Page 1

BR Community: Chimes Street sidewalk gets a facelift, p. 3

NCAA Tournament: Tigers to face off against Penn State at the PMAC, p. 5

Reveille The Daily

www.lsureveille.com

Technology: How are consumers reacting to the new iPad? p. 9 Tuesday, March 20, 2012 • Volume 116, Issue 113

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

Claire Caillier

Contributing Writer

As students peruse The Tiger Lair’s dining options, wallets may shrink while waistlines may widen. The average person should consume between 2,000 and 2,500 calories per day, according to Melissa Moore, assistant

strength and conditioning coach of the Lady Tigers’ basketball, softball and tennis teams. To gain one pound, an individual must consume an extra 3,600 calories in addition to his or her allotted daily calories. For about every 100 calories, an individual would have to walk or run one mile to eliminate them, according to Moore. To qualify for running, an individual must run about 7 mph. For

walking, though, an individual must walk at 3 mph. “Running and walking is the same amount of work,” Moore said. “It is the style that slightly affect the amount of calories burned. The difference between walking and running is the time it takes to complete the desired goal or distance.” Contact Claire Caillier at ccaillier@lsureveille.com

How much of a workout would it take to burn away the calories in some of students’ favorite meals? The Daily Reveille found out. Papa John’s:

Chick-Fil-A:

Personal pepperoni pizza • Calories: 840 • Miles to burn: 8.4 • Running: 1 hour, 12 minutes • Walking: 2 hours, 48 minutes

8-piece chicken nugget meal with medium french fries • Calories: 650 • Miles to burn: 6.5 • Running: 55 minutes • Walking: 2 hours, 10 minutes

Salsarita’s: Beef burrito (lettuce, tomatoes, sour cream and salsa) with chips and salsa • Calories: 887 • Miles to burn: 8.87 • Running: 1 hour, 16 minutes • Walking: 2 hours, 57 minutes

Grande Mochassippi (without flavoring, whipped cream or toppings) • Calories: 90 • Miles to burn: 0.9 • Running: 8 minutes • Walking: 18 minutes

Einstein Bros:

Panda Express: Bowl of orange chicken with fried rice • Calories: 950 • Miles to burn: 9.5 • Running: 1 hour, 20 minutes • Walking: 3 hours, 10 minutes

CC’s:

Quiznos: 6 inch turkey (mozzarella, tomatoes, lettuce and mayo) with Lays chips • Calories: 870 • Miles to burn: 8.7 • Running: 1 hour, 15 minutes • Walking: 2 hours, 54 minutes

Plain bagel and black coffee • Calories: 236 • Miles to burn: 2.63 • Running: 23 minutes • Walking: 53 minutes

McDonald’s: Big Mac with medium french fries • Calories: 920 • Miles to burn: 9.2 • Running: 1 hour, 19 minutes • Walking: 3 hours, 4 minutes photos by MARIAH POSTLETHWAITE / The Daily Reveille

ELECTION WATCH: SG presidential campaigns

Renew LSU seeks to improve student safety around BR Brunner, Davis to focus on budget cuts Danielle Kelley Staff Writer

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first in a four-part series profiling the Student Government candidates. The articles will be printed in order according to presidential candidate’s last name. Baptiste “Bat” Brunner IV and Madeleine Davis hope to “Renew LSU” if elected Student Government president and vice president. Neither Brunner, international trade and finance junior, nor Davis, English junior, has been involved

in SG prior to the current election. “Our biggest kind of hindrance is what are people going to think of our inexperience. We don’t think we’re inexperienced,” Davis said. Brunner and Davis boasted their time served in the Greek community, where he was the chief justice and vice president of the LSU Interfraternity Council and she held multiple positions in her sorority. “I believe because we’re inexperienced, we’re qualified,” Brunner said. “I’m not saying SG is corrupt, but we have our own ideas and beliefs.” Brunner compared his experience to that of Ronald Reagan, who himself had minimal experience when he took office. RENEW LSU, see page 4

XERXES A. WILSON / The Daily Reveille

Baptiste Brunner IV, international trade and finance junior, and Madeleine Davis, English junior, hope to be elected SG president and vice president with their Renew LSU campaign. Tune into 91.1 KLSU at 8:20 a.m. and noon to hear more about Renew LSU.


The Daily Reveille

page 2

INTERNATIONAL

Nation & World

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

NATIONAL

STATE/LOCAL

Kate makes maiden speech to United Kingdom children’s hospice

NY Mets owners agree to pay $162 million in Madoff-related case

Body found in ice chest identified as 83-year-old man, daughter arrested

IPSWICH, England (AP) — The Duchess of Cambridge has delivered her first public address, giving a confident, albeit brief, speech at a children’s hospice in eastern England. The former Kate Middleton spoke clearly and deliberately as she addressed staff and volunteers at East Anglia’s Children’s Hospice in the English port town of Ipswich. She glanced frequently at her notes at first but seemed to make a good impression. Vandals attack Jewish cemetery in Poland with anti-Semitic sentiments

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Mets owners agreed to pay up to $162 million in a settlement announced Monday with the trustee for Bernard Madoff’s fraud victims, a deal that left open the possibility they might pay much less and caused two principal team owners to emerge smiling from the courthouse. “Stick with us,” Mets chief executive and co-owner Fred Wilpon said outside court. “Now I guess I can smile. ... Maybe I can take a day off.”

SLIDELL (AP) — The St. Tammany Parish Coroner’s office says the body found in an ice chest in a Slidell woman’s home was that of 83-year-old Charles Fisher. St. Tammany Parish coroner, Peter Galvan, said Monday they used DNA to identify the body. No cause of death has yet been determined. Charles Fisher is believed to be the father of Debra Fisher, who was arrested for unlawful disposal of remains and mutilating human remains. Authorities say the body might have been hidden inside a 160-quart ice chest for as long as two years. Baton Rouge City Hall left 40 percent vacant, needs to be used

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Vandals have desecrated a Jewish cemetery in Poland, spraying swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans on tombstones and memorial plaques, an official said Monday. The vandals also wrote “This is Poland, not Israel” on one sign at the Jewish cemetery in Wysokie Mazowieckie, a town in eastern Poland, according to the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland. Police are investigating the attack. The cemetery was not fully fenced.

KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH / The Associated Press

Britain’s Duchess of Cambridge joins an art class Monday with Abbi Clarke during a visit to The Treehouse in Ipswich, England.

Original Einstein manuscripts to be posted online for the first time JERUSALEM (AP) — Albert Einstein’s complete archives — from personal correspondence with half a dozen lovers to notebooks scribbled with his groundbreaking scientific research — are going online for the first time. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which owns the German Jewish physicist’s papers, is pulling never-before-seen items from its climate-controlled safe, photographing them in high resolution and posting them on the Internet.

TUESDAY’S KLSU SPECIALTY SHOWs

9PM-11PM RUSTY CAGE WITH DJ CLAW (METAL)

Seattle lawyer arrives to meet sergeant suspected of Afghan killings FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. (AP) — A Seattle defense attorney arrived at Fort Leavenworth on Monday to meet with an Army staff sergeant who is suspected of carrying out a nighttime attack on two Afghan villages that left 16 people dead, including nine children. Lawyer John Henry Browne is having his first face-to-face meeting with Robert Bales, a 10-year Army veteran who is being held in an isolated cell at the military prison, post spokeswoman Rebecca Steed said.

(AP) — Three and a half floors and several other offices in the 12-story Baton Rouge City Hall are vacant since the 19th Judicial District courts moved to the new courthouse more than a year ago. Jim Frey, an architect with the Department of Public Works, tells The Advocate that 40 percent of the 200,000-square-foot building is empty. “We can’t just leave it empty,” Frey said. “We need to utilize it.”

Today on lsureveille.com Get a recap of the Buku Music Festival from “Same Old Song and Krantz” on the LMFAO entertainment blog. Tune in to KLSU on 91.1 FM at 5:20 p.m. to hear about the Laptop Orchestra of Louisiana going to Austria. “Bound for Books” discusses “White Girl Problems” on the LMFAO entertainment blog. Online exclusive: Read about the softball team’s upcoming matchup against Georgia Tech. Get the latest news by downloading the LSU Reveille app in the iTunes Store and Android Market facebook.com/ thedailyreveille

@lsureveille, @TDR_sports

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A duck wanders around the LSU lakes on an idle afternoon. Submit your photo of the day to photo@lsureveille.com.

CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS The Daily Reveille holds accuracy and objectivity at the highest priority and wants to reassure the reporting and content of the paper meets these standards. This space is reserved to recognize and correct any mistakes which may have been printed in The Daily Reveille. If you would like something corrected or clarified please contact the editor at (225) 578-4811 or email editor@lsureveille.com.

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The Daily Reveille

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

BATON ROUGE COMMUNITY

page 3

City heads project to replace W. Chimes St. sidewalk Construction began end of February Kevin Thibodeaux Contributing Writer

West Chimes Street is getting a facelift. Construction has been ongoing since the end of February to replace the sidewalk on West Chimes with a new paved walkway, according to Steven Castay, general manager of Reginelli’s and a member of the North Gate Merchants Association, which is working with the city on the project. He estimates the construction, which will replace the old concrete sidewalk with a new cobblestone one, will be complete in a month. While the project has left temporary ditches and fences around the restaurants, Castay said business at Reginelli’s hasn’t suffered.

XERXES A. WILSON / The Daily Reveille

Cones, fences and equipment block the walkway in front of West Chimes Street businesses as a new cobblestone sidewalk is installed.

Although the restaurant displays “We’re Open” on its window in giant letters, Castay said the message is only to assure

customers that the restaurant isn’t affected by the construction. “We’re just trying to make sure people know there’s a way

to get in, whether it’s through the back door or in the front across the bridge,” he said. Castay said the project has plenty of benefits for the businesses in the area. “It’s going to help level off the sidewalk for outdoor eating,” he said, noting that the sidewalk was previously too slanted for dining outside. He also mentioned the new cobblestone sidewalk will be aesthetically pleasing for anyone driving by the area. Highland Coffees owner Clarke Cadzow, who is on the North Gate Merchant Association board, said in an e-mail the project is part of East Baton Rouge Mayor-President Kip Holden’s Green Light Plan, designed to improve the city’s roadways and sidewalks. He said construction began in the area around the beginning of March and should last about two months. The construction won’t stop with the cobblestone.

Cadzow said benches, bike racks and lighting will be added to the area, as well as landscaping around the street. He estimated that Highland Coffees’ business has been down about 20 percent since the construction began, and he expects other businesses have seen similar trends, but he thinks the new sidewalks will be worth it. “The work is proceeding rapidly, though, and I believe [it] will be worth the temporary inconvenience,” Cadzow said. “It will be one of the prettiest sidewalks in town once it is complete.” He said North Gate is one of the few walkable areas in the city and adds its own unique culture to Baton Rouge. “It’s just part of our overall efforts to improve the area for pedestrians and bicyclists,” Cadzow said.

Contact Kevin Thibodeaux at kthibodeaux@lsureveille.com

RESOURCES

Encyclopedia Britannica halts print Students, librarians prefer Web version Joshua Bergeron Contributing Writer

In the age of smartphones and tablet computers, printed resources like encyclopedias face an uncertain future. The outlook for the printed word got a little more bleak with Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement last week that it will stop printing publications and move to an online-only format. Encyclopedia Britannica published its first three-volume edition in 1771. Now, 244 years later, the print versions face extinction. The 2010 version of the Encyclopedia Britannica will be its last. Many students and librarians concur with the decision and its implication that print versions are no longer necessary. “I prefer online resources, specifically databases,” said Sigrid Kelsey, electronic reference resources and Web development coordinator for LSU Libraries. “If they are controlled and checked by editors, I think they are just as good as print versions. I think that many students also prefer to go online for research because it’s more convenient for them if they are conducting research at home.” Kelsey believes students only use the encyclopedias when professors require a certain number of print sources for a research paper. Kinesiology junior Payton Kingsley said she enjoys using encyclopedias because of the

tangible advantages. “It’s a great resource, but “I like being able to hold pa- students should be sure to use per and have something actually Wikipedia to find other resourcin my hands when I am doing es,” Kelsey said. work,” Kingsley Students said. agreed, but said ‘I prefer online But English that Wikipedia is freshman Brian resources, specifically a great asset when Lafourcade disthey’re only lookdatabases.’ agreed, saying the ing up a quick Internet can offer fact. a wide range of “I use WikiSigrid Kelsey views on a topic. pedia frequently LSU Libraries Web “With encyif I am not doing development coordinator clopedias, there is something for just one viewpoint,” Lafourcade school,” Kingsley said. “Because said. “I can do a search and find it can be changed by anyone, I a bunch of different opinions and wouldn’t use it for an assignviews. I like to use the Internet ment.” because there is more information available. It is just quicker and easier.” Kesley also said the online Contact Joshua Bergeron at trend has led many students to jbergeron@lsureveille.com employ Wikipedia as a resource.

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page 4

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

MANSHIP SCHOOL

Mass comm. curriculum change reduces hours, shuffles classes Program undergoing reinvigoration Ferris McDaniel Contributing Writer

Recent changes in the mass communication degree curriculum could be part of a larger revamp of the program. The change reduces the credit hours from 128 to 120. Library science, six social sciences and humanity hours and one approved elective hour will be eliminated. Additionally, a digital branding course will replace media persuasion and audience analysis will replace advertising media analysis and planning for advertisement concentrations. “It’s to strengthen our

RENEW LSU, from page 1 “Just being an actor, he was one of the best presidents,” he said. “Sure, there’ll be some adjusting. ... We look forward to that.” Budget cuts are one of Renew LSU’s main focuses. To find solutions during the financial hardship, Brunner suggested consolidating the LSU System, though his specific ideas are, in fact, already in effect. “We look to still find a way to consolidate a system and end these budget cuts,” he said. “Why not consolidate [LSU, the LSU AgCenter and the Paul M. Hebert Law Center] into one system? That

signature of political and public affairs and to emphasize the importance of technology,” said Manship School Dean Jerry Ceppos about the change. According to Ceppos, every department of mass communication is examining the current curriculum to see if it can be strengthened. The process of changing the curriculum has spanned two years and won’t be enacted until the 2013 fall semester, said Manship School Associate Dean Andrea Miller. According to Miller, the majority of mass communication programs around the country already require only 120 credit hours, and the hour reduction will not water down the mass communication aspect of the degree — only electives and less significant areas.

“We are really just now comMiller said media research ing in line with what our peer uni- will eventually be replaced by versities have already been doing,” concentration-specific research Miller said. classes — audi‘We’re doing a lot of ence analysis beThe advertising sequence has things very well, but ing the advertising adopted a new, version. digitally-focused there are a few things “For example, curriculum, and in the journalism we’d like to go in the other concenresearch class, we and tweak.’ trations — politiwould teach jourcal communicanalists how to file Andrea Miller tion, journalism freedom of inforManship School associate dean and public relamation requests tions — will try their hand at a new and data mining,” she said. curriculum, which is currently unCeppos said the changes in the der consideration from the faculty, curriculum are occurring at colCeppos said. leges around the country because Visual communication is be- mass communication professions ing critiqued to see if changes are are undergoing many changes. necessary, Ceppos said. The class The massive changes are causing is popular among students, so the professionals in the field to take on faculty wants to ensure that its cur- more and different tasks, he said. riculum is up-to-date, he said. The Manship School wants to

prepare students to work in the ever-changing industry, Ceppos said. Students should be able to work on every platform, whether it’s print, broadcast, the Internet or social media, he said. The mass communication curriculum is not receiving a complete overhaul but rather a reinvigoration, Miller said. Miller said the new curriculum will ensure social media and digital aspects are infused in all classes — from introductory to capstone — to make sure they’re serving the needs of the industry. “We’re doing a lot of things very well, but there are a few things we’d like to go in and tweak” she said.

way the money that goes into those three systems will stay here and not be distributed across the state. When we write our check to LSU, our tuition money will go to our education and not others’.” LSU, the AgCenter and the Law Center already fall under the same umbrella of the LSU System. Students’ tuition dollars are not spread across the system, as Brunner suggested, though state appropriations are. Davis said she plans to bring students into budgetary decisions through social media. “As a public university and the flagship university, everyone should have an active voice in it,” Davis said. “Easier said than done,

but I feel like taking those initial first steps by capitalizing on the social media ... and whatever else you can use to get out to a huge group of people.” Davis explained that she and Brunner chose “Renew LSU” as their slogan because the University needs to prioritize safety and sustaining the University. “In order to get back on track, you have to take a step back and realign where your priorities lie currently and where they should lie,” she said. Safety is one of those priorities, Brunner said. One of his friends was the victim of a hit-and-run on East Boyd Drive, and Brunner says he hopes

of Hurricane Katrina. “It really inspired me to come here,” he said. Brunner said he is running for SG president to help others. “I’ve had the motive to help other people, and I feel like I have the opportunity to do that through SG president,” Brunner said. He picked running mate Davis because she helped him plan his campaign as the “unofficial” campaign manager. “When Bat asked me, I was caught off guard. ... I was flattered,” Davis said.

to improve students’ safety. “It’s not about taking care of students just on campus, but students everywhere,” he said. Some initiatives Brunner and Davis hope to implement to improve safety include updating emergency call boxes, increasing the number of LSU Police Department officers patrolling at night, incorporating bikers’ lanes and adding a crosswalk between the Law Center Library and Parade Ground. Brunner said he always knew he would attend the University. The Jesuit High School graduate’s father showed him the campus when Brunner was displaced to Baton Rouge during the aftermath

Contact Ferris McDaniel at fmcdaniel@lsureveille.com

Contact Danielle Kelley at dkelley@lsureveille.com

Generous Fellowship/Assistantship Stipends are Available to Qualified Students. The Epidemiology doctoral program is designed primarily for those who seek academic and other careers involving teaching and/or research. Its PhD curriculum includes advanced coursework in epidemiologic theory, analytic and statistical methods, study design, data intrepretation and research and instructional experience. Deadline April 30, 2012

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Sports

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

page 5

THE FAB FIVE

#DayInTheLife @LSUShep_10

Close group of wide receivers prepares to break out in 2012

Russell Shepard

Throwing session today at 3:30 @God_Son80 @ZachMett8 @OBJ_33 @Ocalas_Finest86 and some one tell james wright.

Hunter Paniagua Sports Writer

It’s all about swag. They’re a group of five wide receivers — senior Russell Shepard, juniors Kadron Boone and James Wright and sophomores Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham, Jr. — and likely the top-five wideouts at LSU heading into the 2012 season But they’re more than that — they’re the “Fab Five.” “We just wanted a trending thing to start about us,” Landry said. “We know that changes are going to come to our offense, and we’re going to be a part of the biggest changes. We just wanted to have something that carries behind us as we head into the season.” The movement started in February as the players found extra free time during the offseason. They made it public on Twitter, preparing the

10:10 AM - 15 Feb 12 replies

@Ocalas_Finest86 Kadron Boone

@God_Son80 @lsushep10 @zachmett8 @obj_33 im in 11:03AM - 15 Feb 12

@LSUShep_10 Russell Shepard

@God_Son80 @ZachMett8 @OBJ_33 @Ocalas_Finest86 @MackaroniNTrees ....the word of the day is #Soldier That’s what we are.

FAB FIVE, see page 15

10:10 AM - 15 Feb 12

@God_Son80 Jarvis Landry

@LSUShep10 @ZachMett8 @OBJ_33 @Ocalas_Finest86 @MackaroniNTrees Seriously throwing today 10:50 AM - 15 Feb 12 replies

@LSUShep_10 Russell Shepard

photos by CONNOR TARTER and CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

LSU juniors Kadron Boone [top left] and James Wright [top right], sophomores Odell Beckham Jr. [bottom left] and Jarvis Landry [bottom center] and senior Russell Shepard [bottom right] comprise the group of wide receivers who nicknamed themselves the “Fab Five.” Shepard likely gave the fivesome its moniker through Twitter.

@God_Son80 @ZachMett8 @OBJ_33 @Ocalas_Finest86 ...Are you bout that life 10:52 AM - 15 Feb 12

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Lady Tigers look to end second-round woes

Five seniors set for final home game Luke Johnson Sports Writer

The LSU women’s basketball team (23-10) has a chance for its last home game of the season to be especially sweet in today’s NCAA tournament second-round matchup against No. 11 Penn State (25-6) at 8:40 p.m. The Lady Tigers can earn their first Sweet 16 appearance since the 2008 season, when they lost to Tennessee in the Final Four.

But the NCAA tournament’s the second-round bug. Caldwell second round hasn’t been kind to took her last two UCLA teams to LSU in recent seasons, as it was the NCAA tournament, and each bounced in the second round in lost in the second round. its last two tournaBut whatever Next up for the ment appearances. happened in the “We’re not repast doesn’t bother Lady Tigers: ally concentrating Caldwell or her on getting to the Who: No. 5-seed LSU vs. team. Sweet 16 or the Elite No. 4-seed Penn State “The thing that Eight,” said senior When: 8:40 p.m. tonight we talked about is forward Courtney Where: PMAC what you can conJones. “In the past, trol,” Caldwell said. when we have made Watch or listen at home: “We don’t put a it to the tournament, ESPN2 or 107.3 FM lot of emphasis on we haven’t been the past. ... It’s one able to get past this little dead game at a time.” patch right here.” The Lady Tigers got their Even first-year LSU coach first game out of the way without Nikki Caldwell has been bitten by a hitch, as they rallied in the final

10 minutes Sunday to secure a relatively comfortable 64-56 win against No. 12-seed San Diego State on Sunday. But LSU has a daunting task ahead of it in Penn State. The Lady Lions raced to an 85-77 win against No. 13-seed UTEP just hours before LSU took the court Sunday. The high-flying effort wasn’t an anomaly — Penn State averaged 75.8 points per game this season on its way to winning the Big Ten regular season title. The Lady Tigers have had BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille their ups and downs against fast-paced, offensive attacks this LSU senior forward LaSondra Barrett (55) charges past defense Sunday during the Lady Tigers’

PENN STATE, see page 15 64-56 win against San Diego State in the PMAC.


The Daily Reveille

page 6

TENNIS

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

BASEBALL

LSU, Southern game rescheduled Teams will meet tonight at Alex Box

Hunter Paniagua Sports Writer

CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

Ohio State tennis players converse Monday afternoon during their match against the Tigers in W.T. “Dub” Robinson Stadium.

Tigers struggle in loss to No. 2 Buckeyes Lady Tigers host doubleheader today

Tom Knights. Play continued with the match in hand, allowing Ohio State to claim two more victories with No. 6-ranked Rola defeating Ian Fontenot No. 85 Skupski on court one and No. 46 Peter Kobelt taking down Sports Contributor Simpson on court three. The Tigers claimed one vicThe No. 27 LSU men’s tennis team couldn’t pull off an tory in the match with junior upset Monday in its final non- Stefan Szacinski defeating Ohio conference match of the season, State’s Connor Smith on court six, 6-2, 6-7, 1-0 (6). losing to No. 2 Ohio State, 6-1. “Ohio State was a very good There were no surprises in doubles play, as the Buckeyes team, and we weren’t quite at swept the Tigers (11-5, 2-2) to their level today,” said LSU coach Jeff Brown. “Any place gain a 1-0 lead. Ohio State (19-1) came that you have a weakness, they into the match boasting the No. expose it.” The LSU women’s tennis 1-ranked doubles pair in the nation in Chase Buchanan and team will host its second doubleheader in the last Blaz Rola. The duo week as it takes on handled senior Neal Next up for No. 63 Ohio State Skupski and sophothe Lady Tigers: and in-state foe more James TurberGrambling State tovill on the top court, Who: No. 50 LSU (8-6, 8-4. 2-2) vs. No. 63 Ohio State day. The Lady Tigers The Buckeyes clinched the doubles (5-8) and Grambling State will be in search of point with an 8-4 vic- When: 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. key wins after their weekend split with tory by No. 39 Devin today a loss to Minnesota, McCarthy and Ille 4-3, and an afternoon Van Engelen against Where: W.T. “Dub” No. 51 Olivier Bor- Robinson Tennis Stadium victory against Prairie View A&M, 4-0. sos and freshman Today’s doubleheader will Chris Simpson on court two. LSU’s struggles continued give LSU (8-6, 2-2) its last opin singles action as Ohio State portunity to pick up non-conferquickly won four consecutive ence victories before entering the points to clinch the match at 5-0. remaining Southeastern ConferOhio State’s route to victory ence schedule, which begins with started with No. 12 Buchanan No. 11 Tennessee on Friday. taking down No. 71 Borsos, 6-2, 6-2, on court two. After leading in his first set on court four, Turbervill struggled to keep his momentum, dropping to No. 107 Van Engelen, 6-4, 6-0. With the score at 3-0, the Buckeye’s McCarthy clinched Contact Ian Fontenot at the match on court five with a 6-3, 6-2 win against senior ifontenot@lsureveille.com

No. 11 LSU’s meeting with Southern will come one day earlier than originally scheduled as both teams wanted to avoid Wednesday’s predicted inclement weather. LSU coach Paul Mainieri spoke with Southern coach Roger Cador and LSU administrators about moving the game, and the group agreed to meet today at 5 p.m. to avoid conflict with the women’s basketball game at 8:40 BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille p.m. “We all agreed that we would Cody Glenn, a freshman pitcher, lines up his pitch Feb. 28 during LSU’s 17-10 try and get the game in,” Main- victory against Grambling in Alex Box Stadium. ieri said. “It sounded like there Freshman John Thigpen will wouldn’t be much chance of “I’m sorry the game can’t take the mound for be played as scheduled,” Mainplaying on WednesNext up for Southern. Tonight ieri said. “Maybe the crowd day, and 5 o’clock will mark the first will be down because of it, but seemed like the most the Tigers: career start for the unfortunately you can’t fight logical time.” The last time Who: No. 8 LSU (16-4) vs. Houston native, who Mother Nature. You have to work has a 0.90 ERA in 20 around it.” these two teams met Southern Jaguars (9-10) innings of work this came in the 2009 When: 5 p.m. tonight season. NCAA Regional, a Aside from the 10-2 win for LSU. Where: Alex Box Stadium challenge Southern The Tigers trailed by Listen at home: Radio brings, Mainieri was one heading to the 98.1 FM relieved he manseventh inning, but a Contact Hunter Paniagua at seven-run outburst allowed them aged to avoid one bigger issue: hpaniagua@lsureveille.com to cruise to victory en route to the the weather. national championship. Although LSU holds a 452 advantage in the series and Southern hasn’t defeated the Tigers since 2005, senior shortstop Austin Nola expects a close game tonight. “They always play great against us,” Nola said. “They almost beat us [in 2009], so we can’t take them lightly because we know they’re a solid team.” Southern has struggled recently, dropping seven of its last eight games. The Jaguars did win their last outing, a 7-1 victory against Prairie View A&M, but regardless of the team’s record, Mainieri said he has great respect for the Southern program. “I love Roger Cador,” Mainieri said. “He’s done a tremendous job for many years. Their kids work our summer camps and are friends with our people here. We have a great relationship with them.” Freshman pitcher Cody Glenn will get the start for LSU. Glenn has a 5.59 ERA in 9 2/3 innings this season, with one midweek start on Feb. 28 against Grambling State. But like most midweek affairs, Mainieri said he plans to use at least six different pitchers, one of whom may be freshman Carson Baranik, who was suspended for three weeks for a DUI. “He has paid his debts,” Mainieri said. “He hasn’t partaken in a sip of alcohol since it happened. I said when it happened I wasn’t going to persecute the kid forever. Nobody was hurt, fortunately, and hopefully he learned a lesson the hard way.”


The Daily Reveille

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

page 7

Tigers’ defensive focus can’t make up for weak offense WELCOME TO THE SHIRE

CHRIS ABSHIRE Sports Writer LSU basketball coach Trent Johnson is obsessed with defense. When he’s not preaching it to his players, he’s lauding the value of a defensive stop to the media. That’s ďŹ ne. History has proven — across all sports — that a stout defense usually leads to the championship promised land. The Tigers largely held up the defensive end of the bargain this past season, ranking among the top 90 teams in the country and allowing just 64 points per game. There’s just one problem for Johnson and LSU: college basketball doesn’t ow through defense anymore. When Virginia, the nation’s No. 2 overall defense, can get steamrolled in the ďŹ rst round of the NCAA tournament by streaky-shooting Florida, and No. 15-seed Norfolk State is scoring 86 to upend high-octane No. 2 Missouri, it’s obvious that proliďŹ c 3-point shooting and a go-to scorer is necessary for March success. LSU possessed neither of those qualities this season, which crippled its chances to make a push toward the NCAA tournament. The Tigers scored an average of 55 points in their ďŹ nal ďŹ ve regular-season games, going 1-4 in that stretch, and no LSU player averaged more than 12.6 points per game this season. That’s a recipe for disaster in the Southeastern Conference. While Johnson may tout his

photos by CATHERINE THRELKELD / The Daily Reveille

[Left] LSU freshman guard Anthony Hickey defends against the Crimson Tide, and [right] coach Trent Johnson confers with a referee Feb. 12 during LSU’s win against Alabama.

team’s 16-1 record when holding opponents to fewer than 60 points in regulation this season as proof of defense’s importance, it actually proves LSU couldn’t score enough. It’s unreasonable to expect even great defenses to consistently hold SEC teams to fewer than 60 points, and LSU only won twice when allowing more than that. Defense can’t overcome a 242nd-ranked scoring offense and a 40-percent shooting average that ďŹ nished 303rd in the country. LSU’s biggest problem may be that its offensive woes have implications beyond the win-loss column. Johnson’s insistence on pick-androll sets with lots of perimeter passing commits a crime far worse than ineffectiveness. It’s boring. With the basketball program suffering from fan apathy at almost unparalleled levels, an offensive

shake-up is necessary not only for more wins, but also to put butts in the PMAC seats. So what needs to change for LSU to boost its offense, recapture an NCAA tournament bid and stimulate fan interest? Luckily for Tiger fans, the pieces are already in place to create the offensive culture. Johnson should loosen the reigns on point guard Anthony Hickey, who established his intuitive basketball smarts and dynamic playmaking ability with a solid freshman season. Freshman forward Johnny O’Bryant III took better care of the basketball down the stretch, but he has to learn how to pass out of a double-team. Meanwhile, the coaching staff should spend this offseason drawing up more sets for the athletic forward to play above the rim instead of only

3 . 2 1 . . . Countdown To A New You!

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9a.m.-3p.m.

Royal-Cotillion Ballroom, LSU Student Union

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in the post. Junior center Justin Hamilton made an immediate impact in his ďŹ rst season at LSU, but lanky interior defenders gave him ďŹ ts, and the 7-footer proved most effective with his mid-range game. Guard Ralston Turner ďŹ nally snapped out of his sophomore slump with an improved shooting performance during the ďŹ nal month, when he stopped settling for 3-pointers and embraced 15-foot pull-up jumpers. All these pieces nicely ďŹ t the puzzle of the motion offense. LSU experimented with motion sets when it played exhibitions in Italy last offseason, but the stagnation fans came to expect when watching the Tigers this season obviously showed the experiment didn’t make it out of the laboratory. With quality depth being a potential problem for LSU next season, when the Tigers lose three

seniors, it’s understandable if the staff doesn’t want to strain the players with constant offensive running. Either way, LSU’s offense needs to catch up to the 21st century. Low-post looks and pick-and-rolls alone won’t cut it in this era of college basketball. Packing the paint defensively won’t be enough to help LSU pack its bags for an NCAA trip next March. The Tigers’ offense has to stop looking so offensive. Chris Abshire is a 21-year-old mass communication junior from Baton Rouge.

Contact Chris Abshire at cabshire@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

page 8

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Involvement • Leadership • Service

Watch for this ad every Tuesday! Facebook: LSU Campus Life Twitter: @LSUCampusLife

See past spotlights at campuslife.lsu.edu Sophomore, Major: History and Minor: Sports Studies; from Baton Rouge Rachel co-chairs the Homecoming Court Committee and is obsessed with ALL LSU sports. She loves baking and her golden retriever Belle. Favorite music: Carrie Underwood, Luke Bryan, Lady Antebellum Favorite TV: Revenge, Pretty Little Liars, Castle, Glee, Criminal Minds Favorite movies: Remember the Titans, Beauty and the Beast, Lion King Favorite books: Sarah’s Key, The Last Song, Charlie St. Cloud, Heaven is for Real Favorite website: Pinterest Would like to learn to: Wakeboard, well, one day!

MAR Â 4

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7-9 Â pm

Campus Life Student Spotlight: Rachel Rhodes

open  mic  night #Music WED #Poetry Live  Oak  Lounge,   Union      

Student Activiities Board presents...

fri mar 23 9pm-1am parade ground lsu student id required 1 guest/student 18 yrs w/photo id

Sign up in advance by tweeting to @sablsu. or at the event from 6-7pm

+  10 minute maximum time slot +  material most be pg-13

Campus Life Spotlight showcases the diversity of involved students at LSU. Send nominations to jruck@lsu.edu with name, email and why they should be in the Spotlight.

Silent Disco

#Comedy and anything else

Ever wondered why guys do the things they do?

GUYLAND

Dr. Michael Kimmel, leading expert on masculinity, helps the LSU community understand guys and guy culture.

Tuesday, April 3, 7pm, Union Theater

More Info: michaelkimmel.com, campuslife.lsu.edu, 225-578-5160

Apply for PURPLE & GOLD Fri-Sun, April 20-22

Volunteer  LSU  heads  to  Dallas  to  brighten  the  lives  of  child  abuse   victims  by  working  with  the  children  on  various  projects.

Apply by Wed, April 4

at  volunteer.lsu.edu  or  in  Union  Room  350

 

Leading Streak is a student organization that facilitates leadership development opportunities for LSU students through peer led conferences, retreats, and workshops.    Wed, March 21 & 28, 4:30-5:30pm Union Atchafalaya Room

campuslife.lsu.edu     578-­5160

              

Applications in Union 350 or campuslife.lsu.edu to apply: 5 at 4:30pm + Â mDeadline aterial most beApril pg-13

we cannot accommodate drum kits


Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Entertainment

A closer look at the new iPad

0.03 inches thicker, the difference between the new iPad and its previous incarnation is notable. Aside from the weight, another difference is the display. The new iPad packs Apple’s “Retina display,” so called because it’s difficult to see individual pixels on the screen. The resolution is much higher than that of the iPad 2 and most HDTVs. Hill said he truly noticed the IPAD, see page 11

BOY BANDS, see page 11

TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

Taylor Balkom

Entertainment Writer

After months of rumor and speculation, Apple’s new iPad hit stores Friday. Touting a “resolutionary”

display, the tablet had a record chose to avoid long lines at the Apweekend and sold 3 million units, ple store and got his iPad by mail. Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a After moving files from his iPad 2 news release. to the new iPad, he AT&T said The new iPad’s features: immediately began it also “set a new exploring the de• Hi-res “Retina display” single-day record vice. • Quad-core graphics processor for its iPad sales “The weight • 5-megapixel rear-facing camera difference and activations.” made • 4G LTE network support Some Univerit feel more solid sity students added and less fragile to that record weekend by nabbing than the iPad 2, like it was cut from their own iPads on launch day. solid aluminum,” Hill said. Chemistry junior Sean Hill At 0.11 pounds heavier and

Revival of boy bands is not a bad thing

Upcoming British boy bands One Direction and The Wanted will give Justin Bieber a run for his money. The bands have risen to the top of the charts, with both groups currently among the iTunes Top 10 and the Billboard Hot 100. With their pop flair and model features, One Direction and The Wanted fit the cookie-cutter boy-band mold for a new generation. In the ’90s, groups like ‘N SYNC, the Backstreet Boys and Boyz II Men ush- RAYLEA BARROW ered in an era of Entertainment screaming tweens Writer with raging hormones addicted to boys and their merchandise. The cycle continues with the recent appearance of One Direction on “The Today Show,” where they performed their single, “What Makes You Beautiful,” and the group’s upcoming television show on Nickelodeon. This boy-band syndrome isn’t a bad thing. As a child of the ’90s, I can attest to being completely obsessed with the Backstreet Boys

The higher resolution of the new iPad (right) is compared with the lower-quality display of the iPad 2 (left). The new iPad set a weekend record, selling 3 million units.

‘Resolutionary’ new iPad has modest upgrades

page 9

MUSIC

Local jazz, fusion band Captain Green to release first album

David Jones

Entertainment Writer

March is known for its call to green with the fruition of spring and St. Patty’s Day revelers, but local jam band Captain Green wants to fuse a jazzier shade into the month’s festivities. The jazz, funk and fusion band comprised of University students and alumni has infiltrated the live music scene in both Baton Rouge and New Orleans with regular performances at local venues like Chelsea’s Café and The Varsity Theatre. With an ever-expanding fan base and high demand for live performances each week, the band decided to further its efforts with Wednesday’s online release of its first LP, “Everywhere Is Where It’s At.” The band released

the EP “Yafeelme?” earlier this month. Darin Jones, music performance alumnus and saxophone player, said releasing a full album was necessary for the band to continue booking shows and to spread its music to a wider audience. “The live performances kind of solidified us as a band ... but you have to show responsibility for yourself and that you take your music seriously,” Jones said. “We had to make a CD.” The homegrown band did just that with a 13-song instrumental album including groovy tunes like “Cheese?” and “Get Funk’d.” Band members said the album stays true to their origins by bringing the live sound of jazz and heavy funk to the studio while incorporating other musical

styles that highlight the fusion aspect of their music. “We incorporate Latin, rock, blues and other elements, too,” said keyboardist Ross Hoppe. “The best label simply might be fusion because it’s a fusion of all the music we like.” The recording process was a unique experience for the band. Unlike the relaxed nature of their live performances, the band had to be conscious of time and cost efficiency when using a studio. Band members also agreed that, at times, writing music for the album could be a challenge. Members often worked on certain pieces collectively, which Hoppe said he found difficult since he constructs a lot of the intricate tunes himself. GREEN, see page 11

TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

Members of Captain Green warm up Saturday in preparation for their St. Patrick’s Day show at Chelsea’s Cafe.


The Daily Reveille

page 10

FASHION

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Students share the experience of being a model in college

Alba, Rinck go to N.O. fashion week Claire Caillier Contributing Writer

Louisiana has been getting a lot more glamorous in the last few years. Celebrities are pouring into the state as the local filmmaking industry booms, and the expansion of fashion-oriented extravaganzas like NOLA Fashion Week has diversified the cultural opportunities available in the Pelican State. Two University students, fashion merchandising sophomore Pamela Alba and painting and drawing sophomore Kirsten Rinck, are taking advantage. The student models have

appeared in local fashion show and last week took a bigger stage at NOLA Fashion Week. They’ll do it again this weekend at a similarly-named event, Fashion Week New Orleans. Fresh off the catwalk from NOLA Fashion Week, the pair dished with The Daily Reveille on some of their modeling experiences. TDR: Why do you model? Alba: I always wanted to get into professional modeling. This is a way I can gain experience. Rinck: I like wearing nice clothes and going to the after parties. The venues are also really pretty. It’s a great atmosphere. TDR: Are other models mean backstage? Alba: Everybody was nice. We all have the same goal: to get

exposure. There is competition, but it’s not tense. Rinck: You could tell some had attitudes, but they kept it in and let it out on the runway. TDR: How many fashion shows have you been in? Alba: I’ve been in 11 shows all together. I will be in seven more. Rinck: I just started modeling last week, but I’ve been in eight shows. TDR: What is the most stressful part of modeling in a show? Alba: I had to skip a few classes last week in order to study for my midterms. I didn’t go to any after parties because I had to come straight back to Baton Rouge after the show in New Orleans. Rinck: The casting calls are an intense process. If you are in multiple shows, you may finish

one but have to be in another in 30 minutes. They have to completely change your look when switching shows. If your hair is teased, they’ll brush it out for a smoother look for another show. TDR: Do any of the models have eating disorders? Alba: I don’t think anyone has an eating disorder. Rinck: Everyone was asking where the food was. TDR: What’s your favorite show you have done so far? Alba: It’s hard to say because everyone’s so different. I like the ones were I was in extreme makeup. Rinck: There was one show where I had to walk like I was in mourning, but then at the end the music turned happy so we got to dance. I also like when I get

to look completely different in a show. TDR:What is your advice to those who want to try modeling for fashion shows? Alba: If you want to start building a career in modeling, you should try the local fashion shows. Rinck: I started last week. You don’t have to be an Amazon to book shows. TDR: How are the after parties? Alba: I haven’t been able to attend one. Rinck: You get to meet people on a personal level without the hectic back stage stuff. You also get free drinks.

Contact Claire Caillier at ccaillier@lsureveille.com

Retail jobs: ending good moods, one shift at a time TAYLOR MADE

TAYLOR BALKOM Entertainment Writer The customer is always right. Never has a more untrue statement been uttered. As of last week, my yearand-a-half stint in retail is finished. I worked as a cashier and camera sales associate at Best Buy since June 2010. Overall, it was an enjoyable experience, but only because of the great people I worked with. Everything else about the job? Terrible. I don’t know if anyone else has noticed, but people can really suck. Let me explain. My very first day of work, a woman yelled at me for informing her she could just swipe her card on the machine right in front of her. “How impersonal,” she exclaimed. “I might as well be talking to a machine.” I don’t know what hell hole this woman crawled out of, but she needed a big glass of calmthe-hell-down that morning.

Unfortunately, that was only the beginning. The sad thing is, 90 percent of the customers employees deal with in a retail environment are likable. They’re polite, they’re knowledgeable and they want your help. But the remaining 10 percent is all kinds of awful. Rude, inconsiderate, mean and generally unlikable people love to congregate in stores to make everyone around them miserable. Having a good day? Don’t worry, it’ll be ruined by the end of a shift. Maybe it’s because my generation does research online before shopping, but it seemed like everyone older than 35 became an idiot when they stepped into the store. I once had a 15-minute conversation with a customer about whether or not a pair of headphones would fit her iPhone. No, every phone uses a different sized jack. Just to piss you off. Or the one guy who came in looking for a camera and wanted “the best one for the money.” I politely pointed him towards the Canon 5D Mark II, a $2,400

professional DSLR. He didn’t think it was as funny as I did. Customers also like to think they’re funny, which just isn’t true. I get it. You probably don’t understand why we have to check for the watermark on $100 bills. It’s so the store doesn’t lose money on fake bills. It’s apparently not as obvious as I thought. And I see the allure: While I’m holding the bill up to the light, you’ll just casually mention it was printed only this morning. Then you’ll laugh harder than necessary, desperately trying to get some kind of reaction out of me, and I’ll chuckle and say you did a good job. This is a lie. You didn’t do a good job and your joke wasn’t funny. That was a pity chuckle.

Do you really think you’re the first person to tell that joke? The color of the sky isn’t as obvious as that pitiful excuse at humor. Don’t flatter yourself, you’re not that original. But the mountain of misery hits its peak during the holidays. To those that get their holiday shopping done early, thank you. Congratulations on being a reasonable and responsible human being. To everyone who waits until the week before to shop, you deserve the disappointed looks you’ll get when you go home empty-handed. One woman accused me of ruining her Christmas because we were out of iPod Touches on Christmas Eve. Sorry, but the rest of Baton Rouge wasn’t idiots. They bought their gifts two weeks ago

when we had some. Will I miss retail? Nope. Not even a little bit. I’ll certainly miss the fantastic people I worked with, but the amount of crap I put up with didn’t come close to justifying my pay. I served my time. I’m a better person because of my experience. But if I hear another damn $100 bill joke, I’m shoving it down someone’s throat. Taylor Balkom is a 19-year-old mass communication sophomore from Baton Rouge.

Contact Taylor Balkom at tbalkom@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

“A man who stops advertising to save money, is like a man who stops the clock to save time.”

BOY BANDS, from page 9

and wanting every album they released. The blend of ridiculously attractive men who could dance and sing has an effect on young girls I still don’t understand. And if they have accents, the obsession only increases. The appeal of boy bands doesn’t stop at the age of 15. Many grown women, including University students, still cling to their old ’90s heartthrobs. Although many won’t admit it, thousands of older women flocked to stadiums last summer to relive their childhood when New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys reunited for their NKOTBSB tour. It’s an easy avenue to feel young again. Perhaps One Direction and The Wanted will also appeal to an older age group. The trend for 2012 shows a consistent appeal for entertainment from the U.K. in general. Artists like Coldplay, Adele and Jessie J have had great success with their records in an American market. We see it on TV, too. Shows like “The X-Factor,” “American Idol” and “America’s Got Talent” are all remakes of popular British television shows. The only downside of the new boy-band craze is the fluctuation of devotion from fans, which constantly changes whenever a new artist enters the competition. Does anyone even remember

GREEN, from page 9

“Sometimes it can be really simple, but other times it can be really frustrating.” Hoppe said. Hoppe credited his expertise to assistant professor of music Brian Shaw, who taught him that writing can sometimes be a laborious craft. Hoppe said he understands it takes “blood, sweat and tears” to present the best quality of work. With the band’s present success in live performance and forthcoming triumph in the studio, Hoppe and the rest of the band reminiscenced on Captain

IPAD, from page 9

detail when typing his notes in class. “The amount of detail in the bullet points is insane,” Hill said. Hill opened Flipboard, an app that presents news as pages that can be perused like a book. He flipped through a few articles in amazement of the display’s clarity. Close to the screen, text looks just like a printed page. “It feels like I’m reading a magazine,” Hill said. He also flicked through several pictures from a trip to Europe and pointed out impressive-looking pictures of Big Ben and the Eiffel Tower. Hill took a picture of a water bottle with the rear-facing camera, and he said the results were noticeably better than the iPad 2. While Apple rates the new iPad with the same 10-hour battery life as the iPad 2, it didn’t match up when Bluetooth was turned on. Hill played a game with iPad 2

page 11

-Henry Ford

We can help. 225-578-6090

THEN

NOW photos by KATHY WILLENS and CHARLES SYKES / The Associated Press

[Top] Members of the boy band ’N Sync announced July 25, 2000, they would play at the VMAs. [Bottom] Members of the band One Direction attend the March 8 premiere of the Nickelodeon TV movie “Big Time Movie” in New York.

the Jonas Brothers? After their introduction to teenyboppers in 2005, they practically fell off the map in 2009 and were promptly replaced by Bieber Fever. For the time being, One Direction and The Wanted have produced catchy, bubbly hits that have carried the craze across the Atlantic. Only time will tell if they’re here to stay or just a

perfectly manicured flavor of the week.

Green’s first time on stage. “Two years ago, no one really gave us a chance. Our first gig was at North Gate [Tavern] for an open mic night,” Hoppe said. “It’s funny how it all comes around.” Since forming in 2010, the band has undergone a few lineup changes. Three of the original members — keyboard player Ross Hoppe, bass player Bob Kling and alto/soprano sax player Matt Bizot — met in high school. After coming to the University, the band expanded to seven members by adding a drummer, trumpet player, tenor sax and guitarist. A busy future lies ahead for

the Green band as they plan to go on tour around south Louisiana in the upcoming year. The band also plans to release more albums in the near future. Hard copies of Captain Green’s “Everywhere Is Where It’s At” will be available on May 4 during an official release party at “Paint Dat Music” at the Roux House, where the band will perform alongside Brooklyn-based fusion band Snarky Puppy.

owner and fellow chemistry junior Julie Ngo over Bluetooth for 30 minutes, and battery life plummeted 20 percent. Some drain could be attributed to the new iPad’s quad-core graphics processor, which improved graphics on games like “Infinity Blade II.” But Hill said there aren’t any drainage issues during normal use. At $499 for the base model, some may not see the value in upgrading for minor spec bumps, but Hill had no regrets for ditching his iPad 2 for the new model. “For me, as an Apple lover, it was worth it,” Hill said. “But it depends who you are. The screen really did it for me.” Ngo, on the other hand, said she didn’t feel like the screen was reason enough to upgrade. “Personally, I wouldn’t spend any money on it,” she said. “My iPad 2 still works fine, so I see no reason to upgrade.” Don’t expect the testing center to get any new iPads, either.

Proctors at the testing center in Himes Hall use the iPad 2 to check on students while they take exams, but they won’t upgrade in the near future, according to Frank Sipos, contingent worker at the Office of Assesment and Evaluation. “We asked the lab manager, and his short answer was ‘no,’” Sipos said.

Raylea Barrow is a 20-year-old mass communication sophomore from Sugar Land, Texas.

Contact Raylea Barrow at rbarrow@lsureveille.com

Contact David Jones at djones@lsureveille.com

Contact Taylor Balkom at tbalkom@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

Opinion

page 12

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Sexual Healing

State’s broken sex ed mandates need overhaul, openness POSITIVELY CARNAL

KRISTI CARNAHAN Columnist Utah avoided disaster last week when Gov. Gary Herbert vetoed a bill allowing schools to opt out of sex education and mandating abstinence-only education if it is taught. It also would have been a legal gag order on discussions about homosexuality and contraception in the classroom. According to Guttmacher Institute’s March 2012 brief on sex education for teenagers, only 21 U.S. states mandate sex education. Twenty-six states require teaching abstinence as the method of choice in sex ed. Only 18 states require information about contraception outside of abstinence in the curriculum. Legislators are basically saying teachers can’t talk about sex during sex education. Seems like a sound strategy, right? Let’s not teach addition when we teach math, either. While Utah’s governor prevented his state from playing ostrich on real issues, Students in many other states aren’t so lucky. Louisiana legislation regarding sex education stresses abstinence only, doesn’t allow contraception discussion past abstinence and condoms and bans discussions on “practices of human sexuality.” Young adults in Louisiana are finding themselves in scary and lifealtering situations. These situations are preventable if someone took the time to educate with accurate

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Everyone should be represented in SG debates

I write to you today in response to an article by a contributing writer concerning the separate debate for the candidates for Student Government president and vice president that will be sponsored by the Black Student Union this week. Since neither I nor any member of Student Government

information and without judgment. Going off my own sex education in this state, it’s not a stretch to believe many students are receiving medically inaccurate, often religiously-biased sex education consisting of things like, “If you have sex before marriage, you’re going to contract something and die painfully.” I understand that talking about sex is awkward and hard, especially with already-awkward teenagers. Thankfully, it gets easier the more you do it. You’re reading an expert on talking about sex. There’s no better place for talking about sex than in school, where we are supposed to be preparing students for the future. Young adults are craving accurate information about how to protect themselves. They want to hear that they are not crazy or weird for the sexual awakening they are experiencing. Yet Louisiana’s sex education legislation doesn’t require that schools teach sex ed. Parents can even opt their kids out of sex education if it is being taught. Those who do teach sex education often resort to fear-mongering and scare tactics to try to frighten teenagers away from sexual experimentation. Not talking about sex, or only talking about abstinence, often leads to teenagers having anal and oral sex to “save their virginity” without knowing the repercussions, like passing infections and diseases. Utah tried to stick its head in the sand about sex, but Louisiana

has been in the sand for years now. We’re ignoring a real problem in our state, and it’s killing us — literally. Recently released statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention place Baton Rouge first in the nation for number of AIDS cases. Louisiana is in the top five in cases of gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and diseases. Research repeatedly shows that comprehensive sex education delays first sexual experiences, yet legislation mandating more comprehensive sex education in 2010 didn’t pass.

We have practically no sex education in our state, and many people are suffering needlessly as a result. Here’s an idea: Let’s talk about sex. If you want to opt your child out, they have to take a test and undergo an interview to prove they understand all of the subjects discussed in the course. This class should cover the spectrum of sexuality — not saying that anything is right or wrong, simply that it exists. Tell them that there is no safe sex, but there are ways to reduce risks if you are going to have sex. Talk about the diseases and

infections spread by through contact with bodily fluids, how to prevent them and how to get help if you think you have one. Let’s talk about all of the ways available to prevent pregnancy, so our kids have better future than we have currently. It’s time to wake up, Louisiana. Comprehensive sex education saves.

was contacted for comment in the creation of this article, I now wish to provide our perspective. The purpose of the consolidated debate I am organizing is two-fold. Firstly, from the perspective of the candidate, one large debate as opposed to several debates eases time constraints and allows for more speeches to organizations around our campus. Secondly, and more importantly, the more groups involved in a debate likely yields greater opportunities for exposure and increased attendance.

Too many years have gone by in which the vast majority of attendees of debates are those already affiliated with a particular ticket. The goal in acquiring the groups and demographics to be represented in the debate is to ensure that all areas of student life are addressed for the maximum benefit of the audience. It was in pursuit of this goal that I asked Myranda Adams, president of the Black Student Union, to participate in the debate, and to represent other

minority organizations that wished to be involved. While diversity and minority issues are of course of maximum relevance to our University and to the Student Government, they were not the sole ones to be discussed. It dismays me that Ms. Adams, other members of her organization or even your readership may have inferred from the article in question that I or the LSU Student Government are ignorant of the interests of minorities on our campus. Any implications toward this inference are

misleading and contrary to past actions. Our organization, for example, exhibits the only Black Caucus in the Southeastern Conference and has passed numerous resolutions in favor of minority interests to the University administration and even to the Louisiana Legislature.

The Daily Reveille Editorial Board

Matthew Jacobs Chris Branch Ryan Buxton Bryan Stewart Andrea Gallo Clayton Crockett

Editor-in-Chief Associate Managing Editor Associate Managing Editor Managing Editor, External Media News Editor Opinion Editor

TIM MORGAN / The Daily Reveille

Editorial Policies & Procedures

The Daily Reveille (USPS 145-800) is written, edited and produced solely by students of Louisiana State University. The Daily Reveille is an independent entity within the Manship School of Mass Communication. Signed opinions are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editor, paper or University. Letters submitted for publication should be sent via e-mail to opinion@lsureveille.com or delivered to B-26 Hodges Hall. They must be 400 words or less. Letters must have a contact phone number so the opinion editor can verify the author. The phone number won’t be printed. The Daily Reveille reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for space consideration without changing the original intent. The Daily Reveille also reserves the right to reject any letter without notification of the author. Writers must include their full names and phone numbers. The Daily Reveille’s editor-in-chief, hired every semester by the Louisiana State University Media Board, has final authority on all editorial decisions.

Join the conversation at blogs.lsureveille.com/opinion. Contact Kristi Carnahan at kcarnahan@lsureveille.com

Aaron Caffarel Student Government Senate speaker Contact The Daily Reveille’s opinion staff at opinion@lsureveille.com

Quote of the Day “Dinosaurs are extinct today because they lacked opposable thumbs and the brainpower to build a space program.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson American astrophysicist October 5, 1958 — present


The Daily Reveille

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Opinion

page 13

Increasing NASA funding could help U.S. economically MANUFACTURING DISCONTENT

DAVID SCHEUERMANN Columnist We’ve boldly gone where no man had gone before, but now it’s looking more and more likely that we won’t be going any further for a while. Budget cuts to NASA are threatening to cripple our space program and undermine our position as the leading nation in space exploration. Missions and programs designed to broaden the scope of human knowledge are being scrapped in the name of saving money, and these cuts may end up harming us in the long term. The most recent example is the cancellation of a pair of missions to Mars. One, set to launch in 2016, was purposed with measuring gases in the Martian atmosphere. The other would have launched in 2018 and was designed to give us the ability to bring Martian rocks back to Earth for further study. Meanwhile, the Mars Exploration Program has been completely restructured. Many argue that cuts to the NASA budget are necessary and desirable. Opponents argue that these programs don’t produce any tangible results and that taxpayer money could be allocated toward more fruitful ventures. But if there is one federal program that should not be cut, it’s NASA. NASA only costs taxpayers a fraction of a penny every year, and it represents only a tiny fraction of our country’s total

spending. For instance, compare the NASA budget with that of the Department of Defense. NASA’s 2013 budget is $17.7 billion, while the Department of Defense is slated to receive $525 billion. In other words, we are spending 30 times more money per year on missiles and other military equipment than on exploring the cosmos and learning about our place in the universe. Take a second to imagine the implications a reversal of this trend would entail. Instead of throwing money at military projects (that admittedly protect us from threats), we would be investing in a future that would allow our species to progress into the far reaches of space. This would lead to increasing advancements in scientific knowledge and technology. The benefits of NASA are twofold: cultural and economic. Culturally, space exploration has a way of bringing a country together around a common goal. An increase in NASA’s influence could unite the country around something other than the vengeful invasion of foreign countries in the name of security. Science and technology could again become an important part of the nation’s consciousness, and space exploration could fuel a national zeitgeist of discovery. Of course, the most compelling argument for NASA funding is the possibility that it will lead to economic gains. The United States’ position as the economic powerhouse of the world has been threatened in recent years. Reinvigorating NASA could produce the type of

photo courtesy of THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Budgets cuts to NASA are threatening to hinder the U.S. space program and weaken our leading position in space exploration.

innovations that would allow the United States to keep its position as the leading world economy. Many technological innovations that we are accustomed to today are the result of NASA research. The miniaturization of electronics, for example, came about because electronics on space probes and shuttles needed to be as small and light as possible. GPS technology and cordless tools are just a couple other examples that were created as a

result of NASA research. Cutting funding to NASA could possibly harm the rate of innovation in the United States and affect our position as a world leader. European countries are already looking to Russia and China to replace the United States in missions that NASA had to abort because of its new budget. NASA was created as a reaction to the Soviet Union’s ambitions for space and the threat posed by their

advancements. Funding NASA today as a reaction to our economic decline could benefit us in the long term. David Scheuermann is a 20-yearold mass communication and computer science sophomore from Kenner. Follow him on Twitter at @TDR_dscheu.

Contact David Scheuermann at dscheuermann@lsureveille.com

The Fed should take more policy action to encourage growth SHARE THE WEALTH JAY MEYERS Columnist Last month, nearly 13 million Americans were unemployed — that is, searching for a job but incapable of finding one, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In addition, millions more were unwillingly bound to parttime work because they were unable to locate full-time jobs. These numbers are actually moderate improvements compared to the bleak economic conditions that have become the norm in our nation. But one thing is certain: We need more impacting policies from the Fed to stimulate job growth and economic development. The persistence of high unemployment and the pace at which jobs are becoming available is still outrageously unacceptable. The Fed should do

more to accelerate our sluggish job growth. The Economic Policy Institute, a non-partisan think tank seeking to achieve a prosperous and fair economy, estimates that even at February’s pace of job creation, we won’t reach a return to full employment until 2019. Given these dreary predictions, you might have expected unemployment — and how to deal with it — to have been given serious attention at the Federal Reserve’s policy meeting on Tuesday. Unfortunately, it was not. Instead, the Fed announced it would take no further steps to aid the recovery. It plans to keep short-term interest rates at their current level even after admitting they were still uncertain about which way the economy was headed or if a recovery could be sustained. If the Fed is unsure whether our economy can sustain a recovery, then why wouldn’t it be doing everything in its power to get

us back to full employment by pursuing more sensible, expansionary policies? This gross inaction is symptomatic of the zealotry so rampant in Washington that has bullied the Fed into focusing on controlling inflation rather than job-creation policies. Some background: The Fed is the central banking system in the United States, and it was installed in 1913 to ensure a safer, more flexible and more stable monetary and financial system. The Fed manages economic conditions by influencing the direction of interest rates. When the economy is running too slow, the Fed lowers interest rates, which spurs economic development and creates the risk of inflation. Consequently, the Fed raises interest rates if the economy is running too fast, which slows economic development and curbs the risk of inflation. Inflation hawks over at the Fed and politicians like Ron Paul have argued for the past few years

that Zimbabwe-like inflation will soon devastate the U.S. economy due to too much monetary policy from the Fed. These predictions have proven incorrect. In fact, the Fed has more than tripled the size of its monetary base since fall 2010 in successful efforts to stabilize the financial crisis, and inflation has only risen an average annual rate of 1.5 percent a year. Meanwhile, as I previously mentioned, unemployment remains severely high despite the modest improvements in recent months. And the Fed only expects slow improvement, cautioning that the new jobs gains may not be able to sustain economic growth. This all adds up to a clear case for more expansionary action from the Fed. The Fed desperately needs to engage in another program of buying long-term bonds, generally referred to as “quantitative

easing” that lowers interest rates encouraging economic growth. It’s simple Econ 101: Firms are more likely to purchase equipment and hire workers when they can do so cheaply. Expansionary monetary policies like these have been effective in the past at moderating the “Great Recession” and would undoubtedly enhance job growth and conditions now. The Fed needs to stand up to the political bullies protesting about inflation and correctly reiterate their emphasis on jobs. The Fed’s economic leadership is essential for the future of America. Jay Meyers is a 19-year-old economics freshman from Shreveport. Follow him on Twitter @TDR_jmeyers.

Contact Jay Meyers at jmeyers@lsureveille.com


The Daily Reveille

page 14

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Tuesday, March 20, 2012 FAB FIVE, from page 5

LSU nation for the impending offensive overhaul that the “Fab Five” will provide. When new wide receivers coach Adam Henry came to LSU, he encouraged his players to play with a little edge. “Great receivers, they play with confidence,” Shepard said. “They got a little cockiness to them. Not too much, but they have a little cockiness.” Look at past tweets, and Shepard appears to be the founder of the “Fab Five.” His eagerness for the upcoming season toes the line between cocky

and confident. Bringing both seniority and swag, Landry said Shepard created the idea of the “Fab Five.” “He’s into stuff like that,” Landry said. “He’s been a big leader since I got here. He started the name, and it’s just been going from there.” But Shepard showed humility when discussing his role in the creation of a group based on cockiness. “I’m not going to take credit for it,” Shepard said. “We all took it and ran with it.” The “Fab Five” means more than just extravagant attitudes and outrageous posts on Twitter.

The Daily Reveille Once the regular season comes, the fivesome hopes its offseason creation will transform into onfield production. “The dream set for us is a five-receiver set,” Shepard said. “It’s the most receivers you can have on the field, so that’s where the five came from.” Unlike last season, when former wide receiver Rueben Randle was the focal point for opposing defenses, this year’s receiving corps has a different look. With Randle’s departure for the NFL, none of the remaining receivers have more than 500 career receiving yards. Shepard leads the “Fab Five”

page 15 with five receiving touchdowns, but Beckham emerged last season with 437 receiving yards and two touchdowns, earning a spot on the Southeastern Conference All-Freshman Team. Shepard said no one player stands above the rest, something that contributes to the “Fab Five” mentality. “We don’t have just one sole leader,” Shepard said. “Everybody steps up and does their part. That’s what great teams do. Everybody accounts for their responsibility.” All “Fab Five” members will admit, though, that the group would not exist without junior

quarterback Zach Mettenberger. LSU coach Les Miles has taken notice of the relationship between Mettenberger and his receivers. “There’s chemistry between Zach and a lot of guys,” Miles said. “They enjoy him. He’s working to get them the ball and trying to do the right thing.” Mettenberger also has that one trait the “Fab Five” demand. “For a white guy,” Landry said, “he definitely has a lot of swag.”

Contact Hunter Paniagua at hpaniagua@lsureveille.com

COLLEGE of EDUCATION A master’s degree goes a long way. Geaux Holmes! BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

LSU junior guard Adrienne Webb (10) jumps to make a shot Sunday during the Tigers’ 64-56 NCAA tournament victory against San Diego State in the PMAC.

PENN STATE, from page 5

season. LSU held its opponents to just 53.1 points per game this season, using its length to slow down opposing attacks. “We want to dictate our tempo, keep them in the 50s or 60s if we can,” said senior forward LaSondra Barrett. “They’re a highscoring team … so I think that’s going to be very important.” All Barrett has to do is look at LSU’s schedule to see how important defense has been to the team this season. The Lady Tigers have only allowed 70 or more points four times this year, and lost each of those games by at least nine points. “We want to play a fast pace, so we have to make sure that we’re taking advantage of opportunities to run, and that we’re getting out and pushing the pace,” said Penn State coach Coquese Washington. “We have to make sure we do that every time that we have those opportunities.” The Lady Lions feature two dynamic scorers at guard in sophomore Maggie Lucas and junior Alex Bentley. The duo combined to score 33.7 points per game this season and torched UTEP for 44 points on Sunday. Caldwell is especially

concerned about Lucas, who, at 5-foot-11, presents a unique challenge for LSU. “We’re going to have to [defend Lucas] by committee,” Caldwell said. “You can’t just shut down a player like her just by one defender. You have to make sure that you’re doing different things that make it difficult for her to get the basketball.” Win or lose, Tuesday will mark the last time five seniors take the PMAC floor. “I haven’t really thought about it too much,” Jones said. “I don’t want to accept the fact that I have to go on and find something else to do.” Contact Luke Johnson at ljohnson@lsureveille.com

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The Daily Reveille Students on Target presents





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The Daily Reveille - March 20, 2012  

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