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TIMES MAY & JUNE • 2018

KNOW WHAT’S BELOW.

811 BEFORE YOU DIG.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE 3 • PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 7 • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 8 • SAFETY REMINDER 12 • FINANCIAL CORNER

ELECTRIC • NATURAL GAS • PROPANE

Join Us for Kids Day on June 24 at The Works in Newark! Admission ticket inside.


THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE

TIMES

INSIDE 3 • PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 4 • 811 BEFORE YOU DIG 6 • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 7 • DIRECTOR'S CORNER 8 • SAFETY REMINDER 11 • EARTH & ENERGY DAY 12 • FINANCIAL CORNER

Contact us: feedback@theenergycoop.com Todd Ware, President & CEO Gary Baker, Director of Marketing & Public Relations Heather Juzenas, Communications Manager The Energy Cooperative Times is the official publication of The Energy Cooperative. With a circulation of more than 63,000, it is the bi-monthly communication link between The Energy Cooperative based in Newark, Ohio, and its members. Cooperative members – please report any change of email address or phone number to us at (800) 255-6815 or feedback@theenergycoop.com.

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

(800) 255-6815


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

MEASURING SUCCESS BY TODD WARE, PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

afe, Reliable and Sat The Affordable: words we use Energy Cooperative

Todd Ware President & Chief Executive Officer

every day to describe the energy we provide to you, our member-owners. In addition, we also use the word “clean” to help describe the electricity we provide every day. Each of these words is important to us, and each has a different measure of success.

RELIABLE. This is probably the easiest for you to observe on an everyday basis. Do the lights come on every day? Do you have an adequate supply of energy each day to meet your needs? When you lose service do we restore it quickly? AFFORDABLE. This one is a little harder. Your bill, in part, depends on how much energy you consume. Your consumption is often driven by the weather. Mother Nature can be very unpredictable, however we strive to keep your cost as low and consistent as possible, while still meeting your needs every day.

SAFE. This is our most important one and why I left it for last. It is very easy to take safety for granted. All of the energy we provide you is powerful and must be respected. We have designed all of our systems with safety in mind. However, maintaining that safety all the way to your home requires training, commitment, and constant vigilance. We work very hard to improve workplace safety every day. Our employees participate in monthly safety meetings provided internally and from outside consultants. We keep a laser focus on the safety of our employees as well as the maintenance of our system to keep you, our members, as safe as possible. We’ll work hard to make 2018 even safer. As we move into summer months, weather will present plenty of hazards to our daily routine. Please make sure you take a moment each day to stay safe in your home, workplace, and everyday travels. We hope that by taking precautions in your everyday routine, we can all make 2018 as safe as possible.

CLEAN. Clean is tough as it is a relative term. When we speak of clean at The Energy Cooperative, we are focused on the electricity we sell you each month. Most of the electricity we provide has been generated with fossil fuels. Over the last twenty years we have worked diligently to minimize the effects these fuels have on our environment. Today, the Ohio cooperatives are proud to get their electricity from one of the cleanest power plants of their kind in the world.

THEENERGYCOOP.COM

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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KNOW WHAT’S BELOW.

811 BEFORE YOU DIG. BY GARY BAKER, Director of Marketing & Public Relations

W

hile mowing the grass recently I noticed a commercial lawn mowing company unloading in front of the house next door. My neighbors were not home at the time and were preparing to plant some trees. A few days before, my neighbor contacted OHIO811 to locate the utilities in his yard. The locate crews marked the site with paint and flags so when my neighbor dug the holes for trees, he could do so safely and not hit buried utilities. I noticed the mowing crew removed the yellow, natural gas locate flags from the marked yard. Painted lines for communications, telephone, natural gas, water and proposed construction remained but the yellow flags were gone. I went over to the mowing crew and explained why it is important not to remove locate flags prior to any digging or trenching. Locate flags are placed to mark the location of underground utilities. When these flags are removed prior to work being completed, it presents a potential hazard for any homeowner or contractor who is digging

or trenching because they do not know where the initial locate flag was placed. Making contact with any utility line could result in serious injury or death, as well as serious damage to the utility infrastructure. The Energy Cooperative, along with other underground utility companies, spend valuable time and material on emergency calls when residents and contractors dig into a utility line. A vital resource for Ohio residents and businesses alike, OHIO811, formerly OUPS Call Before You Dig, acts as a communication link between utility companies and individuals planning any digging activity. The mission of OHIO811 is to prevent damage to member facilities and to promote public safety by providing an efficient and effective educational communication process. At The Energy Cooperative, we want to ensure our members stay safe when working outdoors. That is why it is critical you are made aware of all utilities that are below the surface by contacting OHIO811.

LEARN MORE @ OHIO811.ORG. 4 8

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES MAY & JUNE THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY• & JUNE 2018 2017

(800) 255-6815


Contacting OHIO811 before you dig is important not only for safety reasons, it is also the law. Homeowners considering a digging project can contact OHIO811 three different ways.

WAYS TO CONTACT OHIO811: 1. VISIT OHIO811.ORG. 2. DIAL 8-1-1. 3. CALL 1-800-362-2764.

also submit their request online with e-dig, the easy online remote ticket entry system for homeowners. There are millions of miles of buried utilities beneath the surface of the earth that are vital to everyday living like water, electricity, and natural gas. Today more than ever, phone, and fiber lines are critical to first responders, hospitals, schools, businesses, and even industrial parks. OHIO811 is free and helps us stay safe and ensure utility service is not disrupted. Safe digging starts with you!

This should be done at least 48 hours in advance but no more than 10 working days prior to excavation excluding weekends and legal holidays. A person can

KNOW WHAT’S BELOW …OHIO811 BEFORE YOU DIG.

OHIO UNIVERSAL MARKING STANDARDS RED YELLOW ORANGE BLUE PURPLE GREEN PINK WHITE THEENERGYCOOP.COM

Electric Power Lines, Cables, Conduit and Lighting Cables Gas, Oil, Steam, Petroleum, or Gaseous Materials Communication, Alarm or Signal Lines, Cables or Conduit Potable Water Reclaimed Water, Irrigation and Slurry Lines Sewers and Drain Lines Temporary Survey Markings Proposed Excavating

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

NRECA CONFERENCE

BY LIJA KALEPS-CLARK, DIRECTOR OF LAND & LEGAL SERVICES

ast month, The Energy Lrepresentatives Cooperative, along with from many

of the other 832 electric cooperatives across the United States, participated in the National Rural Electrification Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) Legislative Conference Lija-Kaleps-Clark in Washington, D.C. The Energy Cooperative had the opportunity to discuss important issues with legislators that represent its members including Representatives Bob Gibbs, Bill Johnson, Steve Stivers, and Joyce Beatty. The Energy Cooperative and other Ohio cooperatives discussed several important issues to electric cooperatives and its members.

STRONG RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS IN THE 2018 FARM BILL REAUTHORIZATION The Farm Bill is critical legislation for rural electric cooperatives because it governs and funds the Rural Utilities Services, the governmental entity that provides funding for low cost loans, grants, and programs for rural cooperatives and rural development. The current Farm Bill expires in September 2018. The cooperatives requested that the Representatives work to reauthorize the current Farm Bill and oppose harmful amendments to this landmark legislation while making a few important improvements to enhance cooperative service. The Energy Cooperative asked its Representatives to modernize the farm bill to reduce red tape and enhance the RUS Electric Loan Program (including the Guaranteed Underwriter Program that funds TEC’s lender, CFC).

INVEST IN RURAL BROADBAND IN 2018 FARM BILL AND FY2019 APPROPRIATIONS Electric cooperatives nationwide requested that Congress support funding to help expand broadband to rural America. Broadband is not available in many rural areas across the United States because of barriers such as high costs and low population. Loan and grant programs through the Farm Bill and FY2019 appropriations will help address and overcome these barriers.

STOP PBGC FROM OVERCHARGING ELECTRIC CO-OP PENSION PLANS Congress has recognized that pension plans like NRECA’s RS Plan pose virtually no risk of default. Yet, electric cooperatives in the RS Plan continue to pay high insurance premiums to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) as if they were such a risk. Legislation has been proposed to adjust PBGC premiums to be in line with risk and reduce costs for cooperative members. The Energy Cooperative asked for its Representatives’ leadership to get this legislation passed. The Energy Cooperative appreciated the Representatives’ time and attentiveness to these important issues. Members of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives can show their support for cooperative interests, like those above, by participating in Co-op Owners for Political Action, a political action committee that supports state and federal officeholders and candidates who support cooperatives. Co-op members are also members of a national political action committee – the Action Committee for Rural Electrification (ACRE). For more information on ACRE Co-op Owners for Political Action and the national issues affecting local cooperatives, visit http://www.nreca.coop/ political-action/acre/.

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

(800) 255-6815


DIRECTOR'S CORNER

MEMBERSHIP MATTERS BY JACK SCHMIDT, BOARD OF DIRECTORS, DISTRICT 3, CCD, BL

sk yourself this—What does it A really mean to be a member of The Energy Cooperative? As a member of The Energy Cooperative (TEC), you have a vote, a voice and a say in how your cooperative is run; in what’s best for the community; in the decisions that allow us to provide safe, reliable and affordable Jack Schmidt energy. By having a vested interest—members are more engaged and more attentive to giving them a sense of responsibility. By following the philosophy of a cooperative, TEC works to engage their members in all issues surrounding the organization. When members are engaged and informed they become an important advocate for their cooperative, not just a consumer. From the beginning, members are the reason cooperatives exist. At TEC, you are a member, and that is the cooperative difference. TEC actively engages with the communities we serve. We care THEENERGYCOOP.COM

The Energy Cooperative believes its members should have the opportunity to view information with regard to the operation of the cooperative. Such information includes our bylaws, policies, articles of incorporation and yearly financial reports. To view this information, simply visit our website at www.theenergycoop.com » member services menu.

about improving the quality of life of our members. From sponsoring the scoreboard at local high school football stadiums, to raising money for charities, to hosting Earth & Energy Day, to offering grants through Operation Round Up, we invest in local communities where you live and work. Membership matters because it entitles you to certain benefits like providing rebates on energy audits helping you find ways to lower your energy use, you can even have your children apply for college scholarships. You receive this newsletter because you’re a member of TEC and we want you to stay abreast of important cooperative issues and events— keeping you connected. Through democratic control, members like you elected me and others to serve on the board of directors, putting control in your hands. We are your board of directors, working for your cooperative, while remaining your friends and neighbors. The best part about being a member of The Energy Cooperative: It’s your cooperative, and that’s what matters.

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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SAFETY REMINDER

TICK SEASON

BY CONNIE HOGUE, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES & SAFETY

INSIDE 3 • PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 4 • 811 BEFORE YOU DIG 7 • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 8 • SAFETY REMINDER 9 • EARTH & ENERGY DAY 12 • FINANCIAL CORNER

Connie Hogue

TICKS ARE MOST ACTIVE IN WARMER TEMPERATURES AND ARE PREVALENT IN OHIO THIS TIME OF YEAR.

yme disease is the most common tick-borne Lannually. disease with more than 30,000 cases reported While most cases of Lyme disease can

be treated with antibiotics, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) offers a few simple precautions to keep you and your family safe.

REDUCE YOUR RISK 1. For the best protection against ticks, use an insect repellent that contains 20 percent of the active ingredient (most commonly DEET, Picaridin, or IR3535). Check the label to be sure. You can also treat clothing, boots, and tents with insect repellent. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a tool on their website to help you determine which repellent best meets your needs. 2. Once inside, examine your clothes for ticks. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors.

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

3. Take a bath or shower after coming indoors to wash off and more easily find ticks. Pay special attention around the ears, neck and scalp when checking for ticks. 4. Check your pets for ticks. Talk to your veterinarian to determine if your pet should have a tick preventive product. Signs of tick-borne disease may not appear for 7-21 days or longer after a tick bite, so watch your dog closely for changes in behavior or appetite if you suspect that your pet has been bitten by a tick.

TICK MANAGEMENT 1. Remove leaves. 2. Clear tall grass. 3. Create a three-foot barrier of gravel or wood chips between lawns and wooded areas to keep ticks out of recreational areas. 4. Mow the lawn often. 5. Keep rodents away by neatly stacking wood in dry areas. 6. Keep playground equipment, patios, and decks away from trees and high grass.

SAFELY REMOVING A TICK 1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible. 2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. 3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with or soap and water. By taking a few small preventative measures, you can help reduce the risk of ticks affecting you and your loved ones. (800) 255-6815


IMPORTANT MESSAGES MAKES CENTS FOR OUR COMMUNITY

I

n April of 2018, The Energy Cooperative's Operation Round Up Foundation awarded $69,700 to the following community organizations: •

Licking County YMCA toward the renovation and expansion of their Western Branch.

YMCA of Mount Vernon toward a renovation.

Newark Midland Theatre toward the purchase of sound board equipment.

Hospice of Central Ohio toward the purchase of laptops and computer equipment.

Kokosing Valley Jr. Anglers toward an “enviroscape model”.

The Thomas J. Evans Foundation to purchase a water fountain and bike repair station for Everett Park.

DO NOT USE OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES TO REPORT AN EMERGENCY Use our emergency phone numbers or SmartHub to report outages or emergencies. Reporting outages on our social media pages or website delays service. Using emergency numbers listed below or SmartHub means the problem will get immediate attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ELECTRIC INTERRUPTIONS OR EMERGENCIES: (888)-535-5732 GAS & PROPANE INTERRUPTIONS OR EMERGENCIES: (800)-255-6815 Our outage system automatically identifies your address if you call from a phone number connected to your account. Members simply press 1 to report the outage. This works only if your current phone number is associated with your account.

SAVE THE DATE: THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE’S KIDS DAY

West Muskingum Schools to purchase an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

Foundation Park Conservancy towards the spotlight project.

Buckeye Lake Village Fire Dept. for the purchase of gas monitors.

We will host our Annual Kids Day at The Works, 55 South First Street in Downtown Newark on Sunday, June 24, from noon to 4:00 p.m. The Works, a local showcase for history, art, science, and technology, will open its doors for this special event held in appreciation for the members of the Cooperative and their families. There will be lots of fun and interactive activities for kids of all ages, including free food, refreshments, goody bags (while supplies last), door prizes, safety demonstrations, entertainment, pony rides, carriage rides, games, and photos for the kids, all for FREE!

Muskingum County Agriculture Society toward updates at the Veterans Complex.

BEWARE OF SCAMMERS POSING AS UTILITY REPRESENTATIVES

Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church (Heath) toward their back to school supply program.

• •

Village of Roseville toward a splash pad project. Weathervane Playhouse toward the purchase of computers.

The Village of Roseville plans to open their splash pad this spring.

THEENERGYCOOP.COM

The most popular trick is to call you and say that the utility company will disconnect your gas or electric if you do not make a payment, usually within a short time frame. Scammers have also posed as utility employees making collection calls at members’ homes. Keep your eye out for these red flags • You are told your account is past due and service will be disconnected if a large payment isn’t made, usually within an hour. • You are told to buy a pre-paid debit or credit card – widely available at retail stores – and call back to supposedly make a payment. • The scammer asks you for the prepaid card’s receipt number and PIN number, which grants access to the card’s funds. Field employees of TEC wear a company uniform with a TEC logo. They also wear a personal identification badge with their name, photo, job title, and a verification phone number. To verify an employee of TEC or to report a scam, call The Energy Cooperative at (800) 255-6815.

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES 9


PLANT THE RIGHT TREE

IN THE RIGHT PLACE

AT THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE OUR NUMBER ONE GOAL IS SAFETY.

WANT MORE TIPS? For more smart tree planting tips visit www.ArborDay.org.

LOOK UP BEFORE YOU PLANT

Trees can conduct electricity and create a safety hazard if limbs grow too close to electric lines. Power outages or flickers can occur when trees or tree branches come into contact with overhead lines. Electrical arcing from a wire to a nearby branch can cause fires. But a much greater concern is the safety risk when children climb trees near power lines. Accidental contact of electric wires with a tree limb or person playing or trimming around the tree could be FATAL. Trees growing near power lines must be pruned to maintain a safe distance from the wires. If you have trees that appear to be growing into power lines, contact The Energy Cooperative at 1-800-255-6815. Never try to prune them yourself. Utilities have skilled professionals trained to safely prune and trim trees for electric line clearances.

At its mature height, a tree planted under or too close to a power line can cause power outages and potential costly trimming and maintenance problems for both you and The Energy Cooperative. Allow at least one foot of clearance for every one foot of height the tree will reach when fully mature.

TRANSMISSION LINES Unlike the power lines located in most neighborhoods, transmission lines use much taller poles and carry much greater voltage. If your property is near a transmission line, please leave the area within 50 feet of the transmission line clear of any trees.

UNDERGROUND LINES The biggest danger to both you and underground lines occurs during tree planting. Call OHIO 811 by simply dialing 811 at least 24 hours prior to digging.

40 + feet

40 feet

Do not plant within 20 feet

15 feet

Do not plant within 20 feet

SMALL TREES

Height/ spread no more than 20 feet

10

40 feet

MEDIUM TREES

60 feet

Height/ spread 20 - 40 feet

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

LARGE TREES

50 feet

Height/ spread more than 40 feet

(800) 255-6815


Earth & Energy Day

ANNUAL MEMBER CELEBRATION

e celebrated Earth and Energy Day on April 22, W 2018 at our Utica Service Center with more than 600 members. The event featured food, fun, and the

opportunity to learn more about the work we do. Our employees and friends of the cooperative shared tips on energy efficiency, safety, and healthy living. There were also many local vendors who helped to make this event a success! Thank you True Core Federal Credit Union; Lowe’s Home Improvement; Ohio Nature Education; Dawes Arboretum; Licking County Soil & Water; Licking County Recycling; Licking Memorial Health Systems; OH Oil & Gas Education Program; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; OSU Extension Master Gardeners; The Works; Midwest Rural Energy Council; Royal Document Destruction; Newton Township Fire Department; and OHIO 811.

THEENERGYCOOP.COM

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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FINANCIAL CORNER

Building Cyber Resiliency BY PAT MCGONAGLE, VP & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

rotecting the nation’s P complex, interconnected network of power plants,

transmission lines and distribution facilities is a top priority for electric cooperatives and other segments of the electric power industry. The electric power industry Pat McGonagle continuously monitors the electric grid and responds to events large and small. Member-consumers are rarely aware of these events because of system reliance supported by planning, coordination and response/recovery efforts. In rare cases where an event does impact electric service, industry resilience and preparedness ensure service is promptly restored. A high level of resilience is built into the power supply system to protect against extreme weather events, vandalism and major equipment failure. This means that multiple layers of protection safeguard critical cooperative assets from potential cyber threats.

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THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

The possibility of a cyber security attack impacting system operations is something for which the power sector has been preparing for years. These preparations include: • Implementing rigorous security standards and technology to protect systems, • Forging close partnerships to protect our systems and respond to incidents, and • Engaging in active information sharing about threats and vulnerabilities. As threats and threat actors continue to evolve, so must the industry’s capability to defend against them. Maintaining the resilience and security of the electric grid requires a flexible approach that draws on a variety of tools, resources and options. The protection and security of member-consumer’s assets is paramount for electric cooperatives. The Energy Cooperative works closely with Buckeye Power, other member cooperatives in the state, industry partners and government agencies to develop flexible, effective approaches to protecting the electric system.

(800) 255-6815


Pat McGonagle

The cooperative has taken many steps to protect our critical infrastructure. One of the highlighted initiatives that came out of the strategic planning session in 2017 was a focus on technological advancement including in-depth analysis regarding all facets of cyber security. The cooperative annually has a third-party vendor perform a comprehensive cyber security test of our organization. This testing is aimed at assessing the company’s information security through simulated attacks on the organization. Using real-world hacker techniques, gaps in the existing security can be identified. Common targets include the Internet perimeter, internal and external network infrastructure, websites, databases, applications, and even our organization’s employees. At the conclusion of the penetration testing services, we are provided substantive evidence of vulnerabilities and recommendations for

THEENERGYCOOP.COM THEENERGYCOOP.COM

effective countermeasures to reduce our risk. This comprehensive report is then shared with management and the board of directors. This allows the company to act before a cyber intruder can compromise our system and steal sensitive and valuable data. Ultimately, our goal is to identify and prioritize the organization’s risks and work to build a manageable plan to strengthen our security defenses.

OTHER FINANCIAL NEWS GBQ Partners, LLC has completed the annual audit of the company’s books and records for the 2017 fiscal year and has issued an unqualified opinion dated March 28, 2018. The results reflected another strong year of net margin for the cooperative. The audited results were presented to members at the annual meeting on May 15, 2018.

MAY MAY & JUNE 20182018 • THE• ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES & JUNE THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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NEW ATTRACTION AT THE WORKS

T

Scidome Planetarium

he Works launches the Scidome on June 9th in downtown Newark. This new planetarium was built in collaboration with The Ohio State University at Newark, and features state of the art programming. The multi-purpose science auditorium is great for children of all ages. The Scidome features both planetarium and full dome production shows to explore the earth, moon,

Our-

sun, space, and more. Scidome shows are first come first serve, and included with a General Admission to the Works (or free for members of the Works). The Energy Cooperative is proud to host Kids Day at the Works on June 24th from noon-4pm. The Works will open its doors for this special event for members of The Energy Cooperative and their families. The Scidome will also be open during Kids Day.

Recipes FEATURED

Do you have a delicious SUMMER DISH that everyone loves? How about sharing it with us! Need some incentive? If your recipe is chosen to be printed we'll give you your choice of a $100 gift card or a $100 credit to your energy bill!

ENTER OUR RECIPE CONTEST!

Win $100 by submitting your favorite SUMMER RECIPE!

Simply visit TheEnergyCoop.com/ Recipe Contest for rules and entry form OR mail your recipe to The Energy Cooperative, Attention Editor. PO Box 4970, Newark, OH 43058

All we need is a copy of the recipe, your name, service address and contact information. Winners will be contacted by the Cooperative’s newsletter editor. Simply mail your favorite recipe to The Energy Cooperative, Attention Editor, P.O. Box 4970, Newark, OH 43058-4970. Or send it via e-mail to feedback@ theenergycoop.com, subject line: Recipe Contest.

SUBMISSIONS DUE JUNE 15TH Questions? Call (800) 255-6815, extension 1220. 14

THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES • MAY & JUNE 2018

(800) 255-6815


THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE IS

COMMITTED TO OUR COMMUNITY.

Big Brothers Big Sisters, Bowl for Kids

Heart Chase

Wildwood Park in Granville

Wildwood Park in Granville

Heart Chase

THEENERGYCOOP.COM

Wildwood Park in Granville

MAY & JUNE 2018 • THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE TIMES

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1500 Granville Road P.O. Box 4970 Newark, Ohio 43058-4970 (800) 255-6815 TheEnergyCoop.com

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

COLUMBUS, OH PERMIT NO. 608

FOR MEMBERS OF THE ENERGY COOPERATIVE: TO REPORT AN ELECTRIC POWER OUTAGE OR A DOWNED POWER LINE: CALL (888) 535-5732. TO REPORT A NATURAL GAS OR PROPANE OUTAGE OR EMERGENCY: MOVE AWAY FROM THE AREA. CALL (800) 255-6815 FROM A SAFE DISTANCE.

HOORAY It’s time for Kids Day! ...and it’s not just for kids.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24 at The Works Museum in Downtown Newark, Noon to 4:00 pm Join us for live music, puppet shows, games, bouncies, photos for the kids, pony rides, carriage rides, crafts, animals, safety demonstrations, and lots of interactive displays for children of all ages. Goody bags, door prizes, food, and refreshments while supplies last. This event is FREE and open only to members of The Energy Cooperative and their families. Please bring a copy of your bill for free family admission! The Works will open its doors for this special event being held in appreciation of the members of The Energy Cooperative and their families. The Works new Scidome will also be open!

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The Energy Cooperative Times: May & June 2018