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TIMES JULY & AUGUST• 2018

OVER $3 MILLION DONATED

TO BENEFIT MEMBER COMMUNITIES Cover Photo: The Natural Resource Center at the Hartford Fairgrounds in Croton, Ohio.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE 3 7 10 13

• PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE • DIRECTOR'S CORNER • NEWARK POLICE K-9 • TREASURER'S REPORT

Thank you

Operation Round Up Members!

ELECTRIC • NATURAL GAS • PROPANE


THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE

TIMES

INSIDE 3 • PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 4 • OPERATION ROUND UP ACHIEVES MILESTONE 6 • VETERANS GRANTS AWARDED 7 • DIRECTOR'S CORNER 8 • SAFETY REMINDER 10 • MEMBER SPOTLIGHT 11 • KIDS DAY 12 • NEWARK POLICE K-9 13 • TREASURER'S REPORT Contact us: feedback@theenergycoop.com Todd Ware, President & CEO Gary Baker, Director of Marketing & Public Relations Heather Juzenas, Communications Manager The Energy Cooperative Times is the official publication of The Energy Cooperative. With a circulation of more than 63,000, it is the bi-monthly communication link between The Energy Cooperative based in Newark, Ohio, and its members. Cooperative members – please report any change of email address or phone number to us at (800) 255-6815 or feedback@theenergycoop.com. Pony Rides at Kids Day

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • JULY & AUGUST 2018

(800) 255-6815


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

MEASURING SUCCESS

BY TODD WARE, PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

R

Todd Ware President & Chief Executive Officer

eliability is a quality of being trustworthy and consistently performing well. For us, reliability is measured by our members having the energy they need- when they need it. One way we achieve reliability is by carefully planning and making improvements to our system.

The natural gas cooperative made huge improvements in 2017. We replaced 11 miles of bare steel pipe, installed 1,272 new Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) meters, and replaced 1,500 risers. This completed our riser replacement program, and over ten thousand risers were replaced as part of this program. Our projects reduced leaks outstanding by 32 percent, and our line loss percentage went down to 1.26%. We also added four miles of pipe in the fastgrowing Johnstown area. For our electric members, we spent just over $8.5 million on capital improvements in 2017 to improve reliability. The main projects included replacing 3.5 miles of transmission line (built in the 1950’s), working on our SCADA project, rebuilding the Johnstown substation (built in the late 1950’s), and rebuilding several tie lines. Our work in these areas reduced outage hours caused by equipment issues. During 2017, there were several large summer storms causing many outages. I believe these outages would have been much worse if we were not improving our system, and trimming our right of way. We also continued to build out the system in western Licking County by adding a mile of new underground service in this area. Each year, we focus on improving our service to you. We continue to make our processes more efficient, review our workflows, and improve our member service culture. We slightly increased our ACSI score, while making big increases in meeting your expectations and overall satisfaction. We understand THEENERGYCOOP.COM

that we can always do better to serve you and continue to work harder to meet your expectations. At the beginning of each year, your board develops goals to ensure we are making progress toward our strategic plan. My management team sets objectives for us to complete based on these goals. This process is important and ensures we move the cooperative forward. This year the Board held a strategic planning session to discuss the future direction (next 3-5 years) of the cooperative. The five directives from this session are listed as follows: 1. Develop and implement initiatives that enhance our safety culture. 2. Create and execute a balanced financial plan that provides strategic direction on plant investment, rates and growth in equity. 3. Develop and implement a plan that focuses on technological advancement. 4. Develop and implement an infrastructure replacement plan to improve system reliability. 5. Develop and implement a plan designed to enhance both engagement of and service to all members. We have put several things in place to start the process of moving these directives forward. In closing, we continue to improve overall service to you; our members. We are slightly reducing our capital budget to hit targets on our financial plan. We will continue to replace bare steel pipe, expand in Johnstown, replace another section of our transmission line, and finish our SCADA project. We understand these projects improve our system, but we always look for ways to reduce expense to keep any potential rate increases to a minimum.

JULY & AUGUST • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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ROUNDUP ACHIEVES MILESTONE OVER $3 MILLION DONATED TO LOCAL COMMUNITIES BY GARY BAKER, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS

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ecently, The Energy Cooperative Operation Round Up Foundation surpassed $3,000,000 in grants made to local beneficiaries. If you are one of the members participating in this program, you have helped to make this possible. Numerous non-profit Gary Baker groups, charities and community organizations have received grants from the Operation Round Up Foundation. In 2005, The Energy Cooperative Board of Directors established the Operation Round up Foundation, Inc. The foundation was suggested by The President & CEO at the time, Dave Potter. The Round Up Foundation is managed by a seven-member board of directors who represent a vast part of the service territory. This community service program is funded by “rounding up” a member’s utility bill to the nearest dollar. The average annual donation is about $6.00 per member per year and is tax deductible. The Operation Round Up Foundation enhances the quality of life and provides valuable support to local communities. This includes scholarships given to selected applicants who are 4 8

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES & JUNE2018 2017 THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • JULY• MAY & AUGUST

committed to pursuing a post high school education at a college, university or technical center. Members are automatically enrolled in this program when opening an account with The Energy Cooperative however; they can opt out by calling the Member Service Department at (800) 255-6815. John C.” Jay” Barker was perhaps Operation Round Up’s biggest fan. Jay helped form the foundation, served as the first chairman, and was the foundation’s treasurer until he passed in March of 2014. Jay’s passion and commitment to Operation Round Up was contagious and his influence is felt at every board meeting. This is in part because his wife, Beth A. (Ourant) Barker, is a member of the Operation Round Up board of directors and currently serves as the treasurer. Shortly after Jay’s passing, The Energy Cooperative Operation Round Up Foundation Board announced the creation of the JOHN C. ”JAY” BARKER SCHOLARSHIP. Students or their parents must be members (customers) of The Energy Cooperative and be a senior in high school or have completed their freshman year in college to be eligible for the scholarship. Qualified candidates must be a resident of Licking County, currently enrolled in college or technical school, and working towards a degree in (800) 255-6815

(800)


Muskingum County

Muskingum County

Licking County

Knox County

Licking County

Knox County

a business or finance field. In memory of Mr. Barker’s commitment to our community, preference is given to students who are involved in community service. Bruce Sumner said “Happy Monday” to start each and every week. This phrase was heard frequently by employees in our Utica, Newark and Hebron offices. Bruce, the former Vice-President & COO of electric operations, was incredibly dedicated to Operation Round Up, and the annual Round Up golf outing. The golf outing has always been a major fundraiser for the Operation Round Up Foundation. After Bruce passed in March of 2013, the Operation Round Up Golf outing was renamed the Bruce Sumner Memorial benefiting the Operation Round Up Foundation. Everyone involved with this event will forever remember Bruce’s up-beat manner and his amazing way to bring a smile to your face. This September marks the 6th Annual Bruce Sumner Memorial, a golf outing that has raised

Knox County

Licking County

over $75,000 for Operation Round Up Scholarships. Programs of all types are eligible for Round Up grants, as long as the funds are not used for utility bills and the organization is non-political and non-controversial in nature. Usually the funds are disbursed to groups who demonstrate a need that benefits not only them, but the overall community as well. A very special thank you goes out to the members, and the foundation board who have helped grant more than $3,000,000 through Operation Round Up. Do you know an organization who could benefit from an Operation Round Up Grant? Applications can be found on our website http://theenergycoop.com/ round-up-application.

Thanks for supporting your community through Operation Round Up! John "Jay" Barker and Nelson Smith, 2013

THEENERGYCOOP.COM

Bruce Sumner and Julie Maurer, 2012

JULY & AUGUST • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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Marketing & PR Director Gary Baker presents the grant to DAV (Disabled American Veterans)

COMMUNITY SUPPORT THROUGH S

VETERANS GRANTS

upporting veterans is one way The Energy Cooperative gives back to the communities we serve. In June, we had the opportunity to recognize three local veteran organizations by awarding each with a grant. The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) received a $1,000 grant for training Jr. Civil Patrol Pilots. The Americans Veterans Post 345 received a $1,500 grant to help build a storage building for veteran's assistance equipment. Post 1060 received $1,500 to help with building renovations.

The Energy Cooperative is among more than 900 cooperatives across the country that provide energy services and support for our nations veterans of all generations. The American Veterans Support Grant

American Veterans Post 1060

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • JULY & AUGUST 2018

assists military service organizations throughout our service territory that assist with veterans' health, housing, education, career development, family support, and more. For funding consideration through The Energy Cooperative's American Veterans Support Grant, please fill out the application on our website theenergycoop.com/veterans-grant. If you have questions or need assistance, please call (800) 255-6815, extension 1220 or email pr@theenergycoop.com.

American Veterans Post 345 Newark Commander Terry Worst

(800) 255-6815


DIRECTOR'S CORNER

Pictured (from left): Tom Graham, John Parkinson, and Nelson Smith

2018 ELECTION RESULTS T

years. Parkinson attends the Utica Methodist Church and has three children and three grandchildren.

hree incumbents were re-elected to the board of directors at the 82nd annual meeting of The Energy Cooperative (TEC) held on Tuesday, May 15, at the Reese Center on The Ohio State University-Newark/ COTC campus.

District 2 Director: Nelson Smith, CCD*, BL* Smith was elected to the board in 2003 and is presently the Chairman of the Board. He has received the Credentialed Cooperative Director (CCD) , Board Leadership (BL) , and Director Gold certificates from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. Smith represents cooperatives from OH, IN, WV, and MI on the board of Federated Insurance, a national cooperative that insures about 90% of electric cooperatives across the country. He serves as a Washington Township Trustee and volunteers on the board responsible for restoring the Historic Licking County Jail. Smith is a 1966 graduate of Newark HS, attended OSU and served 4 years in the Navy. He is the retired publisher of the Utica Herald, The Heath News, the Pataskala Post and On Target. Smith is former part-owner of Chapel Hill Golf Course in Mount Vernon. He is married to Kim and between them have four children and seven grandchildren. District 5 Director: John Parkinson, CCD*, BL* Parkinson was elected to the board in 2003. He has received the Credentialed Cooperative Director (CCD), Board Leadership (BL), and Director Gold Certificates from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. He is a self-employed farmer. Parkinson graduated from Utica HS where he was Utica’s first FFA student to earn the American Farmer degree. He is a member of the Knox County Farm Bureau and was a 4-H Advisor for over 25 THEENERGYCOOP.COM

District 9 Director: Tom Graham, CCD*, BL* Graham was elected to the board in 2009. He currently serves as Vice Chair of the National Gas and Oil (NGO) Cooperative and NGO Transmission Boards. He has earned the Credential Cooperative Director (CCD) and Board Leadership (BL) certificates from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. Graham lives in Jackson Twp, Muskingum County, where he farms corn, soybean, wheat, hay and raises cattle and hogs in partnership with his family. He is the past director of the Ohio Federation of Soil & Water Districts and served on the Ohio Farm Bureau State Young Farmers Committee. Graham has an Associate Degree in construction from Texas State Technical College. He is married to Sue, they have 3 children and 2 grandchildren and attend More Life Church in Newark. * The designation of CCD (Credentialed Cooperative Director) and BL (Board Leadership Certification) is given to a Board Director after completing a series of certification classes provided by NRECA (National Rural Electric Cooperative Association).

JULY & AUGUST 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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SAFETY REMINDER

BOATING SAFETY

BY CONNIE HOGUE, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES & SAFETY

very year 74 million Eboating. Americans enjoy recreational While most experiences

Connie Hogue

are positive, fun quickly turns into fear if boaters lose focus on safety. The three most common incidents in recreational boating are a passenger falling overboard; a boat capsizing, and collision with another object.

LIFE JACKETS ARE ESSENTIAL FOR SAFE BOATING.

The U.S. Coast Guard reports the majority of boating fatalities are due to drowning, and unfortunately most of those victims were not wearing a life jacket. The Wear It campaign promotes boating safety by encouraging boaters to wear life jackets all the time.

BEFORE SETTING SAIL, REVIEW A PRE-DEPARTURE CHECKLIST TO ENSURE YOU HAVE EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN YOUR BOAT, INCLUDING A TOOL BOX AND FIRST-AID KIT. Once on the water, use common sense.

If you notice storm clouds, a sudden temperature drop, or wind speed increasing, the best advice is to play it safe. Get off the water.

GET EDUCATED, REDUCE RISKS. The National Safe Boating Council promotes safer recreational boating through education, outreach and training. The Coast Guard data indicates the vast majority of deaths occurred on boats where the operator had no boating safety instruction. By comparison, 15% of deaths occurred where the operator had received a nationally approved boating safety education certificate. To further reduce risk, the Coast Guard offers these tips: • DON'T DRINK: Alcohol affects judgment, vision, balance and coordination; • TAKE A SAFETY COURSE: 7 out of 10 boating incidents are caused by operator error;

• GET A FREE VESSEL SAFETY CHECK; • KNOW ABOUT CARBON MONOXIDE; this

odorless, colorless poisonous gas is emitted by all combustion engines and onboard motor generators.

The extra effort that goes into taking these kinds of precautions will help create fun-filled adventures for you and your family on the water. Information provided by the National Safety Council.

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • JULY & AUGUST 2018

(800) 255-6815


IMPORTANT MESSAGES THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE WILL NO LONGER ACCEPT PAYMENTS IN THE FIELD AFTER AUGUST 31,2018. PAYMENTS CAN BE MADE VIA SMARTHUB, AT OUR MAIN OFFICE, OR BY CALLING 1-800-255-6815 (OPT 2).

HERBICIDE INFORMATION

MAKES CENTS FOR OUR COMMUNITY

n June of 2018, The Energy Cooperative's Operation Ifollowing Round Up Foundation awarded $69,700 to the community organizations: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Turban Project for sewing machines. Robbins Hunter Museum plant markers for historic garden. Knox County Board of DD toward construction of inclusive playground. Transitions for window replacement. HNCO/Hospice of Knox County for inflatable shampoo basins and bed bumper pads. Coshocton Co. EMS for two King Vision Kits. Muskingum Valley Educational Service Center for basic curriculum shoe box tasks. Muskingum Recreation Center for lane speakers for pool. Licking Township Fire Department for one King Vision Kit. Newark Township Fire Department for firefighter gear. Look Up Center towards heating and cooling. Together We Grow, Inc. for gardening tools and equipment. Chandlersville Building Association to replace tile. Holy Trinity School & Comm. Center towards tables and chairs for community center. Kirkersville UM Boy Scout Troop 4100 towards Eagle Scout project.

Why does The Energy Cooperative use herbicides? To help ensure safe and efficient operations, The Energy Cooperative has an ongoing need to maintain right of way areas where its electric and natural gas facilities are located. Low growing vegetation improves reliability, allows for effective patrol, quick access in the event of an emergency, and also creates a welldefined corridor, reducing the risk of potential damage from nearby excavation. What are some of the benefits to using herbicides? Repeated mechanical clearing / mowing is often not fully effective for long term control of invasive or undesirable vegetation. Herbicides used in conjunction with, or in place of, mechanical clearing methods promote desirable plant growth. Herbicides help foster biodiversity by promoting the growth of native grasses and wildflowers. Rights-of-way maintained in an herbaceous state have a positive impact on wildlife habitat including migratory birds, butterflies, bees and mammals. Herbicides are biodegradable and can be used to target unwanted vegetation such as trees, multi-flora rose or autumn olive without harming desirable growth. Herbicide applications minimize disturbance to landowners as mechanical maintenance activities may be required less frequently. Application of Herbicides is also less intrusive to wildlife in comparison to mechanical means of maintaining rights-of-way. Are herbicides safe? The herbicides selected for use by The Energy Cooperative and its contractors have been extensively tested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) before being approved for use. Furthermore, state agencies regulate herbicide application through the use of public notification requirements, mandated record keeping, applicator training, and certification programs. Where and how does The Energy Cooperative apply herbicides? Applications will not take place within maintained land use sites such as lawns, areas of active agriculture, pasture lands, or hay fields. Depending on the location of the rights-of-way and the surrounding land use, tractor, truck, or ATV applications are used. Optimal herbicide applications are applied to the full width of the rights-of-way within one or two growing seasons after mechanical clearing. For subsequent years, spot spraying can be utilized to control undesirable vegetation and keep rights-of-way in an open meadow like condition.

Newark Township Fire Department THEENERGYCOOP.COM

JULY & AUGUST • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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Lillian Boehmer with her mother, Trish

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED

he Energy Cooperative awarded a total of $12,000 Tparent(s) in college scholarships to high school seniors whose or legal guardian(s) are members of the

Cooperative. The awards were presented at TEC’s annual meeting. Recipients of the scholarships were: • Wyatt Bunstine, Northridge HS • Shelby Graham, Lakewood HS • Brooke Hursh, Clear Fork HS • Nicholas Maxwell, Granville HS • Ethan Reilly, West Muskingum HS • Lauren Riggleman, Newark Catholic HS The Energy Cooperative’s Operation Round Up Foundation awarded $20,000 in college scholarships to eight students. Recipients were: • Griffin Adams, Utica HS • Jordan Aronowitz, Licking Valley HS • Adam Crock, Maysville HS • Keri Felumlee, Licking Valley HS The Energy Cooperative Scholarship Recipients

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• Hailey Long, Centerburg HS • Drew Mirgon, West Muskingum HS • Brant Moreland, East Knox HS • Joshua Walchle, Homeschool

The Operation Round Up Foundation also awarded two $2,500 scholarships instituted in memory of Bruce A. Sumner, former Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Electric Operations at The Energy Cooperative. Recipients were: • Lillian Boehmer, Newark Catholic HS • Jordan Ellis, Licking Valley HS The $2,500 John C. “Jay” Barker Scholarship was created in memory of Jay Barker who was one of the original board members of The Energy Cooperative Round Up Foundation. This scholarship was awarded to: • Brent Monroe, The Ohio State University

Round Up Foundation Scholarship Recipients

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • JULY & AUGUST 2018

(800) 255-6815


KIDS DAY ur cooperative is founded on OCommunity seven core principles. Concern for is one of those principles. Kids Day is The Energy Cooperative’s signature event, and it gives us the opportunity to give back to our members.

An enthusiastic crowd joined us for Kids Day on June 24th. It was a beautiful day in downtown Newark. The Works opened their doors for the event, and the museum was full of excited children and adults. The Scidome shows filled up quickly, and members had an opportunity to experience this new attraction. The Energy Cooperative's Arc Demo Team shared safety tips with a full house as they demonstrated the power of electricity. We would like to say thank you to our many members who came and spent the day with their families. It is our pleasure to host such a fun event. We will see you next year!

THEENERGYCOOP.COM THEENERGYCOOP.COM

JULY&&AUGUST AUGUST •• THE THE ENERGY ENERGY COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE TIMES TIMES JULY

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POLICE K-9

ROUND UP GRANT RECIPIENT THE NEWARK DIVISION OF POLICE PURCHASED MISMO THROUGH AN OPERATION ROUND UP GRANT. MISMO IS PICTURED LEFT WITH HIS HANDLER OFFICER DAVID BURRIS.

T

he Newark Division of Police have a strong tradition of K-9s on their force. Shep (pictured below) was their first patrol dog. In 1969, he went on Patrol with Officer Bernard Frey. Shep was the first of twenty-six K-9 officers on the Newark Division of Police. The most recent K-9 started on May 18, 2018. Mismo works with Officer David Burris and was purchased through an Operation Round Up Grant. A large majority of the dogs have been German Shepherds (16), two were Labradors, one a Dutch Shepherd, and the most recent are Belgian Malinois. All twenty-six of the police K-9s have been funded through grants.

Mismo and Officer Burris Gerda and Officer Connell

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Shep and Officer Frey

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

Malinois are bred to be police or military dogs. They are smaller than their German Shepherd counterparts, weighing 70-75 pounds fully grown. The dogs are trained for patrol work (apprehension and tracking) and for narcotics work. With their impressive speed and strong sense of smell, one Police K-9 can replace six or seven human officers. Perhaps the most impressive part of watching the Police K-9s work, is the close relationship they have with their handlers. Making the decision to be a K-9 handler is not one to make lightly. The dogs live with their officer handler and are with them 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They are as reliable as the officer’s own shadow and are always by their side. It is typical for the officer’s family to become very attached to the dog as well. The typical career for a Police K-9 is ten years. When it is time for the dogs to retire they do so at home with their Handler.

Malcolm and Officer Haren

(800) 255-6815


TREASURER'S REPORT

AS REPORTED AT THE 2018 ANNUAL MEETING BY JOHN KLAUDER, DISTRICT 6 DIRECTOR, CCD. BL

F

or the year ended December 31, 2017, the Board of Directors engaged GBQ Partners LLC to perform an audit of the cooperatives’ books and records. GBQ has extensive experience in auditing both utilities and cooperatives. On March 28, 2018, GBQ issued the audit report for the year ended December 31, 2017. The audit report contained an unmodified opinion, which in accounting terms is a clean opinion from the auditor. As of December 31, 2017, your cooperative had total assets of $282.0 million, which includes $216.9 million in net plant assets. At the end of 2017, the company had $38.6 million of patronage capital in other cooperatives, including Buckeye Power and Cooperative Finance Corporation (CFC). Included in total assets was over $1.9 million in cash and shortterm investments. Total liabilities were $247.6 million as of year-end. In 2017, total combined revenues for the cooperatives were approximately $112 million. Gross margin for 2017 totaled approximately $57 million. Total expenses for the year were $107.5 million, of which $53.6 million was for purchased energy. Operating expenses for 2017 were $53.9 million. Net income for 2017 was $5.7 million. Consolidated THEENERGYCOOP.COM

comprehensive income for the year was $3.8 million.

THE COOPERATIVE HAS EQUITY OF $34.4 MILLION AS OF THE END OF 2017. EQUITY FOR THE COMBINED ENTITIES HAS GROWN TO 12.19 PERCENT. OUR LENDER, CFC, WILL CONSIDER ALLOWING THE PAYMENT OF CAPITAL CREDITS ONCE THE COOPERATIVE REACHES AN EQUITY POSITION OF 20 PERCENT. Individual results by entity are as follows: Licking Rural Electric recorded comprehensive income of $4.7 million for the year. National Gas finished 2017 with comprehensive income of $2.2 million, while NGO Transmission had comprehensive income of $241,000. NGO Development showed a comprehensive loss of $3.7 million. NGO Propane had comprehensive income of $366,000. The cooperatives invested $18.6 million in new plant assets during 2017. As of December 31, 2017, The Energy Cooperative serves more than 64,000 members. During 2017, we paid out approximately $6.3 million in taxes and retired over $79,000 in patronage capital credits to estates. If you have additional questions about this financial report, please contact the office at 1-800-255-6815.

JULY & AUGUST • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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Cheesecake

FEATURED

RECIPE SUBMITTED BY SHELIA WILSON, NEWARK OHIO

SERVING SIZE: 2 cakes PREPARATION TIME: 45 minutes COOK TIME: 45 minutes INGREDIENTS CRUST: 22 graham crackers (preferably with cinnamon/

sugar),1 stick melted butter Filling: 1 large container of small curd cottage cheese, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 teaspoons vanilla, 4 eggs TOPPING: 1 large container sour cream, 4 teaspoons vanilla, 4 tablespoons sugar, fresh strawberries or jam.

Our Recipes ENTER OUR RECIPE CONTEST!

Win $100 by submitting your favorite SUMMER RECIPE!

Simply visit TheEnergyCoop.com/ Recipe Contest for rules and entry form OR mail your recipe to The Energy Cooperative, Attention Editor. PO Box 4970, Newark, OH 43058

INSTRUCTIONS CRUST: Ground crackers in food processor or blender,

then add butter and blend. Save out 1/2 cup of crumbs. Press into bottom and sides of two 9" pie pans. Refrigerate while making the filling. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. FILLING: Blend cottage cheese until smooth. Add sugar, lemon juice, vanilla and blend. Add eggs and mix well (for fluffier texture, whip egg whites separate and fold in). Pour slowly into crust. Bake for 45 minutes to 55 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool completely. TOPPING: Add sugar and vanilla into sour cream. Stir until well blended. Put on cooled cake. Sprinkle saved graham cracker on top. Add fresh strawberries or jam before serving.

If your recipe is chosen to be printed we'll give you your choice of a $100 gift card or a $100 credit to your energy bill! To enter, send a copy of the recipe, your name, service address and contact information. Winners will be contacted by the Cooperative’s newsletter editor.

Simply mail your favorite recipe to The Energy Cooperative, Attention Editor, P.O. Box 4970, Newark, OH 430584970. Or send it via e-mail to feedback@ theenergycoop.com, subject line: Recipe Contest.

SUBMISSIONS DUE AUGUST 17,2018 Questions? Call (800) 255-6815, Extension 1220

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

(800) 255-6815


PEAK ALERT What does it mean? Hot and humid weather conditions cause a high demand for electricity. The Energy Cooperative's generation and transmission provider, Buckeye Power, issues a Peak Alert when they are extremely close to demanding more electric power than ever before. Peak alerts are not a notice of a power shortage. They are simply a load management effort used to reduce the demand for electricity and keep the cost of power as low as possible.

By keeping high electrical demand levels to a minimum, electric members reap the benefit, in the form of a lower cost of power. If we have installed a radio-controlled switch on your water heater or air conditioning system, it is activated during peak alert times. The Energy Cooperative announces Peak Alerts on local billboards and our social media pages.

HOW CAN YOU HELP DURING A PEAK ALERT? Please help by reducing your energy consumption. 1. Raise your thermostat a few degrees. 2. Turn off lights and appliances you aren't using. 3. Delay doing laundry or running the dishwasher until later in the evening. 4. Take advantage of using the outdoor grill to keep cooking heat outside. THEENERGYCOOP.COM

JULY & AUGUST • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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1500 Granville Road P.O. Box 4970 Newark, Ohio 43058-4970 (800) 255-6815 TheEnergyCoop.com

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

COLUMBUS, OH PERMIT NO. 608

FOR MEMBERS OF THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE: TO REPORT AN ELECTRIC POWER OUTAGE OR A DOWNED POWER LINE: CALL (888) 535-5732. TO REPORT A NATURAL GAS OR PROPANE OUTAGE OR EMERGENCY: MOVE AWAY FROM THE AREA. CALL (800) 255-6815 FROM A SAFE DISTANCE.

The Energy Cooperative offers

PROPANE options you want!

Contact us today! (800) 255-6815 TheEnergyCoop.com

Pricing programs to fit your needs • Metered Service • Budget Billing Automatic Refills • On-Line Bill Pay • Energy Advisor

Refer a friend and receive a $50 energy bill credit!

If you're a member of The Energy Cooperative and refer a friend to our propane service, you can earn a credit to your bill. Call us at (800) 255-6815 to find out how.

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The Energy Cooperative Times: July & August 2018