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Monday, July 29 - Sunday, August 4, 2013 Vol. 142 Issue 165 • FREE

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July 29- August 4, 2013

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FIVE-DAY FORECAST

POLICE

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TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Mostly sunny with a high of 78 and a low of 63.

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The Daily Illini is the independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Periodical postage paid at Champaign, Ill., 61820. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and on Mondays during the summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

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CORRECTIONS

Champaign

In the July 22-28, 2013 edition of The Daily Illini, a headline on a story about a new assistant ■ An 18-year-old female was arrested head coach for the Illini Hockey team said he on charges of retail theft in the 300 block would coach the goalies. The coach, Blake Soof East Stoughton Street around 2:15 p.m. rensen, will coach forwards and special teams. The Daily Illini regrets this error. Wednesday. When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we According to the report, the suspect and a minor attempted to steal a bottle of liquor will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see a mistake in the pafrom County Market. ■ A 20-year-old male was arrested on per, please contact Editor in Chief Darshan Patel charges of battery, mob action, aggravated at 337-8365. assault and unlawful use of weapons in the 900 block of South First Street in Champaign around 2:30 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the victim was sitting on the front porch of his fraternity when he was approached by three males who pulled a gun, which the victim slapped away, before all three suspects fled. One suspect was later located and arrested.

ON THE COVER Cover photo by Folake Osibodu Illini head football coach Tim Beckman speaks positively of the team at the Big Ten Media Days in Chicago on Wednesday.

University ■ A 21-year-old male was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol at the corner of Green Street and Mathews Avenue in Urbana around 11 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect was originally stopped because he made an improper turn. ■ A 43-year-old male was arrested on charges of trespassing on state-supported land in the 1300 block of West Springfield Avenue in Urbana around 8:45 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the suspect had been issued a previous trespassing warning, and the officer recognized him walking on the Bardeen Quad. ■ A 39-year-old male and a 63-year-old male were arrested on charges of tampering with a vehicle in the 200 block of South Locust Street in Champaign around 12:45 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspects were sitting in a vehicle that was parked at an automobile repair shop when an officer drove by.

Urbana A 27-year-old male was arrested on charges of delivery of cannabis and an outstanding City of Champaign warrant for possession of cannabis in the 2200 block of South Philo Road around 6:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the officers performed a drug search and found that the suspect had an outstanding warrant as well as cannabis packaged for delivery. ■ A 22-year-old female was arrested on an outstanding City of Champaign warrant for retail theft in the 2200 block of South Philo Road around 6:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the officers performed a drug search and found that the suspect had an outstanding warrant. ■ A 21-year-old male was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of drugs, possession of a controlled substance and resisting an officer in the 500 block of West University Avenue around 8:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the suspect was initially pulled over after showing signs of impairment. ■

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July 29- August 4, 2013

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President Robert Easter sits on a bench outside the President’s House in Urbana on July 2, 2012. The Board of Trustees recently approved an extension of Easter’s leadership until mid-2015.

President Easter’s contract extended for another year Board also approves performance-based bonus for Easter By Darshan Patel Editor-in-Chief

CHICAGO — President Robert Easter will oversee the three campuses a little longer. The Board of Trustees on Thursday approved a one-year extension and a performance-based bonus for Easter, whose contract now runs through mid-2015. The board’s Executive Committee will be responsible for evaluating Easter’s progress of established goals and awarding additional compensation this September. His base salary is $450,000 per year, which is expected to increase in September when employees are set to receive salary bumps. The salary program will increase employees’ pay by an average of 2.75 percent, with a minimum of 0.5 percent. Easter’s bonus will be considered during the trustees’ meeting in September, when the board is expected to approve the budget for fiscal year 2014. According to the board’s proposal, it was in the University’s “best interest” to extend Easter’s contract. “A lot of people think of him as providing stable leadership. I would describe him as being a dynamic leader, even as he has provided stability on a personal level,” Board of Trustees chairman Christopher Kennedy said after the meeting. Easter, 65, agreed to take the position last year after his predecessor, Michael Hogan, resigned. Easter had agreed to serve until mid-2014, “or until a successor has been appointed and is able to assume

the responsibilities of the position.” The trustees opted out of a national search for a president this year, as Kennedy said that it would be conducted a year in advance of Easter’s eventual retirement. “We’re out as a Board of Trustees speaking with important constituents ... through those conversations and more broadly in the entire Illinois community, it became clear there was enormous support to extend President Easter’s leadership,” Kennedy said. The trustees also took action on a number of dean positions at the Urbana campus. They appointed Andreas Cangellaris and Jan Slater for the permanent positions in Engineering and Media, respectively. John Wilkin was approved as the University librarian. The board also signed off on a one-year extension for Robert Hauser in ACES and appointed Brian Ross as the interim LAS dean. The board also signed off on funding for a multi-million dollar renovation to the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago. The University can issue up to $77 million to help fund the development that includes upgrading the hospitals heating and cooling, electrical, plumbing and elevator systems, along with building a twostory addition to the center. The University says the project should be completed in 2017 and should not affect patient care.

Darshan can be reached at patel174 @dailyillini.com and @drshnpatel.

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July 29- August 4, 2013

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The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Desire for facts drives UI professor to Congress Taking paid leave from physics department, Gollin enters race for Democratic nomination By Kat Boehle Assistant assignment editor

University physics professor George Gollin announced his intent to run for Congress Tuesday afternoon at the Champaign County Fair. Gollin will seek the Democratic nomination to run for the 13th Congressional District, a seat currently held by Republican Rodney Davis. “Washington has plenty of lawyers, I’m a teacher and a scientist,” Gollin said in his campaign announcement. “Certainly law is an honorable profession, but as a scientist, I was trained to discover the facts, and act on them. Lawyers, on the other hand, are trained to argue about the facts. I think we have enough argument in Washington already, and need more facts.” To broaden on his reasons of running, Gollin said that he got involved in higher education policy back in 2003 when he learned of “diploma mills,” which are criminal organizations that sell fake degrees. He had started to help with federal legislation on this, and when this bill reached the senate, Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyoming) had “tanked” most of the legislation. “This was meant to stop people (from) selling fake medical degrees across state lines, so I was very distressed with that,” Gollin said. “Once the bill got out of a position where I was no longer able to influence it, politics and dirty money got in the way.” Gollin said that there were other energy policies that went in a similar manner when Congress got involved, and he felt it was time to get involved in the legislative process directly. “It’s wanting to do public service to make my horizons a little bit broader,” he said. Gollin said he has lots of policy interests, and he feels that the most pressing issue to work on right now is job creation, more specifically in encouraging people to complete college degrees to help open up the workforce. Although degree mills is a pressing issue, if elected, Gollin said that he would focus on more important issues. “We know how to kill off the whole diploma mill industry, it’s just a matter of political will,” Gollin said. “In two years, it will be gone.” Starting in the spring, Gollin said that he will be taking a paid leave from teaching and research. He said he will continue the paid leave until he “either loses an election or retires from Congress.” Gollin said that, with the University being a state institution, the administration emphasizes public service to faculty and are therefore very supportive of his campaign. Gollin said he first got involved with

degree mills when he called up a “degree ad” that he was constantly receiving and got a sales pitch on fake degrees. He then did more research on diploma mills and found out that they would go as far as selling degrees to terrorists, which he said makes it a hazard. “Some very bad people in Spokane saw that I had published a report about them,” Gollin said. “They came after me which led to fight and threats. It was pretty scary, but I got the Department of Justice interested, and the authorities brought me in as an analyst.” He said that this eventually led to the arrest of those who had came after him in Spokane. The publicity had attracted representatives, which led to the writing of the legislation. This led to Gollin writing a book, “Dream of Serpents,” that he recently finished and is hoping to get published. Whether Gollin’s election would be beneficial to the University and students, he said that he believed having an educator as a politician would be beneficial for all educational institutions. He also plans to address the spike in costs of attending college. “The whole issue on how expensive it is to go to college is something that really needs pressure to be brought to bear on those who set the administrative structure of universities,” Gollin said. Gollin said that as someone who has worked for the University since 1989, he is well aware of any issues that students are having, which includes the trouble of students registering to vote. “I understand that my first obligation is to be a public servant, to understand the needs of people in the district, and try to defend and protect their interest and their wellbeing,” he said. With the primaries in March, Gollin said that he and his campaign are already planning campaign events that emphasize learning more about District 13 and its residents. “It’s important for someone in office, or running for office, to really learn about the district,” Gollin said. “So what I really want to start soon is to begin a listening tour. I want to go around and have people talk to me about their concerns.” Gollin concluded saying that in politics, it’s best to be optimistic. “In my experience, it’s best to be positive and optimistic, because that is actually the way things work,” he said. “There are real problems in our governance, and it seems like nothing can change, but in my experience, there are surprises in how events unfold.”

Kat can be reached at kboehl2@dailyillini.com.

Zach Dalzell The Daily Illini

Secretary of State Jesse White came to the Institute of Government and Public Affairs on July 25 to discuss House Bill 226 and online voter registration. He urged the governor to sign House Bill 2418, which would allow 17-year-olds to vote in the primaries if they would be 18 by the next general election.

Sec. of State White questions voter policies

Democrats assemble in Champaign to discuss voting rules By Kat Boehle Assistant assignment editor

Voter policies were discussed on campus Wednesday morning when Secretary of State Jesse White, State Senator Mike Frerichs, D-52, and State Representative Naomi Jakobsson, D-103, all joined together at the Institute of Government and Public Affairs on Nevada Street. White opened up the event discussing the fact that when people want to vote, they go to the Secretary of State’s office. “I believe that if you don’t vote, you lose your right to complain about anything in society,” White said. “The streets that you walk on, the medicines that you consume, the schools that you attend, the clothes that you buy, someone in the government has had something to say about those issues and more.” He then introduced the two issues that would be discussed that day, whether a 17-year-old who will be old enough to vote in an election should be allowed to vote during the primaries, and electronic voting. Gov. Pat Quinn officially signed the bill on electronic voting Saturday. Jakobsson then spoke on the issues saying that the bills were very important to her and for the state. She added that she has “worked endlessly” to help students on campus vote with getting registered and changing their address from year to year if they move to different apartments. “If while they’re 17 and they’re going to be 18 in time to vote, it’s really important to let those people participate in our democracy right away in the upcoming primary so that they can help shape the general election as well as participate in it,” Jakobsson said. “This is something that I have always thought was a good idea.” She also showed her support for the online voter registration saying that anyone who wants to vote should be able to do so in the quickest and easiest way possible. Frerichs then spoke on how he and Jakobsson have worked on many voter-registration laws saying that if we want to improve the

state, we have to improve voter participation. “I think (one of) two good ways of doing that is making sure that young people vote,” Frerichs said. “If you’re 17-years-old and you know you’re going to be able to vote in that general election, you should have a say in who that party nominee is.” He also pointed out that 10 other states in the nation do it, including Illinois neighbors Indiana and Kentucky. “It shows that young people want to participate and it’s time for Illinois to join in,” Frerichs said. For online registration, Frerichs said that with everything going online these days, it’s good to get voter registration online too. “There will be some people who will object and say that we need safe-guards in place,” he said. “But once again, Illinois is not taking the lead on this, other states have done this before us and other states have shown how to do it without voter fraud.” The officials then turned it over to questions where it was asked of White what the state will be doing to get the word out to high school students that they can vote in the primaries if they will be 18 years old by the election. White said that the media will be playing a big role in this, saying that if students are watching, listening or reading the news, they will know about this. He also said that another way of getting the word out is that offices of the Secretary of State will have brochures on 17-year-olds being able to vote. Jakobsson also added that senators and representatives who travel around during the primaries will be reminding the audience that 17-year-olds who will be old enough by the election that they can vote. Frerichs also believed that school officials who are aware of political actions will also be reminding students. White and Frerichs said that these laws will be in effect in January in time for the March 2014 primaries.

Kat can be reached at kboehl2@dailyillini.com.


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July 29- August 4, 2013

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Study: Different strategy needed to fix Illinois economy University professor, research assistant show sluggish but steady recovery

Urbana student to hold official vote as trustee Cunningham awarded vote after writing to Gov. Quinn BY DARSHAN PATEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

education. It is the combination of both hard and soft capital that STAFF WRITER makes investing in infrastructure viable.” The Illinois economy is recovering but quite sluggishly. This The duo’s ideas go beyond just a single pronged attack. In an was the conclusion reached based on a study conducted by effort for short-term and sustainable long-term boost, Bruno and University professor Robert Bruno and Chicago Labor Education Manzo want to use a combination of wage variables to help the Program research associate Frank Manzo IV. Bruno, who is also economy. They advocate a raise in the minimum wage and an the director of the Labor Education Program , and Manzo used implementation of the Earned Income Tax Credit system. the data from the current populations survey which is gathered “Illinois is one of six states that administers a fl at tax rate,” by the U.S. Census Bureau. The survey is conducted monthly for Bruno said. “We argue that if you had a slightly progressive income the Bureau of Labor Statistics to help determine tax, given the fact that Illinois is a wealthy, very variables such as the unemployment rate. The high educated state, you will bring in billions of analyzed data for this study was from the March dollars without significantly hampering anybody’s quality of life. You can then turn that money around editions of the survey from 1995 until 2012. “We wanted to take a pre-recession, postand invest it back into the infrastructure.” The researchers believe the success of the recession snapshot of the state of working in Illinois,” Manzo said in a news release. “What state’s economy is predicated on the lawmakers in we found is that there’s still a lot of slack in the Springfield. The lawmakers will need to enact more labor market; in Keynesian terms, we have what’s “worker-friendly” policies to make the state more known as ‘weak aggregate demand.’ The state attractive. Professor Bruno said the higher wages is in recovery, albeit quite slowly, which means and better standard of life will serve as incentives that workers are still worse-off than before for more workers to come to Illinois. Regardless FRANK MANZO IV, the recession. But things aren’t quite as bad as of the higher cost of production, employers will they were during the darkest days of the Great Chicago Labor Education Program also be spurred on to move their businesses to research associate Recession.” and create businesses in Illinois because of the Bruno and Manzo presented some intriguing level of education their workers will receive here. solutions on how to bring the state economy up to speed, including The incentive for the employers lies in higher revenue they can the recommendation that the Illinois government should invest earn in the state. more into public infrastructure. “There is so much potential in the Illinois labor market that is “Infrastructure is both hard capital like roads, sewer systems, going to waste,” Manzo said. “We hope that this study can add to electrical grids and highways,” Bruno said. “It is also building a policy debate that needs to happen in the statehouse.” hospitals, building new schools. It is hiring new teachers. It is putting more money into supporting pre-K through university Lanre can be reached at alabi2@dailyillini.com. BY LANRE ALABI

“There is so much potential in the Illinois labor market that is going to waste.”

CHICAGO — The student trustee from the Urbana campus will hold the official vote at Board of Trustees meetings. Gov. Pat Quinn earlier this month awarded Mike Cunningham, a senior studying economics and political science, the official vote after the three student representatives wrote to him about why they should hold the vote. But the three student trustees, one from each campus, generally voice their opinions in unity. Before Wednesday’s retreat and Thursday’s regular meeting, Cunningham said he had the chance to speak with the other student board members, making time to go through the items they and the regular board members will be voting on. Student trustees were officially instilled during the morning session. Cunningham will serve on two committees: the Audit, Budget, Finance and Facilities Committee and the Academic and Student Affairs Committee. Cunningham edged out Brian Siegel, senior in Media and former Illini Media employee, in the student trustee race this past spring by fewer than 200 votes. Daniel Soso in 2010-11 was the last Urbana student who held the official vote. Students have served on the board since 1973, and one has had voting power each year since 1998.

Darshan can be reached at patel174 @dailyillini.com and @drshnpatel.

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Obama rekindles economic focus as sequester looms Stagnant Washington takes heat for gridlock The Associated Press

GALESBURG, Ill. — Seeking to build momentum for looming fiscal fights, President Barack Obama on Wednesday cast himself as the champion for middle-class Americans struggling to make ends meet. He chided Washington for having “taken its eye off the ball” and declared that the economy would be the “highest priority” of his second term. Obama, in an hour-long address that was at times deeply partisan, also accused Republican lawmakers of succumbing to “an endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals.” He said gridlock had only gotten worse since his re-election. “I am here to say this needs to stop,” Obama said in a speech at Knox College. “This moment does not require short-term thinking. It does not require having the same old stale debates.” Obama, as he often does when criticizing Washington, glossed over his own status as the inhabitant of the city’s most powerful office. GOP leaders quickly panned the president’s remarks as a series of repackaged ideas and empty promises. “It’s a hollow shell, it’s an Easter egg with no candy in it,” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said. Indeed, the president’s remarks were void of new policy proposals or fresh solutions for breaking Washington stalemates. And there were no new approaches presented for resolving potential showdowns with Republicans this fall over raising the nation’s borrowing limit and curtailing across-the-board federal budget cuts known as the sequester. For the president’s advisers, a central goal of the speech was simply to refocus Obama’s agenda squarely on the economy ahead of the fall deadlines. The first six months of his

second term largely have been consumed by priorities like gun control and immigration, as well as an array of foreign policy crises and domestic controversies, including the National Security Agency’s domestic spying programs and IRS scrutiny of political groups. While official Washington’s attention was elsewhere, the economy was slowly but steadily improving. The housing market is recovering, the stock market is soaring, and unemployment, while still high at 7.6 percent, is falling. But the White House fears that standoffs this fall over the debt ceiling and the sequester could upend that progress. The president has declared that he will not negotiate over the debt ceiling and expects Republicans to lift the borrowing limit without concessions. He’s also pushing to end the federal budget cuts before they extend into the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1. The president panned the sequester as a “meat cleaver” that has “cost jobs, hurt our military and gutted investments in American education.” Obama will seek to keep up his renewed economic focus in the coming weeks with a series of speeches on manufacturing, education, housing, retirement security and health care. Advisers say some of those speeches will contain more specific policy proposals, both for congressional legislation and executive action. The president said he welcomed ideas from lawmakers of both parties, but wouldn’t stand for reflexive opposition to his own initiatives. “I’m laying out my ideas to give the middle class a better shot,” he said. “Now it’s time for you to lay out your ideas.”

Seth Perlman The Associated Press

President Barack Obama gestures as he talks about his vision for rebuilding the economy on Wednesday at Knox College in Galesburg Ill. The president repackaged his economic message, a sixpoint plan for putting a floor under the country's diminishing middle class.

CITES commended for improving textbook accessibility UI Foundation raises EText allows students with disabilities to access textbooks, study materials online By Stephen Bourbon Staff Writer

The University of Illinois’ dedication to making content accessible to those with disabilities has been recognized. The National Federation of the Blind “highly commend(s)” the eText Group, which is a part of CITES at the University for making digital textbooks accessible and available to students. The NFB announced and approved its commendation at its national convention in Orlando on July 5. The NFB stated that Illinois was recognized for “leading the way in higher education by showing other institutions and learning management systems the full power of a flexible, interactive and well-supported platform that is accessible to the blind and geared to a variety of learning styles and abilities.” The eText platform allows for online textbooks and study materials to be accessible on an Internet browser for classes. It can

be accessed through a regular computer as well as other devices such as mobile phones, laptops and tablets. Students can save up to 75 percent on costs by choosing eText over printed textbooks, according to CITES.

“The eText@Illinois team has always believed in not compromising on accessibility.” Milind Basole, lead eLearning professional of eText

“The eText@Illinois team has always believed in not compromising on accessibility,” Milind Basole, lead eLearning professional of eText said in a release. “Validation of our work from an esteemed institution like the NFB is not only profoundly gratifying but

reinforces our resolve. It also reinforces our belief that accessibility and great user experience go hand in hand.” EText allows accessibility through complete keyboard control in the interface as well as other resources to assist those using the product. All multimedia content has captions and any videos on the platform have corresponding transcripts with them. The NFB also recognized the eText’s math equations are easily accessible with text-to-speech application as well as in Braille, something “many mostly accessible platforms struggle to implement.” The entire program is compliant with Section 508 of the United States Rehabilitation Act, which requires federal agencies to make electronic information accessible to people with disabilities.

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2 @dailyillini.com and @steve_bourbon.

record funds in 2013 University fundraising brings $428 million in gifts, grants and pledges Daily Illini Staff report

The University of Illinois Foundation announced on Wednesday that it set a record for new funds in a given year. The University’s fundraising arm raised $428 million in fiscal year 2013, marking the first time the UIF surpassed the $400 million mark. The previous mark was $367.4 million in fiscal year 2007. The Urbana campus recorded more than $342 million in new gifts, grants, pledges and deferred commitments. “As we all know, these gifts are essential investments in the University’s mission, and create the ‘margin of excellence’ financial support that sustains the great work of our faculty and the activities and aspirations of our students,” said UIF President Thomas Farrell in a press release.


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July 29- August 4, 2013

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U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks during a news conference Thursday in New York. SAC Capital, the hedge fund operated by embattled billionaire Steven A. Cohen was hit with white-collar criminal charges.

History of illegal activity to threaten hedge fund

2013/2014 Season

Allegations of fraud, insider trading for more than a decade damage SAC Capital Advisors LARRY NEUMEISTER AND TOM HAYS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Prosecutors said a large volume of evidence including electronic messages, court-ordered wiretaps and consensual recordings is stacked against a Connecticut-based hedge fund that pleaded not guilty Friday to criminal charges accusing it of letting insider trading flourish for more than a decade. Assistant U.S. Attorney Antonia Apps told a federal judge in Manhattan that investigators had “voluminous” evidence against SAC Capital Advisors, a Stamford, Conn.-based firm owned by billionaire Steven A. Cohen. She said the evidence included “electronic messages, instant messages, court-ordered wiretaps and consensual recordings.” The plea was entered by Peter Nussbaum, SAC’s longtime general counsel, and came a day after the company was charged with wire and securities fraud, accused of making hundreds of millions of dollars illegally. Federal prosecutors described a culture at SAC that permitted, if not encouraged, insider trading. Prosecutors said the victims were large companies whose inside information was stolen and traded upon. The next hearing was set for Sept. 24. Outside court, lawyers for the company including Nussbaum declined to comment and paced on a sidewalk looking for cars to pick them up as the media followed. SAC said in a statement after the charges were announced Thursday that it will continue normal operations. It said it “has never encouraged, promoted or tolerated insider trading and takes its compliance and management obligations seriously.” The company declined through a spokes-

man to comment Friday. Cohen has not been charged and was not in court Friday. He is referenced in court papers only as the “SAC owner” who “enabled and promoted” insider trading practices. At a news conference Thursday, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said SAC “trafficked in inside information on a scale without any known precedent in the history of hedge funds.” “When so many people from a single hedge fund have engaged in insider trading, it is not a coincidence,” the prosecutor said. “It is, instead, the predictable product of substantial and pervasive institutional failure.” He declined to comment on whether Cohen would be charged, saying: “I’m not going to say what tomorrow may or may not bring.” From 1999 to 2010, the company earned hundreds of millions of dollars illegally as its portfolio managers and analysts traded on inside information from at least 20 public companies, Bharara said. The possibility that the criminal case could topple the firm, which once managed $15 billion in assets, led the prosecutor to note that the government was not seeking to freeze SAC’s assets. Bharara added that prosecutors were “mindful to minimize risk to third-party investors.” Still, the government in one lawsuit sought SAC’s forfeiture of “any and all” assets. The charges came less than a week after federal regulators accused Cohen in a related civil case of failing to prevent insider trading at the firm. While the Justice Department’s action targets SAC but not Cohen directly, the civil case brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission seeks to effectively shut him down by barring him from managing investor funds.

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July 29- August 4, 2013

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Southern states scrutinized again over voter ID laws Holder to mount fight for voter protection By MICHAEL BIESECKER and Paul J. Weber The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Stricter voter identification laws, redrawn political maps fortifying Republican majorities, reducing early voting: States with GOP strongholds intensified these efforts under President Barack Obama and proclaimed victory at the Supreme Court. Now the Obama administration is signaling plans to drag some of these mostly Southern states with histories of minority discrimination into rematches after the high court knocked down a major piece of the Voting Rights Act. First up is Texas, which rushed to enact a tough voter ID law and new redistricting maps after the justices’ 5-4 ruling last month. North Carolina is considered to be another possible target of the administration, and officials in Alabama are also digging their heels in for another possible round with the Justice Department. Other states also are watching closely. “You can imagine a very aggressive Justice Department trying to get the bar as low as possible and demanding that states be bailed in” back under former voting rights protections, said Rebecca Green, co-director of the election law program at the College of William & Mary. Predictions that North Carolina is on deck grew late Thursday after its Legislature sent Republican Gov. Pat McCrory sweeping voting law changes, including the end of a popular program that registers high school students to vote in advance of their 18th birthday. There’s also a strict voter ID measure, slashing early voting by a week and the elimination of same-day registra-

Eric Gay The Associated Press

On Nov. 6, voters wait in line at a polling place located inside a shopping mall on Election Day, in Austin, Texas. Attorney General Eric Holder says Texas is the first place that he will intervene to defend against what he calls attacks on the voting rights of minorities, but it is also the only state where the federal government has a clear opportunity to get involved, experts say. tion. State elections statistics show black voters use early voting in heavy numbers and that more than 300,000 of the state’s residents don’t have a driver’s license, many of them poor and elderly. North Carolina conservatives call the moves voter integrity safeguards and were confident they will stand. “I think what we’ve seen over the past several years is the Obama administration politicize the voting rights section in ways we’ve never seen before,” said North Carolina state Sen. Phil Berger, the top Republican in the chamber. “I do not think they are a non-partisan or neutral arbiter.” North Carolina gave final approval to the measures only

hours after U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced he will ask a federal court to tether Texas back to provisions that require permission to change voting laws. Known as preclearance, the process had been mandatory in all or parts of 15 mostly Southern states with a history of discrimination, until the Supreme Court decision last month wiped out the preapproval. Holder called the decision flawed and said Thursday he will use “every tool at our disposal” in mounting a new fight over voter protection. He did not name other states in the sights of the Justice Department but vowed that Texas “will not be our last.”

Senate’s bipartisan compromise on student loans heads to the House President Obama urges the House to pass the bill quickly, so students may enjoy lower rates sooner By PHILIP ELLIOTT The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan Senate compromise on student loans is heading to House, where lawmakers there already have voted to link interest rates with the financial markets. If lawmakers can iron out the relatively small differences between the House student loan bill and the version the Senate passed Wednesday, students and their parents will find interest rates lower than the ones they faced last year. President Barack Obama encouraged the House to vote quickly on the legislation so returning students can enjoy lower rates across the board. “I urge the House to pass this bill so that I can sign it into law right away,” Obama said in a statement. Critics, including some in the president’s Democratic caucus, said borrowing for tuition, housing and books would be less expensive this fall, but the costs could soon start climbing under the Senate bill. The compromise would be a good deal for all students through the 2015 academic year. After that, interest rates are expected to climb above where they were when students left campus in the spring, if congressional estimates prove correct. The White House and its allies said the new loan struc-

ture would offer lower rates to 11 million borrowers immediately and save the average undergraduate $1,500 in interest charges. The bipartisan Senate bill links interest rates to the financial markets. It is similar to the bill that already had passed the Republican-led House and is like the proposal in Obama’s budget earlier this year. Undergraduates this fall would borrow at a 3.9 percent interest rate. Graduate students would have access to loans at 5.4 percent, and parents would borrow at 6.4 percent. The rates would be locked in for that year’s loan, but each year’s loan could be more expensive than the last. Rates would rise as the economy picks up and it becomes more expensive for the government to borrow money. As part of the compromise, Democrats won a protection for students by capping rates at a maximum 8.25 percent for undergraduates. Graduate students would not pay rates higher than 9.5 percent, and parents’ rates would top out at 10.5 percent. If Congressional Budget Office estimates hold true, rates would not reach those limits in the next 10 years. For the moment, most lawmakers were emphasizing the low costs immediately available, while a few were already looking for a fix in coming years.

“This bipartisan agreement is a victory for students, for parents and for our economy, and it is consistent with the House Republican bill passed in May,” House Speaker John Boehner said in a statement. “The House will act expeditiously,” Boehner, R-Ohio, pledged. The Republican chairman of the House Education Committee, Rep. John Kline of Minnesota, predicted “the bill’s swift passage.” And the top Democrat on the panel, Rep. George Miller of California, similarly urged Boehner to bring up the Senate bill and pass it quickly. All seemed to portend lower rates for students, a reversal from less than a month ago. Rates on new subsidized Stafford loans doubled to 6.8 percent on July 1 because Congress could not agree on a way to keep them at 3.4 percent. Without congressional action, rates would have remained at 6.8 percent — a reality most lawmakers called unacceptable. “This permanent, market-based plan makes students’ loans cheaper, simpler and more certain,” said Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the top Republican on the Senate education panel. “It ends the annual game of Congress playing politics with student loan interest rates at the expense of students planning their futures.”


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July 29- August 4, 2013

9

Plan the perfect date. Check out the calendar each week to find out what’s going on in town. Every Thursday in Buzz Online at the217.com

LOUIS DELUCA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

On July 20, this aerial photo shows the Texas Giant roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. The death of a woman who fell 75 feet is reinvigorating discussion among safety experts about whether it is time to create more consistent, stringent regulations for thrill rides across the nation.

Fatal fall at amusement park in Texas raises discussion of safety regulations Safety experts consider more consistent, stringent regulations BY JAMIE STENGLE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DALLAS — From Six Flags to Walt Disney World, there’s no federal oversight of permanent amusement parks, and regulations vary from state to state. The death of a woman who fell 75 feet from Six Flags Over Texas’ Texas Giant roller coaster is reinvigorating discussion among safety experts about whether it’s time to create more consistent, stringent regulations for thrill rides across the nation. In Texas, the Department of Insurance requires that an amusement park’s insurance company perform a yearly inspection and carry $1 million liability insurance on each ride, agency spokesman Jerry Hagins said. Six Flags Over Texas was in compliance with those rules at the time of Rose Ayala-Goana’s July 19 fatal fall. Six Flags Entertainment Corp. President and CEO Jim Reid-Anderson has said it’s using “both internal and external experts” to investigate Ayala-Goana’s death in Arlington. The park doesn’t need to submit a report to the state on what caused her to fall, and while Arlington police are also looking into the death, they aren’t investigating the ride. “The question is: Will they release it and will it be complete and comprehensive?” said Ken Martin, an amusement ride safety analyst who owns KRM Consulting of Richmond, Va. “There’s a lot of unanswered questions and because of the way it is in Texas we might not ever have the answer to those questions.” Martin noted that both the stringency of inspection regulations and which entity oversees those inspections vary across the country. After an injury that requires medical attention and is possibly due to equipment failure, structural failure or operator error, Texas

parks must shut down the ride and re-inspect it. The Texas Giant has been closed since Ayana-Goala’s death and won’t re-open until the department sees a new safety inspection report, Hagins said. Amusement park trade group spokeswoman Colleen Mangone said 44 state governments regulate parks. The six without state oversight — Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, South Dakota, Wyoming and Utah — have few amusement parks, if any, she said. “There is no evidence that federal oversight would improve on the already excellent safety record of the industry,” she said, noting the association’s statistics show the likelihood of being seriously injured is 1 in 24 million; for dying, it’s 1 in 750 million. “Safety is the number one priority for the amusement park industry and events like the one at Six Flags Over Texas are rare,” she wrote, adding that ride manufacturer guidelines might require additional inspections beyond daily ones. Mangone said the statistics come from an injury survey done for the trade group by the National Safety Council, though just 144 of the 383 eligible amusement parks provided some or all of the requested data. Experts say getting reliable figures on injuries at amusement parks can be difficult. “We don’t know if they are indeed what the park says they are,” Martin said. “We have to take their word for it.” Voluntary standards for amusement park rides are issued by ASTM International, a global organization that draws from, among others, industry professionals. Martin said some states have adopted those standards into law. “The amusement park industry is self-regulated and that’s what the amusement industry wants,” Martin said.

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10 Monday July 29, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions The Daily Illini

Editorial

Unequal situations drive stereotypes into fruition in black community

Rankings something to consider, but nothing to swear by

F

orbes, U.S. News & World Report, Princeton: You name it. Each time a topuniversities ranking is announced, students flock to social media to share their excitement, boasting about how their school compares with other in-state or rival schools. It doesn’t even have to be a prominent publication, and regardless, optimists will find a way to spin the numbers. But that’s exactly what it is: just a number, as evidenced by the criteria Forbes uses in its annually published rankings. The business magazine released its rankings this past week, placing the University 10th among public institutions and 53rd overall. The Urbana campus was ahead, in the public rankings, of University of Texas at Austin, University of Wisconsin at Madison and Indiana University. While there’s no disputing that the University belongs with other top-tier institutions, Forbes’ rankings are just one organization’s thoughts and analyses about where each university belongs in respect to one another. Forbes has its own philosophies on what makes a university better than another, its own experts and its own criteria, a comprehensive one at that. For example, 15 percent of the student satisfaction measure takes into account how instructors fare on Rate My Professors, where students identify the easiest and more difficult professors based on personal experience. However, rating a professor doesn’t necessarily translate over to how much a class and its content have helped further a student’s understanding of that particular subject. Meanwhile, the post-graduate success measure, which accounts for 37.5 percent of the total ranking, is misleading. Fifteen

percent is devoted to data from Payscale.com, which places too much value on salary, while 22.5 percent comes from the America’s Leaders List which, again, places too much emphasis on an exclusive list of leaders with achievements far from the reach of many graduates. The rankings look at return on investment, rather than test scores and admitted GPA, but it leaves out any metric about landing a job. Employment within six months of graduation is this generation’s No. 1 goal after graduation, especially in the final years of college. Forbes’ rankings miss the boat on what success is: College’s role is to help you prepare for your entrance into the working world, not necessarily to develop you into a top executive, politician or engineer. In another example, just over one-tenth of the total ranking is devoted to nationally competitive awards. Does a school rank less for not having a small science or engineering program? And would a school rank lower for a program that doesn’t compete, such as a strong language program? However, the magazine did nail the graduation rates and student debt categories. One further addition might be useful: How does the university use the state’s dollars? How much return investment is the state getting for each dollar it’s giving to public institutions? For example, many post-grads from the University try to find jobs in Chicago. At other universities, in smaller cities, that is less of the case. So how is that factored in to generating dollars for the state’s economy? Not all rankings are the same, and not one is more correct or accurate than another. They might help students and employers estimate the quality of a school’s education, but no one should swear by them. They really just are numbers.

Matt pasquini Opinions columnist

W

hen it comes to the trial of George Zimmerman, I plead ignorance. I did everything in my power to avoid the trial because, at the time, I believed it was the quintessence of the sensationalist media. But since reading and hearing about people’s responses to the verdict, I’ve been recently reminded that while the era of Jim Crow laws and overt prejudices have mostly vanished, a new and inconspicuous form of racism is becoming increasingly prevalent. Ladies and gentleman, I present to you Racism 2.0. This type of racism has been bolstered by the destruction of the ladder of opportunity which has lead to socioeconomic disparity, discrimination and marginalization among minority groups — especially among African-Americans. I hear it all the time: Black people are criminals. They don’t contribute to society. They have no drive to better themselves or their families and therefore believe that they can continue living off welfare. That President Barack Obama is “shuckin’ and jivin’” on the economy, deserving of the title as “The Food Stamp President.” And, in the words of Justice Antonin Scalia defending the decision to strike down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, the African-American community’s ability to vote is simply a perpetuation of “racial entitlement.” But as I looked to debunk these stereotypes, I noticed something incredibly disturbing. These stereotypes didn’t manifest from thin air — statistics support them. A study done by Princeton University says that on average, “by age 17 the average black student is four years behind the average white student” and that “black 12th graders score lower than white 8th graders in reading, math, U.S. history and geography.” The American Psychological Association cites that the unemployment rate for African-Americans is typically double that of Caucasian Americans. And the NAACP says that as of 2001, one in six African-American men have been incarcerated and we can expect that one in three black males born can expect to spend time in prison at some point in their lifetime if the current trend continues. Sure, African-American stereotypes can be backed up by statistics, but that

doesn’t make them stereotypes anymore. It makes them supported assumptions highlighting very real problems. It emphasizes the unequal distribution of resources that crucify communities to the cross of poverty that society has come to assimilate to. It proves that the very assumptions we perpetuate as stereotypes reinforce real issues. At the end of the 2012-13 academic year, the Chicago Public School system closed 49 elementary schools and a high school program. According to a Chicago Tribune report, these closings will put children in the “line of fire,” or expose them to dangerous environments that would otherwise be avoided by being in school throughout the day. Earlier this month, the Republican-controlled house passed a farm bill that completely stripped the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) which is commonly known for distributing food stamps, despite the fact that 22 percent of recipients are African-American (mind you, they only make up 13 percent of the nation’s population.. And let’s not forget Detroit which just filed for bankruptcy. It is a city where 82.7 percent of the population is African-American and has consistently ranked among the country’s top 10 most violent cities. Even more, the city government says that on average, the police response time is 58 minutes. Put yourself in the shoes of an innercity African-American child: Your parents might struggle to make ends meet so they seek other ways of supplementing their income, your school was closed down so now you have to walk through gang territory to get to your new one, and when you call the police in response to a crime, it will take the police around 58 minutes to respond. No wonder these stereotypes exist — I think I’d be pretty disenchanted too if I was born into a world where stereotypes are instantaneously attached to me because of my demographics. Where inherited structural inequalities set you behind even at birth, and you spend a lifetime overcoming them. The prospects for the African-American community are bleak, and I can’t live comfortably with myself knowing that solely due to the color of one’s skin, socioeconomic status or underlying structural inequalities, people can be more subject to lives of scarce opportunity and discrimination. So much for liberty and justice for all.

Matt is a sophomore in LAS. He can be reached at mpasqui2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @matthewpasquini.

Reader’s opinions:  The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. Mail: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.”


Sports

11 Monday July 29, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Illini football optimistic about season despite outsider doubts Illinois revamps with array of new players, coaches By Sean hammond staff writer

CHICAGO — This time around, Tim Beckman knows what to expect. The Illinois head coach has a year under his belt at the helm of a Big Ten football program. And Illini fans have had more than enough time to get a feel for their coach. With college football media days signaling the unofficial beginning of the college football season, Beckman had a clean slate and a pep in his step when he spoke at Big Ten Football Media Days on Wednesday in Chicago. Like every football coach in the country, Beckman is optimistic in July. His quarterback, Nathan Scheelhaase, may have said it best. “You talk to anyone at a media day across the country, you’ll probably hear that the summer went great,” Scheelhaase said, “that they’re looking forward to the season, that they’re ready for Game One. You’re going to hear a lot of the same things.” So what’s different? Thirty-three new faces is a place to start. Between transfers and incoming freshmen, the Illini have revamped about one-third of their roster. Add five new coaches to the mix and you have a program that looks vastly different from a year ago, at least on paper. But games are not won on paper, and Beck-

man knows that. He also knows that there is a lot of pressure on his team and on himself to improve this season. “We’re not going to let negativity infiltrate our program,” Beckman said. “We’re going to be positive with a great passion toward what we want to get accomplished.” If anything, Beckman accomplished a recruiting victory over the summer. The transfer of former Oklahoma State quarterback Wes Lunt, who won’t be eligible to play in 2013, gives the Illini an optimistic outlook for the future. Throw him next to incoming freshman quarterback Aaron Bailey and offensive coordinator Bill Cubit has a healthy quarterback battle in 2014. But it’s not 2014, and Scheelhaase is undoubtedly the Illinois starting quarterback in Beckman’s eyes. “I’m sure nobody is picking us to win games or picking us to do anything this year,” Scheelhaase said. “And that’s all right. “It doesn’t matter what’s going on outside. It matters what’s going on inside our walls.” Scheelhaase is right: No one is picking the Illini to compete in the Big Ten. And why should they? They haven’t won a conference game in more than 21 months. When Beckman spoke Wednesday, he was an afterthought. Urban Meyer, targeting rules and NCAA reform, ruled the media

Folake Osibodu The Daily Illini

Football coach, Tim Beckman, addresses the media during Big Ten Media Days on Wednesday. According to Beckman, the Illini will focus on positivity to get what they want accomplished. discussion. Expectations are low following a two-win season. In the players’ eyes, the difference between the 2012 and the 2013 Illini is camaraderie. “We’ve become more close-knit,” Scheelhaase said. “Our talent isn’t as great as it’s been over the last few years, but that’s required us to play as one. It doesn’t guarantee us anything, but it gives us a greater chance.” Beckman sat down with his team following the season-ending pounding Northwest-

ern handed them and examined what needed to be done to turn things around. That plan played out behind closed doors — in the winter and in the spring, in the weight room and in the film room. Only when the Illini take the field against Southern Illinois on August 31 will the success of that plan be apparent. What Illini fans should expect is not quite so clear.

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

New era for women’s track and field with return of a familiar face Ron Garner comes back to Illinois as head coach with experience, expectations By Lanre Alabi Staff Writer

It is a new era in Illinois. This is one of the things that new Illinois women’s track and field head coach Ron Garner would like Illini fans to remember. Garner returned to Illinois last week, 15 years after he had been an assistant coach here. School is out of session, so there isn’t much pomp and circumstance surrounding his arrival here at the University, but you can’t mistake that for a lack of interest. The program has been on an uptick in recent years, returning to past glory. Garner follows two impressive predecessors as the head women’s track coach. He inherits the Big Ten indoor champion squad from the preceding year, a team that includes the reigning Illinois female athlete of the year and female newcomer of the year, but Garner doesn’t believe there is any burden to live up to. “I don’t think there is any additional pressure,” Garner said. “I think Tonja (Buford-Bailey) is Tonja, Ron Garner is Ron Garner and Gary Winckler is Gary Winckler. Both the previous head coaches had achieved at a high level and fortunately, I was a part of that. I don’t think there is any more pressure than what you put on yourself. The standards are going to be high because Illinois competes at the highest level, but we still have to improve.” Garner brings approximately three decades of coaching experience to Illinois. His career has seen him make eight

coaching stops at six institutions. This wealth of experience is what he will look to employ in the years to come. One of the tasks he will have to accomplish as head coach is recruiting marquee high school prospects to join the Illini, despite the Midwest’s shortcomings in regards to the weather. The climate is a big part of outdoor track and field, but Garner believes he can overcome that hurdle. “Don’t compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges,” Garner said. “We’ll go out and recruit the best athletes in the country (who are) excellent students. We are not going to compare to other Big Ten schools; we want to be University of Illinois. The balance between the education that you receive here, and our athletic pursuits are different than other places. Our team allocation might change over time, but we’ll go after the best kids in the country. We might lose some; we might lose a lot, but the ones we get will get it done.” Ron Garner’s first stint at the University was as an assistant coach to then-head coach Gary Winckler, from 1991-1998. To add some perspective, a young Tonja Buford-Bailey was named an All-American 10 times, won 25 Big Ten titles and was a national champion during the early part of that spell. She went on to be an Olympian several times, eventually coaching the Illinois team and creating Olympians of her own. In that large time span, Garner was part of the success of four other athletic programs, including being named the head coach at his alma mater Clemson University. The 15 years in his absence from the University have brought marked changes to Illinois,

but there is one key ingredient that has remained constant. “There have been improvements in facilities here,” Garner said. “I know that track is down the road of the next phase in development. There is a different administration with different objectives and different goals. The university is no different as an institution than it was before. It has tremendous resources, excellent faculty members and a world renowned institution. That part is still the same.” As far as school success goes, Garner wants to see prosperity for all Illinois athletic programs. He feels that each programs’ success can only bolster a winning culture and ultimately elevate the University of Illinois. For some reason or another, Garner has developed some personal favorites amongst the Illinois programs. “I want all programs to do well,” Garner said. “My wife played volleyball here, so I want them to do well. Soccer was just getting started the year before I left, and coach Rayfield has had a tremendous amount of success. I have two daughters who play softball, so that is also on my watchlist.” Garner’s tenure begins immediately with the head coach being thrown straight into the mix of things. Sprinters Ashley Spencer and Morolake Akinosun are preparing for the World Championships and World Junior Championships, respectively. He will have to do what he can to prepare them for success at the competitions they will be attending in August.

Lanre can be reached at alabi2@dailyillini.com.


July 29- August 4, 2013

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12

Offensive lineman back for 6th year After 3 ACL injuries, Lewis ready to lead By Torrence Sorrell Staff writer

CHICAGO — Tearing one ACL is tough but tearing three can hinder an athlete both physically and mentally in just about any sport. Now in his sixth year as an Illini, senior offensive lineman Corey Lewis is no stranger to adversity as he played a total of four games in the last three seasons all with the same injury. Even that was not enough to stop the 6-foot-6, 310 pound player for giving up a game that he loves. “My drive is my teammates and football. I love it so much that I couldn’t see myself just giving it up to injury,” he said. Lewis also said that his motivation was his family back in his hometown of a small town in Cresco, Pennsylvania. He felt that it was his duty to come back and not let the people who supported him for so long down. Head coach Tim Beckman sees improvement from Lewis in practice since returning from the devastating injury.

Brian Yu The Daily Illini

Blue Team Quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase (2) runs the ball during the Orange and Blue Spring Football game on April 12. The Blue team won the game with a score of 35-28.

“My drive is my teammates and football. I love it so much that I couldn’t see myself just giving it up to injury.” Corey Lewis, senior offensive lineman

“His mindset each and every practice to each and every game has gotten better, better and better,” Beckman said. Just a few months ago Lewis was named the Bresee Most Improved Offensive Player during the spring game on April 12th. Not only has Lewis improved on the field, but he feels he is starting to emerge as a true senior leader for the Illini’s 33 new players. “When the guys came in the summer, I always made sure that we had a meeting, tell them our goals that we set as a team, just so they all can buy in, and they’re not just running around like a chicken with their head cut off,” Lewis said. “You never want anyone to feel left out, especially the younger guys because the better they can adapt, the better they can perform for us.” Lewis has set big goals for himself going into his final year wearing orange and blue; he said he wants to be named All-Big Ten and become more of a leader on the offensive line. Perhaps coming back from those ACL surgeries may be worth a shot giving him another chance to someday play in the NFL, and winning the most improved offensive player award is a start.

Torrence can be reached at tmsorre2@dailyillini.com.

Folake Osibodu The Daily Illini

Quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase answers questions during an interview at Big Ten Media Days on Wednesday.

Scheelhaase keeps his starting spot for fall lineup Beckman removes rumors revolving around next season’s quarterback By Sean Hammond Staff writer

CHICAGO — There is no quarterback controversy in Champaign. Tim Beckman made that clear at Big Ten Football Media Days on Wednesday in Chicago. With the phenomenally low numbers quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase put up last season (1361 passing yards, four touchdowns and eight interceptions in 10 games), it has been speculated that backup Reilly O’Toole or even incoming freshman Aaron Bailey might have a chance to knock Scheelhaase from the starting spot. “Nathan Scheelhaase is our starting quarterback,” Beckman said, a statement he repeated numerous times during the 2012 season. Beckman reiterated that health was an issue for Scheelhaase, who injured his ankle in the season opener last year and missed the following two games. “People forget sometimes that Nate led us to back-to-back bowl games,” said offensive lineman Corey Lewis, who is entering his

sixth year at Illinois and has watched the fifth-year quarterback progress through his entire career. The bowl streak ended with last year’s 2-10 campaign. But a new system under first-year offensive coordinator Bill Cubit might be what is needed to spark an offense that was sluggish in 2012. Lewis said a look at Cubit’s resume is all it takes to see what he brings to the table. “Coach Cubit brings a lot of class,” Lewis said. “And he brings a high-powered offense.” The pace will be one difference — Lewis said the 80 snaps he played in the Orange and Blue Spring Game went by in the blink of an eye — and the play calling will be another. In the spring game, both Illini squads threw a combined 85 passes. Cubit’s offense has many questions surrounding it, but who it is that will throwing those passes is not one of them.

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.


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13

July 29- August 4, 2013

Track athlete sweeps World Championships in France Martin becomes 1st male athlete to win 5 gold medals in single para-athletics event BY MICHAEL WONSOVER STAFF WRITER

It’s been a busy summer to say the least for Illini track and field athlete Raymond Martin. The 19-year-old, who was training twice a day in Champaign the entire summer, headed to Los Angeles for the ESPYS on July 17th, only to take a fl ight immediately after the event to compete at the IPC Athletics World Championships in Lyon, France from July 19-28 . In Lyon, Martin had to prepare to race in five events - the 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m - all while dealing with the ill effects of frequent flying. “It was very tough to have to compete the day after I landed in France,” Martin said. “I had a bit of jet lag that followed me to my competition, but I knew this would happen coming in, so I just put my head down and race as hard as I could.” That’s exactly what Martin did, winning every event offered in his T52 competition at the World Championships and becoming the fi rst male athlete to win five gold medals in one para-athletics event. This comes only ten months after Martin swept all the T52 races at the 2012 Paralympic Games. “The World Championships are very important to me,” Martin said. “It’s a great way to keep track of your progression in the sport between the Games. World Championships are held every two years, sandwiching the Games. Having the opportunity to

call myself a World Champion is such a great feeling.” Martin’s fi rst race at the Championships was in the 1500m, the only event he didn’t compete in at the Paralympics. “The 1500m was a very difficult race,” Martin said. “It wasn’t offered in London, and I’ve only done the race three times prior to the World Championships. I knew the field was very competitive, with Thomas Geierspichler of Austria being a multiple World Championship and Paralympic Games medalist, and Steven Toyoji of the USA being very strong in the distance races.” Despite being inexperienced in the event, Martin had a strategy capture gold in the 1500m. “The plan was for me to pull the draft on the fi rst lap, Toyoji to pull the second lap, Geierspichler to pull the third and for all the bets to come off on the fi nal lap,” Martin said. “I pulled a hard lap and so did Toyoji, but the pack got scrambled and Toyoji and I ended up doing the majority of the work in this race.” Martin needed the help of a teammate to come out on top during the fi nal lap. “At the bell lap, I was actually boxed into lane one. This means that there was someone in front of me, and another racer next to me, so I was physically boxed in,” Martin said. “Thankfully, my U.S. teammate Toyoji was the one in front of me and I shouted to

him that I was boxed in. He moved out to lane two to give me a path out of the box. I had enough energy left in the tank to sprint the last 400 meters and came out with a tough win over Geierspichler and Toyoji who took the silver and bronze.” Martin fi nished with a time of 3:51.28 , narrowly edging out Geierspichler’s 3:51.80. Martin followed up his 1500m performance with back-to-back golds in the 800m and 200m races. He also fi nished fi rst in the 100m and 400m races. “I took gold in the 800m and 200m in London, so I had a bit of confidence heading into these two races,” Martin said. “Thanks to our phenomenal coach at the U of I, Adam Bleakney, I was well prepared to sprint an 800m and do well in my world record event, the 200m.” Fellow Illini Tatyana McFadden was the only athlete to win more gold medals than Martin at the World Championships as she swept all six of her races, becoming the fi rst athlete to do so at the Championships. Now that the Championships are over Martin can fi nally rest, but not for long. “I am really looking forward to some time off,” Martin said. “I have had a very long season. After some time off, I will be doing some longer aerobic training in preparation for the Chicago Marathon this October.”

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US overcomes confident Panama to win 5th Gold Cup Second-half substitute drives home the goal and the game in CONCACAF final BY NANCY ARMOUR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — It took Brek Shea less than a minute to give the United States a goal. And the Gold Cup title. Shea scored 42 seconds after coming into the game as a substitute, and his goal in the 69th minute gave the United States a 1-0 victory over Panama in the CONCACAF Gold Cup final. It is the fifth Gold Cup title for the U.S., but it’s first since 2007. The victory also extended the Americans’ winning streak to a record 11 games, four more than their previous best. When the final whistle sounded, the Americans on the bench raced onto the field to join their teammates. Several players jumped up and down, and hugs and high-fives were exchanged. Coach Jurgen Klinsmann, who watched the game from a luxury box after being suspended for his tirade over the officiating in the semifinal, quickly made his way down to the field, pumping his fists in the air as he walked. The Panamians, meanwhile, could only watch in disappointment. They came into the game full of confidence after beating Mexico twice during the tournament, but never really threatened the United States. The only downer on the day for the Americans was another injury to Stuart Holden’s right knee. He collapsed to the ground after colliding with another player in the first half and grabbed at his right knee. He was able to walk off the field on his own, but U.S. Soccer later said he had sprained the knee and it would need further evaluation. Holden missed almost 2 ½ years because of injuries to his right knee, only returning to the U.S. squad in late May. PATRICK SEMANSKY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The U.S. had been the class of the Gold Cup, outscoring opponents United States' Brek Shea (23) heads a ball in front of El Salvador's 20-4 in the tournament. Klinsmann used a mostly young team, and its Xavier Garcia Orellana during the second half in the quarterfinals of the confidence appeared to grow with every victory. CONCACAF Gold Cup soccer tournament on Sunday in Baltimore.

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14

Soriano heads back to New York Yankees

Bears new tight end entertains on and off field

Cubs secure pitcher Corey Black, spend almost $18 million in trade

Martellus Bennett shares his quirks with press, team

By BEN WALKER The associated press

NEW YORK — Alfonso Soriano took one look around Yankee Stadium and broke into a big, familiar smile. “This is my house, this is my home,” he said. “I’m happy I have the opportunity to come back to New York — 10 years.” The New York Yankees reacquired Soriano in a trade with the Chicago Cubs on Friday, hoping the seven-time All-Star can provide a power boost to a team that desperately needs pop. Soriano went 0 for 5, scored a run and drove in one while batting cleanup in a 10-6 loss to Tampa Bay. He flied out with the bases loaded to end the third inning, then grounded into a forceout with the bases loaded in the ninth. “It’s a good day for me today to have a chance to put on the uniform again,” he said. “I hope we have a better chance tomorrow,” he said. “It’s a tough day tonight.” Soriano did more with his glove, catching a fly to start the game, making a throw to help nail a runner and running down a foul ball. It was the first time he played outfield for the Yankees. “It’s a little different, because, in the old one, I used to play second base. In the new one, I play left field now,” he said. The Cubs got minor league pitcher Corey Black and will send almost $17.7 million to the Yankees to cover much of Soriano’s rich contract. “We’ve obviously been trying to improve our offense, to no avail, throughout this season,” Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said. “By far, he is the best available bat to date.” Soriano outhomered the Yankees all by himself (10-8) in the four weeks prior to the deal. Overall, the 37-year-old hit .254 with 17 homers and 51 RBIs with the Cubs. The Bronx Bombers led the majors with 245 home runs last year, but have become the Bronx burn-outs this season, ranking nextto-last in the AL with only 88. Banged up, they’ve played most of the year without Curtis Granderson, Mark Teixeira, Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez. Their slump from the right side — Soriano hits righty — is even more acute. It’s been a month since a right-hander homered for the Yankees, with Jayson Nix the last to do it on June 25. Soriano got a big ovation when the public-address announcer read the lineups and welcomed him with “and once again a Yan-

By ANDREW SELIGMAN The Associated Press

David Zalubowski The Associated Press

Chicago Cubs’ Alfonso Soriano grounds out to drive in a run against the Colorado Rockies on July 21 in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Denver. kee.” Soriano saluted the stadium’s Bleacher Creatures during their roll call, and was cheered again when his past Yankees highlights were shown on the video board. Wearing his socks high, Soriano got an assist when his throw led to an inning-ending out in the top of the second. He led off the bottom half and flied out. Soriano made his major league debut with the Yankees in 1999 and quickly blossomed into a rare package of speed and power. In 2002, he hit 39 homers and 51 doubles while batting .300, stealing 41 bases, scoring 128 runs and driving in 102. “He’s not the same player he used to be,” Cashman said, “but he certainly provides some thunder from the right side that we’ve been lacking.” Cashman hinted, too, that more deals might be in the works. The Yankees are 54-49 and in fourth place in the AL East, seven games behind division-leading Tampa Bay.

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. — The most interesting person on the Chicago Bears’ roster? Easy. “I’m probably the most interesting person on the team,” new tight end Martellus Bennett said. And who can argue? After all, this is a player who discussed his lactose intolerance at his introductory news conference in March and was on quite a roll in training camp this week, referring to Spiderman and the Bible and discussing his fascination with dinosaurs. Along with his funny and quirky nature, he brings an ability to block and catch passes that the Bears lacked at his position. All that explains why they lured him away from the New York Giants with a four-year deal, hoping he can help them get back to the playoffs after missing out for the fifth time in six seasons. “There’s never a dull moment with Martellus Bennett in the meeting rooms,” tight end Steve Maneri said. Or, it seems, when there’s a microphone or notepad in front of him. Here’s Bennett on who he thinks the coolest people on the planet are: “Me and my wife (Siggi) are probably two of the coolest people in the world. It’s like Jay Z and Beyonce, then it’s me and my wife, and then it’s David Beckham and Victoria.” Here he is on dinosaurs: “I love dinosaurs. They’re my favorite animal. I still do believe that they exist. That may sound crazy, but I do. And, you know, I go by Martysaurus Rex. You can add ‘Saurus Rex’ to your name, too.” Looking for something to do on the weekend?

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Calendar

July 29- August 4, 2013


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Dot. Common

July 29- August 4, 2013

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PuzzLE By ROBERT SEMINARA

Across

Horoscopes

Today’s birthday Domestic bliss sets the stage for a fun year. Explore the wide world through studies or travel. Your credit rating is rising, and work could stay busy. Balance stress with practices for energy, vitality and relaxation. Forgiveness provides peace. Improve your home without incurring debt. Flavor liberally with love. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 — The air is fragrant with summer flowers, stirring romance. A new assignment brings in more revenue. Profit from your creativity. You’re under scrutiny. Put all your ducks in a row, respectfully. Enjoy the party.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 — Entering a two-day innovation phase. You’ll have to listen outside of your cubicle to discover the hidden value of others. Travel a new route to avoid a traffic jam. Count your blessings.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is a 7 — You’re under pressure regarding deadlines. It’s a good time for love and money. A conflict of interests agitates. Keep telling the truth. Consider your next step, with home and family in mind.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is an 8 — Continue to increase your productivity this week. Practical plans are best for now. Today and tomorrow get social and fun. You’re pretty cute, too. Be generous with compassion, and scrimp on frivolities.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — The next two days bring lots of career movement with new opportunities. Get ready to rumble. Add to your holdings. Note the emotional flows at work. Indulge your feminine side. You’re irresistible now.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 9 — You’d rather play than work. Examine your priorities, considering commitments. You may find new expenses. Choose private over public interactions to increase your comfort level. Make a change at home.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 — It’s a good time for reinvention. Consider an investment in your own education, and continue to increase your network. Work from home if possible. Don’t be impulsive; think before you act. Consider your passions.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 — A partner’s opinion is important. A caring soul with expert experience

helps you with a big decision. Break old barriers and achieve compromise. A short walk around the neighborhood clears your mind. Objectivity helps.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 — Get something you’ve always wanted. Work out the details. You can’t afford to go into debt. Hear other opinions. There are options. Get persuaded. The details are important, so get involved.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 — You can start enjoying yourself. Heed your partner’s advice. The situation becomes unstable (but fun). Ask for help; friends are there for you. Use your connections. Finish an old project. Seek out opportunities.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7 — Consider your own values, and provide motivation. Don’t let others spend your money. Draw upon hidden resources. Inspire your friends to action. Energize your home base for an amazing success.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 — You’re smart, and getting smarter. You’ll find it easier to concentrate. Let ideas percolate. Provide for your loved ones first. Gather up the goodies. You’re winning admiration. Record your memories.

Check out the DI on

  1  In ___ (existing)   5  Amorphous mass   9  One of the  Three B’s of classical music 13  Fox series set in William  McKinley High School 14  Tibia or fibula 15  Singer Abdul 16  Original maker of a 38-Across 18  Moving about 19  Huge hit 20  Light horse-drawn carriage  with one seat 22  Boxer who floated like a butterfly, stung like a bee 25  Japanese sash 26  Ingredients in a 38-Across 34  Weight-loss program 35  Amigo 36  Ranee’s wrap 37  ___ of Capri 38  Sweet treat 41  Deadly poison 42  Mascara problem 44  Dress (up) 45  Lone Star State sch. near the  Rio Grande 46  Ingredient in a 38-Across 50  Steve Martin’s “King ___” 51  Hullabaloo 52  Joke you’ve heard many times  before 57  Fragrant wood 62  Acoustic 63  Ingredient in a 38-Across 66  Haggard with 38 #1 country  hits 67  Sea creature with pincers 68  Boutique 69  “Hey … over here!” 70  Sharer’s word 71  Classic trees on shady streets

Down

  1  They’re bought by the dozen   2  Thin   3  Song word repeated after  “Que”   4  Fish caught in pots   5  Original “Monty Python” airer   6  Brit’s toilet   7  Burden   8  Gambler   9  Big party 10  Volvo or VW 11  Video segment 12  Tortoise racer 15  Freaks out in fear 17  Bygone head of Iran 21  Attorney’s org. 23  200 in the Indianapolis 500 24  Muslim leader 26  Gadget 27  Found a new tenant for 28  Mr. T’s TV group 29  Draper’s material 30  Afghani capital 31  Muse of poetry 32  Extend, as a lease 33  Ooze 34  Gossip, slangily 39  Capital of Italia 40  “Heavens to Betsy!” 43  Worrisome engine noise 47  Try for a political office 48  Building material applied with a  trowel 49  Bananas 52  Place to eat a 38-Across 53  Tints 54  Blunders 55  NaCl 56  Drive-___ 58  “… or ___!” 59  Author Roald 60  Isotope, e.g. 61  Sales force, informally 64  Blade in a boat 65  David Letterman’s network

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

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Very Attractive, Furnished 3 BR 1 block from Lincoln & Green, A/C, Fireplace, Living, Dining, Kitchen, W/D, includes parking. Available August. No Smoking. No Pets. $1300 for 3 BR westernrentals705@gmail.com

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APARTMENTS

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3 blocks

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407 W. Elm Available in August, 4,800 Sq. Ft. 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath. Hardwood floors. $1800/month. 367-6626

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Parking spaces for rent! Centrally located. Corner of Wright & Armory $800 August 19 2013 – August 18 2014. Weekend parking unavailable. Please contact Episcopal Church Foundation at 217-344-1924 or stjohns@chapelsjd.org.

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COUNTRY FAIR APARTMENTS 1 & 2 Bedroom, furn/ unfurn, FREE Expanded 80+ Channels Cable TV, FREE High Speed Internet, FREE Water, Heat and trash removal. Offstreet parking, indoor laundry, pool, tennis court. On 4 MTD bus routes. Small pet OK. M-F 9-5:30, Sat 10-5. 2106 W. White Street (near Springfield Ave) 217-359-3713

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Centrally located apartments for rent! Corner of Wright & Armory. Private bedroom, shared bathroom, living room, dining room, kitchen & laundry facilities. $550 - $600, utilities included. Parking available for an additional cost. Please contact Episcopal Church Foundation at 217-344-1924 or stjohns@chapelsjd.org

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Christian Menʼs House. International and temporaries welcome. Limited laundry, internet, Cable TV, telephone. No Smoking. Utilities included. $395/month. 364-3943.

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rentals

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29. Jul 2010

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Subleasing 1-Bedroom 403 W High St. Sharing house with three male students, two bathrooms and garage. Rent $455 and utilities. rajakumarip@yahoo.com, 8474779878

205 W. William, C.

2 BR. Washer/Dryer in apt, Dishwasher, AC, Fireplace, Parking/Carport included, On Busline, $695/mo 217-621-6347 williamstapartments.com

440 ROOMS

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Wanted mature student to assist an elderly person in the home. Only required to be present in the evenings. Room, board and $100 a month. Work will be permanent. Only serious individuals, non-smokers need apply. Female preferred, but will accept others. Telephone: (217) 693-6329, (217) 898-4626.

705 S. FIRST ST., CH 3 bd w/ W/D for $1015/mo 4 bd/2 ba for $1450/mo Furnished, $40/mo parking 217-367-2009 www.tricountymg.com

430 SUBLETS

Unfurnished

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Developing an e-commerce website for small business. Need Computer Science or Marketing major with experience with Web development and SEO. Interested call John at 847. 668.3609 or email jfk@pga.com

906 S. LOCUST ST., CH 4 bedroom unit, only $999/mo Furn, DW, $40/mo parking Great for 2, 3 or 4 people 217-367-2009 www.tricountymg.com

430 APARTMENTS

4

Need extra cash while in school?

On-Campus Apartment Furnished, 2 Bedroom. W/D in unit and parking. $795/month. Call 847-815-3364

Unfurnished

5

020

420 APARTMENTS

2

Part time

Furnished

3

HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS

ake well known of sudoku-topical.com! his website? Then recommend it to your friends. yourself a website, place a link to sudoku-topical.com t out the sudokus then print them twice and give one to one of your friends. acquaintances, friends and teammates about sudoku-topical.com. to make this site well known.!

employment

The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 165  

Monday, July 29- Sunday, August 4, 2013

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