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PAGE 20 AIDS WALK PAGE 6

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THE DINER PAGE 13

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THE SECRET BEHIND FIELD HOCKEY’S SUCCESS PAGE 19

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NEWS

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CORRECTIONS FOR SEPT. 28, 2010

IN THIS ISSUE

Police blotter / Eagle rants (3), Sexual Assault Health Educator (5), AUPAC (10)

OPINION

Staff editorial / Five questions for Jackie Grill (8)

SCENE

34&'5"60(7058&'95#:;9 (<#=1&0#(>$5"&((

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In “AV4U chooses a candidate: Meet ‘Mr. North side,’” Tyler Sadonis incorrectly identified as a member of the College Democrats E-board. Sadonis is actually a member of the College Democrats cabinet. In a campus calendar entry for Oct. 2, it was stated that The Gorenman Beethoven Project event would be held in the McDowell Formal Lounge. This event was actually held in the Abramson Family Recital Hall in the Katzen Arts Center.

MISSION

The Eagle, a student-run newspaper at the American University, serves the community by reporting news involving the campus community and surrounding areas. The Eagle strives to be impartial in its reporting and believes firmly in its First Amendment rights. SUBMISSION AND EDITORIAL POLICIES

All submissions become the property of The Eagle. Unsigned letters will not be published. The Eagle reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for length and clarity. Letters and columns may be published in print or online. Letters and columns are the opinion of the writer and not the newspaper. !"

State Radio (12), The Sex Wonks (14), Arts Festival (16)

SPORTS

Volleyball (20), Field Hockey (19), Women’s Soccer (18)

'(

In “Greeks look to gain voice on Conduct Board” a town hall meeting was incorrectly listed as occurring on Sept. 28. In fact, the event took place on Sept. 29. The Eagle regrets these errors.

(*

TOP TWEETS

The Eagle has a commitment to accuracy and clarity and will print any corrections or clarifications. To report a mistake, call the editor in chief at (202) 8851402 or e-mail editor@theeagleonline.com.

!"

“People like Nate Bronstein aspire 4 greatness. People like me settle 4 getting a featured tweet in @theeagleonline. #Iwishihadgoals” @colincjcampbell, Oct. 3

202-885-1402

Editor in Chief

#$?%!"#$%&! since SEPT. 27

“There is puke outside of every trash can at the tenley metro stop this Sunday morning. Real sloppy #americanu... real sloppy” @pioneermark, Oct. 3

2. Meet Mr. North Side 3. Eagle Rants (Sept. 30) 4. Police blotter 5. AU Central still adjusting to high volume of demand

“Real talk, an AU sorority just tried to recruit me. Also, they serve Belgian waffles with ice cream on campus.” @mjenkins, Oct. 2 “New SIS building at #americanu has a bright orange eames chair?? My school gets cooler every day” @kaydenh, Oct. 1

Arts & Entertainment TheScene@theeagleonline.com

EdPage@theeagleonline.com

TUESDAY 5

WEDNESDAY 6

THURSDAY 7

Breastival 12 - 5 p.m. WHERE: Main quad WHAT: Join Women’s Initiative as they host the sixth annual Breastival to raise awareness about breast cancer and a variety of other health and women’s issues. CONTACT: Women’s Initiative at wi@ausg.org.

Men’s Soccer vs. Georgetown University 3 - 5 p.m. WHERE: Reeves Field WHAT: Cheer for the men’s soccer team as they take on Georgetown University. CONTACT: Kathryn Tortorici at totorici@american. edu.

Political Theory Colloquium 5 - 7 p.m. WHERE: East Quad Building Lounge WHAT: Ralph Lerner will give a talk entitled, “Lincoln’s Declaration and Ours.” Lerner is the Benjamin Franklin professor emeritus in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. CONTACT: Renee Souris at rs1192a@student.american.edu.

Caribbean Circle Networking Event 6 - 8 p.m. WHERE: Mary Graydon Center 200 WHAT: Meet six professionals working in different sectors of the D.C. metropolitan area and the surrounding states. CONTACT: aucaribbeancircle@gmail.com.

Design Editor Chris Droukas Photo Editor Ana Santos Student Life Editor Julia Ryan Administration and Local News Editor Stefanie Dazio News Assistants Anna Scalamogna Sports Editor Sam Lindauer Sports Assistants Kate Greubel Tyler Tomea Editorial Page Editor Linda Barnhart Arts and Entertainment Editor Yohana Desta Music Editor Stephan Cho

Assistant Web Editor Rachel Karas

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Copy Editors Rocio Gonzalez Marissa Cetan

BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager Sam Yolen Finance Manager Bobby Jones

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Front page photo credits (Descending): Ana Santos, Fox Searchlight Pictures/20th Century Fox, Jeff Mindell

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Managing Editor for News Meg Fowler

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OCT. 12

CAMPUS CALENDAR

News

Sports

“Very happy I saw my alma mater @AmericanU representing at the AIDS walk this morning” @CarolynRodehau, Oct. 2

1. Eagle Rants (Sept. 27)

Editor@theeagleonline.com

EDITORIAL STAFF

Ad Reps Jonathon Gaynes

SATURDAY 9 Field Hockey vs. College of the Holy Cross 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. WHERE: Jacobs Field WHAT: Come out and cheer for the field hockey team as they take on the College of the Holy Cross. CONTACT: Kathryn Tortorici at tortorici@american.edu.

SUNDAY 10 NFL Sundays in the Tavern 12 - 11 p.m. WHERE: Mary Graydon Center Tavern WHAT: Watch the NFL games of the week in the Tavern. Game times are at 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. CONTACT: Patrick Ledesma at ledesma@american. edu.


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POLICE BLOTTER Sept. 25 D.C. Fire Department, Facilities Management and Public Safety responded to a stuck elevator in the SIS building. An individual was released without injury. Sept. 26 Public Safety responded to the Berkshire Apartments for a report of a sick person. The reporting person indicated she found the sick person stumbling through the main floor of the building. Upon Public Safety’s arrival, the sick person was semiconscious, vomiting and unable to communicate with Public Safety. DCFD transported her, accompanied by the reporting person, to the hospital. A “Stop” sign was discovered missing from the tunnel. A bicycle was taken from outside McCabe Hall. It had been secured to a bike rack via cable lock. Public Safety discovered the letters “S” and “I” taken from an “American University” sign in the Mary Graydon Center.

tan Police Department and DCFD responded to a report of a sick person in Nebraska Hall. Upon arrival, the individual stated she had a lot to drink and then passed out. DCFD transported her, accompanied by a suite mate, to the hospital. An ambulance transported an injured person from the Bender Arena to the hospital. Sept. 27 Public Safety transported a sick person to the Health Center from the Mary Graydon Center Handicap Support Room. Public Safety responded to a fire alarm in the Mary Graydon Center. No signs of smoke or fire were found. The panel read manual pull station basement north. Facilities Management responded. The fire alarm was reset. A bicycle was taken from a Ward Circle Building bicycle rack. The bike had been secured via combination cable lock.

Public Safety, Metropoli-

Sept. 28 Public Safety responded to a fire alarm in the Kreeger Building. The panel read a smoke detector on terrace level room T-17 was activated. A contractor stated he was soldering wires in the room and the smoke activated the smoke detector inside. Facilities Management responded to the scene. The alarm was reset.

MONDAY 11

TUESDAY 12

T. Howard Foundation Information Session 6 - 7 p.m. WHERE: McKinley 155 Conference Room WHAT: The AU Career Center and Office of Multicultural Affairs will host recruiters from the T. Howard Foundation at an information session to review upcoming internship opportunities. CONTACT: Blair Ufer at Ufer@american.edu.

SpeakOUT: Coming Out Stories 6 - 8 p.m. WHERE: Mary Graydon Center 200 WHAT: In honor of National Coming Out Day, come hear people share their coming out stories and share your own. CONTACT: glbta@american.edu.

Public Safety responded to a report of an injured person in the Jacobs ballfield area. The individual signed a medical refusal form. DCFD transported an injured person to the hospital from Bender Arena.

EAGLE RANTS Public Safety responded to a report of a sick person in Capital Hall. The individual signed a medical refusal form and was transported to the hospital via cab. Public Safety discovered dents to a flammable materials cabinet and graffiti painted on walls in the Ward Circle Building terrace level mechanical room. The lock to the entrance was secure upon Public Safety’s arrival. A padlock to the interior materials cage was unsecure. Aramark was contacted to remove the graffiti. Student #1, living in Anderson Hall, reported having received disturbing e-mail from a former friend, student #2. Student #1 brought the matter to the attention of the Residence Hall Association, the dean of students and Student Activities. Public Safety and Facilities Management responded to a fire alarm in the Asbury Building. The panel indicated smoke detector basement level. Public Safety received a call stating the activation was caused by burnt food in a microwave. No sign of smoke or fire was found. The alarm was reset.

READ MORE POLICE BLOTTER ONLINE.

I wish we had exceptionally rainy days excused from class, all I feel like doing today is napping. I’m pretty sure the entire university feels this way. !

! Freshman, are you seeking guidance and friendship with upperclassman? Upperclassmen are a great resource and make you look really cool, and they love meal swipes. Of which you have too many, offer someone in the marketplace your mealswipe lovin’. Love, Meal-Swipeless Senior ! If you’re having a hard time meeting people, it’s not AU’s fault. It’s your fault. Go and do something with yourself, just do something. If you’re capable of having an even moderately worthwhile conversation, then you should be able to find someone who’s willing to do it more then once. ! Dear People who smoke on the Mary Graydon Steps, Don’t you see the Smoke Free Area signs? Yes, the University doesn’t enforce them, which is completely negligent on their part, but I’m tired of breathing your smoke as I enter and exit the building. Please respect my lungs and move away from the building. ! Because I had just a little JD left over from thirsty Thursday, I decided to attempt the famed Ke$ha ‘before I leave brush my teeth

with a bottle of Jack’.... now my mouth feels kinda dirty and I smell like an alcoholic in my 9:55. ! So a kid committed suicide in New Jersey. The Eagle chooses not to report it. Am I the only one offended by the homophobia that the Eagle espouses? ! Thank you fellow Dav ranter!! The next time a hipster tries to give me sass after I politely ask for coffee I am going to blast Soulja Boy songs into their ears as loud as I possibly can until they melt away from fear of “conformity” and top 40’s pop hits!!!!! Hipster’s Kryptonite! So how about an attitude adjustment Dav workers?

Dear Pasty White Ass, Please refrain from having sex in the study rooms with the doors unlocked. Many thanks! !

! Dear Dude in my Sociology class who looks exactly like Jeff Goldblum, You’re the best. Keep on keeping on. Yours Truly, A Fan

I could have sworn that WONK was a sexual position ... If not, I’m making it one. !

! Dear Editor-in-chief of The Eagle, you have a lovely voice. Ever consider singing? Love, An admirer who would love to hear you on the ra-

dio/tv someday P.S....don’t get too cocky now ;) EDITOR’S NOTE: Come to Roxanne’s on Friday or Saturday night for some classic karaoke with yours truly! ! I’m glad I wait until my senior year (this past weekend) age 22 to lose my virginity. It was worth it to wait for the perfect person.

Dear Editor: You cant’ call it anonymous commenting when you have to provide your real e-mail address and create an account, which you must verify using said real e-mail address. Stop BS-ing. EDITOR’S NOTE: Step 1: Create new e-mail address with Google Step 2: Comment anonymously !

Dear girl in the library, When you asked me to guard your stuff while you went to the bathroom, I got a kick out of your suggested method of theft deterrence: “Can you just trip him or something?” Indeed I can, Miss. !

! Posting my stop censoring rants rant doesn’t make you cool when you censor my other four rants.

READ MORE EAGLE RANTS ONLINE.

CLASSIFIEDS Mystery Shopper (part time) Sitters Wanted. $12 or more per hour. Register free for jobs near campus or home. www.student-sitters.com

Student wanted to help in garden. Two Hours a week at $20 an hour. Call 202-363-5229.

Looking for upbeat & articulate female, 21 to 24 years old. $50/hr. Retail or restaurant exper. pref ’d. Approx. 5-7 hrs/wk - flexible days. Car & driver license req’d. email resume: SBMJunk@ GMail.com

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Student prole: Dubuisson’s work supports women, Haiti “Haitian people have the capability and the drive to bring themselves out of the rubble. It speaks to the character of Haiti.” – Yuzzy Gaina Dubuisson

By ANNA SCALAMOGNA Eagle Staff Writer

JEFF MINDELL / THE EAGLE

HELP FOR HAITI – Yuzzy Gaina Dubuisson, a junior in the School of International Service, recently founded Haiti in Transition, a nonprofit working to establish a new image of Haiti.

AU is pretty great for people seeking to learn more about foreign countries. If you’re planning on studying abroad in Bulgaria and want to learn more about the country as a whole, there’s a club for that.

If you get set up on a blind date and all you know about the person is that they’re from Taiwan and you want to learn more Taiwanese culture, there’s a club for that.

If your best friend invited you to spend winter break at their brother’s friend’s girlfriend’s cousin’s house in Lebanon and you want to know what sites you should make sure to check out while you’re there, there’s even a club for that.

Yup, there’s a club for just about anything. Only at AU.

For more information, contact the AU Club Council at aucc@american.edu

When Yuzzy Gaina Dubuisson moved to the U.S. from her birth country of Haiti at age 7, she left behind friends and family. The AU student did, however, bring a strong sense of Haitian pride and a belief in empowering youth and women to her new home. Through her work with a Haitian-focused nonprofit as well as AU’s Women’s Resource Center, Dubuisson said she hopes to bring a new image of Haiti to the world and inspire women both in the U.S and abroad. Dubuisson, a junior in the School of International Service, is the co-founder of the newly-formed nonprofit Haiti in Transition. The organization is a group of eight young women, including two other AU students, working to establish a new image of Haiti and its culture, as well as to empower its youth. “When most people think of Haiti, they think of the poor,” Dubuisson said. “Not the beautiful people, the rich, vibrant arts.” Dubuisson said she was brought up with a strong pride in her heritage and it is important for her to be a voice for those who don’t have the same opportunities as she has had. She is a firstgeneration college student in her family. The 2010 earthquake in Haiti affected the world’s view of the country and was a personally emotional experience for Dubuisson. Her home was destroyed, and her 109-year-old great-grandmother had to be pulled from the rubble by her cousins. Her great-grandmother survived and was later featured on CNN. After the tragedy of the

2010 earthquake, Dubuisson said she hopes her group’s efforts can help showcase the light and dignity of the Haitian people. “Haitian people have the capability and the drive to bring themselves out of the rubble,” she said. “It speaks to the character of Haiti.” She will be traveling there with the group Haiti in Transition in December to evaluate and plan some of the group’s future projects. In their first project, they will work with local artists as well as the country’s youth to beautify cities through murals and other works of art. The project will start sometime next year, according to Dubuisson. Dubuisson’s interest in empowering others is not just exclusive to her Haitian culture. Her involvement in women’s issues started her freshman year when she and a friend from George Washington University founded a program called the Minority Women’s Initiative. Each month she and her friend would travel to Pennsylvania to hold seminars for girls at their former high school. The meetings usually draw between 15-30 girls and focus on different relevant issues, such as dealing with adversity and the importance of education. This year, she works as a student assistant in the Women’s Resource Center. Dubuisson said working at the Women’s Resource Center seemed like a perfect fit for her passion and interests. “A women’s issue is my issue,” she said. “It was an opportunity to be part of a welcoming place for all women on campus.” ascalamogna@ theeagleonline.com

RÉSUMÉ Dubuisson has been involved in the following organizations while at AU: ! Minority Women’s Initiative (co-founder) ! Haiti in Transition (cofounder) ! Women’s Resource Center (student assistant)

FIVE FACTS ! Dubuisson traveled to Haiti last summer with Haiti’s ambassador to the U.S. and his wife as part of a volunteer group through the Clinton Global Initiative. She had originally met the ambassador at a Gala honoring the Haitian artist Hector Hyppolite in the Katzen Arts Center. ! On the trip to Haiti she received mercury poisoning from eating fish and felt so sick that she fell in her hotel room and split her chin open. She was taken to the hospital on the back of a motorcycle, but the hospital did not have the stitches she needed. The cut had to close by itself. ! She backpacked for two weeks in Israel at the end of 2008 with the inter-faith group Common Ground. ! She loves languages and can speak English, Spanish and Haitian Creole. ! Dubuisson enjoys cooking, especially Haitian dishes such as rice and beans and Caribbean style chicken, as well as Italian foods such as shrimp linguine.


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AUCC releases rst of monthly club allocations By JULIA RYAN Eagle Staff Writer

AU student groups will now be able to apply for larger budgets monthly instead of annually, according to AU Club Council Chair Katelyn Hurley. The AUCC recently released its budget allocations for the remaining days of September and the entire month of October. Under the new monthly budget system, clubs can submit proposed budgets on the 15th of the month and the AUCC will release their budget decisions around the 30th of that same month. Mock Trial and the Debate Society both had the biggest allocated budgets, with $3,000 each, according to Hurley. Other groups with high monthly budgets include College Republicans and the Jewish Student Association, both of which received $2,500. About 25 student groups got the minimum budget of $100, according to Hurley. A total number of 76 student groups requested $200,000 overall, but the AUCC only allocated $46,865.10 this month, Hurley said.

She also said every group is guaranteed at least $100 when they apply, but no group can get a budget of more than $6,000 per month. Only one or two groups received the amount of money they requested. While most groups were only required to submit their proposed budget for the upcoming month, bigger groups were required to submit a tentative budget for the rest of the school year. Hurley noted that certain factors affect how much the individual groups will get in their monthly budgets. “We tend to give higher budget allocations to groups that have high membership, put on events that would appeal to the whole AU community, groups that make their members pay dues and groups that hold fundraising events to offset their own expenses,” Hurley said. The AUCC budgeting system was changed largely because the annual system put smaller clubs at a disadvantage. Hurley hopes this new monthly budgeting system will allow smaller clubs to grow as they get bigger budgets. jryan@theeagleonline.com

In depth: The top 10 AUCC funding recipients

DEBATE SOCIETY MOCK TRIAL COLLEGE REPUBLICANS JEWISH STUDENT ASSOCIATION FACILITATING LEADERSHIP IN YOUTH GOSPEL CHOIR COLLEGES AGAINST CANCER DIALOGUE DEVELOPMENT GROUP ON A SENSUAL NOTE QUEERS AND ALLIES $500

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$1000 $1,500 $1500 $2,000 $2000 $2,500 $2500 $3,000 $3000

New sexual assault health educator hired

NEW JOB

Daniel Rappaport will help plan programs to educate the campus about sexual assault By RHYS HEYDEN

Eagle Contributing Writer The Wellness Center filled the newly created position of sexual assault health educator Sept. 23. Daniel Rappaport, who started work at AU last week, develops educational programming, works with individual students and serves as a resource for the campus, said Michelle Espinosa, associate dean of students. “We’re talking about programs in the residence halls; we’re talking about programs with other student organizations,” Espinosa said. “There’s a variety of areas on campus that

he can connect with.” University administrators realized that sexual assault was an issue that needed to be addressed more urgently, according to Dean of Students Robert Hradsky. AU examined the problem over the past two years and made a decision to create the position before the end of the Spring 2010 semester. “We really felt that there was more that we could be doing, but we didn’t have anyone dedicated to lead the efforts,” Hradsky said. “This is a person that can lead our educational efforts, and they can be there to work with survivors of sexual assault as well.”

Although support systems for victims of sexual assault were already in existence, including the Women’s Resource Center and Women’s Initiative, Hradsky said sexual assault is not only a women’s issue. Quinn Pregliasco, director of the Women’s Initiative, said she agreed that groups other than women should feel that the sexual assault health educator is accessible to them. “There are a lot of people on campus who are affected by [sexual assault] but just don’t ever have discussions about it,” Pregliasco said. news@theeagleonline.com

Daniel Rappaport

Rappaport’s position is based at the Wellness Center in McCabe Hall, and he works there 20 hours per week. He said he plans to keep his hours “very flexible,” and he will try to be on campus at times when students are most available for counseling and educational programs. Rappaport received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Maryland-College Park, and he received his master’s degree in mental health counseling from Boston College. “We need to change the way that people think and feel about this issue … I want to see what gaps I can fill,” he said.

(www.mei.edu) New Language Prociency Courses (All Language Skills / Speaking Only) The Middle East Institute is excited to announce the launch of its accelerated language prociency courses for professionals in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Hebrew, Dari and Pashto. These classes are targeted at military and civilian professionals in the Middle East eld and focus on improving language prociency in general while enhancing technical vocabulary in order to meet your professional needs. At the beginning and at the end of each course, students will be tested by ACTFL Certied Testers based on ILR and ACTFL scales. Evening and weekend classes will be offered at the Institute. Private Tutoring and Offsite morning classes are also available upon request. For 8 weeks courses, fees are only: $430 for 4 hours/week course and $995 for 8 hours/ week intensive course. REGISTER TODAY! Located in Dupont Circle 1761 N St. NW, Washington, DC For more information: http://mei.edu/Languages.aspx 202-785-2710 Mel-nady@mei.edu


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AU assembles largest college AIDS Walk team for fth time

2007 2008 2009 2010

$14k $12k $15k $12k

In numbers: AU AIDS Walk fundraising totals by year

By SOMMER BRUGAL

Eagle Contributing Writer

THE NEW FILM FROM THE DIRECTOR OF

WWW.GHETTOPHYSICS.COM

E XCLUSIVE E NGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8 TH

AMC MAGIC JOHNSON CAPITAL CENTRE 12 800 Shoppers Way 301/324-4220 CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

For the fifth year in a row, the “AU Fights AIDS” team was the largest university team at the annual AIDS Walk Washington Saturday. This year’s team had the largest number of students to date, with over 400 registered participants. The team raised over $12,000 this year, while last year’s participants raised nearly $15,000, according to Liz Bayer, the director of Women’s Initiative’s HIV/AIDS Taskforce. Total donations raised each year vary based on individual fundraising by each participant, according to Bayer.

news@theeagleonline.com

Zipcars now accessible to 18-year-old students By GEOFFREY BEEBE

Eagle Contributing Writer

ADVERTISE IN THE EAGLE — BUSINESS@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

“The AIDS Walk is a great way to call attention to this public health crisis that is happening right here in this community we live in,” Bayer said in an e-mail. Between 2007 and 2010, “AU Fights AIDS” has raised approximately $53,000 for the AIDS Walk, for which all proceeds go to the Whitman-Walker Clinic. The clinic is a non-profit, community-based organization that provides health care for those with HIV/AIDS and support for those who are affected by the disease. A 2008 study found that 3 percent of the D.C. population has HIV/AIDS. “It was amazing and really

demonstrated that combating HIV/AIDS and serving the larger D.C. community is something that is important to our whole AU community,” Bayer said in an e-mail. A total of 25 different clubs and organizations, including University offices, AU Student Government departments, greek life and student clubs, co-sponsored the team this year. Alison DiDonato, a freshman in the School of International Service participated in the AIDS Walk because she wanted to be a part of the solution to the high infection rate of HIV/AIDS in D.C. “I chose to walk because AIDS is a prevalent issue in my new home, D.C.,” DiDonato said. “As a student here, I feel it is my duty to relate to the people in this city and do what I can to help.”

A new joint agreement between AU and Zipcar gives students age 18 and older a chance to use nearby rental cars. Until recently, customers had to be 21 or older to use Zipcars located in the Nebraska Parking Lot, according to Student Government President Nate Bronstein. Zipcar is a vehicle rental service that students with a year of driving experience can use for a monthly fee. A student can sign up for the service through Zipcar or the University’s websites. George Washington University launched a similar pilot program in the fall of 2007. It was Zipcar’s first ever under-21 urban-setting system of its kind, The Eagle previously reported. Rates for Zipcar start with

a $35 enrollment fee, and driving rates start from $7 an hour or $69 per day, according to company’s website. There is a $35 annual fee every year after a driver enrolls. A day with a Zipcar includes gas, insurance and 180 free miles, with 45 cents for each additional mile over 180 miles, according to the How much does Zipcar cost?

69/day $ 7/hour

$

Zipcar website. Former SG President Andy MacCracken made many attempts to achieve a similar program for AU students last year, supplementing efforts made by SG presidents before him. The latest change to Zipcar’s AU policy makes it a third viable option for getting around without having to pay for having a vehicle on campus. Students could also use AUTO vans or Avis rental cars. Student groups can use Avis rental cars for organization travel. Bronstein said he is excited about this service. “In a lot of ways it represents the completion of a broader transportation initiative the past presidents and myself have been working on,” he said. news@theeagleonline.com


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OIT problem stalls SG election results

WHAT’S LEFT? Three out of the five SG Senate seats for the Class of 2012 ! All five SG Senate seats for the Class of 2011 ! One of the two SG Senate seats for the College of Arts and Sciences ! The one SG Senate seat for the School of Communication !

WHAT’S FILLED? ! Two SG Senate seats for the Class of 2012 ! One SG Senate seat for the Class of 2011 ! One SG Senate seat for the School of Communication

By MEG FOWLER Eagle Staff Writer

A technical error with the online Student Government ballot resulted in a delay in announcing which write-in candidates earned spots on the SG during this fall’s election. During the announcement of the results last Wednesday, Board of Elections Chair Anthony Dunham said that open positions could be filled with an application and appointment process through the SG Undergraduate Senate. But some open seats could still be filled by write-in candidates. Student Activities Coordinator of Governance and Leadership Andrew Toczydlowski had results that showed that no writein candidates had gained a clear majority, but these were results from last year’s fall election, he said.

Based on the results released Wednesday, the following positions remain open: ! Three out of the five SG Senate seats for the Class of 2012 ! All five SG Senate seats for the Class of 2011 ! One of the two SG Senate seats for the College of Arts and Sciences ! The one SG Senate seat for the School of Communication “We had originally said from the write-in results that there are no clear winners from the races, so we had just kind of said that all of those positions would be appointed,” Toczydlowski said. Dunham said that now that the correct election results have been identified, he will contact the appropriate write-in candidates Tuesday and Wednesday this week. If they accept the positions they were written

in for, these candidates will fill the following positions: ! Two SG Senate seats for the Class of 2012 ! One SG Senate seat for the Class of 2011 ! One SG Senate seat for the School of Communication Toczydlowski realized the results were faulty when Roger Deming, a junior in the School of Public Affairs who ran as a write-in candidate for a Class of 2012 Senate seat, e-mailed him asking for this election results. Toczydlowski replied, saying that of 42 votes cast for write-in candidates, Deming received zero. “Right away I knew there was some sort of error going on,” Deming said. “Because at the very least, I voted for myself, obviously, and I saw three of my friends physically vote for me.” Dunham confirmed that

Deming would be one of the candidates he will contact this week to fill an open position. Deming says he also asked 10 to 12 of his other friends to vote for him as a writein, as well, he said. Toczydlowski e-mailed the Office of Information Technology about it Monday evening. The problem was found in the link from my.american.edu to the write-in candidates’ results, which was displaying last year’s results, he said. OIT Web developer Marico Hawes said the issue was a “small typo type deal.” Student Activities and the SG are looking for another method of logging elections in the future, according to Toczydlowski. “We seem to have some consistent problems in working with OIT to facilitate elections,” he said. “We’re considering other options ... So we wouldn’t

have to go through the third party to update the election. We could just do that ourselves.” Dunham said there has not been an election cycle since he participated in the SG in the 2008 fall election that did not face OIT problems. While the process of announcing the results of write-in candidates has been delayed several days this year, Toczydlowski said that Dunham assured him the technical problem has not affected the application and appointment process of open positions. The numbers also show that no write-in candidates gained enough votes to potentially oust the previously announced winners of the fall SG elections, he said. mfowler@theeagleonline. com

Join a new generation of leadership ANCHORED IN THE PRESENT FOCUSED ON THE FUTURE EDUCATING GLOBAL LEADERS MASTER OF PACIFIC & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Career tracks include: Economics, Management, Politics, Public Policy, Environmental Policy, Development & Nonprot Management Shaping strategic decision-making through public policy, management, and international relations.

Please join us for an Open House

Thursday | October 7, 2010 | 6 p.m. University of California Washington Center 1609 Rhode Island Avenue NW Metro: Farragut North/West; Dupont Circle Register at openhousedc.eventbrite.com


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Making our voices heard on Capitol Hill New student group shows how AU students can benet from living in the District As AU students, we take much pride in our position as the most politically active campus in the nation, but do we fully live up to our reputation as such? Although we join political groups, host speakers on campus, and take part in marches and protests, many ignore one our greatest advantages: the ability to directly advocate issues in front of our representatives. We hold up as an exemplar AUPAC, a new group on campus that goes beyond the confines of campus to advocate for their cause. We call upon the campus community to follow their lead and fully embrace the

opportunities presented by this city. AUPAC is a relatively new student organization that advocates in Congress for policies that support Israel. Without wading into the issue itself, we are excited that a group of AU students have the opportunity to advocate for important issues. While we commend the actions of AUPAC, we admit our surprise that they are one of the only student groups to move beyond the edge of campus to actively advocate in Congress. However, looking at recent developments like the continued work of the A Voice 4 U campaign it

Although we join political groups, host speakers on campus and take part in marches and protests, many ignore one of our greatest advantages: the ability to directly advocate issues in front of our representatives.

seems that AU students are begging to live up to our reputation for activism. Living and studying in D.C. provides us with a powerful advantage over other schools throughout the nation in that we can make our voices heard to the most powerful people in the U.S. In addition, with the large amount of issues concerning students under debate these days, the potential for students to advocate our own causes is greater than ever before. We see the actions of AUPAC as a start for us. Among the multitude of student organizations on campus, there must be more that can take a

similar course of action. There are opportunities in this city beyond hosting guest speakers on campus. As enlightening and interesting these speeches might be, they make AU students into passive observers. Let’s continue raising money to fight HIV/AIDS, let’s continue attending downtown protests and let’s start advocating our issues directly to the decision makers living just down Massachusetts Avenue. AUPAC is helping to lead the charge into a new level of AU political engagement — now it is up to us to live up to our true potential.

Five questions with Jackie Grill Five questions about the American University Public Affairs Committee for its president, Jackie Grill: 1. What exactly do you do on the Hill in terms of advocacy? Students involved with AUPAC for Israel understand the importance of the U.S.-Israel relationship. We go to the hill to advocate on behalf of this relationship and to urge our members of Congress to support a democracy and friend in the Middle East, Israel. 2. How did you get your start on the Hill? Our days on the Hill come from hard work and

personal relationships. Our students meet with members of the House and Senate in which we are constituents, and after our own research, explain the importance of the United States’ continued support of Israel. On our most recent trip, we had the opportunity to meet with staff members from the office of Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., who let us know that they were sponsoring legislation that we were advocating for the creation of (the implementation of the Iran Sanctions passed earlier this summer). By having meetings like this, we know we have a friend to return to on the Hill, and continue to discuss the U.S.-Israel relationship with.

3. Why did you decide to advocate on the Hill? Our organization feels that the most effective way to support Israel is by working with the people who vote on the issues concerning Israel, our legislators. By talking to our legislators we are showing our strong interest and passion in the subject matter as well as thanking our members for their continued support. 4. What effects have you seen from your advocacy work? What goals do you have? Our advocacy missions have a dual purpose. First, our trips to the Hill al-

low our members to understand the opinions of their constituents, allowing us to really participate in our government. This is a pretty cool thing for college students and, as a secondary purpose, our trips to the Hill allow students to see the impact they can have. Students can see their true impact as they speak to a senator, congressmen or any staff members. It’s a great feeling to leave an office and know that what you have to say was not just listened to, but was processed and will be put into action. 5. What advice would you give to other student groups wishing to get more involved with advocacy work on the Hill?

TALK BACK: E-MAIL EDITOR@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

Trips to the Hill are the most effective way to make a difference in federal legislation. If there is a specific issue that any organization is passionate about, they should tell their legislators the importance of it. It is only through meetings that members and their staff can learn what is important to their constituents and what they can do about it here in Washington. “Five questions with Jackie Grill” is part of our “Five questions with ...” series where The Eagle asks various members of the AU community five questions about hot issues.

LEARN MORE ABOUT

AUPAC

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school, not enter it. This past week, Newsweek ranked AU sixth on their list of “The 25 Most Diverse Schools”. However, not all college rankings have been so generous to AU in the diversity factor. College Prowler, a prominent ranking publication, gave AU a C+ for diversity. Newsweek was impressed with the variety of religions represented at AU, and for our gayfriendliness that has been praised by several college rankings systems. However, Newsweek also mentioned AU’s study abroad program in their review. They note not only that 6 percent of our student body is from countries all around the world, but almost 75 percent of AU students go back into the world through study abroad. Also, 6 percent is great compared to most state schools, but hardly compares to Boston University’s 17 percent. The

75 percent going abroad though blows away most of our competitor’s study abroad statistics. As we all come back from our times abroad with genuine interest in another culture and often a newly acquired language skill we add a new level of diversity not measured by incoming freshman diversity statistics. This observation on studying abroad, however, is not a measure of diversity of incoming students. College Prowler makes a fair point saying that examining diversity depends on what one considers diverse. It, too, praised AU’s multireligious and gay-friendly atmosphere, but was rather harsh when it came to minorities and socioeconomic diversity. “A majority of students are white, and some say they expected to see more minority students on campus. Considering how culturally and racially diverse D.C. is, AU is not a great reflection of that,” College Prowler said. Compared to other universities on Newsweek’s “The 25 Most Diverse Schools,” AU’s percentage of whites/ Caucasians is much higher

than most. I am still not convinced though that this qualifies AU as only a religious and sexually-orientated diverse school. As Newsweek said, our study abroad program is robust and offers students opportunities few other schools can. We have excellent majors, ranging from Bio-Chemistry to Business to International Development, and if none of the majors offered appeal to you — you can create your own! Professors too come from a range of backgrounds. Maybe we as the student body are not diverse, but our experience certainly is. This diverse experience will change us for life and expose us to far more then if we had stayed in the same small upper-middle class town in New Jersey where we grew up. The fact that we all even know a white girl who speaks Chinese is often far more then our high school friends can say. Sarah McHaney is a junior in the School of International Service and an AU affairs columnist for The Eagle.

Do we even have a right to privacy? There’s no right to privacy in the Constitution. Not explicitly, that is. It’s within our capability to insert it, although, the Tea Partytrembling Democrats and the Eric Can’t-or (won’t) Republicans couldn’t collaborate to pass gas, much less an addition that bold. An amended constitutional right to privacy could garner bipartisan support by assuaging conservatives’ desire for minimal government, while appeasing liberals by solidifying female autonomy over their bodies. Bipartisan or not, the complexity of privacy issues demands a constitutional framework. An explicit, expansive, right to privacy couldn’t possibly account for all potential privacy violations in future technology. It’d be foolish to claim it could. However, we’d at

least have parameters to work from, which could deter bullies like Clementi’s roommate by making privacy as sacrosanct as free speech. Instead, we live in a legal vacuum. Our privacy rights hinge in the courtroom on the whims of a single judge. Gridlocked legislatures are unable to keep pace with rapid technological growth, so our judicial system weathers the challenge. Yet even judges are ill-equipped to confront these issues with no clear precedent or constitutional relevance. Closer to home, a Maryland man was recently acquitted after filming a routine traffic pullover. “[Circuit Court Judge Emory] Plitt cited the videotaped recording of the Rodney King beating in Los Angeles and the explosion of ‘rapid fire information technology’ to note that virtually anyone in a

public place should expect their actions could be recorded and broadcast,” according to the Baltimore Sun. Important clarification: rights to privacy shouldn’t be blanket. Public figures should forfeit much of their privacy. And while police should have reasonable rights to record, citizens should be afforded a comparable level for their protection. Even closer to home, the Obama administration is expected to advocate for expansion of wiretapping (Skype, Facebook, etc.) according to The New York Times. “The bill, which the Obama administration plans to submit to lawmakers next year, raises fresh questions about how to balance security needs with protecting privacy and fostering innovation.” Under the guise of national security and without a constitutional impedi-

AU’s diversity measured in more than demographics DIVERSITY DISCUSSED

SARAH McHANEY The White Girl Who Speaks Chinese. We all know one — the girl from New Jersey who sits in the front row of economic policy class copying out Chinese homework while randomly interjecting her little known facts. The girl from Wisconsin who is furiously learning Arabic and spends her summers in Egypt. The boy from Long Island who speaks Swahili and studies development in Africa. Maybe this is AU’s version or definition of diversity: Not that people are so very different from one another when they arrive, but when they leave they no

longer fit where they came from. No one else in South Jersey will be able to speak to the white girl who has learned Chinese — except for maybe her language partner also from Jersey, or the kid who sat behind her, also from Jersey. Maybe diversity doesn’t lie within the students, but in our experiences here at AU. The discussions professors ignite about world politics, current events, controversial issues and philosophy. There are few schools where it seems normal to discuss international economic policy, Hemingway’s style of writing, and whether Locke was racist or not all in one day — and that doesn’t even include our coffee talks on the elections (I am referring to the Student Government elections, not the congressional ones in November). Perhaps diversity should be measured as we leave

Student suicide shows subpar privacy laws SMARTER THAN I LOOK

CONOR SHAPIRO We’re facing a war — not on terrorism, not on drugs. This war concerns our right to privacy, and we’re losing. (A strikeout, for anyone keeping score.) Last week, Tyler Clementi, a Rutgers University freshman, committed suicide

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after his roommate and an accomplice illicitly broadcast footage of Clementi’s sexual encounter with another man. Tragically, this case isn’t unique. Clementi is one of an increasing number of students who have been victimized by cyberbullying via text, instant messenger and other media. Technology can be used as a check on the abuse of power and, conversely, to visously abuse someone. When breaches of privacy occur, where do we turn for regulation or sentencing?

TRENDING TOPICS to Zipcar for allowing AU students under 21 to use Zipcars. Now, in addition to being able to vote and fight in the armed forces, 18 year olds can now rent Zipcars.

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to Zipcar for only having very few cars available for use in Nebraska Parking Lot. Plan early and run fast if you plan on borrowing a car for the day.

"

to AU students that supported AU Fights AIDS and the AIDS Walk this weekend. Especially those that managed to get up that early and battle cold weather.

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to seasonal beverages of all varieties — here’s looking at you, Pumpkin Spice Lattes and Oktoberfest.

!

A very special and heartfelt “oy” to Rick Sanchez.

edpage@theeagleonline. com.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ONLINE AT THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

ment, he will likely have as much trouble as LeBron James dunking. Not the kind of ‘change’ I was ‘hoping’ for. Privacy issues permeate our daily lives and no attention is being paid to assess the root of the problem. As essential as a detailed right to privacy in the Constitution is, it needs to be augmented by an evolving standard of decency. A privacy amendment should designate different standards to distinguish public officials, celebrities, regular Joe’s, etc. Privacy rights are complex, and while there’s no universal definition, you can’t build a house before you lay the foundation. Conor Shapiro is a graduate student in the School of International Service and a liberal columnist. edpage@theeagleonline. com


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AU student group lobbies on Hill for Israel “We have faith in the system that they will put our words into action through legislation.” – Jackie Grill, AUPAC president

By JULIA RYAN Eagle Staff Writer

SHIRA KARSEN / THE EAGLE

TWO SIDES, ONE VOICE – Danny Shaket, right, speaks about his work with OneVoice, a nonprofit organization which strives for an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Ahmad Omeir, left, said he joined OneVoice because of a friend’s death in 2003.

Student leaders talk peace By JULIA RYAN Eagle Staff Writer

OneVoice student leaders spoke about their lifechanging experiences in the midst of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at an event on Thursday night in the East Quad Building Lounge. Youth leaders Ahmad Omeir and Danny Shaket spoke about their lives growing up in Israel and Palestine, and took questions from the audience. OneVoice was founded in 2002 by Daniel Lubetzky to promote peace as an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and to promote the two-state solution. Omeir is a 26-year-old Palestinian youth leader from Bal’a, a village in the northern West Bank. Danny Shaket is a 25-year-old undergraduate student at Tel Aviv University who grew up in Netanya, a town about 20 minutes outside of Tel Aviv. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict reached Omeir on a

personal level in 2003 when one of his friends was killed by Israeli troops. One afternoon, Omeir visited the candy shop his friend owned in his hometown, then went to the shop next door for a moment. He says he heard Israeli troops come into his friend’s candy shop and speak harshly to him. “I didn’t understand Hebrew at the time, but I understood the gunshots that came next,” he said. He ran into the shop to see his friend lying on the ground covered in blood. An Israeli soldier told Omeir the only way he could live would be to put his foot on top of his friend’s chest. He resisted at first, but then his friend, who was not dead yet, reached over and placed Omeir’s foot on his chest. At this point, Omeir fainted and did not regain consciousness until he woke up at a hospital the next day. Omeir believes his friend was killed because he was

Palestinian. Shaket said he had not seen the violent side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict until 2000 during the Second Intifada, a Palestinian uprising. “It felt like all hell broke loose,” he said. “My hometown had seven or eight explosions right on my block.” Around the same time, he was drafted into the Israeli National Army. Because of a medical condition, he could not serve in active duty, and he spent his time in the human resources department. Shaket first found out about the OneVoice movement in 2007, and became a member in 2009. He was able to get a large group of OneVoice student activists to attend Vice President Joe Biden’s speech at Tel Aviv University in March 2010. He also arranged a public debate about the two-state solution in Tel Aviv. When Omeir first heard about OneVoice, he did not want to join the group because there was a social

stigma around joining organizations that “encouraged love of one’s enemies,” he said. But he eventually joined after hearing someone in the group say they were members because they did not want their children to live in fear. “I did not want anyone to have to live in fear anymore,” he said. “I wanted to participate in change.” Shaket believes peace is an end result, not an immediate goal, of talks between Israelis and Palestinians. “Peace is the result, in the future, of an agreement between both sides, he said. “We first need to bring both sides to the table first before we can achieve peace.” A number of pro-Palestinian and pro-Israeli AU student groups and organizations co-sponsored the event, including Students for Justice in Palestine and the Center for Israel Studies. jryan@theeagleonline.com

A new student group at AU is looking to take the creative efforts of students to make a difference in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on Capitol Hill. The American University Public Affairs Committee on Israel, or AUPAC, has started lobbying congressional representatives and state senators to advocate for direct talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders and for the passage of the Iran Sanctions Act, which would put sanctions on Iran for continued nuclear proliferation, according to AUPAC President Jackie Grill. AUPAC had its first meeting with political officials on Sept. 15. A group of 25 students visited the offices of five senators, including Sen. Frank Lautenberg, DN.J., and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. The group will conduct meetings with members of Congress and various state senators throughout the school year to give them information about the relationship between the U.S. and Israel and to urge them to take action on various foreign policy issues, according to Grill. At the Sept. 15 meeting, the students gave information packets to the foreign affairs aides for four of the five senators. The AUPAC members were able to meet with Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., in person. “He thanked us a lot for what we’re doing, and he thanked us for our support of the U.S.-Israel relationship,” Grill said. “And that

felt great.” AUPAC will be visiting the offices of congressional representatives and state senators again on Nov. 10. Grill is confident AUPAC’s meetings with senators and members of Congress can make a positive impact. “We have faith in the system that they will put our words into action through legislation,” she said. “This is the most impactful way to make a difference in the conflict.” She also noted that while other pro-Israel AU student groups like AU Students for Israel organize cultural programming, AUPAC is more politically based. The group started over a year ago when one of Grill’s friends told her he wanted to lobby for political issues at AU. AUPAC became a Student Activities-recognized organization earlier this semester. Though the group is proIsrael, it is not restricted to just Israeli or Jewish students, said AUPAC Vice President for the Leadership Board Emma Noftz. “The type of people who lobby Congress with us varies with each different event,” she said. “But the great thing about our organization is that not everyone has to be Jewish.” Grill stressed she is not looking to stir conflict with pro-Palestinian groups. “We don’t want rallies,” she said. “We don’t want protests. You won’t see us outside of a [Students for Justice in Palestine] event screaming and yelling. We want to sit down and talk calmly about the issues.” jryan@theeagleonline.com


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AU student group lobbies on Hill for Israel “We have faith in the system that they will put our words into action through legislation.” – Jackie Grill, AUPAC president

By JULIA RYAN Eagle Staff Writer

JEFF MINDELL / THE EAGLE

TWO SIDES, ONE VOICE – Danny Shaket, right, speaks about his work with OneVoice, a nonprofit organization which strives for an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Ahmad Omeir, left, said he joined OneVoice because of a friend’s death in 2003.

Student leaders talk peace By JULIA RYAN Eagle Staff Writer

OneVoice student leaders spoke about their lifechanging experiences in the midst of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at an event on Thursday night in the East Quad Building Lounge. Youth leaders Ahmad Omeir and Danny Shaket spoke about their lives growing up in Israel and Palestine, and took questions from the audience. OneVoice was founded in 2002 by Daniel Lubetzky to promote peace as an end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and to promote the two-state solution. Omeir is a 26-year-old Palestinian youth leader from Bal’a, a village in the northern West Bank. Danny Shaket is a 25-year-old undergraduate student at Tel Aviv University who grew up in Netanya, a town about 20 minutes outside of Tel Aviv. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict reached Omeir on a

personal level in 2003 when one of his friends was killed by Israeli troops. One afternoon, Omeir visited the candy shop his friend owned in his hometown, then went to the shop next door for a moment. He says he heard Israeli troops come into his friend’s candy shop and speak harshly to him. “I didn’t understand Hebrew at the time, but I understood the gunshots that came next,” he said. He ran into the shop to see his friend lying on the ground covered in blood. An Israeli soldier told Omeir the only way he could live would be to put his foot on top of his friend’s chest. He resisted at first, but then his friend, who was not dead yet, reached over and placed Omeir’s foot on his chest. At this point, Omeir fainted and did not regain consciousness until he woke up at a hospital the next day. Omeir believes his friend was killed because he was

Palestinian. Shaket said he had not seen the violent side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict until 2000 during the Second Intifada, a Palestinian uprising. “It felt like all hell broke loose,” he said. “My hometown had seven or eight explosions right on my block.” Around the same time, he was drafted into the Israeli National Army. Because of a medical condition, he could not serve in active duty, and he spent his time in the human resources department. Shaket first found out about the OneVoice movement in 2007, and became a member in 2009. He was able to get a large group of OneVoice student activists to attend Vice President Joe Biden’s speech at Tel Aviv University in March 2010. He also arranged a public debate about the two-state solution in Tel Aviv. When Omeir first heard about OneVoice, he did not want to join the group because there was a social

stigma around joining organizations that “encouraged love of one’s enemies,” he said. But he eventually joined after hearing someone in the group say they were members because they did not want their children to live in fear. “I did not want anyone to have to live in fear anymore,” he said. “I wanted to participate in change.” Shaket believes peace is an end result, not an immediate goal, of talks between Israelis and Palestinians. “Peace is the result, in the future, of an agreement between both sides, he said. “We first need to bring both sides to the table first before we can achieve peace.” A number of pro-Palestinian and pro-Israeli AU student groups and organizations co-sponsored the event, including Students for Justice in Palestine and the Center for Israel Studies. jryan@theeagleonline.com

A new student group at AU is looking to take the creative efforts of students to make a difference in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on Capitol Hill. The American University Public Affairs Committee on Israel, or AUPAC, has started lobbying congressional representatives and state senators to advocate for direct talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders and for the passage of the Iran Sanctions Act, which would put sanctions on Iran for continued nuclear proliferation, according to AUPAC President Jackie Grill. AUPAC had its first meeting with political officials on Sept. 15. A group of 25 students visited the offices of five senators, including Sen. Frank Lautenberg, DN.J., and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. The group will conduct meetings with members of Congress and various state senators throughout the school year to give them information about the relationship between the U.S. and Israel and to urge them to take action on various foreign policy issues, according to Grill. At the Sept. 15 meeting, the students gave information packets to the foreign affairs aides for four of the five senators. The AUPAC members were able to meet with Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., in person. “He thanked us a lot for what we’re doing, and he thanked us for our support of the U.S.-Israel relationship,” Grill said. “And that

felt great.” AUPAC will be visiting the offices of congressional representatives and state senators again on Nov. 10. Grill is confident AUPAC’s meetings with senators and members of Congress can make a positive impact. “We have faith in the system that they will put our words into action through legislation,” she said. “This is the most impactful way to make a difference in the conflict.” She also noted that while other pro-Israel AU student groups like AU Students for Israel organize cultural programming, AUPAC is more politically based. The group started over a year ago when one of Grill’s friends told her he wanted to lobby for political issues at AU. AUPAC became a Student Activities-recognized organization earlier this semester. Though the group is proIsrael, it is not restricted to just Israeli or Jewish students, said AUPAC Vice President for the Leadership Board Emma Noftz. “The type of people who lobby Congress with us varies with each different event,” she said. “But the great thing about our organization is that not everyone has to be Jewish.” Grill stressed she is not looking to stir conflict with pro-Palestinian groups. “We don’t want rallies,” she said. “We don’t want protests. You won’t see us outside of a [Students for Justice in Palestine] event screaming and yelling. We want to sit down and talk calmly about the issues.” jryan@theeagleonline.com


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BREASTIVAL EVENTS Breastival Festival 12 – 5 p.m. WHERE: Main quad WHAT: Women’s Initiative will set up tables and activities promoting women’s reproductive and breast health. Students can participate in a dunking booth, condom crafts, Coca Cola giveaways and cookie decorating, among other projects. CONTACT: Women’s Initiative at wi@ausg.org. Women’s Initiative will descend on the quad for Breastival 2010: Treasure Your Chest Tuesday at noon to put on activities promoting women’s reproductive and breast health. The Breastival is a yearly women’s health festival sponsored by Women’s Initiative. The event originated at Johns Hopkins Un i v e r s i t y - Ho m e w o o d campus in 2001. The Breastival has since been recreated at over 100 universities across America, as well as in Canada and the Middle East. AU participated for the first time in 2005, making this the sixth-annual festival at the University. The event began as a way to disseminate information about the dangers of breast cancer to a younger, often overlooked audience. Women’s Initiative has broadened the focus in recent years to include activities on safe sex and other reproductive health issues. About 2,000 students attended last year’s Breastival, according to Quinn Pregliasco, director of Women’s Initiative.

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Gloria Steinem, presented by the Kennedy Political Union 8:15 p.m. WHERE: Ward 1 WHAT: Feminist icon Gloria Steinem will speak to students about her experiences fighting for equality. In addition to gender issues, Steinem studies race caste systems, conflict resolution and indigenous culture. CONTACT: Josh Levitt at josh.levitt@ausg.org. Second-wave feminist leader Gloria Steinem will address AU students Tuesday evening, thanks to a collaboration of Women’s Initiative and Kennedy Political Union. Steinem founded feminist publication Ms. Magazine in 1972 and championed the Women’s Action Alliance and the National Women’s Political Caucus. Now she continues to speak on civil rights issues internationally. In an interview on her website, Steinem said the greatest challenge collectively facing women today is physical safety and reproductive health. “[Steinem] really thinks that everyone’s futures depend upon each other,” said Quinn Pregliasco, director of Women’s Initiative. “It’s really the support of both men and women that will bring us to equality.” -SP

AU students help the homeless The Community Partnership for the Prevention of Homelessness conducted its annual point-in-time enumeration in D.C. on Jan. 27, 2010 and counted over 6,500 homeless individuals. By ALISSA SCHELLER Eagle Contributing Writer

Last spring, Aileen George and Bryan Yannantuono headed an initiative to allow students to donate unused meal swipes to feed D.C.’s homeless. It seemed easy enough. After the duo cut through the expected red tape, Yannantuono and George were able to have the cashier at Block Express swipe an ID card 50 times and give them 50 donated boxed lunches. But they ran into problems when they had to transport the lunches. “They gave us a cart that wasn’t even a cart, and we had all the meals and sodas and waters on it, and the wheels didn’t really work,” Yannantuono said. “That was the worst.” Despite the hardships, they came back to Block Express five times and donated a total of 250 meals to Friendship Place, a center that helps homeless individuals near Tenleytown. Yannantuono and George said they hope student efforts to fight homelessness and hunger will be easier this year now that the two started an official student group, AU Students Fighting Homelessness and Hunger. The club aims to work with existing organizations on campus and around the city to combat homelessness and hunger.

The founders said their focus this year will be getting off campus and helping the community. George, a senior in the School of Public Affairs and the College of Arts and Sciences, said she developed the idea for the club after an internship with Student Public Interest Research Groups. Last year, George, along with Co-President Yannantuono, a sophomore in SPA and the School of International Service, organized a clothing drive and AU Fights Homelessness and Hunger Week. They also organized an ice cream social benefiting Street Sense, the D.C. newspaper that works to raise awareness of issues homeless people face. Austin Young, a sophomore in SPA, got involved with the group last year when he was asked by Yannantuono to help out at the Street Sense ice cream social. Young’s hometown in Vermont had very few homeless people, he said, and when he first visited D.C. the number of homeless people in the city surprised him. “I had never seen that before,” he said. “I talked to Phillip [a Street Sense vendor stationed in Tenleytown] and then saw him later at Best Buy, and he was a really cool guy.” Yannantuono said he wanted to push AU to get a Street Sense subscription in the residence halls or get a

Street Sense vendor to come closer to campus. After his experience with meal swipe donations last year, Yannantuono also wants to focus on how to improve that process. He said he wrote up a policy for Bon Appétit detailing how they could reform the system. “I think that during finals week or just after finals week, you should be able to go on [my.american.edu] and say ‘I didn’t use this many meals’ and donate them to the University,” he said. Apart from making it easier for students to donate meal swipes, the new club’s goals include being a resource for members of other organizations, such as fraternities and sororities, that are looking to serve the community. George and Yannantuono said they want to work with organizations such as A Wider Circle, a nonprofit organization in Silver Spring, Md., that provides basic necessities to people transitioning out of homelessness, and D.C. Central Kitchen. They also plan to again work with Bon Appétit to donate meal swipes. AU Students Fighting Homelessness and Hunger will work with the Community Service Coalition, Community Action and Social Justice and D.C. Students Speak, an organization that tries to connect students at different D.C. universities

to help them work toward common goals in the community. At their first meeting, new members suggested events like a hot cocoa fundraiser for Street Sense, helping serve holiday dinners and a “trick-or-treat” for canned goods in the dorms. The club also aims to raise awareness of homelessness in D.C., the U.S. and abroad. Because homelessness is not a permanent situation for many people, it is difficult to estimate the number of people who are homeless in D.C. or the nation. An estimated three million people nationwide are homeless during a given year, including about 1.3 million children, according to the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty. George said that being in the nation’s capital gave AU students a unique opportunity to help out with a nationwide issue. “Where our school is situated helps us reach out,” she said. “It’s not something that can end with one person. It’s a continual problem.” But, she said, students have to get involved in order for the new club to make a real difference. “We want to be a continual solution,” Yannantuono added. news@theeagleonline.com

GO ONLINE: A TICKET TO RIDE

- Sarah Parnass

OCT. 5

ANA SANTOS / THE EAGLE

CAPITAL BIKESHARE – Massachusetts Avenue now sports a rack of 15 bicycles installed by the Capital Bikeshare Program. Members of the public can rent these bikes at over 100 stations across D.C. and Arlington, Va. Full story online at www.theeagleonline.com.


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RACHEL SLATTERY / THE EAGLE

‘RADIO’ WAVES — Alternative-rock band State Radio played a well received set and took the opportunity to share their political views with the audience. Over the past eight years the band has built a reputation for combining their high energy rock with support for various causes and charities.

State Radio champions voting, free music at upbeat Tavern show By LAURA BECK

Eagle Contributing Writer Music has a history of promoting change, and State Radio’s show last Saturday night had a strong focus on civil obligation and political activism. And in a show sponsored by AU’s Student Union Board (SUB) and held in the Tavern, they were able to bring local politics and universal musicality Voting was the theme of the night; volunteers hopped around the line into the show encouraging students to register to vote in D.C. The volunteers sought seeks to gain student voters so that representation from the University is heard for issues including dorm expansion and dining hall renovation. Endway opened the night with an upbeat pop/rockstyle set. While generic in their style and lyrics, they kept the audience intrigued with their energy. Con-

versing with the audience — specifically one overlyexcited group of students — they reminisced of missing significant others while being in college and promoting hard work. Opening with “Running Man,” Endway’s lead singer Morgan Dorr posed the question: “How many of you feel like the running man sometimes?” followed by “Give it up for hard work.” The band was immediately able to connect with the audience, attempting to inspire them. Passion also shined through with Dorr’s proclamation that “we never stop making music because we love it so much.” Group sing-a-longs were prominent as well, led by the whole band. At their conclusion, Dorr recognized the voting campaign when he reminded students to “sign up to vote. We are America.” After much anticipation, State Radio moseyed onto the stage and took the

show to a whole new level. Chad Stokes Urmston (lead guitar/vocals), former member of the rock band Dispatch, entered the Tavern sporting a shirt with an illustration of a fishing Snoopy and a “guitar” made from what used to be a can of gasoline. Chuck Fay (bass/vocals) walked onto the stage with leis covering his entire neck, thanked whomever put leis in the dressing room and proceeded to throw them out to audience members as the night progressed. Opening with “Good Graces,” State Radio’s heavier sound captured the crowd’s attention. Playing a variety of their songs from their 13 albums including “Us Against the Crown,” “Year of the Crow,” and “Let It Go.” Songs like “Mansin Humanity,” “Guantanamo,” “Time Served” and “Bostonia” revealed the darker side of this ska-alternative band’s style. “Calling All Crows,” “CIA,” “People to

People,” “Dr. Ron, the Actor” and “Camilo” were more upbeat crowd pleasers, with audience members singing along and rocking to the Bob Marley-influenced beat. “People to People” shined as one of many hits of the night, with a smashing solo by Urmston on a more common electric guitar this time. Whether brash or upbeat, many of the songs’ lyrics reflect a theme of service and humanity. In addition to being complex and layered, State Radio’s lyrics, primarily written by Urmston, give way to the band’s intense focus on the importance of service. Urmston gave a shout out to the voter registration volunteers in the back of the crowd, reminding students that it only takes 20 seconds to register, and that “a lot of us wouldn’t be here without democracy.” The band has supported many causes in the past, including raising money

RACHEL SLATTERY / THE EAGLE

‘STATE’ OF PLAY — The crowd filled the Tavern and sang along with both Endway and State Radio. and awareness for women refugees in Sudan. When asked about his thoughts on the changing music industry, Urmston responded, “We rely on the live show — I’m all for file sharing, stealing shit.” They said that they are fine living off of ticket sales and enjoy sticking to their

own record company, Ruff Shod. There is no doubt that State Radio stand for something, and they continue to survive and thrive in this world of setbacks for musicians. thescene@theeagleonline. com


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EYE-OPENER

WEEKEND BRUNCH

C AFE • BAR • B O O K S TO R E OPEN EARLY & LATE 7 DAYS • 24 HRS FRI & SAT BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER “BEST BOOKSTORE” –Washington City Paper, Washington Post’s expressnightout.com, Washington Blade

1517 CONNECTICUT AVEUE NW • DUPONT METRO/Q STREET EXIT • KRAMERS.COM JEFF MINDELL / THE EAGLE

LATE NIGHT EATS — The Diner in Adams Morgan is the perfect spot for breakfast 24 hours a day. There you’ll find a wide variety of delicious eats like grilled cheese and burgers.

The Diner: Beer, omelets for those late-night afterparties ... with red vinyl seats, checkered black and white oors, high ceilings and jazzy music playing in the background, The Diner is more of a trendy hangout. By KELLY HOLLIDAY Eagle Staff Writer

As a self-proclaimed hotspot that serves “early birds, night owls and everyone in between,” Adams Morgan’s The Diner is the perfect place for brunch, a juicy burger or a late-night snack. Affiliated with neighbor Tryst Coffeehouse and Open City, The Diner has become the perfect eatery for D.C. college students and young hipsters alike. With a menu that declares that “all men and women are

created with equal appetites” and that diners have “the right to eat breakfast whenever the hell they please (like 4 in the morning); the right to wear running shorts, pajamas, or last night’s clothes to Sunday Brunch and the right to eat out in D.C. without breaking the bank,” before listing the food offered, eating at The Diner is an experience in and of itself. Expect to find club-goers stopping by for a very early morning bite to eat or locals chowing down on grilled cheese with a glass of red

wine. Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, you won’t find any jukeboxes or poodle skirts in this diner. However, with red vinyl seats, checkered black and white floors, high ceilings and jazzy music playing in the background, The Diner is more of a trendy hang-out than Al’s Diner from “Happy Days.” As for the food, expect to find an array of ethnicities and cultures represented on the menu. Jerk chicken, homemade meatloaf, stuffed

portobello mushrooms and Croque Monsieurs are featured, while American breakfast staples and samplers dominate the menu. If you’re in the mood for the most important meal of the day, be sure to try the “Diner Royale,” a breakfast sampler piled high with eggs, toast, and the choice between French toast or pancakes and bacon, ham or sausage. The homefries are not to be missed either: with a soft center and crispy outside, these potatoes are breakfast stars. Craving a cup of coffee? Look no further, as The Diner grinds its own beans and brews it fresh. And then there are the omelets. The Diner offers a Spanish omelet with salsa, jalapeños and pepperjack cheese, a Greek omelet with spinach and feta and the classic cheese omelet, to name a few. But don’t worry about making it to The Diner before noon if you want to enjoy eggs and bacon: they

serve breakfast every hour, all day long. The lunch and dinner fare is your basic diner food: burgers, sandwiches and salads. Don’t miss out on The Diner’s delicacy, the original grilled cheese, or a twist on the classic comfort food, the Plymouth Rock, with Swiss cheese, turkey and cranberry sauce, or the Original Deluxe with cheddar, tomato and bacon. Though not as notorious as Kramerbooks and Afterwords Café’s desserts, The Diner offers typical diner sweets like sundaes, malts and milkshakes for postmeal treats. As mentioned in the declaration, The Diner promises to keep wallets deep with change. The average price of a bountiful breakfast sampler or sandwich and fries is about $10. kholliday@theeagleonline. com

WHAT

Good diner cuisine on a relatively tight budget.

WHERE

Adams Morgan’s main drag, 18th Street.

TRY THIS

The “Diner Royale,” a breakfast sampler piled high with eggs, toast and a choice between French toast or pancakes and bacon, ham or sausage.

SCENESTERS SAY

Good place to get a beer or Belgian waffle. Or both.


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Setting limits: Clear consent key to having pleasurable sex THE SEX WONKS

RYAN CARTER AND TARA CULP-RESSLER Where is your line? This question is sparking an entire movement to define sexual boundaries. We briefly touched on the issue of consent in our last column, and we want to dedicate more space to it now. Take some time to think about it. What situations make you feel sexually empowered? What could your partner do to make you comfortable and secure enough to have the best sex of your life? On the other hand, when do you feel like you’re out of your comfort zone, when do you want to stop, when do you want to say no? What words or actions cross your personal “line”? Drawing that line certainly isn’t simple. Just take a look at the recent changes to AU’s Student Handbook — our updated Sexual Assault Policy elaborates on different aspects of consent in a list nearly 10 paragraphs long. We won’t reprint it in its entirety here, but we strongly urge you to educate yourself as students and empowered sexual beings by checking it out. On the very basic level, AU’s updated Sexual Assault Policy defines consent as “words or conduct that indicates a freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or to participate in sexual activities.” Pretty good, but we would go a step further and argue that the best consent must be a mutual verbal agreement; ultimately, “conduct” just doesn’t cut it. She didn’t say “no.” Even if your partner hasn’t said the word “no,” you don’t automatically have his or her go ahead. Even if you’ve started to hook up with someone and she

isn’t protesting, she hasn’t actually given you permission to proceed. Consent is enthusiastic, it’s passionate, it’s a resounding “YES!” that communicates your eagerness to engage in sexual activity with your partner. Because, honestly, why would you want anything less out of a sexual encounter? Sex is only sexy when you’re into it, you’re begging for it, and your partner is totally on the same page. Anything less than that is not only the makings of an extremely less-than-hot hook-up — it’s also not true consent. If you’re feeling annoyed and wondering if all this

Sex is only sexy when you’re into it, you’re begging for it and your partner is totally on the same page.

“consent” stuff will cramp your style when you try to get laid this weekend — never fear. Getting the go-ahead isn’t about having less sex, or even fewer casual sexual encounters. It’s really about having positive, respectful and safer sex. Seriously, consent can be pretty sexy. Check in for consent and greater pleasure Checking in on your partner doesn’t have to be awkward, and it definitely shouldn’t kill the mood. Use any of the following questions while you’re getting it on as a way of obtaining consent, learning about your partner’s wants and needs, and working to-

ward steamier sex for both of you: “Do you like it when I touch you there?” “Do you want me to keep going?” “Want to switch it up and change positions?” “What do you like?” “What do you want me to do next?” “Does it feel good like this?” And folks, if you would rather die than ask your partner a question like this, you should probably reconsider whether you’re mature enough to be engaging in sexual activity in the first place. The first step to having amazing sex is communication, and that communication should be structured around getting your partner’s approval every step of the way. Remember that consent is a process! When you move to the next step of sexual intimacy, you need to make sure it’s okay with your partner instead of just assuming. Just because you’ve done one thing with somebody doesn’t mean they want to do another thing. Respect your partner’s line as well as your own line. Starting to hook up with someone is never a promise that you’ll go further or do certain things. You and your partner have the right to draw your lines anywhere, and you can take back your consent at any time. Ask for consent early and often, and don’t cross any lines. We promise it will lead to the sexiest experiences of your life, because you’ll be totally in control. And what’s sexier than complete empowerment? Check out The Line Campaign at whereisyourline. org and Scarleteen at http:// www.scarleteen.com/resource/boyfriend/consent_ is_sexy for more information about sexual consent and drawing your line. And, as always, e-mail Tara and Ryan with any questions, comments, concerns, or sexual fantasies. sexwonks@theeagleonline. com

MICHAEL W. RICHARDSON / THE EAGLE

LONDON BRIDGE — Before all the fun and stress of exploring a foreign land, AU students must cram months of supplies into their luggage.

Packing proves difcult foe in preparations for studying abroad CROSS-CULTURAL DISPATCH

LONDON, ENGLAND By OLIVIA STITILIS Eagle Staff Writer

Writing my third “abroad” column while still at home in Connecticut proved to be a real challenge. Even with my visa struggles, spending hours on the phone with my insurance company practically begging them to override my prescriptions and the ordeal of opening a United Kingdom bank account, the real challenge — the true test of my emotional sanity — is my current endeavor. I am in the midst of packing hell. I have always had a strained relationship with packing. I will do practically any task to procrastinate. I just volunteered to do the weekly grocery shopping. So much so that packing and I have become accustomed to meeting each other very late at night or early in the morning. This disdain for packing escalated to such a point that last year I started packing my dorm room up at 1 a.m. My mother was coming to

pick me up at 9 a.m. the next morning. Eight hours later, a hallway completely taken over and strewn with various suitcases and furniture my room could no longer contain, and a frantic last hour frenzy of stuffing bizarre combinations (rain boots, DVDs and econ books wrapped like a bizarre gift basket) in whatever bags I could find, it was done. Packing epitomizes transition. I don’t do transitions well. I think how this time tomorrow I will be 3,000 miles away from my home with no one that I know. I stare at my suitcases thinking how so much of what I will need in the next nine months has to be inside them. Once I am there I will be completely fine, but it’s the lead up that really gets me. Thus I vowed not to spend my last night in the U.S. pacing around my room avoiding packing. Admirable effort has been made toward this goal. I started sorting through all my clothes deciding what to bring and what to keep at home over a week ago and have consistently been taking things out and choosing to leave them instead. Even though every time I have walked into my room in the past three days I still cringe at the piles on the floor, something about this packing experience is different than others that have come before. First, I have developed a

passionate love affair with vacuum compression bags. Whoever invented them clearly hated packing as well. Put clothes in the bag, zip them shut and then roll or squeeze all the excess air out. Seriously miraculous. At this point in the preabroad stage I have come to realize that challenges are 100 percent relative. This time next week I will have a whole other set of challenges. What’s more, study abroad is not about what you bring. It is about what you take away from it. Whenever people find out I am going abroad for a year, sentiments like “This year will change your life,” follow. And though these sentiments can be incredibly intimidating they are also very helpful. They have helped me to realize that it doesn’t matter what you stuff your suitcases with, but rather what memories you make, new experiences you try and how you immerse yourself in your abroad journey wherever in the world you may be. Now I must get back to my vacuum compressed bags. EDITOR’S NOTE: Olivia touched down safely in London. For a quick update, check this story on our website, www. theeagleonline.com. thescene@theeagleonline. com


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Latin cinema shines at AFI lm festival WHEN COST

Now until Oct. 13

$9 per film with valid student ID

WHERE

AFI Silver Theatre, two blocks away from the Silver Spring stop on the red line.

SCENESTERS SAY

If you like Latin American or foreign films, don’t miss this chance to see them in some comfy seats.

By ZACHARY COHEN

Eagle Contributing Writer

ADVERTISE IN THE EAGLE — BUSINESS@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

The Latin American Film Festival will be showing at the American Film Institute in Silver Spring, Md., from Sept. 21 to Oct. 13. The festival is a collection of films from Latin American countries as well as Spain, according to AFI. AFI is giving movies the royal treatment at this 21st annual event. The films are shown in grandiose cinemas at AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. Their “stateof-the-art film and video projection facilities” give films their proper splendor, according to AFI. Unbelievably comfortable seats add to the perfect experience. The festival is a cultural exposition. Through the films, viewers come to learn what other cultures revere and can learn to appreciate universal values through humor and dramatic situations. There are romances, adventures, comedies, action films and

documentaries. AFI Programmer Todd Hitchcock is primarily responsible for curating the movies found at film festivals across the world, including Berlin, Cannes, the Czech Republic and Toronto. Hitchcock sees value in doing festivals such as this one. It brings viewers “deeper into, and more comprehensively, into a selection of new films from the region,” Hitchcock said. “One gains a “sense of what’s going on country by country ... in terms of cinema right now.” This season has been going particularly well. AFI sold twice as many passes to the festival as last year, according to Hitchcock. Embassies around D.C. helped promote the event, Hitchcock said. He noticed that there was a lot of turn out to films from the embassies wishing to see films from their own countries. “Everyone knows D.C. has a large population from El Salvador,” Hitchcock said. “But there have also been large turnouts by the Bolivian, Colombian, Dominican and Brazilian populations in the D.C.-metro area.” AFI Silver will continue to host international films with its AFI European Union Film Showcase this November. AFI Silver is also in the process of setting up film festivals for Korea, Africa and the Caribbean. Admission to any film shown at the Latin American Film Festival is $9 with a valid student ID at the box office. AFI is two blocks north of the Silver Spring Metro stop on the red line. More information can be found at www.afi.com/silver/new/. thescene@theeagleonline. com


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NEVER LET ME GO By YOHANA DESTA Eagle Staff Writer

In Hollywood, when all else fails, directors turn to making books into films. The latest novel to receive this treatment is Kazuo Ishiguro’s 2005 novel “Never Let Me Go.” While some novels are skewered by cinematic reimaginings, “Never Let Me Go” is a marvelous take on the award winning dystopian masterpiece. Directed by Mark Romanek — who is mainly known for directing music videos — the film stars Carey Mulligan (“Wall Street 2”), Keira Knightley, and Andrew Garfield (“The Social Network”). The film is narrated by Kathy (Mulligan), a 31year-old woman reflecting on her life. The film opens with her childhood years, as a precocious schoolgirl at a boarding school in the English countryside called Hailsham. While it seems like an average school, Hailsham

! ! ! ! !

MOVIE REVIEWS

of adolescence. Knightley, playing Kathy’s beautiful best friend and greatest enemy, is captivating. However, it is Garfield who adds a light touch to the film, with his awkward nature and lanky frame working hand in hand to add comic relief. While the film moves quite slowly, Romanek works to build a realistic relationship between Kathy, Ruth and Tommy. It moves quickly in comparison to the novel, but that’s to be expected from any adaptation. Fans of the book may be slightly put off, but the superb acting makes up for the lack in complete character development. The film moves deftly, attempting to recreate the atmosphere of Ishiguro’s own mysterious and powerful writing. While it does fall short of achieving Ishiguro’s masterful detail and depth, the film makes up for it in beautiful landscapes and artistic vision. Romanek highlights the loveliness of foggy England. Everything

“Never Let Me Go” is a thoroughly depressing, yet captivating lm held together by magnicent acting and moments that reafrm true love really exists.

students are told everyday that they are special and that they serve an important purpose. Little do they know that their futures only hold disturbing and unalterable truths. Kathy’s close friends are Ruth (Knightley) a devious and flighty young girl, and Tommy (Garfield), a young boy often bullied by his peers. Students at Hailsham follow a strict regimen of education, playtime and daily checkups. They are bright and happy and extremely obedient. As they grow up, they are moved from Hailsham to a different part of the English countryside, dubbed “The Cottages.” Mulligan does a brilliant job of playing the ever-wistful and pensive Kathy. She seems to be older than her years and somewhat out of touch with the insouciance

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is thoroughly British, from the gray skies and seas, to the uniform caps and rain boots. As the story develops, it takes on a far more depressing tone. The heartbreak and torturous reality suffered by the characters lends to a touching third act. Kathy’s narration is brief and melancholy, completely enrapturing the audience. “Never Let Me Go” is a heart-wrenching film, wrought with feelings of injustice and dread. While there are moments that lift the film up out of the darkness, the film is a dramatic tear-jerker. The plot will slowly but surely reel you in and leave you questioning the extent to which love truly can conquer all. ydesta@theeagleonline.com

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS

By MAXWELL TANI and MAEVE MCDERMOTT Eagle Contributing Writers Oliver Stone has always loved stirring the pot. His movies have been the subject of intense criticism for the controversial liberties taken with historical figures and events. However, fifteen years ago, few would have questioned his ability to take the drama of human history and craft an excellent film from it. In “Platoon” and “JFK,” Stone utilized tight storylines and believable, complex characters to shed light on sensitive issues. However, that Oliver Stone is nowhere to be found in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.” With the long-awaited sequel to Wall Street, both critics and fans alike were hopeful for a return to form for Stone. Set against the backdrop of the economic collapse of 2008, “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” finds Gordon Gekko (Michael

its star-studded cast, led by Douglas’ shrewd, coldblooded Gordon Gekko. While not as riveting as his original Oscar-winning performance, Douglas portrays a more mature, weathered Gekko set on redeeming himself. Carey Mulligan gives a solid performance as Gekko’s estranged daughter. Josh Brolin finds himself in another Oliver Stone leading role, and spins a decent performance from a poorly written character. Frank Langella provides a scenestealing turn as Lou, the managing director of the Bear Sterns-esque bank who serves as Moore’s mentor and the foil to the ruthless Brolin. Unfortunately, the cast’s collective talent isn’t enough to overcome the movie’s convoluted storyline and not-so-subtle political statements. As the market unravels, so does any resemblance of a coherent plot. Stone chooses to stuff his sequel full of half-baked political

! ! Oliver Stone squanders good ! performances with half-cooked political mumbo-jumbo. " Douglas), “Wall Street’s” cunning master stockbroker and insider trading extraordinaire, fresh out of jail, having written a new book about the impending economic crisis. Gekko takes up-andcoming stockbroker Jacob Moore (Shia LaBeouf) under his wing after he learns that Moore is dating his estranged daughter. The situation gets complicated as the bank in which Moore works collapses (starting the domino effect which eventually bursts the housing bubble), and forces him into business with Gekko. Eventually, the characters are all forced to deal with the “moral hazards” of living a life juggling millions of dollars of other people’s assets as the world teeters on the brink of economic collapse. The greatest strength in “Money Never Sleeps” is

subplots like green energy, speculation and the housing bubble, without providing too much information about any of them. Cameos from Sheen and Stone himself provide laughs for about 10 percent of the audience and cheapen the film, making its erratic political messages all the more forgettable. The first “Wall Street” succeeded by painting a realistic picture of the evil, alluring nature of easy-money stock trading of the 1980s through dynamic characters and a whip-smart screenplay. While “Money Never Sleeps” has all of the right ingredients to replicate this masterpiece, the film gets caught up in gimmicky motorcycle races, watery dialogue, and countless winks at the audience. thescene@theeagleonline. com

Dupont festival celebrates local artists, musicians “I have never seen the community from young to old get together and really strive to make one event a huge success.” — Festival co-chair Stephen Rutgers

By HOAI-TRAN BUI

Eagle Contributing Writer On Saturday, Dupont Circle played host to the first 17th Street Festival, attracting families, dog-walkers and dancing transvestites. The Street Festival brought together the 17th Street community with artists, musicians and locals who celebrated the end of renovations on their street. “I have never seen the community from young to old get together and really strive to make one event a huge success,” said festival co-chair Stephen Rutgers. “No matter who you are in the neighborhood you had something to benefit from the festival.” One group who stood to benefit were local artists, who jumped at the opportunity to display art in front of such a varied crowd. Over 50 artists participated in the Fine Arts Show, hoping to gain new customers. Although it wasn’t the first art show for many of these artists, they shared enthusiasm for the new festival. “Just the experience when you hope someone will buy something is a great learning experience,” said Jay Schiffres, one of the artists. The art show was just as varied as the festival’s visitors. One of the most popular art exhibits was “The Republican Doppleganger,” in which programmer Jim Webb matched photos of people’s faces to various Republican politicians using a facial recognition program. “It’s just fun for the festival,” Webb said. “It’s my creative outlet.” John Johnson was helping Webb take photos of the participants.

“People love it,” Johnson said. “We’ve been getting huge crowds.” The Fine Art Show was only a subset of the festival, which was created to celebrate the end of a $4 million stimulus project to renovate the street-scape. Substantial construction and revitalization efforts have made the formerly-ramshackle street into the perfect venue for an art festival. “The festival was a way to show off the street and all of the businesses,” Rutgers said. The festival committee, in an effort to convince as many businesses as possible to participate, even gave out free banners for them to hang outside. In addition to local businesses, there was a Pet Zone, kid’s activities, a beer garden at JR’s Bar and Grill, and various music performances by bands such as Double Life. “There was a great turnout, with lots of great vendors. They did a fantastic job with this festival,” said No Kings Collective artist Peter Chang. The local community played a large role in the celebrations. When the 17th Street Festival was first getting off the ground several months ago, it received support from the local Advisory Neighborhood Commissions and Dupont Circle Citizens Association, as well as the D.C. Council Members and the mayor. “Everyone really came together and supported the event,” said Rutgers. “We had an amazing response from the community and it really brought everyone together.” thescene@theeagleonline. com


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TUESDAY 5

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SCENE CALENDAR WEDNESDAY 6

THURSDAY 7

GAYNGS 8:00 p.m. WHERE: Black Cat, 1811 14th St. NW METRO: U Street/AfricanAmerican War Memorial/ Cardozo (green and yellow lines) WHAT: With the release of their debut album “Relayted,” GAYNGS have been receiving widespread acclaim for their ability to mesh ‘80s-inspired soft rock with contemporary indie stylings. They were even named one of Stereogum’s “Top 40 Best New Bands of 2010.” If you weren’t able to spot their recent performance on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” you can still catch them at the Black Cat. COST: $18-$20 CONTACT: www.blackcatdc.com

Flo Anito 9:00 p.m. WHERE: Chief Ike’s Mambo Room, 1725 Columbia Rd. METRO: Columbia Heights (green and yellow lines) WHAT: After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in music, jazz-pop artist Flo Anito decided to make D.C. her home. Since 2008, she has been a centerpiece for local D.C. venues. You can catch her “First Wednesdays with Flo” performance where she will be joined by other local musicians. COST: Free CONTACT: www.chiefikes. com

Three Sisters 8 p.m. WHERE: Katzen Studio Theatre, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW WHAT: Alice Ivanova directs this broody and passionate work by the brilliant Anton Chekhov. Originally written in 1900 for the Moscow Art Theatre, the play tells the story of three refined sisters who have been living in an unassuming town for many years but must return to their hometown of Moscow following the death of their father. COST: $10 CONTACT: Katzen Box Office at www.american.edu/ cas/auarts

FRIDAY 8

SATURDAY 9

SUNDAY 10

Built to Spill 8:00 p.m. WHERE: 9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW METRO: U Street/AfricanAmerican War Memorial/ Cardozo (green and yellow lines) WHAT: With seven albums under their belt, Built to Spill have been pioneers in indie rock since the ‘90s with their blend of pop, post-modern style and jamming. Their recent tour comes a year after the release of their latest album, “There Is No Enemy.” They’re joined by newcomers RevoltRevolt. COST: $25 CONTACT: www.930.com

Taste of Georgetown 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. WHERE: Georgetown, Wisconsin Ave. & M St. NW METRO: Foggy Bottom Metro Station (blue and orange lines) WHAT: The 17th annual “Taste of Georgetown” features a bevy of delicious dishes from D.C.’s finest restaurants and eateries. Over 12,000 people are expected this year in celebration of food, wine and music. Tickets are $5 for one tasting and $20 for five tastings. COST: $5-$20 CONTACT: www.tasteofgeorgetown.com

We Were Promised Jetpacks 7 p.m. WHERE: Rock N Roll Hotel, 1353 H St. NE METRO: Union Station (red line) WHAT: Hailing all the way from Edinburgh, Scotland, this indie rock group is embarking on a North American tour opening for Jimmy Eat World. Their latest EP, “The Last Place You’ll Look,” which was recorded within a two-week period, has received critical acclaim. COST: $15 CONTACT: www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

MONDAY 11 Bowerbirds 9:00 p.m. WHERE: Black Cat, 1811 14th St. NW METRO: U Street/African-American War Memorial/Cardozo (green and yellow lines) WHAT: North Carolina folk rock trio Bowerbirds grace the D.C. area with songs from their second album, “Upper Air.” They are joined by Tennessee native Sharon Van Etten, playing uplifting acoustic pop songs. COST: $13 CONTACT: www.blackcatdc.com

Virgin Mobile FreeFest brings big bands to frugal fans at Pavilion By MARISSA CETIN Eagle Staff Writer

Free music? Yes. Legally? Even better. Virgin Mobile’s FreeFest was back this year in full eclectic force at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Md. on Sept. 25. Merriweather Post Pavilion was decked out in Virgin Mobile and other sponsors’ banners, tents, outdoor lounges, giving FreeFest the feel of a carnival — or even a hipster Disneyworld, with swarms of twenty-somethings, freebies and funnel cake. A Ferris wheel decorated with a Virgin Mobile logo was set up next to the West Stage and was colorfully lit up at night, adding to the fun feel. The event marked the fourth year that the Virgin Group sponsored the music festival, but only the second year tickets were free. In 2009 the festival was dubbed “FreeFest” and general admission ticket seekers were encouraged to donate $5 to various homeless youth charities partnered with Virgin. When the main batch of tickets sold out, Virgin Mobile’s FREE.I.P. program allowed people to sign-up for various volunteer drives to earn tickets. Last summer’s FreeFest raised more than $80,000 for youth homelessness and logged over 30,000 hours of volunteer time. Some notable acts: ! Trombone Shorty, a funk band from New Orleans, played their afternoon set at the West Stage to a small crowd. Their music was infectious and catchy as the crowd jammed along. Highlights included a solo by frontman Troy Andrews during their

single “Hurricane Season” from their “Backatown” album and their surprisingly sweet take on Lil Wayne’s “Lollipop.” !" Yeasayer, a psych-rock band from New York, played a set that varied greatly. They wrapped up their set with crowd-pleasers “O.N.E.” and “Ambling Alp,” which were perfect for dancing along to the psychedelic-pop. Previous songs lacked the fun bounce the closers had. !" Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, seeming a bit out of place, rocked away any doubts and performed with the same hard, rebellious edge that first made them famous in the ‘70s. With decades passed, little seems to have changed Jett as her singing sneer only led to more singing along, especially during “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll” which had the entire lawn clapping and yelling in unison. !" Matt & Kim were booked to play the open Pavilion Main Stage. The duo looked microscopic on the stage compared to larger bands like Edward Sharpe and LCD Soundsystem — not that size stopped Matt & Kim from performing with great smiles plastered on their faces and their typical through-the-roof levels of fun and energy. In addition to powering through most of their original songs, Matt & Kim snuck in covers of “Jump On It,” “Just A Friend,” and “Better Off Alone.” !" Ludacris was FreeFest’s lone rapper as he performed to an enthusiastic crowd. The audience was very receptive to Ludacris’s own hits like “Area Codes,” “Act a Fool,” and “Move Bitch,” as well as when he mixed in his guest verses on hit songs like Taio

Cruz’s “Break Your Heart” and Fergie’s “Glamorous.” !" M.I.A. and LCD Soundsystem were arguably the most anticipated acts of FreeFest, so when M.I.A.’s hour long set was scheduled to overlap LCD’s by 30 minutes, people weren’t pleased. M.I.A. did not help the situation by showing up to perform almost 30 minutes late. Finally, a teeter-tottering M.I.A. appeared, one-piece poncho and all, and began her set with a fantastic rendition of “Bamboo Banger” off her sophomore album “Kala.” After opening with a hit, M.I.A. stayed away from performing other hits until the end of the set. M.I.A. put in a strong performance with her strong, unique style of rapping and fascinating stage presence. In what critics hail as the best set of FreeFest, LCD Soundsystem rocked the pavilion. Unfortunately, those who wanted to catch both headliners had to miss nearly the first hour of LCD’s bumping set, missing hits like “Daft Punk Is Playing At My House” and “Dance Yrself Clean.” Luckily they were still treated to a fantastic live version of “Yeah.” A massive disco ball hung from the rafters, perfectly complementing the beats and only encouraging the audience to dance even more than LCD’s music already does. A perfect end to Virgin Mobile FreeFest, LCD Soundsystem’s set energized the crowd when many felt like they were running on empty after the long music-filled day. mcetin@theeagleonline.com

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KEIR GILCHRIST

EMMA ROBERTS

and ZACH GALIFIANAKIS

ZACH GALIFIANAKIS IS A REVELATION!”

– SCOTT MANTZ

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Sometimes what’s in your head isn’t as crazy as you think.

Bucknell snaps women’s three-game win streak By SAM LINDAUER Eagle Staff Writer

The Bucknell University Bison (3-10) snapped the AU women’s soccer team’s three-game win streak with a 3-0 victory Saturday. The shutout marked the seventh time the Eagles have been blanked this season. This time around, Bucknell’s goalkeeper Sandita McDermott was the culprit behind AU’s lack of goals. The Bison scored their first goal in the 24th minute. Caitlin Holtz was able to put the match’s first goal in off of a corner kick. The one goal would be all the Bison would have in the first half of the match. The next score would come in the 62nd minute in the second half, as Bucknell’s Kelsey Johnson put the ball in the net after a free kick. It was her first goal of the season for Bucknell. Kelliann Doherty would score the Bison’s final goal !

STARTS OCTOBER 8TH IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE

WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY

SOFIA COPPOLA IN SELECT THEATRES DECEMBER 22

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from COACH on page 19

All-Americans, 17 All-Region selections and 24 allconference honorees. This year alone, nine different Eagles have been recognized by the Patriot League for their outstanding weekly performances. On a team level, Jennings preaches an attacking style of hockey in which AU dictates the level of play. He wants his players to understand their roles on the team but also have enough knowledge of other roles to be able to fill in if necessary. More than anything, Jennings wants his team to play with excitement. “We want to be fast, fit and play with good skill,” he stressed. “I’d rather win a game 5-2 than a 1-0 slogger where we have three shots but play strong defense. I’ll take that to win a national championship, but I’d rather

of the match with only seven minutes left in play. The goal just added on to a defeat where, according to AU’s head coach Dave Bucciero, the defense wasn’t at the top of their game. “I thought we lost the game today because we did not defend set pieces well, which resulted in their first two goals,” Bucciero told AU Athletics. “We did not come out strong enough in the first 25 minutes, and that put us in a hole. We played much better in the second half, but weren’t able to overcome our mistakes.” Despite being outscored, AU had a consistent attack as they outshot Bucknell 1410. They also had five shots on goal, compared to Bucknell’s four. On offense the Eagles were lead by Kendra Jones, who had a game-high four shots. Patricia Bailey and Carleigh Morba each had three shots for the Eagles. While Bucknell’s goalie

was able to keep the Eagles’ offense at bay, AU had some trouble against their opponent. Starting goalie Arianna Efstathiou played the first 61 minutes of the match and allowed two of Bucknell’s goals. Efstathiou was later replaced by Lindsey Farthing, who finished out the game allowing one goal. The game was both teams’ first Patriot League match of the season. The Eagles will play the rest of their schedule against Patriot League teams after a home match against Princeton University on Monday. AU will play their next two Patriot League matches on the road against The College of the Holy Cross and then the United States Military Academy before returning home to take on Colgate University on Sunday, Oct. 17.

play a game where people walk away saying, ‘You know what, those kids are amazing athletes and that was a great game.’ ” This mentality is what has led AU to be ranked as high as fourth in the nation in 2004, and it’s what motivates players like senior Kirstin Gebhart to buy into the system. “Steve is somebody who really empowers you and isn’t one who gives you the answers, ever,” she said. “He wants you to figure it out for yourself. He’s really trying to turn you into a smart player.” Jennings’ players are not just smarter on the turf, but smarter in the classroom as well. AU finished last season with a 3.50 team GPA, good enough for third in the nation. The team has ranked in the top five academically in five of the last seven years. “We try to build the team as

a family and try to do a lot to have support groups around [the players] so that they feel like this is something they really have to treasure, defend and honor in a lot of ways,” he explained. As of Sunday, the team is ranked 14th in the nation and has won eight matches in a row. On Sunday, AU beat No. 4 ranked Princeton University. The Eagles have outscored opponents 17-2 over the last three games. AU field hockey has come a long way since Jennings took over and its players are continuing to develop. The Eagles still have a long way to go this season, but one thing is for certain: They have no problem hitting the far post.

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Tom Schad is athletics communications assistant for the AU Athletics Department. sports@theeagleonline.com


October 5, 2010

Sports 19

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FH topples Princeton By ERIC SALTZMAN

Eagle Contributing Writer The Eagles had a tough road test this weekend with consecutive away games against Lehigh University and Princeton University. The Eagles opened their weekend road trip with a 9-0 win against Patriot League rival Lehigh. The Eagles cruised with seven different Eagles scoring. Senior forward Christine Fingerhuth and junior forward Melissa Casale led the Eagles’ scoring with two goals each. In addition, Gina Hofmann, Lotte Van De Mierop, Anne van Erp, Jenn Bradley, and Shelly Montgomery each scored a goal. Junior midfielder Natalie Ellenberger and senior midfielder Kirstin Gebhart each had three assists. The Eagles scoring began at 10:25 when Casale scored the first goal. AU

then scored four goals in seven minutes. The Eagles continued to dominate the game with four more goals in the second half. The nine goals the Eagles scored is a season high and the 9-0 win is the largest margin of victory of the season. The win marks the Eagles seventh straight win against Lehigh. The Eagles out shot Lehigh 30 to three. “The team did a great job of finishing today and it was important to start out league play with a strong performance,” Head Coach Steve Jennings told AU Athletics. “We have been working hard to continue improving week by week, game by game, and I think we definitely made some extra strides in this match.” On Sunday, the Eagles did not have the same offensive power they had against Lehigh but still

managed to defeat the Princeton Tigers, who are ranked fourth in the nation, 3-2. Christine Fingerhuth scored two goals and again led the Eagles’ offense. Gina Hoffmann contributed the only assist of the day. The Eagles only had four shots the entire game. The Tigers had nine shots on goal but were only able to score twice. The Eagles scored all of their goals in the first half. Princeton rallied for two second half goals but could not get the equalizer before the final buzzer. The Eagles did a good job of keeping Princeton’s Kathleen Sharkey, who leads the NCAA in goals, from having a big game. Prior to the game, The Eagles had lost their last two matches against Princeton. The win also marks only the second time this year that the Eagles have

won by only one goal. The two goals the Eagles allowed snapped a five period shutout streak. The win against Lehigh marks the team’s first conference win. The two wins this weekend give the Eagles an eight-game winning streak. They are also undefeated on the road this season. The Eagles haven’t lost a game since early September. AU still leads the Patriot league with a commanding 9-2 record. Statistically, the Eagles are dominating the rest of the Patriot League with 4.76 goals per game (the next closest has 2.61) and a mere 1.41 goals against average (compared to the second fewest 2.36). The Eagles continue their season this weekend when they host The College of the Holy Cross and Duke University. sports@theeagleonline.com

EAGLE FILE PHOTO

TOTAL DOMINATION — Freshman defender Keelin Bannon dribbles around the opposition in a game earlier this season. The Eagles won both games this past weekend against Lehigh and No. 4 ranked Princeton by scores of 9-0 and 3-2.

Field hockey coach nds the winning formula By TOM SCHAD Eagle Staff Writer

The year was 1999 and Steve Jennings was beginning his first season as head coach of the AU field hockey team. He arrived at practice and gave the squad a rudimentary drill — he would pass a player the ball and they’d shoot. The simple task proved to be anything but easy and every shot flew wide of the near post. Jennings brought the team together and explained that the goal was to aim for the far post. A flurry of shots missed, each skimming the near post. He once again gathered the players and demonstrated the proper form and technique necessary to fix the problem. Somehow, the problem still persisted. Jennings was forced to make an ultimatum: If a player missed, she would have to do five pushups. Like clockwork, balls started rattling the back of the cage. “Do you guys realize the problem?” he asked. “You’re teaching me how to coach you. And right now you just taught me that the only way I can get you to do something properly is a threat. I don’t want to do that.” Since that practice 11 years ago, Jennings has taken AU to the heights of DivisionI field hockey. The Eagles have won seven consecutive Patriot League Championships dating back to 2003 and have qualified for six NCAA Tournaments in that span. They are now ranked 14th in the nation and are on an eight-game winning streak Jennings has experienced his fair share of success as well, having won Patriot League Coach of the Year honors each of the past five seasons. His secret to success: a personable coaching style that works with each player on an individual level.

“I try to let each player have their own strengths and not try to curb that,” Jennings said. Jennings first joined the AU coaching staff in 1993 as an assistant coach to current Ohio State head coach Anne Wilkinson. During his three years there, Jennings helped Wilkinson guide the Eagles to their first national ranking and a cumulative record of 35-18. In 1996, he followed her to Ohio State. When Jennings returned as head coach three years later, he was determined to bring AU field hockey to national relevance. In the competitive world of college athletics, many coaches scream at athletes and run seemingly pointless drills. Jennings aims for the opposite. He doesn’t just teach his players what to do, but he also tries to show them why. “If I electro-shock people, I can get them to all run faster that day. So I get them to do it, but they do it against their will. It’s a short fix,” he explained. “I want people to want to be great. I want them to want to get better. Not because if they don’t here are these consequences.” While this philosophy has worked wonders for the program, many players take months and months to adjust. Players like senior Christine Fingerhuth are so used to fueling themselves with the screams of their coaches that Jennings’ coolness was at first unnerving. “What I was used to in Chile was everyone just yelling at me and cursing at me, so [Jennings’ style] is completely different,” Fingerhuth said. “Steve is very psychological and he wants to see what works for you. I like it a lot better.” One of Jennings’ strengths is his ability to nurture individual talent. In his 11year tenure at American, Jennings has coached seven ! see COACH on page 18


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AU men’s soccer team bounces back with conference win After losing to Virginia Tech, the Eagles came back to win their second Patriot League match of the season. By MARK NATALE

Eagle Contributing Writer

ANA SANTOS / THE EAGLE

BIG BLOCK— Seniors Katerina Cinkova (12) and Magdalena Tekiel (16) go up for the block in their 3-0 win over Holy Cross.

AU continues dominance over Holy Cross By KATE GREUBEL Eagle Staff Writer

The AU Volleyball team picked up its tenth straight victory this past Saturday with a win over conference opponent The College of the Holy Cross in straight sets. AU (16-2) won the sets 2513, 25-15, 25-16. The Eagles remain undefeated in Bender Arena, winning seven straight matches each in three straight sets. Despite heading into the match with a 19-0 record versus Holy Cross, senior Angelina Waterman said her team did not write off the match as an easy win. “Holy Cross is better than they have been in past years, so we didn’t know what to expect from them,” Waterman said. “We came into the game not thinking that we were going to win but thinking that this is just one step further for us getting to the Patriot League [Championship].” Stand out performances by Waterman and fellow senior

Magdalena Tekiel led the Eagles to their sixteenth victory of the season. Waterman had 12 kills in 26 attempts, while Tekiel picked up another double-double with 17 kills and 11 digs. Tekiel finished the match with a .538 attack percentage. Krysta Cicala set up her team for kills with 20 assists in the match. AU pulled ahead early in the first set, picking up points from both kills and Crusaders errors. Four AU players — Waterman, Tekiel, senior Cassandra Ricketts and sophomore Bianca Richardson — each registered four kills in the set. The Crusaders quickly surrendered the set to AU, 25-13. “There is something about getting to create power and momentum from a kill that gets your team ready to get going and putting that ball on the ground,” Waterman said. The second set proved to be more balanced, with the teams trading points until the score reached 7-5 in favor of AU. At that point, the

Eagles went on a 5-0 run. Once again the Eagles held a healthy lead over the Crusaders, averaging a cushion of eight points throughout the set. AU picked up the set 25-15 off a Crusaders error. With the score even at 5-5 in the third set, the Eagles went on a 3-0 run jump started by a kill from senior Katerina Cinkova. Long volleys and blocks deflected out characterized much of the set as the Crusaders trailed AU by three, 11-8. Back-to-back AU errors allowed Holy Cross to shrink its deficit to one, providing a set score of 16-15. Freshman Virginia Fitch said that in the huddle after each AU error her teammates encouraged one another saying, “shake it off ” and “we have the next one.” Up 19-16, the Eagles won six straight points to win the match 25-16. “We cannot let teams come in and play sloppy, and find holes in our defense,” Goldberg said. “We did not let [Holy Cross] do that today, and I think that made a big

difference in the game.” The Eagles return to Bender Arena on Oct. 7 for a match against the United States Naval Academy, a Patriot League opponent. AU current sits at the top in Patriot League rankings while Navy rests at the bottom with a conference record of 0-4. kgreubel@theeagleonline.com

Volleyball First Half AU: Holy Cross:

25 13

Second Half AU: Holy Cross:

25 15

Final AU: Holy Cross:

25 16

Washington, D.C.

The Eagles (5-4) defeated the Army Black Knights (1-8) with a 2-0 victory to win their second Patriot league match up Oct. 2. The Eagles improved to 2-0 against Patriot League opponents after beating Bucknell on Sept. 25. The win on Saturday against Army was a nice response to being shutout by Virginia Tech on the 28th. In a game where the Eagles were trying to avoid losing their second game in a row, they ended up dominating West Point. Seniors Jamie Davin and Nick Kapus scored goals to put AU ahead at the finish on the game. Following the first half of play in which both sides appeared evenly matched, AU needed a strong second half to put the game away. With 15 shots against Army’s two in the second half, the Eagles controlled the ball in the latter part of the game. In the 72nd minute, Davin scored a penalty kick after being fouled inside the box, putting the Eagles up 1-0. Later in the game, an Army foul gave senior Mike Worden a penalty kick. Worden lined up and fired a shot, but a stunning save from Army’s Ryan Currens kept the ball out of the net. Just three minutes later, Kapus scored off an assist from Davin, putting a finishing touch on the game

and defeating the Black Knights for the fourth straight time and seven out of the last eight match-ups. “I challenged the guys to raise the energy in the second half and the improved work rate led to more scoring opportunities,” Head Coach Todd West told AU Athletics. “Overall it was a hard-fought conference win on the road. Army is an improved team and we are happy with the result.” The Patriot League Player of the Week for August 2026, junior goalkeeper Matt Makowski, put his name in for a repeat bid at the honor, earning his second shutout of the season with a couple great saves. Makowski will need to be at top form for the rest of the season — he’s played every minute of the season so far, and the Eagles will be looking for him to continue carrying his team to the Patriot League playoffs. The leading scorer for the Eagles, sophomore transfer Alassane Kane, was kept quiet by the Black Knights’ defense, getting three shots off in the last third of the game. AU now turns to its second Big East opponent of the year, facing Georgetown University in an intercity battle on Oct. 6. A win against Georgetown would make for the first consecutive victories this season for the Eagles. sports@theeagleonline.com

The eagle, Oct. 5, 2010  

The OCt 5, 2010 issue of The Eagle.

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