Page 1

Seniors’ last stand

Free football tickets The DI is giving away two pairs of tickets TODAY to Saturday’s football game against Purdue. Like us on Facebook and the winners will be randomly chosen from the page’s recent likes.

Friday November 16, 2012

Illini face Boilermakers in final home game of season SECTION C

The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

High: 54˚ Low: 33˚

Vol. 142 Issue 60

|

FREE

RSO gives away free cigarettes on Quad BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

Students who feel their right to choose is being violated by the upcoming campuswide smoking ban gave passers-by their own choice on the Quad on Thursday: Apple, donut or cigarette? Members of the RSO Young Americans for Liberty held the demonstration to start a conversation about individual rights. Dan Humbrecht, YAL president and sophomore in Engineering, said the event was hosted to gain support for ending the smoking ban. “We are trying to get awareness and to get people talking about the smoking ban,” Humbrecht said. “Our club is based off of individual rights, and because of that, we don’t believe that it’s the University’s place to dictate what sort of lifestyle you are living.” The University announced last month that the campus would go smoke-free next year. The ban is an extension of the current rule requiring that smokers be 25 feet away from public buildings and prohibiting smoking indoors.

See SMOKING, Page 3A

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

The UIUC Chapter of Young Americans for Liberty handed out free cigarettes for smokers and free apples and donuts for nonsmokers on the Quad late Thursday afternoon. The group feels that the efforts of the administration to completely ban smoking on campus are a serious infringement on the rights of the student body.

Blue Waters will receive feedback from researchers BY AUSTIN KEATING STAFF WRITER

A Blue Waters test run that began Nov. 6 is providing staff with critical feedback on the system’s operation, a National Center for Supercomputing Applications spokeswoman said. The test run, called “friendly-user” mode, gives researchers the opportunity to use the supercomputer to test the system and work on their research, said NCSA spokeswoman Trish Barker. This is the next step toward receiving approval from the National Science Foundation and the system’s eventual operation. “It’s mutually beneficial because they get access to the supercomputer, and we get a lot of feedback from them on how well the supercomputer is running,” Barker said. The process is referred to as acceptance testing. Greg Bauer, Blue Waters advanced user support program manager, said the friendly-user period allows Blue Waters staff to test the system’s operation. “The friendly-user period provides a way for the researchers to run their applications on the machine and lets us test different aspects of the machine,” Bauer said. “We put the machine through its paces and make sure we’re not missing something before finishing.” According to the NCSA website, several research groups are participating in the friendly-user period, including University professors Klaus Schulten, Bob Wilhelmson and Don Wuebbles. The system is also going through additional testing called availability testing, Bauer said. “(Availability testing) is a period of time during the acceptance tests where the machine has to provide a certain amount of useful work,” he said. “A certain success rate for jobs has to be achieved.” According to Bauer, there are over 500 tests conducted by the NCSA in the acceptance stage. But due to time constraints, the Blue Waters team has to intersperse these tests during the friendly-user period. “When all of the testing is completed, and we have demonstrated to the NSF that the supercomputer is ready, then we will go into full production status,” Barker said. Full production status is expected to be reached in early 2013, and Barker said they expect operations to last for about five years.

Austin can be reached at akkeati2@dailyillini.com.

“It’s mutually beneficial because they get access to the supercomputer, and we get a lot of feedback from them on how well the supercomputer is running.” TRISH BARKER, spokeswoman for the National Center for Supercomputing Applications

INSIDE

Ten Ill. counties oppose ban on concealed guns

Ten referendums support concealed-carry law Voters in 10 Illinois counties approved nonbinding referendums supporting the right to carry concealed firearms in last week’s election. Illinois is the only state that bans concealed carry. Stephenson

BY EMMA WEISSMANN

Rock Island

STAFF WRITER

Henry Mercer Warren

Champaign

McDonough Schuyler Adams

Bond

Randolph

Source: County clerks from the 10 counties

EUNIE KIM Design Editor

Hoping to push state legislators to act, 10 Illinois counties passed a referendum showing support for a concealed carry law in last week’s election. The voters who support concealed carry are hoping to get lawmakers talking about the issue in the coming months. Illinois is currently the only state that does not legally allow the concealed carry of a fi rearm . Valinda Rowe , spokesperson for IllinoisCarry, an online organization dedicated to passing concealed carry laws in Illinois, said voters in the 10 counties collected signatures and then approached their county boards to ask for the referendum to be placed on the ballot. Colleen Daley, executive director for the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence, said she was “not surprised” to hear that the referendums passed but does not think any new laws will come out of it. “These are counties that have overwhelmingly supported concealed carry as have their state legislators,” Daley said. “I think it gets the same individuals who are already in support of it riled up, but I don’t think it gets any new legislators engaged on this issue

White House takes down Chief petition

... I don’t think it opens their eyes.” Champaign County Clerk Gordy Hulten said no one approached Champaign’s election authority about placing a referendum on last week’s ballot. There was interest in January 2011, when an Illinois House bill, the Family and Personal Protection Act , was fi led. Since then, however, the bill has not made it out of the chamber and has been in committee for the past seven months. It was this bill, Rowe said, that sparked the interest of the 10 counties. At the University, the Illinois Student Senate passed a resolution in March 2011 that would ban concealed weapons on the University campus if the proposed bill were to pass. The resolution passed 18-9. Christopher Dayton , student senator and senior in LAS, was one of the student senators who voted to pass the resolution. Dayton, who is a Revolutionary War, Civil War and World War II re-enactor, is a gun owner in his home state of New York. He said he believes concealed carry should be legal in certain contexts but not on a University campus.

See CONCEAL CARRY, Page 3A

‘I have the right to know’

BY ILYA GUREVIC STAFF WRITER

An online White House petition to bring back Chief Illiniwek collected more than 3,000 signatures before moderators took it down Wednesday. The petition, started by Matthew Wilkins, junior in LAS, was originally posted Tuesday. “When we lost the Chief, we lost a part of us,” he said. Wilkins said he had wanted “to make a petition that’s kind of outlandish and worthwhile.” The next day, however, Wilkins received an email from the moderator of the website stating that the petition had been taken down. “The email wasn’t very descriptive. (It said) the petition didn’t really meet the goals of the website,” Wilkins said. According to the email, the petition was “outside the scope of the We the People” project, a website that hosts petitions to the White House.

See PETITION, Page 3A

»

» » » » » »

More inside: Turn the Page 3A to learn more

about this movement.

CLAIRE EVERETT THE DAILY ILLINI

A mural created by local artist Kyra Gunther was featured at Food and Water Watch’s “Let Me Decide” campaign event outside of Big Grove Tavern on Thursday as part of its initiative to get genetically engineered foods labeled.

Po l i c e 2 A | Co r r e c t i o n 2 A | H o r o s c o p e s 2 A | O p i n i o n s 4 A | Le t t e r 4 A | C r o s s w o r d 5 A | Co m i c s 5 A | S p o r t s 1 B | C l a s s i f i e d s 3 B - 4 B | S u d o k u 3 B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, November 16, 2012

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300 Copyright © 2012 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Samantha Kiesel Photo night editor: Joseph Lee Copy editors: Matt Petruszak, Lindsey Rolf, Elise

King, Ilya Gureic, Ryan Weber Designers: Nina Yang, Rui He, Hannah Hwang, Stacie Sansone Page transmission: Natalie Zhang

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

POLICE

Champaign A 58-year-old male was arrested on the charge of retail theft at County Market, 331 E. Stoughton St., around 7 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspect was issued a city notice to appear for retail theft. ! Burglary from a motor vehicle was reported at the intersection of East Vine and Neil Streets around noon Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender burglarized the victim’s car and stole four items. ! Discharge of a firearm and criminal damage to property was reported at the intersection of East Bradley Avenue and Romine Street around 2 a.m. Wednesday. !

According to the report, an unknown offender fired a weapon at the victim. The bullets missed the victim but struck a house, damaging its exteior. ! Theft was reported in the 2000 block of North Prospect Avenue around 10 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole money from the victim’s purse. ! Attempted residential burglary and criminal damage to property were reported in the 200 block of South Lynn Street around 11 p.m. Monday. According to the report, an unknown offender attempted to burglarize the victim’s house but was unsuccessful. A window was damaged during the process.

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

Urbana Reckless discharge of a firearm was reported in the 1500 block of North Romine Street around 7:30 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender discharged a firearm near an occupied residence. The bullets entered the residence and a nearby car. ! Theft was reported in the 400 block of Brookens Drive around noon Wednesday. According to the report, the victim sent money to the offender thinking it was to help a friend get out of jail. The victim wired $1,915 to the offender and later discovered it was a scam. !

James Bond, cultural icon

What makes James Bond a cultural icon that stands the test of time is his ability to change with the world. What makes James Bond a cultural icon that stands the test of time is his ability to change with the world. To read more at at DailyIllini.com.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are.

Compiled by Klaudia Dukala

Visit DailyIllini.com

HOROSCOPES moneymaking venture. Your theory gets challenged. Draw heavily on your experience. Figure out finances today and tomorrow. Provide great service and it all works out.

BY NANCY BLACK TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Today’s Birthday

Get your heart and mind focused on the same goal, and there’s no stopping you. Mars in Capricorn (today until 12/25) benefits relationships. Choose priorities, and results come with charming ease. Financial and career gains come as a natural result of this healing year. You’re enchanting.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today is an 8 -- This period is good for negotiations. Use your imagination, and stick to the rules. Put in extra effort. Haste makes waste. A partner’s opinion is important.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Today is a 7 -- Curb the impulse to run away. Work and prosper today and tomorrow. Provide support, and find an amazing breakthrough in love. Clean up any messes.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is an 8 -- Responsibilities weigh heavily today and tomorrow. Balance immediate goals with longterm dreams. Get ahead of the eight ball, and you just may win. Inspire changes at home.

Today is a 9 -- Your nerves will become less frazzled soon after the current chaos. Follow a hunch at work. Make a change for the better. Others are ready. Choose family.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 9 -- Keep digging and find the clue. Consider all the information. Family and home issues take the forefront today and tomorrow. Keep your objective in mind. Postpone romance.

Today is an 8 -- Set long-range goals over the next two days. The more you finish, the better you look. Start working on strategy. Learn from experience. Start a new writing project.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Today is a 6 -- Begin a new

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 -- Listen to your coach to improve performance. There’s

no such thing as a stupid question, but your timing could be off. Follow instructions. Make recommended changes. Your credit is rising.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is a 7 -- Join a good team. Fill orders and rake in the dough. Teach in a way they can learn. You have an advantage. Consider making changes in your living arrangements.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 9 -- Let yourself be drawn outside your safety zone. You’re extra confident today and tomorrow. Ask for what you want. Remain objective, despite any temporary confusion or disruption. Relax.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 6 -- Start by listing current expenses. Identify new resources, and replenish reserves. Costs are high, so take care. Rest and recuperate today and tomorrow. Study values and ethics, too.

The Best of

CU 2012

Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast. CORRECTIONS

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is an 8 -- Study with a passion. It’s easier to concentrate now. Today and tomorrow are good party days. Water may be involved. You can do more than you thought.

dailyillini.com

Go to www.readbuzz.com To See

Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news.

In the Nov. 14, 2012, edition of The Daily Illini, the column, “Illinois needs to advance healthcare,” stated that Illinois is setting up a state-run health insurance exchange. Instead, it should have said it will start an exchange in partnership with the federal government. The Daily Illini regrets the error. When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

Do U Want to Pay Less Tuition Next Semester U of I?

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

General contacts: Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production................(217) 337-8320

Newsroom Corrections: If you think something is incorrectly reported, please call Editor in Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337-8365. News: If you have a news tip, please contact Daytime editor Maggie Huynh at 337-8350 or News Editor Taylor Goldenstein at 337-8352 or e-mail news@DailyIllini.com. Press releases: Please send press releases to news@DailyIllini.com Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact Photo Editor Daryl Quitalig at 337-8344 or e-mail photo@ DailyIllini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call Sports Editor Jeff Kirshman at 337-8363 or e-mail sports@dailyillini.com. Calendar: Please submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com/calendar. Employment: If you would like to work in the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact Managing Editor Reporting Nathaniel Lash at 337-8343 or email mewriting@DailyIllini.com. Letters to the editor: Contributions may be sent to: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820 or e-mailed to opinions@ DailyIllini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. UI students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Daily Illini On-air: If you have comments or questions about our broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please call 337-8381 or e-mail meonair@DailyIllini.com. DailyIllini.com: Contact Managing Editor Online Hannah Meisel at 337-8353 or meonline@DailyIllini. com for questions or comments about our Web site.

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. ! Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. ! Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com. Employment: If you are interested in working for the Advertising Department, please call (217) 3378382 and ask to speak to Molly Lannon, advertising sales manager.

House Hunting at its finest www.CollegeBargain.com

Apartment search

choose houston law YOU BELONG AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON LAW CENTER.

TOP Tier Law School TOP Tier University TOP Legal Market Apply today.

www.law.uh.edu

!"#$%&'(#)*'+,$-.$/-0*+-&$'*$1&$223455$'&*6+06-&7


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

CONCEAL CARRY FROM PAGE 1A “I do not believe that this University is a place, in any context, for firearms,” Dayton said. “All it takes is for my shirt to move (and have) my firearm showing through my shirt to make a student uncomfortable or to act differently around me.” Dayton said he thinks many students who would want to have a concealed weapon would probably want to use it for protection. “We all see the crime alerts,” Dayton said. “But we also need to look at the fact that most people walking home late at night are walking home from bars. At which point you’re mixing alcohol with gun ownership, and those two things do not go together.” That year, the University police confiscated five guns from campus and an additional one that was discharged, according to Lt. Roy Acree of the University Police. So far in 2012, three weapons have been

PETITION FROM PAGE 1A Robert Warrior, director of American Indian studies, did not comment but referred The Daily Illini to the department’s statement online. The site makes clear that the department and the Native American Cultural House “support the March 2007 decision by

Friday, November 16, 2012

recovered. Daley said if students were able to legally carry concealed guns on a college campus, they would use them. “There have been a lot of unintended consequences that come along with a concealed carry law that people don’t necessarily think about,” Daley said. “They think about their own safety but might not think about the safety of somebody else around them.” Despina Batson , president of College Republicans and senior in LAS, said she supports a concealed carry law in Illinois and is happy that the counties’ voters were able to express their opinions through the referendum. “In our constitution, it’s our second amendment,” Batson said. “We have the right to bear arms, it’s a form of protection and our state should not be denying us that ... There are regulations in place. It’s not going to be a free-for-all if concealed carry is passed.”

Emma can be reached at wessmnn2@dailyillini.com. the University of Illinois board of trustees to retire the University’s former mascot in name, performance, and symbol.” The statement goes on to highlight the need to “critique and set aside images that confi ne the perception of an entire people to a limited and narrow existence.”

Ilya can be reached at gurevic2@ dailyillini.com.

PROTEST

group came out in support of the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout, held annualFROM PAGE 1A ly to encourage smokers to make Some students chose the cig- a plan to quit on that day. arettes, including John Regan, Melissa DeCicco, cancer edujunior in AHS, who said smoking cation chair for CAC and junior is a personal decision and does in Engineering, said she felt nernot require permission. vous about YAL giving out free “Everyone should have the cigarettes. choice if they want to smoke or “It was a little frustrating that not,” Regan said. “The second- they are giving out cigarettes, but hand smoke you get crossing I understand the point they are the Quad from one smoker is making,” Decicco said. Matt Cronot going to harm you in nin , vice any permapresident nent way.” of CAC and Others, senior in h owever, FAA, said went with the that although apple. Deanthe ban will na Ciaccia , make smoksophomore in ing less conDGS, who is venient, supportive of individuthe ban, said als can still she does not make their agree with own choicsmoking, es to smoke but the event after the polDEANNA CIACCIA, gave her a icy becomes sophomore in DGS better undereffective. standing of a “I don’t smoker’s standpoint on the policy. think the University is making the “I think hearing their per- choice for anyone,” Cronin said. spective is interesting. It is your “They are not saying you can’t choice to stay healthy or get a cig- smoke, (but) they are saying you arette.” Ciaccia said. “However, I can’t smoke on University properstill feel that it’s our right not to ties. So there are plenty of places inhale their secondhand smoke. you can still smoke. They are not ... I think it’s in the best judgment making anyone quit.” for the University to have this ban The University is set to become for the health aspect of the whole smoke-free by November 2013. campus.” The RSO Colleges Against Can- Carina can be reached at lee713@daicer set up a table near YAL’s. The lyillini.com.

“However, I still feel that it’s our right not to inhale their secondhand smoke. ... I think it’s in the best judgment for the University to have this ban for the health aspect of the whole campus.”

3A

Mural supports labeling GE food BY CLAIRE EVERETT STAFF WRITER

An Illinois-shaped mural decked in comments about labeling genetically engineered food sat outside Big Grove Tavern on Thursday afternoon. The mural was part of the campaign “Let Me Decide” by the national organization Food and Water Watch. The initiative seeks to get genetically engineered, or GE, foods labeled. Community members wrote phrases like: “I have the right to know!” and “What goes in my body is my choice” on the board. “We’ve had over 1,100 residents of the Champaign-Urbana area sign postcards in support of this issue,” said Hanna Saltzman, local representative for Food and Water Watch. She said the campaign wasn’t focused on Chicago anymore because Representative Deborah Mell, D-40, has already agreed to introduce the GE labeling legislation into the Illinois House of Representatives in January. “There’s a lot of national momentum for this issue,” Saltzman said. Recently, the ballot initiative Proposition 37 in California to label genetically engineered foods failed by a margin of six percent. Saltzman said Californians were thrown into voting on the issue, without an explanation of what it was. Food and Water Watch hopes to educate citizens of Illinois on the issue, in preparation for potentially voting on it. Stephen Moose, professor in Crop Sciences, said big companies do not want to label GE food because it would cost a lot of money to test each product and see what type of GE crop was in each one. He said labeling in one state would be even more costly, because the testing would only have to be done for that state, causing its food prices to rise. “It’s not that companies are trying to hide stuff,” Moose said. “It’s because, if that passed, it would be more expensive for them to sell their product.”

CLAIRE EVERETT THE DAILY ILLINI

A mural created by local artist Kyra Gunther was featured at Food and Water Watch’s “Let Me Decide” campaign event outside of Big Grove Tavern on Thursday as part of their initiative to get genetically engineered foods labeled. He said the FDA tested GE foods, so the food industry saw labeling as unnecessary. If consumers learned the sciences behind GE technology, they wouldn’t be afraid of it, Moose said. Back at Big Grove Tavern, David Bane, farmer and veterinarian, spoke about why he thought GE food should be labeled. “No long-term or multi-generational studies have been done on genetically engineered foods or feed grains,” Bane said. “A number of independent shortterm studies link genetically engineered foods to a host of health issues including obesity and allergies.” Bane said although geneti-

cally engineered foods make up over 90 percent of corn, soybeans and canola in the U.S., the world consensus is that genetically engineered ingredients are not safe. Over 50 countries have mandatory labeling and several banned GE foods altogether. “With these (genetically engineered) products, they are not sold unless they are reviewed by the government,” Moose said. “A lot of the opposition to (genetically modified) is really anticorporation, which is a very popular thing.” Champaign resident Judy Molly was the last to put her phrase on the mural. It read: “The birds, the bees, and the butterfl ies deserve a world where it is okay to eat, to drink, and to

alight...and so do all other living things.” Food and Water Watch has scheduled a meeting with Senator Mike Frerichs, D-52, next week to discuss introducing a companion bill to Chicago’s House of Representatives bill in the senate. Saltzman said in a press release she wants to live in a world in which people know the food they are eating is safe. “In Illinois, we’re building a base of people who are informed,” Saltzman said. “We’re educating people and we’re giving people the power to speak up for what they care about.”

Claire can be reached at everett5@dailyillini.com.

Diabetes rate boomed over past 15 years Most dramatic increase seen in Southern, Southwestern states BY MIKE STOBBE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The nation’s diabetes problem is getting worse, and the biggest jump over 15 years was in Oklahoma, according to a new federal report issued Thursday. The diabetes rate in Oklahoma more than tripled, and Kentucky, Georgia and Alabama also saw dramatic increases since 1995, the study showed. The South’s growing weight problem is the main explanation, said Linda Geiss, lead author of the report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

“The rise in diabetes has really gone hand in hand with the rise in obesity,” she said. Bolstering the numbers is the fact that more people with diabetes are living longer because better treatments are available. The disease exploded in the United States in the last 50 years, with the vast majority from obesity-related Type 2 diabetes. In 1958, fewer than 1 in 100 Americans had been diagnosed with diabetes. In 2010, it was about 1 in 14. Most of the increase has happened since 1990. Diabetes is a disease in which the body has trouble processing

sugar; it’s the nation’s seventh leading cause of death. Complications include poor circulation, heart and kidney problems and nerve damage. The new study is the CDC’s fi rst in more than a decade to look at how the nationwide boom has played out in different states. It’s based on telephone surveys of at least 1,000 adults in each state in 1995 and 2010. Participants were asked if a doctor had ever told them they have diabetes. Not surprisingly, Mississippi — the state with the largest proportion of residents who are obese — has the highest diabetes rate. Nearly 12 percent of Mississippians say they have diabetes, compared to the national average of 7 percent. But the most dramatic

increases in diabetes occurred largely elsewhere in the South and in the Southwest, where rates tripled or more than doubled. Oklahoma’s rate rose to about 10 percent, Kentucky went to more than 9 percent, Georgia to 10 percent and Alabama surpassed 11 percent. An offi cial with Oklahoma State Department of Health said the solution is healthier eating, more exercise and no smoking. “And that’s it in a nutshell,” said Rita Reeves, diabetes prevention coordinator. Several Northern states saw rates more than double, too, including Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Maine. The study was published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Obama puts spotlight on New York residents struggling after Sandy BY MATTHEW DALY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — President Barack Obama vowed Thursday to stick with New Yorkers still struggling 17 days after Superstorm Sandy “until the rebuilding is complete” after getting an up-close look at devastated neighborhoods rendered unlivable. Obama brought the spotlight to people still without heat or electricity and hugged many of those trying to rebuild their lives. He also delivered a postelection message of unity, nine days after a closely divided America gave him a second term. “During difficult times like this, we’re reminded that we’re bound together and we have to look out for each other,” Obama said from a Staten Island street that was demolished by the storm. “And a lot of the things that seem important, the petty differences, melt away.” Obama announced that Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, a former chief of New York’s Housing Authority, will be his point person to oversee long-term redevelopment in the region. On a three-hour tour, the president encountered many still suffering in Sandy’s aftermath and waiting in lines for food, supplies and other help. He also met privately with parents whose two young boys, Brandon and Connor Moore, were swept away by the powerful storm. Damien and Glenda Moore’s children were among more than 100 people

who deaths were blamed on Sandy. “I expressed to them, as a father, as a parent, my heartbreak over what they went through,” Obama said. He said the Moores were “still obviously a little shell-shocked” but wanted to thank the New York City police lieutenant who stayed with them until the bodies were found. “That spirit and sense of togetherness and looking out for one another, that’s what’s going to carry us through this tragedy,” Obama said. Before arriving on Staten Island, his helicopter flew over Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, including the waterfront community of Breezy Point, where roughly 100 homes burned to the ground in a massive windswept fi re. On Staten Island, Obama met with residents waiting in line at an emergency response center at New Dorp High School, where the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Small Business Administration, IRS, Red Cross and city agencies have set up tents to help survivors. The White House said about 1,500 people had received services at the center, one of several in affected areas, as of Monday. People sought refuge from the cold on “warming buses” and the New York Fire Department provided hot showers. Insurance companies including Travelers and Allstate also had buses where people went to fi le claims. The president hugged one woman at the business tent, asking where she was staying and

CAROLYN KASTER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama — accompanied by Michael Bloomberg, mayor of New York City; Andrew Cuomo, governor of New York; Janet Napolitano, secretary of Homeland Security; Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; and others — hugs Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., after a news conference Thursday on Cedar Grove Avenue, a street significantly impacted by Superstorm Sandy, on Staten Island in New York. if her loved ones were safe. He also visited a tent where food and toiletries were being distributed and thanked the workers and volunteers who came in from around the country. Several hundred people gathered nearby to see the president and shouted: “We love you!”

One girl collecting supplies who said her house is unlivable said: “We need help. He should have been here a long time ago.” That sentiment was shared by others, including Anthony Gatti, who said his home near the ocean was wrecked by Sandy.

“I think he should’ve been here a few days ago to see how much devastation we’ve had here,” said Gatti, who was hoping to get a FEMA trailer to live in with his parents while they fi nd a new home. They lost everything they owned in the storm, he said.

Gatti said he has been standing in line all day, every day, waiting to speak with FEMA officials. “If he could do something to make this process with the government a little faster and easier on us, that would be a great thing,” he said of Obama.


4A Friday November 16, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

POLITICAL CARTOON

Slow down, spend time with family on Thanksgiving

VERONICA PHAM THE DAILY ILLINI

Editorial

EPA should listen to concerned citizens, tread carefully on Clinton Landfill matter

L

ast Friday, local governments banded together to file a complaint with the Illinois Pollution Control Board, calling out Clinton Landfill for planning to dump dangerous chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls, at its site directly above the Mahomet Aquifer. The underground reservoir provides drinking water for more than 750,000 people. One week later, and here we are — still no progress has been made. It seems no move has been bold enough in this fight to get wheels turning. When considering alternatives in this situation, there aren’t many, if any, good solutions. Disposal options — incineration, chemical dechlorination, etc. — are expensive and often counterproductive in terms of environmental effects as they create even more problems. But to knowingly bury PCBs in a landfill directly above a water source for so many people in this state is not a wise decision, even if officials say that the landfill has little to no potential of leaking into the water. The Daily Herald reported that George Roadcap, a hydrogeologist with the Illinois Water Survey, said beneath the landfill, there is a potential path of leakage from the landfill into the groundwater, and it’s only a short 150 feet away. We can cross our fingers all we want, but the fact of the matter is, there is the potential that major harm could be done. These chemicals are poisonous, and they have caused cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency is perhaps at blame here, too. It’s been over a year since local governments began battling the landfill, and citizens are still waiting for an answer. It would seem that in these situations these decisions should be expedited. As Central Illinoisans wait for any definitive answer (while others remain fatefully unaware), the agency continues to sit, as does Clinton Landfill’s brand new facility, which is rearing to go. More alarming about the issue is that regardless of their choice, many community members have voiced their disapproval of this request by the landfill. In the situation that the EPA did approve the permit, it still seems rather backwards that despite people drinking the water, they have little to no say in the matter. Of course there are public forums and other ways of expressing concern, but in the end, it all comes down to what the EPA determines. So here comes — but more like came and went — another move. We stand strong behind these government officials who filed the complaint, and we urge those making the final to decision to heed the concerns of Central Illinois governments.

SHARE YOUR

THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

KATE CULLEN Opinions columnist

B

Voting issues should not be overlooked TA’LES LOVE Opinions columnist

T

he Election is over, but the hysteria hasn’t subsided. In fact, politics is more entertaining now than it was before the election. Actually, politics has become borderline obnoxious. Little attention is given to foreign affairs issues now, or even domestic problems, such as the upcoming review of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which happens to be one of the most important and most overlooked post-election issues. For the past week, people have been so wrapped up in coming to terms with President Obama’s reelection, with some handling it better than others. People in numerous states have organized petitions and are now pushing for secession from the rest of the union (because that worked out great last time), the GOP continues its soul-searching mission to discover where they went wrong, Democrats continue to laugh at their misfortune and the fiscal cliff looms over everyone’s heads. There’s also that one guy that has caused quite the national stir. Former CIA Director David Petraeus resigned from his post last week due to an affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell. This developing saga gets stranger by the hour. With so much chaos occurring in the political world, it may be hard to distinguish the important issues from the ongoing soap operas. After elections, many return to life under their rocks for the next four years until it is time to come out again. However, issues such as the Supreme Court’s upcoming review of The Voting Rights Act is why people should continue to stay attentive and engaged. Many feel the nation’s achievement of its first African American president warrants The Voting

Update and greetings from Illinois Student Senate As we prepare to complete the fall semester and as final exams approach, we can all take care to observe the many changes that have occurred and continue to take place at the University. The restoration of Lincoln Hall was completed, and progress is being made on the new home for electrical and computer engineering on the Bardeen Quad. Robert Easter took the helm as University president this past summer, and Phyllis Wise started her second year as chancellor. President Barack Obama was re-elected, and the upcoming budget battle in Congress will have ramifications for both this University and all of us individually. Thus, this year will be one of great change as we seek to strengthen our University amid a bleak financial situation.

Rights Act as outdated, useless and unconstitutional. But this is not true. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was legislation to prevent the discrimination or denial of the right to vote, mostly among blacks. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the act also “contained special enforcement provisions” specifically designed for areas of the country (the South) with the greatest potential of discrimination. Section 5 of the law, the part due for review, states that jurisdictions under these previsions are not allowed to implement changes affecting voting systems unless approved by the Attorney General or the United States District Court. Firstly, the overturning of the law has the potential to send us into a backwards time warp. The elimination of the act would potentially allow state governments to discriminate against all voters or manipulate voting systems in their favor. This was seen during this past election when many forms of voter suppression were prevalent all over the country. For example, Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted shortened early voting periods, a method which is “disproportionally” used by African Americans and low-income voters. Latinos, African-Americans and elderly voters in Florida received phone calls telling them they could vote via phone, and other voters received calls informing them that the election was on Wednesday instead of Tuesday. It doesn’t stop there. Voters of all colors in Pennsylvania were asked to present ID when the state law only requires this for first time voters. In other places, people showed up only to wait in line for four to six hours, something President Obama said needed to be fixed as similar scenes continued to play throughout the country. In large minority communities in Wisconsin and Ohio, there were reports of numerous billboards

Guest Column However, I am proud to have leadership willing to make tough decisions to enhance our strategic position as a world-class university. Chancellor Wise has committed herself to promoting institutional excellence and agility in a rapidly changing educational environment. To this end, Wise envisions Illinois as a leader among our peer institutions by championing sustainability and inclusiveness on our campus. President Easter continues leading efforts to develop Illinois into the nation’s preeminent public research university. Even still, President Easter and Chancellor Wise are committed to hearing the student voice as decisions are made, and we must exercise that voice to ensure that student interests are represented. This is a shared responsibility and a process in which we can all participate. I encourage you to seek membership on a student senate or campus committee. Apply for vacancies on

warning against voter fraud, seemingly aiming to discourage people of color against voting. Latino voters in Arizona were “over-vetted” for their identification and sent to cast provisional ballots. The moral of this story? Voter suppression is real, and the elimination of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act only makes it easier for incidents such as the examples listed above to occur more frequently, especially among minority populations. Waiting in lines for hours, discouraging billboards and misinformation are all attempts to keep certain kinds of people from voting. Still, with this current law in place we see many instances where election officials and politicians are maneuvering around laws and trying to manipulate them in their favor. If this is happening with the law intact, the Supreme Court shouldn’t believe that its absence will curtail these problems. As mentioned before, some feel that President Obama’s success contradicts the law and that it is therefore no longer needed. This is due to the large voter turnout amongst African Americans in which the majority supported him. However, President Obama will not remain president forever, and who’s to say that voter turnout will be the same in upcoming elections? This uncertainty along with evidence of voter suppression is exactly why the law should remain. Although we are past the Jim Crow Era, these incidents show that the discrimination tactics and strategies live on. Because of the amount of involvement of the federal government and changing demographics, politicians feel that this law is unconstitutional and hinders their chances at political success, surging a need for redistricting. However, politics is indeed a game and you can’t change the rules just because you are not winning.

Ta’les is a junior in Media. She can be reached at tllove2@dailyillini.com.

our website, iss.illinois.edu. I look forward to continued student participation in decision-making as we guide the University toward renewed excellence. I would happily extend an invitation to any and all students to join us at our next regularly scheduled senate meeting, Wednesday, Nov. 28. The Illinois Student Senate will be welcoming Chancellor Wise to deliver remarks to the assembly. All students are welcome and encouraged to attend. To all students, the Illinois Student Senate wishes you a sublimely happy Thanksgiving and a relaxing fall break. I hope you are as excited as I am for the coming weeks and closure of the semester, and be sure to recharge over this break in preparation for final exams. The coming weeks promise both many great opportunities and many great challenges for all of us. BROCK GEBHARDT, ISS student body president

Letter to the Editor

Research is making a contribution to humanity

Of all places, the University space is where the value of research is not to be measured by corporate use. Some see no “real” value in such a type of inquiry or research, and tuition waivers seem like lost money. After all, research in music, art, English — you name it — does not promise profit, and too many graduate students ignore academic market needs. I have heard this argument aplenty. Yes, one can argue that the University uses graduate students as cheap labor as a substitute for faculty positions. This, however, is an issue gener-

ated by the University administration, not the graduate students. Certainly, if research value is defined exclusively by monetary profit, then we, as a species, are not well off. If we define it as “making a contribution,” then the question is to whom do we make the contribution? Often academics remain in their own circles, write for their own peers and talk to themselves more frequently than they talk to people outside their disciplines. We need to ask ourselves if we want to work for industries to improve the industries’ methods or if we would rather improve current social conditions not for (but in spite of) business interests? Of course, critiquing cor-

porate institutions does not attract big business money, such research is not attractive for the industry, and it is not supposed to be. It, therefore, needs the University space and financial support to be effective. It is not targeted at small academic and business elites, but it focuses on people outside the University walls. Thus, what the University must provide is a space for diversity that makes us realize again that we are more than numbers. This is what academic freedom is about — it is not a lip service but is exercised by critical research. MANDY TROGER, graduate student at the Institute of Communications Research

efore we are able to put our Halloween costumes away or ingest obscene amounts of candy, retail stores advertised their holiday sales and radio stations started playing Christmas jingles. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but their calendars are wrong. It is not December. Put the jingle bells down. I don’t think that’s too much to ask. Can’t I just enjoy one holiday at a time? The squirrels haven’t even gotten the chance to devour the pumpkins I carved. While Halloween is usually able to hold its own against the premature holiday advertisements, Thanksgiving is squished between two festive celebrations and inevitably falls victim to this holiday fast-forward. While this may seem inconsequential, it is of great significance because the fate of your Thanksgiving hangs in the balance. As soon as the weather turns from a chilly breeze to a brisk wind, Santa figurines slowly creep out into display windows and garland is strategically hung. But by skipping straight to the holiday season, we’re not savoring the mouthwatering meal we get to gobble down, which, may I remind you, only comes around once a year. But most importantly, we leap right over the one holiday when we are supposed to appreciate what we have — without expecting anything in return — so that we can get to the holiday when we get more than we usually need. Unlike Hanukkah and Christmas, which are culturally centered around the premise of giving gifts, the main event of Thanksgiving is a meal — making it one of my favorite holidays by far. But it’s not the meal itself that makes the fourth Thursday of every November a holiday; it’s the meaning behind it, the idea of being grateful that distinguishes the day among others. We are supposed to take time out of our busy lives to slow down, spend time with family and consider what we are grateful for. That’s what this American holiday is about, and we can celebrate it together. Unfortunately, many are too distracted by the pre-holiday sales advertisements to enjoy it. Black Friday itself is evidence that Thanksgiving is undervalued as a holiday. Stores begin to encourage shoppers in October to wake up at ridiculous hours in the morning of Black Friday just to get the best sale prices. This is frustrating not only because my Thanksgiving meal has barely been digested — and I cannot even begin to think about Christmas — but also because stores are persuading customers to buy products they probably don’t need, hours after they are supposed to be giving thanks for the things they already have. The paradox here is obvious. I’ve worked in retail on and off for several years, but last year I had the fortunate opportunity of working in the mall on Black Friday — it was one of the scariest days of my life. I remember one woman in particular because her eyes were glazed over, her hair was disheveled and she looked as if she had been fighting off the crowd all day. She came up to the register, and I began to ring up the sweater she had chosen. Unfortunately, the price was not what she wanted and she demanded I recheck to see if it was on sale. When I politely informed her it was not, she took the sweater and threw it at my face. I stood there, shocked and amazed, with a sweater on my head for about a minute. It was hard to believe that people like her were probably eating a quiet Thanksgiving dinner with their families just one day prior. Needless to say, that day really killed the relaxed post-Thanksgiving feeling I had going. Don’t get me wrong, I love the holiday season and enjoy celebrating Christmas, but Thanksgiving is just more relaxed compared with the rushed holiday season, which is why I truly enjoy it. Maybe it’s because parents aren’t rushing to purchase last-minute gifts or put up decorations, but I think it’s mostly because sweaters aren’t being hurled at me. Thanksgiving is just about spending time with friends and family, enjoying each other’s company. Unfortunately, we’ve forgotten this and are intent on rushing through Thanksgiving just to speed up the arrival of the holiday season. However, I will graciously indulge in a delicious turkey dinner doused with stuffing and potatoes, followed by an extended food coma all while spending time with my family. And I will enjoy every second of it because after all, every holiday deserves its time in the limelight.

Kate is a junior in LAS. She can be reached at cullen9@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

5A

Friday, November 16, 2012

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

ACROSS

SEBASTIAN SCHEINER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men gather around the body of Mirah Sharf, who was killed in the southern town of Kiryat Malachi by a rocket thought to have been fired by Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip.

Palestinian militants kill 3 in unprecedented Tel Aviv attack BY IBRAHIM BARZAK AND KARIN LAUB THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — Palestinian militants targeted densely populated Tel Aviv in Israel’s heartland with rockets for the first time Thursday, part of an unprecedented barrage that threatened to provoke an Israeli ground assault on Gaza. Three Israelis were killed. Air raid sirens wailed and panicked residents ran for cover in Tel Aviv, Israel’s commercial and cultural capital. Israel responded by moving troops and heavy weapons toward Gaza and authorizing the call-up of tens of thousands of reservists.

There was no word on where the two rockets aimed at Tel Aviv landed, raising the possibility they fell into the Mediterranean. A third rocket landed in an open area on the southern outskirts of Tel Aviv. The fighting, the heaviest in four years, came after Israel launched a ferocious air assault Wednesday to stop repeated rocket fire from Gaza. The powerful Hamas military chief was killed in that strike, and another 18 Palestinians have died over two days, including five children. Some 100 Palestinians have been wounded. Israeli warplanes struck dozens of Hamas-linked targets in Gaza on Thursday, sending

loud booms echoing across the narrow Mediterranean coastal strip at regular intervals, followed by gray columns of smoke. After nightfall, several explosions shook Gaza City several minutes apart, a sign the strikes were not letting up, and the military said the targets were about 70 underground rocket-launching sites. There were mounting signs of a ground operation. At least 12 trucks were seen transporting tanks and armored personnel carriers toward Gaza late Thursday, and a number of buses carrying soldiers arrived. Israeli TV stations said a Gaza incursion was expected on Friday.

2

14

3

4

1 Clobber   5 Lakeside rental 17 18 11 Angel dust 14 O’Neill whom J. D. Salinger 20 wanted to 22 marry 15 Arrived by plane 25 16 Sweater letter 17 Huge snagger 29 30 31 of salmon 20 On the dot 38 21 Pulverized perfumery item 39 22 “Here ___, there …” 23 Gum ball 40 24 ___ jure 25 Cheery cashier in 41 Progressive ads 27 Hoosier humorist George 43 44 45 29 Follow, as a leader 38 Behaves like a puppy dog, 52 53 say 57 39 Quaint worker doing a hansom job? 59 60 40 Steps around? 41 Gazetteer abbr. 62 63 42 El Paraguay, e.g. 43 D-day divider? 46 Slangy hello DOWN 49 Run out   1 Concave kitchenware 52 Winter warmer   2 Kerfuffle 55 Before   3 Let flow 57 Caseworker’s compilation   4 Jewelry 59 Interior decorator’s concern purchase 60 Mirthful   5 Stone picture 61 Part of a C.S.A. signature   6 It’s bent on a bender 62 6-Down locale   7 Roman land 63 Combination of rings?   8 Old arena 64 Wine list section draw?   9 Bird that lays a one-pound egg 10 Sleep sites 11 Before one’s big opening? 12 Organization’s opposite

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

15

12

13

35

36

37

50

51

16 19 21 23

24

26

27 32

33

28

34

42 46

47

48

49

54

55

56

58 61 64 PUZZLE BY MARTIN ASHWOOD-SMITH

13 18 19 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

___ Velho, Brazil Formal defenses Brush Low tie Household helper Beyond elated They might be nervous Order to get moving “Felicity” star Russell ___ per second (luminosity unit) Galley order Setting of a Barry Manilow hit Pro follower Sugar suffixes

37 43 44 45 46 47 48 50 51 53 54 56 58

Simple Leader of the pack Frère’s sibling Imposing a general liability, legally Morning ritual, for many Dark “Fiddle-faddle!” Made hot? Clichéd Bart Simpson’s middle name “___, you noblest English”: Shak. Basic solutions 1969 Peace Prize grp.

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

DOONESBURY

BEARDO

BILLY FORE

GARRY TRUDEAU

DAN DOUGHERTY

MATTHEW HINTON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, center, arrives at a press conference followed by Acting Associate Attorney General Tony West, far left, and lead by Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division Lanny A. Breuer, top right.

BP charged $4.5b in damages after pleaing guilty to oil spill BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS — A day of reckoning arrived for BP on Thursday as the oil giant agreed to plead guilty to a raft of charges in the deadly Gulf of Mexico spill and pay a record $4.5 billion, including the biggest criminal fine in U.S. history. Three BP employees were also charged, two of them with manslaughter. The settlement with the federal government came 2 ½ years after the fiery drilling-rig explosion that killed 11 workers and set off the nation’s largest offshore oil spill.

In announcing the deal, Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said the tragedy “resulted from BP’s culture of privileging profit over prudence.” BP will plead guilty to charges involving the 11 deaths and lying to Congress about how much oil was spewing from the blown-out well. “We believe this resolution is in the best interest of BP and its shareholders,” said Carl-Henric Svanberg, BP chairman. “It removes two significant legal risks and allows us to vigorously defend the company against the remaining civil claims.” The settlement appears to be

easily affordable for BP, which made a record $25.8 billion in profits last year. And it will have five years to pay. But the oil giant still faces several billion dollars in additional claims for damage to people’s livelihoods and the environment. Separately, BP rig workers Robert Kaluza and Donald Vidrine were indicted on federal charges of manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter, accused of repeatedly disregarding abnormal high-pressure readings that should have been glaring indications of trouble just before the blowout.

Divided federal court overturns Mich. ban on affirmative action in college admission BY ED WHITE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — Michigan’s ban on affirmative action in college admissions was declared unconstitutional Thursday by a deeply divided federal appeals court, six years after state voters said race could not be an issue in choosing students. In an 8-7 decision, the court said the 2006 amendment to the Michigan Constitution is illegal because it presents an extraordinary burden to opponents who would have to mount their own long, expensive campaign through the ballot box to protect affirmative action. That burden “undermines the

Equal Protection Clause’s guarantee that all citizens ought to have equal access to the tools of political change,” said Judge R. Guy Cole Jr., writing for the majority at the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. The court said having supporters and opponents debate affirmative action through the governing boards of each public university would be much fairer than cementing a ban in the constitution, which it referred to as home of “the highest level” of public policy. The court did not comment on a portion of the amendment that deals with government hiring. The decision is limited to

states in the 6th Circuit, which includes Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee. But it also raises the odds that the U.S. Supreme Court may get involved. A very similar law in California was upheld by a San Francisco-based appeals court, and the Supreme Court could choose to resolve the conflicting decisions of the 9th Circuit and the 6th Circuit on voterapproved bans. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette, a supporter of the ban, said he will ask the nation’s highest court to take the case. “Entrance to our great universities must be based upon merit,” he said.

Where are

you living

next year?

Let Apartment Search make finding your next campus home a snap! Search by price range, location, number of bedrooms, amenities, and more.

http://classifieds.dailyillini.com/apartments


6A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, November 16, 2012

High hopes for ‘Girl Meets World’

‘Christmas Story’ on Broadway has 2 stars

ZEFAN ARAYA

Two boys make Broadway debut in stage adaptation of iconic 1983 film

Staff writer

“B

BY MARK KENNEDY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — This Christmas, if Ralphie ever actually does shoot his eye out with a Red Ryder BB Gun, don’t worry. There’s a spare Ralphie. Johnny Rabe and Joe West, both 12, are taking turns playing the bespectacled, daydreaming hero in a musical stage version of the cult film “A Christmas Story.” Both grew up watching the 1983 movie, both initially auditioned by submitting videos, and both are now making their Broadway debuts. “It’s so great to be here,” Rabe said during a joint interview in a rehearsal room. His co-star agreed: “I’m very excited but, at the same time, nervous.” The film and musical are based on writer and radio-TV personality Jean Shepherd’s semi-autobiographical story of 9-year-old Ralphie Parker’s desperate attempt to land an air rifle as a Christmas gift, despite warnings from everyone that he’ll shoot his eye out. Like the film, the musical features a menacing school bully, an annoying kid brother, an eccentric father, a lace-stocking-clad leg lamp, a bright pink bunny suit and a kid who gets his tongue stuck to a frozen flagpole during a triple-dog dare. “It’s cool to be playing such an iconic character,” said Rabe. “I mean, a lot of people know Ralphie. They know who he is. They know the gun, the

MARK KENNEDY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Joe West, left, and Johnny Rabe hold a Red Ryder BB Gun, one of the props from “A Christmas Story, the Musical” in New York on Oct. 26. Both 12-year-old boys are making their Broadway debuts playing Ralphie in the stage adaptation of the cult 1983 film. glasses, the cheesy smile, the daydreaming.” The show has more than a dozen catchy songs written by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul — titles include “Red Ryder Carbine Action BB Gun” and “A Major Award” — and a book by Joseph Robinette. It also stars Dan Lauria, who played the dad in “The Wonder Years.” But the stars are really Rabe and West, who will shoulder the role of Ralphie for as many as nine shows a week. Though Rabe will take the bulk of the Ralphies, the boys insist there’s no competition. “We both have it so it’s going to be great,” said West, from Valencia, Calif., who has already played Oliver in “Oliver” and Jem in “To Kill a Mockingbird” in California. “Both of us really just want to have a great time,” said Rabe, from Naperville, Ill., who has appeared in productions of “The Music Man” and “For the Boys” in his native state. John Rando, the show’s director, is grateful he’s landed two Ralphies oozing talent. “We’re talking about these very young boys, but yet their confidence levels and their professionalism is extremely high,” he said.

West was almost born to be doing this — his parents, Maura West and Scott DeFreitas, are actors who met on the soap opera “As the World Turns.” Rabe’s parents have no connection with show business, but their son has loved theater since he was 2. Both boys are being homeschooled by their moms during the show’s run. A rough early version of the show debuted in Kansas City in 2009 with a different creative team. Since then, it’s found a director in Rando (“Urinetown: The Musical”) and a choreographer in Warren Carlyle (“Finian’s Rainbow”). Last year, a version with a different Ralphie went on a five-city tour. That actor aged out of the role — at 13 — and a national search was launched. Rabe knew the part since he’d been in the tour’s ensemble. Rando says the creative team had been quietly considering the young man as a good choice one day to play Ralphie. “When he was onstage, my eye kept drifting to him,” said Rando. “He has a kind of young, scrappy boy quality that I think fits the part. He’s hearty. He’s from the Midwest and that also

gave him a quality that I was really interested in.” West was cast after he submitted a video audition and was asked to come to New York to try out in person. “He had a remarkable singing voice for an 11-yearold boy. That was the thing that really perked up our interest in him,” said Rando. “He, too, has this sort of scrappy quality that I think is really right for the role.” If ever they need inspiration, the boys need look no further than Peter Billingsley, the original Ralphie, who has signed on as a producer of the musical. All three have chatted. “We’ve been told to play our own Ralphie. He hasn’t given us a lot of advice. He’s just saying, ‘Be your own Ralphie and have a lot of fun,’” said Rabe. Along the way, the two boys have bonded. Quick to joke around but equally serious when it comes to work, Rabe and West have learned how to tap dance and discovered that they both like fencing. They’re also earning a paycheck for being on Broadway. How much? They’re too polite to say. “A very nice amount for a 12-year-old,” said West with a laugh.

elieve in yourselves. Dream. Try. Do good.” Those were Mr. Feeny’s last words to the beloved “Boy Meets World” characters that almost every 1990s child grew up watching; those words were the sum of seven seasons’ worth of life lessons. I was heartbroken when the show ended, and sometimes I still wonder what ever happened to Cory, Shawn, Eric and Topanga. How was Topanga’s internship in New York? Do they ever visit Mr. Feeny? Did Angela and Shawn find their way back together? So naturally, when I found out about the spinoff “Girl Meets World,” the story of Cory and Topanga’s daughter, I hustled to find out everything I could. “Girl Meets World” will feature the “adorable, fiercely loyal, and optimistic” Riley Matthews, Cory and Topanga’s 13-year-old daughter, according to the casting call. The two also have another “dark (and) edgy” 14-year-old son Elliot, and Riley makes a friend in Maya, an only child who never knew her father and finds a father figure in Cory. Oh, and Cory — he’s a teacher now at Riley’s middle school. The parallels between characters in the new show and the original are obvious. “The one I didn’t really see coming as being parallel is Mr. Feeny and Cory,” said Monica Kociolek, senior in LAS and an avid fan of “Boy Meets World.” “Mr. Feeny was so knowledgable, very mature, and Cory always looked up to him. ... I could never imagine Cory being as educated and as knowledgable as a teacher Mr. Feeny was.” Kociolek’s favorite part of the show was the pure, clean humor.

“I think the humor is so different than the humor that they show in TV now. ... It was just like pure funniness,” Kociolek said. I admit that I never laughed as much in front of a TV screen as when Eric yelled out his Feeny call or when Cory walked into a situation clueless as usual. It was wholesome, slapstick humor that I hope Disney, the producers of the spinoff “Girl Meets World,” will preserve. However, when I rewatch the old seasons of Boy Meets World (usually five or 10 episodes at a time), my favorite part isn’t the slapstick humor, but the life lessons. In some incredible way, “Boy Meets World” was able to bring humor to some of life’s hardest lessons. The show addressed violence, peer pressure, drinking and sex. It introduced even more serious issues through Cory’s friendship with Shawn, such as socioeconomic class differences, abandonment and death. It followed the friends through real struggles, real problems and real pain. Although I am excited to see “Girl Meets World,” my one reservation is that Disney won’t teach real lessons. Look at the shows that populate Disney Channel. I admit to watching a fair share of “Hannah Montana” episodes (embarrassing, I know), but they just kill time. The shows don’t really mean anything, and I don’t want Riley Matthews to turn into another Hannah Montana. So, I’m a little skeptical of how “Girl Meets World” will turn out. Will Disney’s parental controls keep it from teaching a new generation the same painful but necessary lessons that the orignal show did? Even now when I watch the reruns, I still cheer for Corey, vow to never forget the lesson that Mr. Feeny just taught me, and I feel a little more prepared for the world. Can Disney live up to that?

Zefan can be reached at araya1@ dailyillini.com.

‘Star Wars‘ action figures inducted in Toy Hall of Fame BY CAROLYN THOMPSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia outmuscled little green army men for a spot in the National Toy Hall of Fame. “Star Wars” action figures join centuries-old dominoes in the class of 2012, which was announced by the Rochester hall Thursday. A national selection committee chose them from among 12 finalists, plucking the most ancient and most modern toys from the list. “Star Wars” action figures went on the market in 1978, following the 1977 release of the 20th Century Fox movie. The 3 ¾-inch figures of Han Solo, Chewbacca, R2-D2 and company were sold until 1985 and again from the mid1990s to today. Museum officials say their phenomenal popularity inspired other toy makers to tie their products to movies and television series and they note the toys’ appeal extends to adults who continue to collect them. “They are a force to be reckoned with,” said Patricia Hogan, curator at The Strong museum, which houses the Toy Hall of Fame. More than 20 lines of “Star Wars” figures have launched, propelling the film

series’ merchandise sales to $20 billion over the past 35 years. The action figures were first made by Kenner, which was bought by Tonka and later Hasbro. The toys beat out plastic green army men, the board game Clue, the FisherPrice Corn Popper, Lite-Brite, the Magic 8 Ball, the pogo stick, sidewalk chalk, the electronic game Simon, the tea set and Twister. Officials at the Toy Hall of Fame say anyone can nominate a toy and thousands of suggestions come in every year. An internal committee of curators, educators and historians chooses the finalists and then a national selection committee votes for the winners. To date, 49 toys have made the cut. They range from classics, like Play-Doh and Slinky, to the less obvious, like the stick and cardboard box. Longevity is a key criterion for getting into the 14-year-old hall. Each toy must be widely recognized, foster learning, creativity or discovery through play, and endure in popularity over generations. “Play is an essential activity, critical to learning and to human development,” said Christopher Bensch, The Strong’s vice president of collections. “Play is also a window into understanding American culture.”

VICTORIA AROCHO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Star Wars” action figures Darth Vader, right, and Ben (Obi-Wan) Kenobi, left, are displayed with Princess Leia Organa.

Religious Services

UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CHURCH on campus at 4th & Daniel Sunday Worship at 11am

a church for students, where students lead and serve !""#$"%"&&&'''()*+,-./0,10(*23 !"4-0484!"

University Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod A Congregat ion of St udents in the Hear t of Campus Life Divine Services

Be Someone’s Personal Santa Get ready to donate beginning November 26! Families from Crisis Nursery in Champaign and Parent Wonders in Rantoul need your help to make their holidays happy.

Stay tuned to WPGU for details

Su nday 10 : 30 a m 604 E. Chalmers 344-1558

Worship |9:30am| Education & Seminars |10:45am| 602 W Green St, Urbana !!!"#$%&'(%)&*%+,-,".%/ Find us on Facebook


1B Friday November 16, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Griffey, Illinois travel to Maui for Invitational put some things in perspective for our guys.” Tyler Griffey has his idiosynThe business side of the trip crasies. He curated his own blog for Illinois (2-0), before even during his freshman year at Illi- the Maui Invitational, begins nois. His fandom for the St. Louis Friday night against Hawaii. Cardinals is unparalleled. The Warriors have raced out This week, in the days leading to a 3-0 record after wins over up to Illinois’s jaunt to the Pacific inferior competition in MaryOcean for an away game against land-Eastern Shore, ArkansasHawaii on Friday night and Pine Bluff and Houston Baptist. the Maui Invitational, Griffey Hawaii center Vander Joaquim let slip another one of his idio- leads the team in points at 15.3 syncrasies — he keeps track of per game and rebounds at seven every state in which he’s scored a per game, and Groce said that basket in a game. Barring injury Joaquim reminded him of Indior any other unforeseen circum- ana Pacers forward David West, stance, Hawaii will be No. 37. whom Groce coached as an assis“He’s traveled more than any- tant at Xavier. one,” Illinois head coach John “I had a chance to see him on Groce joked. fi lm last year,” “ That’s one Groce said. thing I learned “ Watch i ng about him this him, he has a summer. My chance to play for a long time wife is jealprofessionally ous of Griff Illinois Hawaii with the way because she (2-0) (3-0) likes to travel.” he operates T he s a nd around the Friday, 11:30 p.m. and the surf of basket with Honolulu Hawaii might his feel and Illinois’ matchup with Hawaii isthe be the Illihis footwork Illini’s final tune-up before the Maui and his skills.” nois basketball Invitational. team’s environHawaii runs ment for the an up-tempo next week, but everyone from offense comparable to Illinois’s Groce on down maintained that system, which Groce said could the road trip is about business. challenge the Illini’s transiThat mindset started in Mon- tion defense, a weakness Groce day night’s 89-64 blowout vic- has identified on his squad two tory over St. Francis at home, games into the season. where the Illini bypassed lookThe Hawaii game marks the ing ahead to the road trip and fi rst road game under Groce’s soundly thumped the Terriers. tenure at Illinois. The head coach Groce praised his seniors and did not give any indication that captains for keeping the focus his team would be rattled by a on the St. Francis game and not road atmosphere, but said that the extraneous distractions that the team needed some familiaraccompany looming road trips. ity with the new coaches’ schedThe team hopped on a bus to ule for road games. Chicago directly after Monday Griffey is excited to hit the night’s tilt and flew to Hawaii road once again, and summed on Tuesday morning. The Illini up how the week on the islands will have ample time at the beach of Hawaii will fit into the frameover the course of the next week, work of the season. but Groce planned a special vis“We’ll see where we’re at as a it for the team to Pearl Harbor, team,” Griffey said. coinciding with Veteran’s Day. “We went there (Wednesday) Thomas can be reached at bruch2@ morning,” Groce said. “It really dailyillini.com and @ThomasBruch.

Volleyball hopes to avenge loss to Michigan Illinois has to win final 4 games to qualify for NCAAs

BY THOMAS BRUCH STAFF WRITER

BY ELIOT SILL STAFF WRITER

at

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Tyler Griffey (42) shoots against St. Francis Monday night at Assembly Hall. Griffey hopes to make Hawaii the 37th state he’s scored a basket in.

The last time Illinois volleyball played Michigan and Michigan State, things were much, much different. Entering that week, Alexis Viliunas was still a redshirt, Illinois was still ranked and still .500. A 3-0 loss to Michigan remains one of the season’s low points. “I think in games like that especially, there was a lot of errors that none of us have ever made, like in our whole careers,” redshirt freshman Jocelynn Birks said. “So it’s just like, ‘That’s weird, why did I do that?’” That game pre-empted a switch at setter. Later that weekend, the freshman Viliunas paced Illinois to a five-set victory. Since that weekend, Illinois has gone 2-6 and is now 11-15. Though its record might suggest otherwise, head coach Kevin Hambly has seen his team improve in the past month. “There was a lot of big things we were still working on the fi rst half of the Big Ten. I think now we’re working on a lot of small things and details,” Hambly said. “So I think we’re better, but we still need to learn how to close.” The lack of closing execution was prevalent in last Saturday’s loss to Ohio State, as Illinois lost the third set after being tied 23-23 and the fi fth after leading 14-13. The Illini worked on closing games in practice this week. Hambly said the team worked similarly to how a football team would practice a two-minute drill. But ultimately, libero Jennifer Beltran said, it will take something else in

See VOLLEYBALL, Page 2B

Immekus aims for perfection when kicking Kickers ‘only have one shot to be out there’ BY SEAN HAMMOND STAFF WRITER

BRENTON TSE DAILY ILLINI

Nicole Breece (11) plays in Illinois’ dramatic 3-2 win over Michigan State. The Illini will face the North Carolina Tar Heels on Friday.

Soccer looks to kick Rayfield’s alma mater, UNC, out of tournament freshman Nicole Breece said. “It’s not like any other day you For the second year in a row, are going to go play a top-notch the Illinois women’s soccer team like them, who has made a team will be fighting for a spot name for themselves with their in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA titles, but I think the whole team tournament. will have good energy. It’s the After defeating Missouri second round of NCAAs and the 3-0 in penalty kicks, the Illini next win will push us that much earned a bid to the second round further along.” of the tournament against North Illinois has won five of its past Carolina. six matches, including handThe Tar Heels are the No. ing Penn State its first confer2 seed in the tournament and ence loss of the season durwere victoriing the second round of the ous 2-0 in the opening round Big Ten Touragainst Big nament. Two of South Conferthe wins were ence champion earned after Radford. They Illinois North Carolina penalty kick (11-5-2, ACC outshot the (10-8-4, Big Ten shoot-outs. 6-4-1) 6-3-1) In the fi rst Highlanders round of the 29-3 and had Friday, 5 p.m. a 13-0 edge in NCAA tourChapel Hill, N.C. corner kicks. nament, the Illinois and North Carolina played Tigers outshot North Carolieach other in the 2008 NCAA na has won 20 the Illini 28-19 Tournament, with the Tar Heels of the previand had a coradvancing 3-0. ner kick advanous 30 NCAA Championships, tage of 9-3. Illithough it has shown vulnerabili- nois goal keeper Steph Panozzo ty the past two seasons, losing in made the win possible, making the third round to Notre Dame seven saves during regulation 4-1 and UCF in a 5-4 penalty play and an additional two durkick battle. ing the penalty kick shootout. “UNC is a huge team, and it’s a big game to get psyched up for,” See SOCCER, Page 2B BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

at

The extra point is the most taken-for-granted point in all of sports. But it wasn’t for Nick Immekus on Sept. 19, 2008 . In front of the home crowd on a Friday night, Immekus watched his Wheaton Warrenville South High School teammates drive the length of the field for a touchdown to cut Glenbard North’s lead to 14-13 with less than five minutes remaining. Immekus, a junior, trotted onto the field to attempt the point after. His kick was blocked. Immekus walked back to the sideline amid a hushed crowd. Glenbard North and quarterback Evan Watkins, a future Northwestern Wildcat , retained possession with the lead. Immekus watched from the bench along with Tigers backup quarterback Reilly O’Toole as the Wheaton Warrenville South defense came up with a stop, forcing Glenbard North to punt. The Tigers took over with just under a minute left and drove 48 yards to pull within field goal range with 1.9 seconds on the clock. Immekus had a second chance. Only this time it was more than 45 yards from the goal post. Immekus promptly walked onto the field and knocked the ball through the uprights, giving his undefeated Tigers a 16-14 victory. “That was the turning point of my kicking career,” Immekus said. “I put it through, and I was like, ‘All right, maybe I can do something with this.’” And Immekus has done something with his abilities. He’s now a third-year sophomore kicker for the Illinois football team, sharing duties with redshirt freshman Taylor Zalewski . O’Toole, who now backs up Nathan Scheelhaase as quarterback for the Illini , remembers Immekus’ gamewinning kick. “That was crazy,” O’Toole said. “I was a spectator the whole time, played on the JV team. That was a fun game. It was a big game, and it was pretty much a miraculous win.” It wasn’t Immekus’ only big kick during high school. One year later, with O’Toole at the

CHONG JIANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Nick Immekus kicks a field goal, scoring Illinois’ only three points during the game against Minnesota held at Memorial Stadium on Saturday. Immekus will spend an hour and a half working on kicks each practice. helm of the offense, the Tigers won the state championship over Glenbard West in double overtime, with Immekus hitting a 7A championship game-record 47-yard field goal. In their fi rst years at Illinois, Immekus and Zalewski did little except spectate. But there was no one better to watch and learn from than Derek Dimke, the most accurate kicker in Illinois history. Dimke, a fi nalist for the Lou Groza Award for the best kicker in the nation his junior year, fi nished his career at Illinois 39-for46 on field goal attempts and a perfect 89-for-89 on extra point attempts. “He was a great role model, great mentor,” Immekus said. “He helped me out with a lot of things. I feel like the biggest thing is the mental aspect of the game because to be a kicker, you only have one shot to be out there. The mental part of it has to be top-notch.” In April, Dimke was signed by the Detroit Lions as an undrafted free agent. His stay with the

Lions was short. The team cut him before the regular season, but it didn’t come as much of a surprise because the Lions have one of the most experienced NFL kickers in Jason Hanson. In the absence of Dimke, Immekus and Zalewski have fi nally been given a chance to prove themselves. Immekus won placekicking duties coming out of Camp Rantoul , but a leg injury against Charleston Southern sidelined him for five games. With the Illinois offense as stagnant as it has been in 2012, neither kicker has had many opportunities. In a 45-0 loss to Michigan on Oct. 13 , Zalewski was needed for just one kickoff. “It is what it is,” Zalewski said. “You have to be ready to get on the field. You’ve got to stay into the game. It’s still great being out there.” Since returning from Lions training camp, Dimke, who is from Rockford, Ill., has been staying in the Champaign area. When Illinois had its bye week following the loss to Michigan,

Immekus and Zalewski had a chance to work out with Dimke. For the kickers, football practice consists of exactly what one would guess: kicking. Zalewski said the kickers will spend as much as an hour and a half each day just working on their kicking. The Monday after the Michigan game, Immekus and Zalewski spent two full hours working with Dimke. “We worked on our form,” Zalewski said. “A lot of it is swing-trough’s without the ball and shorter kicks from the sidelines, doing sharp angles and stuff. A lot of it’s the technical stuff.” Immekus and Zalewski got their start, like most kickers, in soccer. At 6-feet, 220 pounds, Immekus certainly looks like he was built for football. “I was a bigger guy in soccer, bigger than a lot of the other kids,” he said. “So it was hard for me to keep up. All my best friends from middle school played football, so I wanted to go out and play with them.”


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, November 16, 2012

Illini will be short 4 players over weekend due to brawl

Swimmers rest for meet at Northwestern

BY STEPHEN BOURBON

BY J.J. WILSON

STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

As if playing on the road against the No. 3 team in the country wasn’t hard enough. The Illinois hockey team will hit the road to Ohio to take on the Bobcats shorthanded this weekend. After a brawl in Saturday’s contest against Lindenwood, three Illini players were given one-game suspensions, while a fourth, Kent Kovlasky, was given a two-game ban. Forwards John Olen, Nick Stuercke and Kevin Chowaniec must all sit JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI out Friday’s contest. Illini Mike Evans (7) controls the puck on Friday, November 9. The Illini beat Lindenwood. “There’s a lot more pressure,” defenseman Mike Evans said. “There’s a lot of pressure ing with right now. Bobcats forwards Brett “We’re going to have to step up our focus on our top line guys to produce when we’re Agnew and Jonathan Gulch were held out of on the defensive zone,” Fabbrini said. “I the 5-0 loss, but with the two forwards back don’t think we can go in there and expect to missing some key guys in the lineup.” Although scoring has nevin the lineup, Ohio returned score five or six goals and come away with er been a problem for the to form and were able to sal- a win, we need to play to win 2-1 or 3-2.” Illini (12-5-2) being withvage a split. Despite the suspensions, Illinois has been out the freshmen Olen and “I’m sure they remember strong on Friday nights all year long. The Chowaniec — two of the losing 5-0,” head coach Nick Illini have won on four consecutive Fridays, team’s top four scorers — Fabbrini said. “I expect and six of their past seven on the year, yet presents a challenge for them to try and fi ll the net Illinois has lost three straight Saturdays Illinois Ohio the Illinois forwards. That against us and try and bury and four of its past five Saturday matchups. (12-5-2) (13-2-1) offense was on display just as many as they can.” “We play really strong on Friday nights,” With the offense missing Evans said. “I’m not too worried about two weeks ago on Nov. 2-3 Friday, 7:30 p.m., when these two teams faced in the lineup on Friday, Fab- the fact that we’re missing a few guys Saturday, 7:30 p.m. off at the Big Pond. brini said that extra empha- because I think we’re ready to step up to Bird Arena Illinois came out and sis needed to be put in the the challenge.” embarrassed the Bobcats Illinois will be without four players defensive zone, an area With a week off for Thanksgiving looming by a 5-0 margin in the fi rst Friday and one Saturday as a result of where the Illini have strug- next week, the Illini will have a whole week a brawl last weekend. game, before the Bobcats gled all year long. Even with to either celebrate or stew on their perforresponded in turn with a 3-1 the shutout against the Bob- mance this weekend. victory in the next game. cats on Nov. 2, Illinois is averaging 3.5 goals Ohio (13-2-1) faced a similar scenario in per game allowed against conference oppo- Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini. the team’s fi rst meeting that Illinois is deal- nents this year, parlaying to a 3-3 record. com and @steve_bourbon.

After a week full of rest and tapering, Illinois is bringing its top weapons to make an impression in this year’s Northwestern Invitational. Last year, the Illini fi nished second out of eight teams in the three-day invitational in Evanston, Ill., falling only to the unyielding Wildcats. Throughout the entire meet, Northwestern never relinquished its lead and fi nished with a near-200-point margin. Sitting at 1-2 and having already been defeated in a head-to-head matchup with the Wildcats, the Illini have their work cut out for them if they want to seize the win. “Obviously, we’re trying to go in and win,” head coach Sue Novitsky said. “We’re backing off (the swimmers) a little bit (in practice). Their legs are pretty tired from the last few weeks, which we defi nitely saw last Friday, so I want to see them a little bit fresh and see how they react to that.” Novitsky applied pressure to her underclass squad last week in the meet against Illinois State, but this week she said she is looking for adversity

Illini runners get ready for NCAA tourney

Selig says trade with Marlins, Blue Jays is currently under review

Hockey heads to Ohio for final series before Thanksgiving

at

seen himself compete among some of the best athletes in the For the second consecutive country, and it has been a snowseason, the Illinois men’s cross- ball effect for him. He is getting country team will send two run- out much more aggressively in ners to the NCAA Champion- each race and responding very ships. Illinois runners Hunter well to movements in the race, Mickow and Jannis Toepfer will be it near the fi nish line or in compete at the national meet on the middle of the pack. Hunter is among some very established Saturday in Louisville, Ky. “I am excited for both of company, and he doesn’t back them,” head coach Jake Stewart down from the other top runners said. “It’s the fi rst time the two he is up against.” of them will be running in the Toepfer, a fi rst-year runner national championship in cross- hailing from Bochum, Germacountry. The big concern this ny, has also experienced a signifiweek is just recovering as best cant amount of growth throughwe can from the regionals last out the season — growth that can Friday.” benefit him at the national meet. Stewart said the best way to “Coming from Europe, where recover is to back off on the the approach to long-distance intensity of r u n ni ng is the workouts quite differand of the hard ent from here miles during in the U.S., the practice Jannis defiweek. At this nitely has had an adjustment point in the season, recovperiod,” Stewery from week art said. “He is to week is the a quick learner, though. After bigger goal than advancing his fi rst meet NCAA Championships one’s strength of the season, Saturday, 10 a.m. and fitness, he he has gotten Louisville, K.y. said. better every T he o ne Saturday marks Hunter Mickow and week and is a aspect that very diligent Jannis Toepfer’s first appearance in gives the team and consistent the NCAA Championships. confidence is worker.” The sheer that both runners have the ability to run suc- volume of runners whom Toepcessfully at the national meet fer and Mickow will have to congiven the growth that both run- tend with on Saturday is another ners have undergone throughout challenge facing the duo. There the season. will be runners competing from Stewart spoke about the growth 31 different schools plus 39 othof Mickow, saying: “Hunter has er runners selected through the

BY JAY COHEN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY DAN ESCALONA STAFF WRITER

FOOTBALL FROM PAGE 1B friends from middle school played football, so I wanted to go out and play with them.” The recruiting process is not the same for kickers as for other positions. Kickers have fewer chances to show off their talents than other position players. Kicking camps play a large role in getting a kicker noticed by recruiters. Camps usually consist of anywhere from 100 to 200 high school attendees. They do field goal kicking and other types of kicking competitions, but everything is charted and every kicker

SOCCER FROM PAGE 1B The Illini will rely on momentum and pure passion to increase their offensive opportunities. “We’ve talked a lot about North Carolina and we’re just going to continue playing how we have been playing,” junior Allie Osoba said. “We gained a lot of momentum during the Big Ten Tournament, putting down a lot of big

BRENT HOFACKER THE DAILY ILLINI

Colin Mickow (106) runs during the Big Ten Championship at the Arboretum on Oct. 30, 2011. Mickow qualified for the NCAA tournament this year. qualification process and receiving at-large bids. “There will be close to 200 really talented runners on the course at nationals, making it that much more important to avoid falling behind too far at the start,” Toepfer said. “Right when the gun goes off, you need to start fast and make sure you’re at your best.” The familiarity between both runners and the ability to feed off each other’s movements in the race is what gives the team confidence heading into Saturday.

is rated. The best kickers names are given to college scouts. “I went to a few camps and was ranked pretty high coming out of them,” Zalewski said. “That’s when you start getting some phone calls and then you start thinking, ‘Maybe this will work.’” Zalewski doesn’t have any game-winners on his resume like Immekus. During his freshman year at Carl Sandburg High School he did hit a go-ahead field goal with 10 seconds left against Bolingbrook. But the ensuing kickoff was returned for a touchdown. Immekus said he has made fi eld goals from as far as 59 yards in practice, while Zalewski claimed to have

teams, and I think we are going to bring that into this weekend. We talked about playing with all of our passion and obviously we have to win for those seniors to keep playing.” North Carolina is best known for producing athletes such as Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly during the 1990’s, but 10 years before they arrived, Illinois head coach Janet Rayfield was also a member of the Tar Heels from 1979-82. She led North Caroli-

“The fact that we are used to running together and being pretty familiar with his running style is the biggest benefit of racing along with a teammate,” Mickow said. Mickow outlined his expectations for himself and the Toepfer, saying: “I expect the both of us to run a strong race and be named All-Americans. We’re confident and know we have the potential and the ability.”

Dan can be reached at descalo2@ dailyillini.com.

hit one from 65 or 66 yards. Immekus, who rooms with long snapper Zak Pedersen, said they all have a pretty good relationship. But he’s quick to clarify that they also hang out with guys on the team who “actually play.” And although they like to joke around, they know when it’s time to get down to business. “There’s a lot of competition,” Immekus said. “We’re all trying to push each other to become the best that we can be.” And at a perfect 6-for-6 on the season, the Illini kickers know how important the extra point can be.

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@ dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

na to the 1981 AIAW National Championship and a 23-0 record in the program’s third season. As a senior captain, Rayfield led the Tar Heels to their first ever NCAA women’s soccer championship. She is proud of the Illini team she will be bringing to her alma mater this weekend. “It’s always fun to go back and see how things have changed and see people that haven’t changed and people that are still there,” Rayfield said. “It’s a famil-

ROSEMONT, Ill. — Bud Selig was on hand when the Miami Marlins played their first regularseason game in their swanky new ballpark in April. The commissioner provided a glowing review of the $634 million project and boldly declared that opposition to the facility would fade away within five years. So far, it’s not looking so good for that last prediction. Selig said Thursday that he is examining the pending blockbuster trade that sends at least three of Miami’s best players to Toronto for a package of prospects just seven months after the Marlins moved into their new home, which was financed primarily with tax money. Speaking at the conclusion of the owners’ meetings, Selig said he also is aware of fan anger in South Florida but is going to do what’s in the best interests of the sport. “People have different views of that as to what you should do and how you should do it, but I think I’ve been able to come through all these situations, and the sport’s been stronger and better as a result,” he said, pointing to his recent experience with the Texas Rangers and Los Angeles Dodgers going through bankruptcy proceedings. “So when I say I have this matter under review and I’ve talked to a lot of our people and I’ve spent a lot of time here in between all the other meetings — this is a tough place to do it — that’s exactly what I mean. It is under review. I am aware of the anger, I am. I’m also aware that in Toronto they’re very happy.” The Blue Jays, who fi nished fourth in the loaded AL East last season, are bringing in All-Star shortstop Jose Reyes, left-hand-

VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE 1B addition to that practice to figure out how to fi nish games on top. “It’s an attitude. I feel like it’s just being really focused on those last points, just making sure we’re sticking to the game plan, how we prepared for it,” she said. There’s no room for error in figuring out how to close for the Illini, who need to win both games this weekend to remain eligible for the NCAA tournament. Hambly isn’t worrying about the pressure his team may be feeling. “We just address it and just deal

iar ground, and fun is not the right word. It is an honor to play against people that you respect and the coaches that you respect in this league, and there are a lot of them. Obviously, (North Carolina head coach) Anson (Dorrance) and what he has done in that program I have a ton of respect for.” Though Rayfield has previous knowledge of North Carolina’s playing style, both the game of soccer and the Tar Heels have progressed since she was last

to challenge the entire team. With three days dedicated to swimming, she said this will provide the swimmers with a good opportunity to not only rely on fast swims, but selfmanagement from session to session. “Most of them have swum these kinds of meets before, and a lot of them try to make it a little different because it’s college,” Novitsky said. “(We just have) to remind them that they know how to do this.” Freshman Lori Lynn said she is looking forward to being rested, feeling that she does much better even when she is a little tapered. While Lynn shares a common goal of wanting to drop time and reach fi nals in their events, sophomore Alison Meng has a goal in mind with a little more foresight. “My goal for the team is to have a lot more girls qualify for the national meet, which is the week following Thanksgiving break,” Meng said. “I truly think that a lot more girls can get the cuts because there are only eight of us right now that are going.”

J.J. can be reached at jjwilso2@ dailyillini.com.

er Mark Buehrle and right-hander Josh Johnson under the deal, which is contingent on physicals for the players. Selig also said there is money going from Miami to Toronto but did not offer any details and said the trade hadn’t been officially presented to his office yet. Reyes and Buehrle signed lucrative free-agent contracts with the Marlins last offseason, and Johnson has been Miami’s best pitcher when healthy. The Marlins get infielders Yunel Escobar and Adeiny Hechavarria, right-hander Henderson Alvarez and several top prospects, a nice haul but certainly not enough to satisfy a fan base that went through similar rebuilding after the franchise won the World Series in 1997 and 2003. “I’ve talked to two baseball people — I have a lot of people that I check with and talk to — who have, actually, an interesting view on the trade.” Selig said at an airport hotel just outside of Chicago. “They think that (Miami), in terms of young players, did very well. These are two independent baseball people. These are not chefs in these kitchens here. “So I want to think about all of it and I want to review everything. I want to be my usual painstaking, cautious, slow, conservative self in analyzing it. ... There’s a lot of variables here.” Paul Beeston, the president and CEO of the Blue Jays, rushed by a group of reporters as he left the owners’ meetings. Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria was seen in the lobby at the hotel but did not make himself available to media. Asked Thursday if it’s in the best interests of baseball for Loria to continue to own a franchise, Selig said he wasn’t going to comment any further other than saying the trade is under review.

with it,” he said. “They know what’s in front of ’em. We’re not hiding them from pressure situations, they’ve gotta go out and perform, and it’s like the playoffs.” Hambly said it’s different from the playoffs because they’re going to play the fi nal four games no matter what. But for the purposes of making the tournament, the reality for Illinois is that it must win or its season will end early. “A lot’s on the line now,” Beltran said. “We realize that, and we just know we have to work.”

Eliot can be reached at sill2@dailyillini. com and @EliotTweet.

there. However, there are a few things that have stayed the same, and Rayfield has prepared her team for the battle. “It’s not the kind of style that we played when I was there,” she said. “The game has progressed, players have progressed and the level of competition across the country has progressed. Certainly we are familiar with some of the players who were in Japan with the under-20 team, and in this day and age there aren’t

many teams that you don’t get to watch and see quite a bit of. It’s a style that’s high-paced and super-competitive, but a team that can also knock the ball around. I think they will be a team that will be conducive to us trying to play the way that we like to play. My prediction is that it is going to be a great college soccer match.”

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

3B

Friday, November 16, 2012

Bears’ Urlacher says he would lie about concussion BY ANDREW SELIGMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Brian Urlacher wasn’t backing down. Chicago’s star linebacker would still lie to cover up a concussion. Urlacher raised a few more eyebrows on Thursday when he reiterated what he told HBO earlier in the year, and it didn’t seem to matter to him that Bears quarterback Jay Cutler is recovering from that same injury. His stance remains the same. “Yeah,� he said when asked if he would lie to cover up a concussion. Coach Lovie Smith wasn’t quite sure how to respond to a question about Urlacher’s comment. “I don’t think players will cover up an injury, so that’s what I make of it,� Smith said. “I didn’t hear Brian say that, so I don’t know exactly what you’re talking about. I just know when Brian has been injured, when he hurt his knee he came out, and every other injury I assume he’s had he’s come out. That’s what I’m going with.� Urlacher acknowledged it would be tough to cover up a concussion while questioning whether newer helmets really were cutting down on such injuries, and he added that the NFL needs to do a better job protecting players from knee injuries. He said there are points in most games where a player is woozy from a hit, where “you’re like,

whoa, that was a good one.� But he also said: “I don’t know how you can lie these days with all the (stuff) they have to see who’s concussed and who’s not. I don’t know how they can tell in the first place. I think the helmets aren’t very good. I wear an old helmet and Lance (Briggs) wears an old helmet. We don’t get concussed. We have some pretty good collisions, we don’t get concussed. I think a lot of it has to do with the helmets. They’re saying they’re better but they must not be because people are getting more concussions now.� Urlacher said he suffered a concussion against Denver in 2003 but didn’t miss any games that season. “I’ve been lucky,� he said. Cutler wasn’t so fortunate on Sunday. The Bears believe he suffered his concussion when Houston’s Tim Dobbins nailed him with a helmet-to-helmet hit late in the first half that forced him to sit out the final two quarters of a loss to the Texans. His status for Monday’s game against San Francisco is in question, and if he’s not available, Jason Campbell figures to start in his place. That could leave both teams without their starting quarterbacks because the 49ers’ Alex Smith is also recovering from a concussion he suffered last week. Head injuries and the long-term effects are a hot-button issue in

NAM Y. HUH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher looks on from the sidelines during an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Chicago on Oct. 22. Urlacher said again Thursday that he would lie to cover up a concussion. With starting quarterback Jay Cutler recovering from a concussion suffered Sunday in a game against the Houston Texans, the Bears’ defensive star wasn’t backing off comments he made to HBO earlier this year. sports, particularly in the NFL. The league has cracked down on flagrant hits in recent years and toughened its guidelines for treating players with concussion symptoms. Cutler and Smith need to be cleared to return by their team physicians and independent neurological consultants. The issue has been getting plenty of attention this week in Chicago, but Urlacher would like to see the league focus more on the

knees. Specifically, he’d like to see cut blocks banned. “But that seems to be OK with the NFL so they’re not too concerned about safety, obviously,� he said. “They are concerned about long-term concussions, but immediately they’re not concerned about your knees or your ankles or anything like that. I think that should be an issue. Concussions are taking care of themselves. It’s a big deal now to everyone

difference.� Then, he acknowledged the long-term impact of head injuries. “That’s why you have to judge,� Urlacher said. “If you don’t want to play if you get concussed, then don’t play. It’s your career. It’s your life.� On the knee issue, defensive end Israel Idonije agreed “100 percent.� “We all know that, though,� he said. “It’s an offensive game.�

Cutler’s Monday Night status unknown following concussion

Bulls player takes stage at Goodman THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Chicago Bulls star Scottie Pippen will take the stage this holiday season in the Goodman Theatre’s “A Christmas Carol.� The theater said Thursday that the former NBA champion will appear in the Dec. 14 production with 7-year-old La’Ren Kimble from Make-A-Wish Illinois. La’Ren is from Rockford and suffers from kidney cancer. The Make-A-Wish Foundation says she loves acting and being in the limelight. The theater says Pippen and La’Ren will both have specially tailored costumes. Pippen says he hopes to make his co-star La’Ren and the cast proud. Pippen was a member of the Chicago Bulls when the franchise won six NBA championships in the 1990s. The Hall of Famer is now special adviser to the team’s president and chief operating officer.

because of all the older players coming back and saying they’re all messed up now. That’s definitely an issue, but I think the cut blocks need to be a big issue as well.� Isn’t there a big difference between a head injury and knee injury? “Huge,� Urlacher said. “Because a knee injury puts you out for a season, a concussion you may miss a game or two. Huge

49ers quarterback Alex Smith, who also suffered concussions last week. Lovie Smith gave mostly vague answers about Cutler. When asked if he expects his quarterback to practice on Friday, saying, “Wait till tomorrow and see.� He also left open the possibility of Cutler playing without practicing this week, assuming he gets cleared. But he wouldn’t say if the Bears would hold out their quarterback even if the doctors gave the OK to play. “I can’t wait for us to get to the point where Jay is ready to play and we’ll make all those decisions then,� Smith said. “First just (get him) ready to practice and then we’ll go to that next step.� Defensive tackle Henry Melton said Cutler “looks like the same old Jay.� When he’ll be able to play is another issue.

BY ANDREW SELIGMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NAM Y. HUH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) is helped up by teammates after he threw an illegal forward pass and was hit by Houston Texans linebacker Tim Dobbins on Sunday in Chicago. Dobbins was penalized for unnecessary roughness on the play. Cutler did not play the second half, and his status is in question.

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler missed practice on Thursday and his playing status remains in question because of a concussion. Coach Lovie Smith said Cutler continues to improve, but it’s not clear if he’ll be ready to play at San Francisco on Monday night. If Cutler can’t play, Jason Campbell will likely start. The Bears believe Cutler was injured on a helmet-to-helmet hit from Houston’s Tim Dobbins late in the second quarter of Sunday’s loss. He finished the half but sat out the final two quarters after showing symptoms in the locker room at the break. Cutler needs to be cleared by team physicians and independent neurological consultants before he can return. The same goes for teammate Shea McClellin and

FOR RENT

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

110 120 130 140 150 160

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Rentals

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

Apartments Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Campus Events

Community Events

Announcements

Classes

710 720 750

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830

Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

Important Information About Your Ad

9 "

7

(

!

5

9

4

"

"

6

!

8

9

7

7

5

6

4

8

(

4

9

7

8

!

5

9

4

5

6

"

(

6

7

(

"

8

!

8 5

"

6

6 (

"

7 5

6

! 8

7

4 "

!

8 6

(

9 !

"

9

4

(

5

7

(

8

9

5

"

5

(

9

7

4

8

6

!

8

7

9

!

4

7 6 4 ( 5 " ! 9 " 6 7 ! 8 5 4 9

6

"

8

5

6

4

(

7

7

6

8

5

"

7

6

!

(

(

9

!

4

!

4 5

9 !

8 "

! (

6 7

" 9

7 4

" 5 8

!

7

9

8

7

"

(

!

9 " 4 8

( 5 6 7

6 8 ! 7 9 (

!

4

5 7 6 9 ( "

8

6

9 " 5 ( 7 !

7

(

" ! 4 8 5 9

"

5

8 9 7 6 ! 4

(

!

7 5 8 4 " 6

(

5

6

4

"

4

8

4

6

!

4

5

9

5

8

9

7

6

(

9

8

(

"

7

"

6

8

5

7

!

!

9

!

!! 6

9

4 ( " ! 8 5

!

"

5

8

4

6

(

9

7

5 (

(

5

4

4

6

!)

8

4

7

"

(

5

(

5

7

6

!

(

9

8

7

5

(

"

6

!

8

4

5

5

8

" ! 9 4 ( 6

(

5

8 " 6 7 4 9

6

4

7 9 8 ! 5 "

!

"

7

9

4

!

5

(

"

4

(

5

9

6

8

7

9

7

!

(

6

8

(

!

6

(

8

!

5

! 4 6 9 7 "

9

(

4

5

9

8

6

7

"

4

!

6

5

9

(

!

7

4

8

"

9

"

6

8

6

5

7

9

(

!

4

9

(

8

5

4 6

7

"

5

(

8 !

6

8

"

4

!

(

7

9

8

6

5

!

4

7

"

4

6

(

!

9

8

9

!

"

5

"

6

7

!

"

8

(

5

7

6

6 4 9

8

!

(

9

5

(

7

4

5

8

5

( "

4

"

9

8

4

7

9

6

4

7

!

8

"

5

8

9 6

9

5

9

4

!

"

6

(

5

9

7

(

6

6

7

7

!

"

(

8

4

5 4 ! 6

7 8 4 5 "

8

4 6 ( ! 5 7

!

8

(

6 5 4 " 7

9 6

6

(

" 4 5

8

7

4

!

5

9

4

9

8

7

6

!

(

"

"

9

7

8

6

(

8

5

"

!

7

"

9

8

4 ( 6

5

5

!

7

9 " 8

8

(

8

!

" 9 5

(

!

9

4

5

6 7 (

6

5

4

"

6

7

"

8 4 !

!

9

7

4

6

(

7

5

(

8

8

9

6

(

!

4

!

"

7

!

"

6

5 8 9

5

4

8

(

9

7 ! 4

9 7 5 4 ( 6

"

8

9

!

5

7

6

4

(

4

7

6

8

"

!

(

9

5

7

(

4

5

"

6

"

9

!

8

"

9

www.ramshaw.com (

"

!(

4

"

8

"

9

" (

7 " 5 ( 4 6 8

7

!

9

9

(

6

8

7

!

4

"

!

9

5

6

"

4

8

7 5

9

(

5 " 4 8 ( 7 9 ! 6

6 7 ( 5 8 4 ! " 9

" 4 5 ! 6 9 7 ( 8

! 9 8 ( 7 " 6 5 4

8 ! " 6 4 ( 5 9 7

4 ( 9 7 5 ! 8 6 "

7 5 6 9 " 8 ( 4 !

!"#$%&'$()!)$$$$$$$$$$*+,-$.$$$$$$$/01223$

\eafp

(

4

5

"

6

"

8

*MMJOJ.FEJB$PNQBOZt"UUO#VTJOFTT%JSFDUPS 512 E Green St, Champaign, IL 61820

!

8

9

4

6

!

To be considered, email resumes to hr@illinimedia.com or mail to:

6

"

4

9

5

Plus many more at

K?< ;8@CP @CC@E@

skills and generally familiar with office equipment.

(

7

(

8

4

202 E. White St., C 1009 S. First St., C 54 E. John St., C

to work independently, the ability to prioritize and meet deadlines, excellent organizational and time management

9

7

5

7

9

Qualities required include superior attention to detail, ability

5

(

8

s

i\X[Ylq q

8

!

(

4

Now Leasing: Studio, 1-5 Bedrooms Bedroom

!

4

9

5

!

5

Hundreds of Apartments to Choose From! 3,4,5

6

"

7

The Best Selection Is Now!

4

6

9

217-742-6130

505 W. University Ave., Champaign

(

410

7

7

Furnished/Unfurnished

!

(

6

L Y E S

8

T I R E D

!

M E R E

"

I L O

O S E S

6

J O J O

P O R T O

(

I N R E M

C H A O S

8

S O E U R

A U P A I R

I P N R N B E S R O I P D E E F R L E A I N T R C A I O O U S U N T S T O E L R E

!

A L P H A

K I W I

"

K E R I

J E T S F L E W K B R O O R R W A D O N E S C E R T O A G E P L S T A L S U P O H N S N A L H O V I A N E T W

9

A S A P

A P O L O G I A S

5

T I C S

P A I R O F E A R R I N G S

"

U N D A M

7

H O O H A

!"##$%#&'$&()$*&'#"$$ +,-.$'"&.%$+/01-+ !"#$%"&'(")"&*%+#*,( -./(0+,*(%"1#(2&3"#"4(1!( /56789:7-96;(<&( /5679:57==:.( *0<(3+$&<<%,( ">?@A?BAC(D?EF?GH(/.58( IFGE@JKCL(MG(FENFGE@JKCL(( ,COFGCL(BF@AL@EPJ(Q@RK(CAC>?RMGJ(( I@>C(A?FELGH(GMMSJ( 2ELCGPGMFEL(?EL(OM>CGCL(T?GU@EP( !@S@RCL(NGCC(T?GU@EP( A?ELS?GU7?TRJVJBOPAMB?AWECR(( QQQWA?ELS?GURML?HWOMS(

4

W O K S

!""#$#%&'()*+#, !"#$$%&$'#(()*%+%&,-"%,.,#-)$/-% ,0,12,&2$%3(#%2$,4$%56764-%89+:;% <$0$4%=#(6.%>#(.$#-?%% @,/,7$)$/-;%% 8+AB::ABCCD9%

9

)45%+467869:;%+<=;>?@%+A=B%9C% ;<D%6EE58>9;:%688A9E6>9<;C%F<?G% % 36?>5;H5?C% %% $?5I9<=C%5J85?95;E5%6%8A=C%B=>%;<>% ?5K=9?5HL% % '88A@%9;%85?C<;%M67NO87G%% PQPP%R<=>4%$?<C85E>%'I5;=5S% +467869:;%-#%

!"#$%&'()*+&(*,*&%-.$%/ !"#"$"%&'())*+",-(./"-.,-(.+"0122" 2345.'&'"678"9:5..&;<"95=;&">?+" 0122"@AB:"C4&&'"D.E&(.&E+"0122" F5E&(+"@&5E"5.'"E(5<:"(&*)G5;H""I,,J <E(&&E"45(KA.B+"A.'))(";5-.'(L+"4));+" E&..A<"M)-(EH"I."N"O>P"=-<"()-E&<H"" C*5;;"4&E"IQH"OJ0"RJSTU7+"C5E"!7JSH" $!7V"FH"F:AE&"CE(&&E"" !"#$%&'(%)"*+#,-&./#0& $!WJUSRJUW!U" " XXXH*L545(E*&.E:)*&HM)*"

!"#$%&'()*#%+',*"%-./0 !"#$%&''(")'*+",-./" 0"#$%&''(1",22/" 3"#$%&''(1",.2/" 4"#$%&''(1",!!55" -6!5"#$%&''("7'81$1"" *&'(",32/9:$%&''(" ;'($"8+<=<+<$1>"&$('%$=$%" 3-26--0-"

6

!"#$%&'()"*% )!"%+!',$'-.(% +/0()12%+#03

410

410 APARTMENTS

Furnished/Unfurnished

(

!"#$%&'%(")*%"%+,--*.*#/*0% 1*#2%34'.$%5,'%$'6% 7.'84*$%9,/)%:';*.3% <=>?%@A%(,/4,;"#%BC*A% D.5"#"%EFG%H<I><%

Furnished/Unfurnished

410 APARTMENTS

7

!"#$%&'()*'#$!*+$(,$*--#.'(+/$ $*..&(-*'(0+,$102$3*2'$!()#$,*&#,$ $*,,0-(*'#,$4('"$0.#+$ $*5*(&*6(&('7$(+-&89(+/$9*7,:$ ;..&7$(+$.#2,0+$*'$ !"#$#!%&!'()*+,-./0!

Furnished/Unfurnished

!

Qualified candidates: tZFBSTPGFYQFSJFODFXJUI(-NBJOUFOBODFBOE mOBODJBMTUBUFNFOUQSFQBSBUJPO t1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFVTJOH(SFBU1MBJOT%ZOBNJDT PSTJNJMBSBDDPVOUJOHTPGUXBSFJTQSFGFSSFECVUOPU SFRVJSFE t"TTPDJBUFTEFHSFFPSEJQMPNBDFSUJmDBUFJO "DDPVOUJOHPS#VTJOFTT"ENJOJTUSBUJPO BQMVT t&YQFSJFODFDBOTVCTUJUVUF t.VTUCFGBNJMJBSXJUI.JDSPTPGU0GmDF

APARTMENTS

!"#$%&"'()*#"!+,*-! "#$%! &'()*+! ,#-*(.! /**%*%! $/! 0(1#/#2! 3445! 6788!9:!;:$/2!<=$>-!:/!&'()*+.2

!"#$%"&'(!&$%"&()""*"*+ !"#$%&'(')*%+",&%-'.$%/&",)(%% 0/12,34%5/)6%6"%$/&)%3"1$%$76&/%% 0/384%98$%:/';+%<;;')'%'3%;"".')*%="&% /%($;'#$&+%(&'#$&%="&%5$()$3(/+% 1"&)')*3%36/&6')*%/6%>?%98$&$%@';;%% -$%"68$&%"22"&6,)'6'$3%6"%@"&.%% 1"&$%8",&3%/3%@$;;A%<=%')6$&$36$(% %$1/';%0'&0,;/6'")B';;')'1$('/A0"1A%

APARTMENTS

rentals

8

The bookkeeper will be responsible for, payroll tax return preparation, bank reconciliations, and sales tax returns. Duties also include but are not limited to A/R, A/P, cash management, and managing staff of assistants.

Full/Part time

FOR RENT

4

IMMEDIATE POSITION available for a full-time paraprofessional/bookkeeper

030

5

010

Part time

020 HELP WANTED

6

Full time

Full time

010 HELP WANTED

9

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

4

employment

8

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

"

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Services

5

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

*"%+"##%*,'+,%'-%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(5 2.%+"8.2&"9%:7",%;"3'((",0%2&%&'%<'/;%-;2",0.4 %<'/;."#-%)%+"8.2&">%$#)3"%)%#2,*%&'%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'( &%'/&%&7"%./0'*/.%&7",%$;2,&%&7"(%&+23"%),0%?2@"%',"%&'%',"%'-%<'/;%-;2",0.4 3A/)2,&),3".>%-;2",0.%),0%&")(()&".%)8'/&%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(4 '%()*"%&72.%.2&"%+"##%*,'+,45

Employment

`egi`ek%fec`e\% pflieldY\ife\jfliZ\%


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, November 16, 2012

420 APARTMENTS

!"#$%&'($)*+,!"#$%&'()*"+&),-$./& %,0/1,"+$&& 2&34567789&:&3;<=9&(>?>@<9&AB2CC& D>6EF@=459&G;HH&:CBI& ';8J>@&3>@9&14@@4H&*;6K9&/,& *$%+9& &LLL9HFEM7HE@=F64J67J9M78& :BNOIPQOBPPQ& !"#$%&'($)*+,!"#$%&'()*"+&),-$./& %,0/1,"+$&& 2&34567789&:&3;<=9&>??@@&/,09& ';8ABC&3BC9&14CC4D&*;6E9&/,& *$%+9& &FFF9DGHI7DHC=G64A67A9I78& :?JK2LMK?LLM&

420 APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

Furnished

Furnished

1107 S. Sign Fourth

! '&%!)*!+,-./$-0!1*! ! '&'!)*!234560!1*!! ! '&'!7!8#-,5$0!9*! ! :&:!)*!;#<0!9*! ! :&=!)*!+/.34>0!9*! ! %&(!)*!"/3?>@0!9*! ! (''!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! %&=!)*!),A>@0!9*! ! B&=!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! -./0!B&B!7*!C@,>50!9* ! 1112343*56*75+87,2963& ! %'DE((DE::=%!

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

1 BR-CAMPUS-JAN 2013 503 E. Springfield, C. Newer building, C/A, D/W Washer/Dryer, $795 www.ppmrent.com 351-1800 !"#$%#&%'(%#)'(*+,+-.+/(0120( 3/(4!56!/7(28(0129: !""#$%&$'()*+,-$.&-$/*012+345-$67 8450((9+-$!$8:,3-$52+3;:+340-$$ 52+<(+:=-$<:0>21?$:@:2=:8=4-$=:*150A$ 0((9$21$8*2=521?$BC""D9(1,3&$$ 6!C7EF#7!G6H$$ ;;;&+92,3:<:0,941,+7)*&)(9$

!"#$%"#%"&"'$()#$%$*"$%+,#-$%"%$.'/)01

PERKS GALORE!

!"#"$"%&'(&)*+,

theuniversity

group

www.gregory-towers.com 217-352-3182

430 PARKING / STORAGE 570

Unfurnished

a 4 or 5 bedroom lease!

! "#$$!%&'(! !

!"#$%&''(" ('%$&)" *'+),'-.$

420 APARTMENTS

!"#$%&"%'"()$%*%+,-./#$($,00 1,"234(%4$5)-.6%)75,/4-.6%84$5.% 575,&#$.&)%5&%7,-8$)%("2944%:$% &;5./<24%<",00

Great location. 2 blocks from main quad. Leather furniture, hardwood floors, & flat screen TV. Loft style 4 and 5 bedrooms, each with 2 full bathrooms. Great location! Just across from the U of I Armory.

*+,-./!"#$!"%&!"$'()*+, -./"01234"52"3678'9!"" /.(:.//;:.(!"93:/.3/9" 0"%(12334 <2=.>2'9/"?+,@*" 5"%(12334 A2B5"<2=.>2'9/"?++**" 5"%(12334 <2=.>2'9/"?C**" ===D1:.321.9>:;/8;28D327" )+EF,CGF+CCG"

Illini Union 3 1/2 Blocks Mech. Eng. 3 Blocks

Leasing for Fall 2013 Engineering Campus Close In Urbana Locations

1,2,3&4 BEDROOMS

“Your Friends Are Already Here”

Digital Comp. Lab, Grainger, Siebel 2 1/2 Blocks

SUBLETS

www.BaileyApartments.com

440

Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

217-344-3008

!"#$%&'()*+$&,*%+'-".(/+&0&,-1%)-+ )/2+")-($+3"*"'-+45678+!%9/).+&).+ 3,1/,:8+;)+44+#"'$()%8+<=77>1/)-?8++ @/)-&9-+.0"$A4B($$()/('8%."8+

HOUSES FOR RENT

510

! "#$$!%&'( ! "#$!%&'()*(! ! +,-!#!+,"!.!/01'2! ! "34!#!"35!.!6789&! ! +3+!:!;8<97! ! =0)>2!<')?!/)@*9A!B1'2&9C! ! )))*+,+-./-0.1203*4/+ ++4#DDE-!

1mb

7,-+82+91 :/0.1/2314 ;$<

! ! "#$%&&' ( ) "#$%&&'*)"+,- ./0,1 ! 234 56+, 78%##/ 9:; <+%$=&&$ 56&&%1; ! 7>+80&?1 @&&'1 (ABAA6&A1A#A,A1A;A"A+AA6A8A&A/AC ! 5?%/01-#$; 2+?/$%C; D/,#%/#, D/86?$#$ ! B&E#%#$ F+%G0/H; 7GC60H-,1

!"#$%&'()

!"#$%&'()*+*,$)*-*.()#//0*'/"&(&* /$*1,02"&*$(,#*34/"5'4/$*,$)* 3%64'*,$)*7'%/*,$)*8%$1/9$:* !,99*;<=>?;<=+* @,99*>-A?=+<B*

Smith Apartments 217‐384‐1925

'

$365

Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

*$+',-../) 508 S. First 108 W. Charles 104 E. John 103 E. Healey 105 S. Fourth 108 1/2 E. Daniel 310 E. Clark 106 E. Armory 308 E. Armory 312 E. White 507 S. Elm, C.

1$+',-../) 1103 S. Euclid 807 S. Locust 208/210 E. White 312 E. White 306 E. Armory

Call for an appointment

351­1767

www.johnsonrentals.com rentals@jrpm.comcastbiz.net

2$+',-../) 308 E. Armory 1103 S. Euclid 807 S. Locust 208/210 E. White 306 E. Armory 3$+',-../) 1103 S. Euclid 306 E. Armory 4.5)') 509 S. Elm, C. 314 E. White 106 1/2 E. Armory 106 E. Armory 108 E. Daniel

-

7

9

8

8 ;

(

7

7

8

217-742-6132 Affordable Campus Studio Apartments 1005 S. First Street, Champaign located on the west side of campus on the 22 Illini, Yellow and Gold bus lines. These studio apartments are nicely furnished and affordably priced. Laundry facility in building.

ramshaw.com

'

!

!"#$%&'

( '

9

<

7

T U N E I N; EVERYDAY

9

8

<

:

'

' : 7

(

-

-

Need to sublet your

Sudoku :

;

7

:

!217­337­8337

Call DI Classifieds

!"#$$%&

9

7

' :

: '

;

'

(

7

( <

<

8

;

;

9

:

9

9 -

9

8

7

< 7

- 8 apartment?

9

8

(

8

<

-

(

( 8

;

7

:

-

;

The Weiner Companies, Ltd. 384-8001 www.weinercompanies.com

:

7

'

'

$450/person ($1,800 mo.) 705 W. Main, U Free Heat, Free Water, Free Pkg, Free Trash, Free Electric, Hardwood Floors, A/C, Laundry

"#$%&'$!(!)*++$! ! ,-.!(!/.#-+! ! 01-!(!23$#+'! ! 435!(!6&.$! ! 7-.!(!8'3*5! ! 90:;<<:;==,9! ! >>>?@.@A*&A+*-#+1?%&@!

9

<

8

-

(

7

PARKING / STORAGE 570

;

;

' Only8one available, Furnished : 4BR & 2BA -

9

Leasing for January!

8

7

' (

: Best Bargain Near Campus

:

7 9

Sign a 4 Bedroom apartment by Thanksgiving and take $100 off your monthly rent

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or to set up an appointment call 217.328.3770

:

:

< Now Leasing!

9

-

505 W. University Ave., Champaign

0$+',-../) 104 E. John 105 S. Fourth 208/210 E. White 308 E. Armory 312 E. White 1103 S. Euclid

-

-

H.,;"!

Fall 2013 Apartments

Happy Fall '()&*+,&-.'.&&&&&&&&&&/012&3&&&&&&&!4566%&

www.smithapartments‐cu.com

Property Management

!"#$%&'()%% The Daily Illini *+*),-.#, YOUR SOURCE. /",0%,0.%% %%%%$*"1&%"11"#" *+*),-.#, 2.*)30

!"#$%#&'()*+#,-./(#-&0.

!"#$"#%&'#(#)*'+,,-#.,/0*01## 2*-,'*3*'1#4/+&506*'1#4%33#789!1## 79:;::<;78=$#

NOW RENTING FOR 2013­2014 SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING NOW!

Johnson Rentals

Check out the Classified Section of the Daily Illini

WPGU 107.1

!"#$%$&'()*+$, !"#$%&'($"")*%+%,-+%&./0%0"#1'% .2.34.&4'%5"$%4'.1'%6#7#1/%+8,9:% ;'2'1%<$"#=%>$"='$/?%% @.A.7')'A/:%% +,BC9BBCDDE8%

!"#$%&&$'%(& )))*+,-./0.1/2314*506

Most apt. furnished, parking available, laundry available

\m\ipk_lij[Xp

!"#$$%&'($)(#%"*%""%+%)!,-

!"#$%&'()*%$'+*%&,& !"#$"#%&#'()*++,#+-#./,012## 345!#0(*#'()*++,6# 78%59#4$5:$$8$#

3 Bedroom Apartments E".$<&$C*?2*D,$'&

Need extra cash?

C L A S S I F I E D S

!"#$%&'()$*+,-(./0(12$$ 3$4563$7,()-&&.$,+,-(./0($8&-$$ 1'79/($1+-:0;<1'../-$=>3?2$$ @'-0:1)/A2$BC3C<.&0()2$$ .D/99EF=>>GH)&(.,:92I&.$

"''% =* >+38? </@+8+

H.,."" $890 $950 $685-745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775

,#$&'8)%#)3"#$%;)>?$.'7.7)@3&";) @2.37.)6322A%.?%)@352)3'")!''.))

Looking for a job?

!"#$%&&'()*+,+-&.%(&*+&*/01%-*+&* 2-34*56*708(*!&6*90-*!,-'()*:;<26* =>;;?.0(&86*@0(&+A&* B+&C+.6D+,00-6<:2E).+'$6A0.6*

!"#$%"&"'(%)**+",*-.(."" *$"/#+0-.1"2-334"5-)$6.,(%1"" 23#7"./)(($"89.:";!<&=)**+"" >?@A>B?AC?&@" ./,$(6%()A0)*0()76(.1/*+"

!"#$%&'(%&') 104 E. John 312 E. White 1103 S. Euclid

Roysebrinkmeyer.com Like us on Facebook!

!"#$%&#'()*&+%,-#%,.+)/)0.122),.3+) 4#5+)6#'6.+'7)37)4#5)8.%)%#)9'#:) 57;;;6+.3%&<.=).'.+8.%&6)6#5$2.))

BBC/CDE/FFCG)

!"#$ %&'#(#)$ *(+,,,

2 Bedroom !;$<&$'(=>?9*8,$'&$@<%A !B$<&$C*?2*D,$'& E".$<&$C*?2*D,$'& !..$%&$'()*+(,$'& /"6$%&$012)3(124,$5& .""6$0&$72+)81,$'& .""F$%&$'>=*G,$5& ."."$%&$'>=*G,$5& .".E$%&$'>=*G,$5&

850

Adoption & Egg Donation

LISTEN TO THE FACTS.

$490-540 $510 $660 H!.!,$H!/!

APARTMENT HUNTING ???

ADOPTION

!"#$%&$'()*+,-$./0$123$4$#&#!$25$4$6$4$7

1 Bedroom !"#$-$!..$%&$'()*+(,$'& /."$%&$012)3(124,$5& .""6$0&$72+)81,$'& .."/$0&$09+24:,$'&

!

!"#$%&'(%&&) !"#$%&'#(#')&%(%&*$(+##,(&--.(

TenantUnion.illinois.edu

!"#$%&'()&'(*&+,$#-''%&.,/#0

Efficiency !"#$%&$'()*+(,$'&

!"#$%%&'(#)*)++,-$.*/+"*)+$.01&"2*"&0 )#1-+$%3-45*6*)+7&*1+*.+*1+*8)(9%5*:;<0 =>?0:@:?*

A program of the Office of the Dean of Students

!!!"##$%&'(")*$+++ +,-."/0-"-122

!"#$###% &'()*+,'-% ./%&0-12

830

TENANT UNION

Do You Want Close?

1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms on campus

!"#$!"%&'(&)*+,-./&0( !"#$%&'((('"))*+,-.'*)/#,*-#01'2'3'4' 5*6+""7'898+&7*-&%')"+':;2<=' >"7*'$-,&%'9*&')+,*-6?0='>#@*6$?*'8-' 899",-&7*-&'&"680A' :2BC<DBC:;;E'FFF=&+,#"$-&07.=#"7'

!"##$%&'())'(*))'$+,$-(."/#$$ !"#$%&&"'(!&)"$$"*"+(!"%,#-+./-.. &01+"/.2-03.-4*.5677.&8-0/-0/9.

LEASE REVIEWS

!"#$%&'())&"*%&"#& )+,-(./&0"#*),)&1"2& /,.)(#3&#"45

!"#$%&$'()*+$%+&,$!"#"$"%&'())*"+,(-./0&'"121(3*&-3/" +)("456!7"8)"2&3/7"9:0&',;&"3)"/&&" 30&*"%&+)(&"30&<=(&">)-&?"" 46@A!B@A455C"DDD73(.:),-3<*>7:)*"

MISCELLANEOUS

900

LANDLORD COMPLAINT RECORDS

211 W SPRINGFIELD AVE CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820 | 217.352.1129

!!!"#$"%&'()

SHOUT OUTS

announcements

G E T T H E FA C T S

%%%%%%

Available Fall 2013: 4BR Loft $1620 GREGORY 5BR Loft $1780 TOWERS

every thursday :: readbuzz.com

Furnished

buzzed ::

APARTMENTS

get

4B

7 7

8

!"#$%&#'$&"()*$%+&,-.&/"&#'$&*01"2&+314$+&+5&#'1#& $14'&%567&450()"&1"8&9:9&+;(1%$&45"#1/"+&5"0<&5"$& 5=&$14'&"()*$%>&?'$%$&/+&5"0<&5"$&+50(#/5">&@+50(#/5"&/"&A01++/=/$8+&1"8&5"0/"$&1#&666>81/0</00/"/>45)B>&

The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 60  

Friday, Nov. 16, 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you