIC OR PROPANE? ANSWER: The Facilities Fee and Distribution Charge include the fixed cost of running the Cooperative. This includes meter reading, billing, record keeping, replacing pipeline, infrastructure, poles, power lines, and other equipment. This is also the cost to distribute energy to you. The facilities fee is applied each month, even when you do not consume energy.

QUESTION: WHEN IS MY BUDGET BILLING AMOUNT ADJUSTED? ANSWER: The Energy Cooperative offers budget billing which allows your monthly utility costs to remain constant throughout the entire year. The budget accounts are reviewed during the month of March and September. During this review, your budget amount may be increased or decreased depending on your usage.

QUESTION: WHY DID YOU RAISE THE PRICE OF PROPANE? ANSWER: Propane prices are driven primarily by the supply and demand of crude oil. Crude oil increased in price nearly 50% this year. This price increase combined with an Ohio winter that was much colder than the previous two years likely led to a noticeable increase in your propane bill. Your propane rate is calculated based on your usage from the previous year. This year, both the price for propane and the amount used by our members went up. The Energy Cooperative is continually evaluating its cost to serve our members. This includes identifying the total revenues needed to operate, which fluctuate depending on the amount of energy used and the cost of generation, transmission, and delivery. Estimating the amount of energy that members use enables the Cooperative to determine what rates should be. Rates are reviewed annually. By monitoring our controllable expenses, we are able to provide affordable and reliable energy with cost-based rates.

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2017

(800) 255-6815


Our

Recipes FEATURED

Cranberry Pie

Submitted by Sandy Drenning, Mount Vernon INGREDIENTS: • • • • • • • •

DIRECTIONS:

4 cups of cranberries, chopped (also add some whole berries) 1 1/4 cup sugar Pinch of nutmeg 1 tbsp. butter 3 tsp. cornstarch Pinch of salt 1 egg white Double the crust recipe of your choice

1. Chop cranberries in food processor. 2. Add cranberries, sugar, cornstarch, nutmeg, and salt in a large bowl. 3. Mix well and set aside. 4. Roll out the bottom crust and place in a 9” pie plate. 5. Add cranberry filling. 6. Dot with butter. 7. Lay the top crust over the filling. 8. Trim off excess dough, crimp edges, cut vents in the top crust. 9. Brush crust with egg white mixed with 1 Tbsp. of water. 10. Sprinkle with 1-2 tsp of sugar.

Bake at 375 degrees until the crust is golden, approximately 40 minutes.

S DAY DESSERT? eet VALENTINE’ printed we'll sw a ve ha u en to be OKS! Do yo CALLING ALL CO us. If your recipe is chos ll! bi Share it with 00 credit to your energy give you a $1 service , your name, contacted pe ci re e th a copy of s will be All we need is ntact information. Winner co address and tter editor. by our newsle ntion erative, Atte rk, OH op Co gy er En pe to The x 4970, Newa Send your reci Road, P.O. Bo energycoop.com, e ll vi an Gr back@the Editor, 1500 e-mail to feed 43058-4970. Or Recipe Contest. subject line: 18. DECEMBER 7, 20 20. BY ED IV CE RE 12 BE , extension RECIPES MUST (800) 255-6815 ll Ca s? on ti Ques

WWW.THEENERGYCOOP.COM

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2017 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

15


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

1500 Granville Road P.O. Box 4970 Newark, Ohio 43058-4970 (800) 255-6815 www.theenergycoop.com

PAID

COLUMBUS, OH PERMIT NO. 608

FOR MEMBERS OF THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE: • •

TOUCHSTONEENERGY.COM

TO REPORT AN ELECTRIC POWER OUTAGE OR A DOWNED POWER LINE: CALL (888) 535-5732. TO REPORT A NATURAL GAS OR PROPANE OUTAGE OR EMERGENCY: MOVE AWAY FROM THE AREA AND FROM A SAFE DISTANCE CALL (800) 255-6815. TOUCHSTONEENERGY.COM

PROVIDING ENERGY FOR COUNTLESS FUTURE GENERATIONS. That’s why your local not-for-profit Touchstone Energy cooperative will always have the reliable information you need about optimal renewable energy options for our region. To learn more about what’s available, go to TouchstoneEnergy.com.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION

Profile for theenergycoop

The Energy Cooperative Times: November & December 2018