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Thankful: Student counts her blessings after live-changing surgery FEATURES 6A

More than a number

Barrera dons No. 73 in honor of Curtis Speed SPORTS, 1B

Wednesday November 14, 2012

The Daily Illini

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Vol. 142 Issue 58

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Solar farms to boost University’s use of renewable energy BY CLAIRE EVERETT STAFF WRITER

Students light up Quad for Diwali RSO celebrates Festival of Light with ceremony BY ILYA GUREVIC STAFF WRITER

The Quad’s paths were aglow with tealights Tuesday night as the Indian Graduate Students Association held a ceremony in observation of Diwali, an Indian celebration marking the triumph of good over evil. Students and community members lit candles along the paths on the Quad throughout the night. A major tradition of the Hindu holiday is to light candles as a symbol of welcoming home an Indian king. As the story of Diwali goes, the demon king Ravana kidnapped the wife Sita of Lord Rama while the couple was in exile. Diwali celebrates Rama killing Ravana, symbolizing “the victory of light over darkness,” said group member and graduate student Ashish Khetan. Indian students who celebrate Diwali shared the meaning of the candles and other traditions with non-Indian students who attended the event. Group members served Indian desserts such as gulab jamun — fried dairy dough balls in flavorful syrup to

represent the sweetness of the occasion. Attendees traveled from as far away as India to celebrate Diwali in Champaign. Suranjana Sur Mukherjee traveled from Calcutta, India, to visit her son at Illinois and came to the celebration. “It was a very beautiful ceremony,” Sur Mukerjee said. “All castes, all creeds, all communities (are) coming together to celebrate. It’s a universal brotherhood.” Sur Mukherjee added that as Rama and Sita returned to his hometown, the community lit candles to illuminate their way home. The candles on the Quad recreated that scene. “We celebrate Lakshmi, the goddess of money... When we light all our lamps and ... leave the door open the belief is that Lakshmi will look at all the lighting in your house, and she will come and bless you with money and prosperity,” said Varun Goel, graduate student. “We all get together; there’s worship (and) there’s food. My parents take special care in cleaning their house.” Kavya Gundavaram, freshman in Engineering, said she valued the opportunity to celebrate on campus. “I’m from India, so Diwali is a large part of my life, kind of like Thanksgiving here,” Gundavaram said. “It’s the first year I’ve been away from my family (for Diwali).” Aside from the significance of the event, attendees also enjoyed the aesthetic appeal of the celebration.

A 20.5-acre solar farm may provid the University with 1.8 percent of its energy by this time next year. The solar farm comes as part of a $15.5 million plan approved Thursday by the board of trustees to move the University closer to its goal of having at least 5 percent of its power grid run on renewable energy by 2015. Installation on the 20.5 acres of land near First Street and Windsor Road will begin this summer after the land-lease and power-purchase agreements are signed in March. The project is slated to be done in fall 2013. While the majority of funding will come from campus administration, about $1 million will be covered by the Student Sustainability Committee and roughly $85,000 will be covered by the University’s Facilities and Services unit. “It is going to be, if not the largest, one of the largest solar projects on any campus in the country,” said Jack Dempsey, executive director of Facilities and Services. “I think it shows the University of Illinois and their students believe in renewable energy, and they’re willing to put the resources (behind it) needed to make it happen.” The panels purchased from Phoenix Solar Inc. will be lined

The Indian Graduate Student Association lit up the Quad with candles for the Indian Festival of Light, Diwali on Tuesday.

BY CORINNE RUFF STAFF WRITER

The Illinois Student Senate may add another trip to Springfield during veto session in addition to their annual Lobby Day trip. The senate will discuss the resolution Wednesday at its regular meeting. The resolution calls for the trip to be co-sponsored with the Civic Leadership Program, a University political science program connected to its Cline Center for Democracy. “With this being an election year, and with a bunch of important issues up right now, we wanted to make sure we gave students the opportunity to go to Springfield and meet the legislators,” said Jordan Hughes, chairwoman for the community and governmental affairs committee, which is sponsoring the resolution, and senior in AHS. Joseph Moseley, senator and sophomore in ACES, said there are hundreds of issues to be dis-

INSIDE

cussed from education to agriculture but said he believes the most prominent issue is the need for bipartisan efforts. “I think both sides need to answer the call to work together from the president,” he said. “It speaks volumes when (legislation) passes with a good number of Democrats and a good number of Republicans.” Moseley said he also believes the trip would be a great experience for himself as well as many other student senators considering careers in politics. “I’d like to see how it is like to be a state senator, given the nature of politics, given that some of us are aspiring politicians and are using ISS as a trial stage for the future,” he said. The resolution proposes a $580 allocation to cover the cost of a bus to transport senators to the capital. Kevin Seymour, ISS trea-

See ISS, Page 3A

in rows and tilted at a 20-degree angle for maximum sunlight absorption. “For every kilowatt the solar farm generates, that’s one less the University has to buy from the electricity grid,” said Morgan Johnston, sustainability coordinator for Facilities and Services.

See SOLAR FARM, Page 3A

“(The candlelight) makes it beautiful at night ... The fact that we live in this place and can come together and have something like this is really nice,” said Rhea Matar, senior in Education. For some, the event was not just a religious festival but a symbol of acceptance on campus. “The candlelighting is something that they do in most Indian households, so it’s kind of cool that the University is embracing it and kind of celebrating the holiday along with the Indian culture,” said Vidhan Desai, senior in Business. “I think it brings some diversity and culture to the campus.”

Solar farm will add to UI’s renewable energy plan The Illinois Climate Action Plan sets a goal of 5 percent of campus energy coming from renewable sources by 2015. The new solar farm is expected to generate 2.1 percent of campus energy by then. Projection for renewable energy

Projection for non-renewable energy

2015 5%

17.5%

2020

2025

25%

Ilya can be reached at gurevic2@dailyillini.com. 20%

40%

Source: iCAP 2010 UIUC

Senate considers trip to Springfield over veto session

Energy conservation: A 30 percent reduction in total building energy use by fiscal year 2020. Coal use at Abbott Power Plant: End all investments in the operating of coal-fueled sources at Abbott by 2017. Building standards: All new buildings and renovations are required to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold Standards. Procurement and waste: The University will make more than 30 percent of food purchases from local sources — within 100 miles — by 2015. It will also commit to a “zero waste” campus policy by 2012 and a large-scale food-composting project.

BRIAN YU THE DAILY ILLINI

0%

ILLINOIS STUDENT SENATE

Other goals in the 2010 Climate Action Plan

Hampers filled with something other than dirty laundry

60%

80%

100%

BRYAN LORENZ Design editor

LAS to offer dual degree with computer science in Fall Computer skills in high demand for jobs BY MADDIE REHAYEM STAFF WRITER

ROCHELLE WILSON THE DAILY ILLINI

The Office of Volunteer Programs collected laundry baskets filled with different non-perishable items to help families in need prepare for a Thanksgiving dinner at the Union on Tuesday.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is set to offer a new degree program for students who want to pursue degrees in LAS and computer science. Students will soon be able to receive a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in a discipline such as psychology or biology and computer science, which is offered by Engineering. Rob Rutenbar, computer science department head, said the department proposed the program in January 2010, and it will be available for the Fall 2013 semester after it is approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. “The idea of this degree is that you could do computer science plus anthropolo-

See LAS, Page 3A

Po l i ce 2 A | Co r re c t i o n s 2 A | H oroscopes 2 A | Opi ni ons 4 A | Crossword 5 A | Comics 5 A | Health & Living 6 A | Spor ts 1 B | Classifieds 3 B | Sudoku 3 B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300

A 26-year-old male was arrested on the charge of trespassing property in the 2000 block of Vawter Street around 7:30 a.m. Monday. According to the report, the suspect was previously banned from the property. He disobeyed the ban and went onto the property and was arrested. ! Theft and credit card fraud were reported in the 100 block of West Washington Street around 11 a.m. Monday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole the victim’s debit card and has used it to make two unauthorized purchases.

Champaign

!

A 20-year-old male and a 19-year-old male were arrested on the charge of damaging property in the 300 block of East Green Street just after midnight Friday. According to the report, the suspects damaged the property of the apartment complex. The suspects were issued notices to appear. ! Criminal damage to property was reported in the 1800 block of Crescent Drive around 3:30 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged the windshield of the victim’s vehicle.! !

Copyright Š 2012 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

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Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper

University

Urbana

!

Theft was reported at

Noyes Laboratory, 505 S. Mathews Ave., at 3 p.m. Monday. According to the report, a University student reported that an unknown offender stole a bike that was locked to a railing near the location. The bike is valued at $300. ! Theft was reported at Grainger Library, 1301 W. Springfield Ave., at 5 p.m. Monday. According to the report, a University student reported that an unknown offender stole a computer that was left on a table at the library. The student left the computer unattended during a restroom break. The computer is valued at $1,200.

Compiled by Klaudia Dukala.

HOROSCOPES adventure. Watch your words as you make personal decisions. Gather information, and listen to all considerations. Fill orders and rake in money.

what you’re spending. Accept an unusual, lucrative assignment.

BY NANCY BLACK TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today’s Birthday

Today is a 7 -- Grasp a fast-breaking opportunity; the pace is picking up. You’re exceptionally creative and persuasive. Clean up. Monitor liquid intake. Love finds a way.

This year, make your mark on the world. Consider how to apply your talents in service of making the greatest impact toward a cause that inspires you. Money and attention come naturally. Align head and heart to your purpose. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Today is a 9 -- Commune with your inner muse. Don’t abandon an idea just because it’s too expensive. Launching is good. Tone down the celebration. Embrace a surprise.

Today is a 9 -- Openly state your ideas without sarcastic criticism. Get clear before speaking. Use your network. Let your partner set the schedule. Take another approach.

Today is an 8 -- Watch what you say for the next three weeks. Listening is extra profitable, and actions speak louder than words. You can take new ground.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 6 -- Your imagination goes wild over the next two days. Take care; it could get expensive. Meet to work out strategy. Intensive team effort is required.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 9 -- Your ability to concentrate is enhanced. Get into a good book, or investigate a new invention. Focus on home. There’s genius in the chaos.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 6 -- Stay in close contact with partners for maximum benefit. Let them know what you need. Go over the paperwork carefully before choosing.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 -- Concentrate on your studies. Use imagination, not work, to profit. Discuss the situation with a co-worker. For about three weeks, find ways to work smarter.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is an 8 -- Your mind is more on enlightenment than work. Streamline procedures for awhile; know exactly

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Today is a 7 -- Take a romantic

Today is an 8 -- Friends offer comfort and advice. Follow a hunch and dig deeper for an interesting discovery. Explore the possibilities. Choose your path after consideration.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is an 8 -- Review the backstory this week. Get organized, and keep track of cash. You’ll gain spiritual understanding for the next three weeks. Social events capture your attention. Follow your intuition.

Night editor: Johnathan Hettinger Photo night editor: Melissa McCabe Copy editors: Crystal Smith, Lauren Cox, Kaitlin

Penn, Kirby Gamsby, Chad Thornburg, Ilya Gureic, Designers: Nina Yang, Rui He, Hannah Hwang, Sadie Teper Page transmission: Harry Durden

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

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In the November 13, 2012 usthe on edition of The Dailyto Illini, caption for the article “Veterans YouTube for video honored at Parkland� incorrectly stated that Jose Gomez coverage and theis a veteran and president of the Daily Veterans Illini Vidcast. Student Association at Parkland College. It should have stated that Gomez is a current member of the military and a past president of the Student Veterans at Parkland. When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

3A

GEO garners undergrad support for negotiations BY TYLER DAVIS STAFF WRITER

The Undergraduate-Graduate Alliance held its fi rst meeting of the school year Tuesday at the University YMCA. This is a group sponsored by the University Graduate Employees’ Organization in order to encourage and facilitate communication between GEO members and undergraduates. Communication is particularly important to the GEO especially during their contract negotiations with the University, said Juan Bernal, meeting organizer and graduate

ISS

student. Bernal will be on the strike working committee if the GEO’s strike authorization vote passes Friday. Bernal said the purpose of the meeting was to reach out to undergraduate students for their support. “If we stand together, we can put a lot more pressure on the administration since we are all students on this campus and (striking) will affect us all,” he said. He said the GEO needs undergraduate support in the coming weeks to keep negotiations with the federal mediator moving or

to make an efficient strike if negotiations aren’t successful. Natalye Tate, graduate student, was the first speaker at the meeting, explaining the process of contract negotiations and how long the GEO has been negotiating with the administration. Tate explained the frustration felt among GEO members regarding the University’s lack of communication at the bargaining table, citing the example that the GEO chose 57 hours within three weeks for possible mediation meetings while the University selected 16 of those hours, cancelling one

meeting out of those 16 hours. “We only have three bargaining sessions left, and we’ve still yet to talk about the big (issues) — tuition waivers, some big issues with healthcare and wages,” Bernal said. “I was there last Friday, and it took them all day to talk about an issue that is not huge.” Tuition waivers remain an issue of concern for the GEO, Tate said. “If we don’t receive waivers, a lot of us cannot be here teaching you...because we cannot pay our tuition,” she said. The University is searching

Four decades worth of rock ’n’ roll hits Assembly Hall

FROM PAGE 1A surer and graduate student, said the total cost of the trip would be $1,200, but the student senate would be splitting the cost with the Civic Leadership Program. Max Ellithorpe, senator and graduate student, said unlike other ISS events, such as the funding of a haunted house, it is the senate’s duty to advocate for students by visiting the capital and lobbying for student issues. “One way to advocate for students is to travel and meet with our elected officials,” he said. “It’s a great way to fight for what we represent.” If the resolution passes, several senators said they would take the opportunity to question current legislators about the pressing issue of funding for the University. Matt Gold, senator and senior in LAS, said he believes senators need to push elected officials to pay back the University the money it is owed. “Too often I feel like the state government ignores the concerns of our flagship university,” he said. “They owe us a ton of money, and it really puts us in a difficult situation every year when we budget.”

Corinne can be reached at cruff2@ dailyillini.com.

BY THOMAS J. SHEERAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — A Cleveland woman puffed on a cigarette, wore headphones and ignored passers-by and crowds of reporters as she stood for an hour Tuesday under a judge’s order holding a sign that said, “Only an idiot would drive on the sidewalk to avoid a school bus.” A Municipal Court judge had ordered 32-year-old Shena Hardin to serve the highly public sentence Tuesday and Wednesday for the Sept. 11 citation after she was caught on camera driving on a sidewalk to pass a Cleveland school bus that was unloading children. She arrived bundled up against the 34-degree cold at the intersection near downtown Cleveland as passing vehicles honked. Satellite TV trucks streamed the event live. Hardin refused to comment, as did her mother, who watched from a parked car. A message seeking comment was left for Hardin’s attorneys. Hardin’s license was sus-

bargain room,” she said. “We want to stay in the classroom.” But as Bernal noted during his presentation, a strike is the last resort in the GEO’s efforts to negotiate a fair contract. “If we say yes (to a strike), our membership does believe it’s the only option left,” Bernal said. The next mediation session will take place Wednesday, and the GEO’s strike authorization vote will run until Thursday. The votes will be counted on Nov. 16.

Tyler can be reached at tadavis2@ dailyillini.com.

Man executed, accused of slaying woman in 1997 innocence claim. “He’s very, very, very guilty,” LUCASVILLE, Ohio — Ohio she said afterward. “Now Winda on Tuesday executed a con- can be at peace, and that’s what demned killer who calmly went it’s all about.” to his death still claiming he was Stebbins read a statement from innocent of stabbing a woman Hartman’s family in which they 138 times, slitting her throat and professed his innocence and cutting off her hands. asked for additional testing of “I’m good, let’s roll,” Brett scene evidence. Hartman said in his fi nal words. “We hope that the taking of He then smiled in the direction Brett’s innocent life might serve of his sister and repeatedly gave as a wake-up call to the flaws in her, a friend and his attorney a our legal system,” the statement “thumbs up” with his left hand. said. “This is not going to defeat Hartman came within about a me,” Hartman then said to war- week of execution in 2009 before den Donald Morgan, who didn’t federal courts allowed him to pursue an innocence claim. respond. The effect of the single dose When that claim failed, Hartman of pentobarbital did not seem as had a new date set last year, but immediate as in other executions that was postponed because of a at the state prison in Lucasville, federal lawsuit over Ohio’s exein southern Ohio. Four minutes cution policy. after Hartman fi rst appeared The Ohio Parole Board had to be reacting to it as his abdo- unanimously denied Hartman’s men began to rise and fall, his requests for clemency three abdomen rose and fell again, he times, citing the brutality of the coughed and his head shifted Snipes’ slaying and the “overrhythmically for a few moments. whelming evidence” of HartHis sister, Diane Morretti, man’s guilt. dabbed at her eyes during the Hartman’s attorneys long said process. The warden declared that crucial evidence from the Hartman’s time of death as 10:34. crime scene and Snipes’ body had Both Hartnever been tested, raising quesman’s attorney, tions about HartDavid Stebbins, and prisons sysman’s innocence. tem spokeswomThe evidence an JoEllen Smith included fi ngersaid the gap prints allegedly found on a clock between HartBRETT HARTMAN, man’s movements and a mop hanwas not out of the moments before being executed in dle. Hartman the state prison in Lucasville, Ohio. also argued the ordinary. Hartman was evidence could the 49th inmate put to death implicate an alternate suspect. since Ohio resumed executions The attorneys argued that in 1999. if Hartman’s innocence claim Hartman acknowledged that wasn’t accepted, he should still he had sex with Winda Snipes have been be spared because early on the morning of Sept. 9, of the effects of a “remarkably 1997, at her Akron apartment. chaotic and nomadic early childHe also says he went back to hood,” including being abanSnipes’ apartment later that doned by his mother. day, found her mutilated body His lawyers also said Hartand panicked, trying to clean up man’s behavior in prison was the mess before calling 911. But exemplary and showed he was Hartman said he didn’t kill her, a changed man. They cited his a claim rejected by numerous devotion to religious studies, courts over the years. his development as an artist and A former co-worker and friend community service projects in of Snipes who witnessed the exe- prison. cution said afterward that the The state opposed those argufamily was relieved the case ments, citing the strength of was over and that the continu- the evidence and the fact that ous rounds of appeals and media courts have repeatedly upheld reports about the case were at Hartman’s conviction and death an end. Jacqueline Brown of sentence. The state also said Doylestown in northeast Ohio Hartman refused to take responalso flatly dismissed Hartman’s sibility and show remorse. BY ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Chicago, the self-described “rock and roll band with horns” formed in 1967, returned to Assembly Hall on Tuesday night. One of the longest-running and most successful rock groups in history, Chicago performed hits spanning four different decades, much to the delight of the large crowd.

Woman ordered to carry sign in public Unusual sentence given for driving on sidewalk to avoid bus

for a contract agreement that “reflects difficult economic times we are in, and that appropriately reflects the rights and interests of each side,” said campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler. “The University remains optimistic that we can reach an agreement with the GEO, without a strike occurring,” Kaler said in an email Saturday. “It was helpful to work with the federal mediator Friday.” GEO spokeswoman Stephanie Seawell said in an earlier interview that the GEO also wants to reach a fair agreement. “We want to settle this in the

pended for 30 days and she was ordered to pay $250 in court costs. Lisa Kelley, whose 9-year-old daughter boards the bus that Hardin had been passing on the sidewalk, said the sentence fit the crime. “She’s an idiot, just like her sign says,” Kelley said as she watched Hardin lean against a fence, her head down and her eyes hidden by dark glasses. “She did this almost every day last year,” Kelley said. “She won’t stop laughing. She’s not remorseful, she laughed at every court appearance. She’s still laughing, so she needs to be humiliated like this.” Kelley said she was only sorry the woman was standing in the cold and not the rain or snow. Bill Lipold, 37, who works nearby in the blue-collar neighborhood of older homes and factories, yelled to Hardin: “Why do you hate kids?” He hopes the punishment works. “How else are you going to stop her from doing it again?” he said. “She really didn’t show remorse for her action after being caught, so you’ve got to try something.” With two schools located within two blocks of the location and busy commuter traffic, the area can be risky for youngsters walking to class, Lipold said.

“I’m good, let’s roll. .... This is not gong to defeat me.”

TONY DEJAK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Shena Hardin smokes a cigarette as she holds up a sign to serve a highly public sentence Tuesday in Cleveland.

Another general linked to, under investigation in Petraeus affair BY ROBERT BURNS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOARD A U.S. MILITARY AIRCRAFT — In a new twist to the Gen. David Petraeus sex scandal, the Pentagon said Tuesday that the top American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, is under investigation for alleged “inappropriate communications” with a woman who is said to have received threatening emails from Paula Broadwell, the woman with whom Petraeus had an extramarital affair. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said in a written statement issued

LAS FROM PAGE 1A gy, which would be really interesting if you wanted to study social networks, or you could do computer science plus chemistry. There’s very interesting stuff going on with computational chemistry today,” said Charles Tucker, associate dean of engineering. Rutenbar agreed that such combinations, such as the computer science and anthropology major, would allow students to examine platforms such as Twitter “from a very professional, human society point of view.” The degree is aimed at students who are not pursuing

to reporters aboard his aircraft, en route from Honolulu to Perth, Australia, that the FBI referred the matter to the Pentagon on Sunday. Panetta said that he ordered a Pentagon investigation of Allen on Monday. A senior defense official traveling with Panetta said Allen’s communications were with Jill Kelley, who has been described as an unpaid social liaison at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., which is headquarters to the U.S. Central Command. She is not a U.S. government employee. Kelley is said to have received

threatening emails from Broadwell, who is Petraeus’ biographer and who had an extramarital affair with Petraeus that reportedly began after he became CIA director in September 2011. Petraeus resigned as CIA director on Friday. Allen, a four-star Marine general, succeeded Petraeus as the top American commander in Afghanistan in July 2011. The senior official, who discussed the matter only on condition of anonymity because it is under investigation, said Panetta believed it was prudent

to launch a Pentagon investigation, although the official would not explain the nature of Allen’s problematic communications. The official said 20,000 to 30,000 pages of emails and other documents from Allen’s communications with Kelley between 2010 and 2012 are under review. He would not say whether they involved sexual matters or whether they are thought to include unauthorized disclosures of classified information. He said he did not know whether Petraeus is mentioned in the emails. “Gen. Allen disputes that he has engaged in any wrongdoing in this

matter,” the official said. He said Allen currently is in Washington. Panetta said that while the matter is being investigated by the Defense Department Inspector General, Allen will remain in his post as commander of the International Security Assistance Force, based in Kabul. He praised Allen as having been instrumental in making progress in the war. The FBI’s decision to refer the Allen matter to the Pentagon rather than keep it itself, combined with Panetta’s decision to allow Allen to continue as Afghanistan commander without a suspension,

suggested strongly that officials viewed whatever happened as a possible infraction of military rules rather than a violation of federal criminal law. Allen was Deputy Commander of Central Command, based in Tampa, prior to taking over in Afghanistan. He also is a veteran of the Iraq war. In the meantime, Panetta said, Allen’s nomination to be the next commander of U.S. European Command and the commander of NATO forces in Europe has been put on hold “until the relevant facts are determined.”

computer science degrees but still have to meet the growing demand for computer skills from employers. “Lots of people who aren’t going to do IT for a living still need to do computational kinds of stuff,” Rutenbar said. He added that dealing with data and analytics is important in many professions but does not require a computer science degree. Programs like this have not previously been offered to University students. Double majoring in computer science and LAS is rare because of scheduling and differences in the programs, and majoring in one while only taking a few classes in the other does not provide

sufficient knowledge, Rutenbar said. He said administrators gauged student interest by noting the increasing amount of students from different academic backgrounds opting to minor in informatics. “We’re constantly seeing some of our colleagues in other places doing really exciting things, like at the intersection of sociology and computing or the intersection of anthropology and computing,” Rutenbar said. “Anything that gets the engineers south of Green is good, and anything that gets the LAS guys north of Green is good.”

SOLAR FARM

Action Plan,which set the University’s energy goals, after signing the American College and University’s Presidents’ Climate Commitment. These steps have led the University to set a goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. Marika Nell, junior in Engineering, said that while costs of renewable energy are high, the implications nonrenewable energy have on health and the environment can create even more expenses. “The price of nonrenewable energy like coal does not include the environmental costs to it,” Nell said. “It doesn’t include the cost to human health. It seems more expensive, but when you look at the overall costs to our society, it’s not that different.”

Student trustee David Pileski said he wanted to stress solar panels weren’t the only way the University was going to meet the University’s energy goals. He said the University is also looking into wind technology and more efficient or sustainable combustibles, such as natural gas or biomass, as well as other technologies. “I think the solar farms are a good symbol of what the University stands for,” Pileski said. “To see that blend of agriculture, technology and renewable energy, to me, is a bright beacon for the future, and the innovation that is occurring at Illinois.”

Maddie can be reached at rehayem2@ dailyillini.com.

FROM PAGE 1A Some students aren’t happy with the project’s cost. “Investing $15.5 million in a new energy source that replaces only 2 percent of (campus power plant) Abbott’s resource usage seems like an inefficient allocation of scarce funding,” said Mitch Hiett, senior in ACES. But Johnston and other backers say the project will recoup some of that money. She said that over the next 20 years, the solar farm will generate enough energy that the University will save about $10.2 million. The University was prompted to create the Illinois Climate

Claire can be reached at everett5@ dailyillini.com.


4A Wednesday November 14, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

What do companies owe society?

JOHNIVAN DARBY THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois residents deserve progress with Democratic supermajority

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lection 2012 brought a decisive victory for Democrats in Illinois. With a supermajority in the state Senate and House supplementing the Democratic governor, there is little doubt that the next few years will be marked by distinctly Democratic policy. Besides its obvious impact on Republicans, Democrats won five out of the six contended congressional seats and now outnumber Republicans 71- 47 in the House and 40 -19 in the Senate. This reveals just how powerful a role redistricting played last Tuesday. In 2010, a Democrat-controlled governor’s office and Legislature redrew political boundaries that significantly limited competition for Democratic candidates in many districts. As a result, the sweeping seat gains will enable the Democratic congress to override Gov. Pat Quinn’s veto power. House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton are now arguably the real muscle behind the Illinois political machine. With less Republican resistance, Democrats will likely be able to push policies more quickly and easily through the legislative process. This may prove to be beneficial for a state that urgently needs reform in its spending. Without Republican opposition, the blame for any legislation that doesn’t get pushed through or any that fails will rest with the Democrats. Yet without opposition, one of the key mechanisms to moderate and balance the state’s political policy has taken a major hit. Now, the responsibility lies even more heavily on the people to hold their representatives accountable for passing legislation and creating programs that meet their needs. Democratic leaders need to take extra precaution to strike a balance between tax hikes and spending cuts. Shortly after the 2010 elections, unpopular tax hikes passed, which increased the income tax by 67 percent and corporate tax by 46 percent. That gives Illinois the fourthhighest corporate tax rate in the nation. These taxes are certainly intended to drag the state of Illinois out of its economic crisis, but the government has a responsibility to also observe frugality and achieve balance. Especially in a presidential election year, it’s easy for the local elections to be drowned out by all of the press and publicity swirling around a competitive race to the White House — yet some of the most significant legislation to our everyday lives comes from our state Legislature. We often look to the Oval Office and Capitol Hill for reform, but voters and citizens must remain vigilant to what is happening on the state level. There needs to be a collective consciousness of Illinois’ political process given the current fragility of the Illinois economy, and state residents must hold their leaders — Democrats and Republicans alike — accountable to their promise to move forward.

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Email: opinions@dailyillini. com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

DYLAN HOYER Opinions columnist

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time to put those policies in place. In this proposed draft on how to appoint health insurance exchange board members, it suggested that the governor, general assembly and attorney general include representatives of insurance companies. Additionally, the exchange board would have the power to form a technical advisory committee, whom insurers would be among. The primary issue with this would be that it raises a clear conflict of interest; very easily and very often, “consumer advocacy agencies and big insurance companies butt heads,” Lenhoff said. This effectively would stall the progress such a board would make. The state may have until the end of the month to submit its draft of plans for the exchange, and it may be well ahead of several other states. But the Legislature cannot delay addressing the governing and funding of such a large project. States like California, Maryland and Oregon have already both identified a source of revenue and prohibited representation from insurance companies on their boards. It’s time for the state to take the next steps and define the grounds on which we tread, before contracting a bid to start building the exchange.

reshmen Business students know all too well about the concept of professional responsibility: What do I owe to myself, my company and the world at large? The final third of the semesterlong course is dedicated to the question of what companies owe society. This question, once the topic of theoretical debate, is becoming reality, not just in the classroom but in greater happenings around the world and here in the states. The reality is seen in the likes of the once-relevant Occupy movement or the impending capital gains tax increases that are likely to be a part in any grand bargain to avert the fiscal cliff. Never before has such a frontal attack on the pure profit motive of business been attempted since the populist movement that rode on the United States on the backs of farmers set against the business world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Now the buzzword of social responsibility has transcended the gap between politics and business and populist ideals of accountability to the “greater good,” and a “social conscience” is becoming ever more popular, even on Wall Street. But what is society if not the summation of individuals with differing ideals and preferences? It is impossible to fully respond to the concerns of everybody in society because everybody is different. The values of someone are inherently different from the values of another, and these values have to be ranked in order of preference. Corporations cannot do that and instead are forced to rely on — and are only responsible to — shareholders and customers. These two swaths of the public are a far more effective representative sample to showcase the interests of society than the aggregate of the entire population because both groups already have a vested interest in the future of the company and their own individual interests. The best way corporations and individuals serve the interests of society is by serving their own individual interests. When I walk into a store as a customer, I expect certain things. Before I purchase anything, I am finding the answers to several questions that matter as much or more than the price of my desired item. How are the employees treated? How are the employees treating me? Are the aesthetics and arrangements done so in a desirable way? Do they have this in my size? The importance of these questions and many others will vary for each individual, and these differences play a tremendous role in market-based decisions. While I have been subconsciously asking these questions only upon entry, the owners of the store have already been asking themselves for sometimes weeks or months in advance how I as a consumer would answer these questions. If I buy their product, they know they have been successful. If I and enough others refrain, their business will have to change to meet society’s expectations or leave the marketplace. This is the beauty of the profit motive and the free market. Corporations are forced to respond to changes in customer behavior and preferences. If they do not, they lose and another organization will rise to meet the challenge. Customers are ultimately responsible for the actions of the company, as businesses can only respond to situations with any real effectiveness. The money that flows through consumers’ pocketbooks dictates where the company will go and how it values scarce goods. Like a loyal pet, corporations’ true allegiances lie with that of their owners. Shareholders provide the direct vehicle for any real social change, with the customer always in the driver’s seat. So what do corporations owe society? Better yet, what do they owe me? The pursuit of their own selfish interests. If I am a customer, I provide the testing grounds for corporations. If their practices or procedures are not meeting an acceptable standard, then their venture will fail by me. The corporation continually works on my behalf to improve the quality of my visit or product in the tried-and-true hope that they will be monetarily rewarded. If I am a shareholder in the corporation, the company owes me the flexibility to ensure the customer is getting a fair deal and returns on my investment. If I am in neither of these two groups, the business owes me nothing but to follow the law. I am making my statement and choice by willfully not being in either group, and I am not entitled to make others’ choices for them. The Occupy movement and the increase in capital gains tax represent different facets of the greater corporate social responsibility movement. With the fiscal cliff looming, and a governmental branch-and-a-half in favor of promoting this agenda, there is a possibility that the profit motive of business will be blunted. In effect, the greatest social catalyst of change will be damaged in the name of social change.

Nora is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at ibrahim7@dailyillini.com.

Dylan is a freshman in Business. He can be reached at dhoyer2@dailyillini.com.

GIF is word of the year over YOLO JOHN BUYSSE Opinions columnist

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ith each passing year, popular culture welcomes the heavy usage of new words and phrases for an indefinite period of time. Eventually, these terms go from daily mentions to casual references to reminisce-about-when-it-was“big” nostalgia. It also seems that with each passing year, these societal inside jokes for a given year are becoming more and more common. This is in large part due to the rise of the Internet and social media sites that promote hashtagging, meme production and so much more. Although there is no official start or finish to when these words are relevant, Oxford American Dictionary somewhat catalogues these short-lived cultural icons by annually inducting a “word of the year.” This year, the term GIF, short for graphics interchange format, took home the top prize. The word deserves the recognition. In use since the ’80s, the Internet became a playground for these flashing images throughout the year of 2012. As a result, GIF will always be remembered by Oxford American Dictionary. What happens to the other 2012 terms though? Do they float off into irrelevance, only to be remembered when looking through old Facebook posts between you and your friends?

The reason I ask is because one my favorite and least favorite words of 2012 lost out to GIF — YOLO. This acronym-turned-word swept into the American pop culture lexicon within the last year. YOLO, short for “you only live once,” is most commonly used by teens and 20-somethings in situations where they are about to do something that they might not normally do like take a spontaneous road trip or spend money on an extravagant night out. Other times, it is used in inconsequential situations such as ordering an extra shot of espresso or watching TV instead of going to the gym for a work out. The beauty of YOLO is that it can apply to any situation and carry the same core meaning. In its early days, I used YOLO somewhat frequently as it became second nature and inescapable on a college campus. Overall, though, the use of the word has become tired, and it appears to be entering its twilight as a go-to phrase for Internet users and friend groups alike. No matter how it is used, its temporary relevance to our culture is undeniable. Past words of the year include LOL, OMG and Nom Nom. LOL means “laughing out loud.” OMG means “oh my gosh.” Nom nom is just a fun way of talking about food and eating. While past words are simply interjections, YOLO has meaning. For example, earlier this year I intended to spend a Friday night studying for the several exams that were coming

up in the next week. On this same night, my good friend Tom was planning to attend the Best Coast concert, which was part of the Pygmalion Music Festival. About a half hour after telling him I had to study that night, the term I had somewhat frequently used in much less important situations entered into my mind and would not leave. YOLO. You only live once. In 30 years, when my own kids are going to college, I won’t be telling them about the time I studied for exams on a Friday, I will tell them about the fun memories I made on campus. Studying right then and there was not a life-or-death situation, and I still had time to study on Saturday and Sunday. So, I went to the concert. This scenario likely doesn’t sound like a life lesson moment, but it is a perfect example of how reminding yourself that you only live once can open your mind and heart to living life to its fullest. Unfortunately, this 2012 popculture-staple-turned-life-lesson will fade into obscurity once our societal ADD kicks in and new words are created. Before YOLO fades, soak up its true meaning and live life accordingly. This might mean skipping a class to catch up on “Breaking Bad.” It might mean ordering that extra shot of espresso. It might mean finally committing to study abroad. No matter what it means to you, just remember — YOLO.

John is a junior in Media. He can be reached at jbuyss2@dailyillini.com.

Illinois needs to advance health care NORA IBRAHIM Opinions columnist

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resident Barack Obama’s re-election last week officiated his controversial Affordable Care Act on the federal level, but the wheels are still turning for state-level aspects of the law on health care reform. One of the key tenets of Obamacare to be adopted by every state is the development of a health insurance exchange program, an online marketplace for all citizens to purchase insurance, compare rates and learn whether they qualify for federal subsidy. The Obama administration extended the deadline for all states to submit their plans for such an exchange from this Friday to mid-December, to allow for lagging states to make final calls. As of publication, Illinois is one of a few states that has decided that it will build a state-run health insurance exchange, not run jointly with the federal government. It is 1 of 15 states processing and developing some form of an exchange. Since the exchange was signed off via legislation, Illinois has been reviewing five potential online vendors to build the exchange. “We do it ourselves, we do it right,” said Claudia Lennhoff, executive director of Champaign County Health Care Consumers. “Because the exchange will have the authority to regulate the health insurance products that are sold in the

exchange, from the consumer’s perspective, we want to see it in consumer’s control.” The benefits of a state-run exchange will be readily seen for Illinois residents. According to Illinois officials, the exchange is projected to insure roughly 800,000 in 2014 and over 1 million residents by 2020. Additionally, the easy access of the market smoothes out troubles inherent in the search for private or group insurance. This is especially true for uninsured University students looking to graduate soon. “Students are very familiar with using that (online) technology. It will be a very natural way to shop for insurance,” Lenhoff said. As much as there is to celebrate, there are a number of things to chew off Illinois’ plate before it can reap the benefits of the exchange in 2014 — namely, how it decides to appoint its governing body and how it funds the site. In 2011, a legislative committee was formed to make recommendations on the governance, board membership and avenues of revenue for the exchange, but since the end of 2011, it has not made any conclusive effort or push toward finalizing these details, according to the Commonwealth Fund. Though they had released a thorough report on its suggestions in October 2011, they are quickly losing

According to Illinois officials, the exchange is projected to insure roughly 800,000 in 2014 and over 1 million residents by 2020.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Perception of time can change, researchers say BY ROHAINA HASSAN STAFF WRITER

Fear is an emotion that arises out of response to physical and emotional danger. When Neville Longbottom was faced with Severus Snape in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” time slowed down and his heart started racing. Lupin stepped in and told him to focus, and all of a sudden Snape was dressed in Longbottom’s grandmother’s clothes. Although Simona Buetti and Alejandro Lleras did not aim to prove J.K. Rowling right, they did find some inspiration from ’70s literature that talked about timeperception and control. This is why Lleras, associate professor in psychology, and Buetti, postdoctoral research associate, worked together to uncover the secrets behind how we perceive time and how that changes with good or bad events. Lleras had previously worked on time perception, and Buetti worked with arachnophobic individuals, and they brought their respective expertise together to create this study. “I started, I was interested in neuropsychology. I was really interested in the brain and how

the brain could predict some types of behavior,” Buetti said. Before joining the field of psychology, Lleras was on the path to become an engineer. He took a cognitive psychology class as a general education requirement and said he was transformed by it. “I don’t really think there’s anything more captivating than the mind, the human mind. I dropped everything and switched my major to psychology,” he said. Over the course of a year, Lleras and Buetti used a basic prescreening questionnaire to test a sample group of voluntary participants until they whittled down the subject pool. They performed five individual experiments during which the participants were shown a variety of images based on the level of emotional arousal it might generate. Some of these images included mops, roller coasters and spiders. There was a nonanxious group and a arachnophobic group, and each group was asked to report how long the images were display after viewing them. While the spider-fearful participants reported that the images lasted longer, all of the images were displayed for the same time for both groups.

Spider-fearful participants got anxious throughout the study, especially closer to the end. “The only thing that mattered to them was if it was positive or negative. They saw the world in black-and-white,” Lleras explained. Their research demonstrates that in the human mind it appears when something that is both highly arousing and negative, we perceive the experience to last longer. If it is highly arousing and positive, however, we imagine that it was short and quick. When the circumstances are inverted — low arousal and negative or low arousal and positive — the results were completely opposite. While many of their original questions were answered, Buetti and Lleras found they had another group of questions lined up already. They hope to delve deeper into the mechanisms that force us to act, or how personalities might shape our perceptions. They are in the process of creating another study to refine their current results.

Rohaina can be reached at rhassa7@ dailyillini.com.

5A

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  1 1970 #1 hit with the lyric “Easy as …”   4 Last option, often   9 Equally poor 14 Miracle-___ 15 Soap genre 16 Macbeth or Macduff 17 Surgically replaceable body parts 19 With 49-Across, jumble 20 Sop up 21 Many a corporate plane 23 On videotape, say 24 Supposed skill of some hotline operators 27 The sun, in Spain 28 Some INTs result in them 29 When mammoths roamed 31 Sedona automaker 33 On-the-spot appraisal 36 “___ directed” 39 Sun-kissed 40 Tea-growing Indian state 41 Classic mountain bikes 44 H.R.H. part 45 Alternative to texts 46 Manhattan’s crosstown arteries: Abbr. 49 See 19-Across 52 Cards, on scoreboards 53 Green “pet” 54 Bar musicians may put them out 56 Total nonsense 58 “___ the loneliest number” 59 Serving with syrup 62 Lee and Laurel 63 As such 64 Merry Prankster Kesey 65 The hotheaded Corleone 66 Protected from rainouts, say 67 Sellout sign

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PUZZLE BY PETE MULLER

DOWN  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13

Terror-struck Greased the palm of Thickets Foot problem Manhattan film festival locale ___ Solo (Ford role) Defib operator Sing like Tom Waits Playwright Fugard Hits the “Add to Cart” button and then continues, say Elicitors of groans Actress Jolie Bug repellent

18 Stewart in the “Wordplay” documentary 22 Action hero’s underwater breathing aid 25 Body part that may be deviated 26 Nightwear … or a hidden feature of 17-, 21-, 33-, 41-, 54- and 59-Across? 29 Clouseau, e.g.: Abbr. 30 Defensive excavation 32 PIN requester 33 “Casablanca” pianist 34 Needle-nosed swimmers 35 Ed.’s workload 36 Work the aisles, informally

37 Put on, as pants 38 Like some Turks and Georgians 42 Give the raspberry 43 Basic orbital path 46 Tases, say 47 Bygone Wall Street device 48 Refuses 50 Spirit of Islamic myth 51 Like a blowhard 53 “The Bourne Supremacy” org. 54 Eject from the game 55 Dirty Harry’s org. 57 Handled the music at a rave 60 DiCaprio, to pals 61 Escort’s offering

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

DOONESBURY

BILLY FORE

GARRY TRUDEAU

JEFF ROBERSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Patient Joe Logsdon holds $5 in his hand to pay for his office visit as Dr. Russell Dohner, right, walks past on Tuesday. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged $2, but has since raised it to $5.

Ill. doctor charges $5 for visits Dohner on call despite rising health care costs THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RUSHVILLE — Patients line up early outside his office just off the town square, waiting quietly for the doctor to arrive, as he has done for nearly 60 years. Dr. Russell Dohner is, after all, a man of routine, a steady force to be counted on in uncertain times. Wearing the fedora that has become his trademark, he walks in just before 10 a.m., after rising early to make rounds at the local hospital. There are no appointments. He takes his patients in the order they sign in — first come, first-served. His office has no fax machines or computers. Medical records are kept on hand-written index cards, stuffed into row upon row of filing cabinets. The only thing that has changed, really — other than the quickness of the doctor’s step or the color of his thinning hair —

O’CONNER FROM PAGE 6A an hour or so and let some calorie-burning fun bring the family together. According to LIVESTRONG’s fitness page, you can burn about 526 calories per hour playing flag or two-hand touch football. Notice the words “friendly” and “flag” in front of football. A visit to the Emergency Room would certainly put a damper on all the festivities.

Do the dishes

Yep, loading the dishwasher for 30 minutes can burn 105 calories, according to FitDay.com. It’s the best revenge on the lazy family members parked on the couch.

VEGAN FROM PAGE 6A ing to the school’s vegan and vegetarian students. Huling said the University is setting an example for schools around the country. “Something that the U of I does quite well and that we’ve encouraged other schools to fol-

is his fee. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged the going rate around town for an office visit: $2. Now it is $5. This in an era when the cost of healthcare has steadily risen, when those who don’t have medical insurance often forgo seeing a doctor. But not Dohner’s patients. He doesn’t even accept medical insurance — says it’s not worth the bother. “I always just wanted to be a doctor to help people with their medical problems and that’s all it’s for .,” the 87-year-old family physician says. “It was never intended to make a lot of money.” Being a doctor, helping and providing a service — that has been his goal since he was a boy. One of seven children, Dohner grew up on a farm just north of Rushville, outside the little town of Vermont, Ill. His father had hoped he’d take up farming, too. But young Dohner had other ideas, inspired by the town doctor who’d treated him when he had seizures as a child. “I remember waking up and seeing the doctor there and thinking, ‘THAT is what I want to do,’” he says.

Lose the chair

It’s no secret that the amount of calories shoveled into your body will far outweigh the meager work of lifting the fork to your mouth. But if you let dear old Aunt Agnes take that last chair, or bite your tongue when cousin Joe snags that last cozy space in front of the TV, you will burn 50 calories more standing than sitting per hour, according to LIVESTRONG’s weight management webpage. And they’ll think you’re just being polite.

Enjoy the day

Ultimately, Turkey Day is about a whole lot more than just the turkey. The number one travel day of the year is meant for just that: making the journey to see family and low ... is offer options that appeal to nonvegetarians,” Huling said. “These are foods that all students could enjoy, regardless of whether they’re vegetarian or not. We encourage schools looking to break into the contest to follow the example of the U of I and others like them.” Huling said that by choosing a vegan option over a meat-filled

After serving in the Army in World War II, Dohner went to Western Illinois University, paying for his education with funds provided by the G.I. bill. In the early 1950s, he attended Northwestern University’s medical school. He had his sights set on becoming a cardiologist and thought about staying in the big city. But when a doctor in Rushville asked him to put off his heart specialist studies to practice medicine back at home, he agreed to do so, at least for a little while. Then that doctor left town. “So I couldn’t very well leave,” Dohner says. “That’s just the way it worked out.” It was a sacrifice, yes. His young wife didn’t want to stay in such a small town, he says, and so their marriage ended. He never remarried and instead dedicated his life to his work, only leaving this small central Illinois town for medical conferences over the years, never taking a true vacation. Even when the medical profession changed around him, he was always on call, ready to drop everything for a patient. friends and pausing for that one day to remember just how much we have to be thankful for. So don’t stress yourself about one day of indulgence; the Boston Globe said the average American will consume over 3,000 calories (almost the equivalent of one pound) during their Thanksgiving Day feast, and I don’t know anyone who would be willing to spend six hours playing flag football with the family to burn it off. So enjoy the company, the food and the holiday atmosphere, and remember to laugh — a study from Vanderbilt University found that you can burn 50 calories with just 10 to 15 minutes of sustained laughter.

Maggie is a junior in LAS. She can be reached at oconno36@ dailyillini.com. dish, students can significantly reduce animal cruelty and global warming. The 2012 winners of PETA’s Most Vegan Friendly College Contest will be announced Thursday. For more information about the contest, visit peta2.com.

Bailey can be reached at bebryan2@ daiylillini.com.

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Time Warp Uncover the secrets behind how we perceive time, and how that changes with good or bad events. Turn to 5A to find out more on why an anxiety-producing situation may seem to last longer than a pleasant experience.

6A | Wednesday, November 14, 2012 | www.DailyIllini.com

Give thanks to a healthy lifestyle Ways to shed some calories on Thanksgiving Day MAGGIE O’CONNER Staff writer

T

PORTRAIT BY KELLY HICKEY THE DAILY ILLINI

New lease on life UI student thankful for doctor who cured her mysterious pain BY ALICE SMELYANSKY

T

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

hanksgiving is a time to rejoice and appreciate family, friends and delicious seasonal food assembled on the dinner table. But for some, the smell of pumpkin pie and turkey stuffi ng doesn’t stir up the usual warm festive feelings associated with this holiday. They only produce powerful, sharp stomachaches. For five months, Kristin Goffi net, senior in LAS, opened her eyes every morning to an instantaneous surge of pain. Beginning last October, each day was a battle against her body and coming out victorious seemed like a distant goal. No matter what Goffi net attempted to eat, she simply could not keep it down. Her days were fi lled with persistent nausea, horrible upper abdominal pain and constant exhaustion from not eating — all leading to a rapid weight loss of about 20 pounds. “You get so hungry. You think, ‘Okay, maybe I’ll just have a cracker.’ But then it didn’t matter what it was, because you would still feel that pain,” she said. “It would last for hours. It’s debilitating.” With no energy to get up in the morning to go to class, Goffi net began searching for the cause to her incapacitating pain. She became a frequent patient at McKinley Health Center, Provena Covenant Medical Center and the emergency room as doctors took blood samples and ran CT scans and MRIs. “They ran every test in the books. They did everything they could think of,” Goffi net said. “But no one could give me a solid answer. And it wasn’t getting better — it was only getting worse.” It was only after a visit to the University of Chicago Medical Center in early December that Goffi net fi nally found herself in the

right hands. The man who saved her life was Though her life is completely different Dr. Donald Liu, section chief of pediatric sur- from how it was a year ago, Goffi net hasn’t gery and surgeon-in-chief at the University of forgotten about the hard times. The support Chicago Medicine’s Comer Children’s Hospi- of her friends, her boyfriend and her family tal. He diagnosed her with having a condition — including her mother, brother and sister called median arcuate ligament syndrome, — helped her cope during those days when or MALS. she couldn’t picture a life without pain. They MALS is a medical condition in which the consistently reminded her the doctors would median arcuate ligament compresses the celi- fi nd a cure, it wouldn’t be much longer and ac artery, causing pain and compromising she would be able to live her life again. blood flow that is vital for digestion. One of And she will never forget the man that gave Liu’s specialties was diagnosing and perform- her life back to her. ing surgery on patients with this disease. While relaxing in southwest Michigan with Liu was “internationally recognized for his family this August, Liu saw two children his expertise in pediatric minimally invasive drowning in Lake Michigan. surgery, a type of surgery that is performed He went out into the water to save them, and while the children made it through small incisions, rather than large, open incisions,” safely back to shore, Liu nevaccording to the University of er made it out. Chicago Medicine website. He “He was a terrific doctor, was the fi rst surgeon in the a sweet person, and super greater Chicago area to presmart and skilled. We knew form these procedures. all that. But the more I have Though she was nervous for learned about him since his the surgery Liu scheduled, passing, it is even clearer how Goffi net was relieved to know lucky we were,” Cindy Goffi that the symptoms were not all net said. in her head, as many doctors Kristin is grateful that she met him when she did. Yet she she visited claimed. “I needed something to hapfeels sorrow for all of the chilpen one way or another. I just dren who were on the waitcouldn’t live like that anying list to see him and the more,” she said. patients just like her that fear Goffi net felt instantly betthey may never fi nd the right ter when she awoke from the diagnosis. CINDY GOFFINET, surgery. Even with all of the “I just couldn’t understand mother of Kristin Goffinet surgical pain, she could feel why he died. Why of all peothe change that had occurred ple?” Kristin Goffi net said. “I think I held onto that thought for a long time in her body. “When she had several days in a row with — that it just wasn’t fair. He was the least no pain, it was like a miracle,” said Cindy Gof- likely deserving of that fate.” fi net, Kristin’s mother. “I truly felt as happy About two weeks after her surgery, Kristin that day as I did the day she was born — it had a checkup with Liu. With a big smile on her face, she seized the opportunity to shake was like a new life was given (to) us.” Now, months after the surgery, Kristin can his hand and say thank you. live a happy, normal college life. This Thanksgiving, she will be thinking of “I am very grateful to have her healthy all the loved ones around her, the abundance again,” said David Myers, senior in AHS and of food before her (which she no longer has to Kristin’s boyfriend. “I am thankful that her and restrict herself from), and of course, Dr. Liu. I can visit our families over break, see everyAlice can be reached at smelyan2@dailyillini.com. one and just enjoy time with our families.”

“He was a terrific doctor, a sweet person, and super smart and skilled. We knew all that. But the more I have learned about him ... it is clear how lucky we were.”

here’s no doubt about it: When we think Thanksgiving, we think food. Period. We dream of tables heaped high with golden turkey, mounds of mashed potatoes, savory stuffing and baskets piled high with warm bread rolls. And then there’s a lot of sitting — sitting around the table, around the TV as football teams charge across the screen, maybe going to see that movie that was released Thanksgiving day or paging through the ads for Black Friday deals. The result? We let those countless calories sit and melt onto us like the spoonfuls of gravy that drown our plates. So if you’re considering going to the movie theater, instead of adding 1,000 calories of salty movie theater popcorn drenched in butter to the already-overwhelming amounts of turkey protruding from your stomach, get up and get moving.

Haul out the holiday decorations Nobody likes climbing through the dusty crawl space or digging through heavy boxes to fi nd those buried decorations from last year, but you will usually fi nd something interesting and the physical activity will hopefully bring you out of your postturkey coma. Of course, this is reserved for those who are at home for the holiday — but maybe you could spread some Thanksgiving cheer by helping your grandparents haul out their decorations. ‘Tis the season.

Gear up for Black Friday shopping Use those stored-up calories for the rush of the Black Friday crowds. A typical shopper can walk up to 2.96 miles and burn about 150 calories per hour — but depending on the urgency of the deals, the dash for the last product on the shelf, not to mention the many bags to carry, can significantly increase that number. Put on your walking shoes, my friends, and let the holiday shopping begin.

Organize a friendly family game of flag football Whether you want to believe it or not, professional football will go on without you watching. Peel your eyes off the TV for

See O’CONNER, Page 5A

Illinois one of nation’s most vegan-friendly universities BY BAILEY BRYANT STAFF WRITER

In addition to supporting animal rights issues, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals holds an annual Most Vegan-Friendly College Contest, currently in its fi nal round. In early October, PETA’s youth division peta2 launched the seventh annual contest, which has two divisions, large and small. Thirty-two schools were chosen to enter each division and then pitted against each other in a single-elimination tournament. The University of Illinois was one of the schools included in the large division. The end of the contest will result in one victor from each

division holding the title of PETA’s Most Vegan-Friendly College. The contest has four rounds and a fi nal matchup. In each round, schools must defeat a predetermined opponent in order to advance. The winner of each round is determined by the number of votes a school receives, the quality and quantity of different vegan dishes offered, the school’s enthusiasm about vegan options and student feedback, according to the PETA website. “We decided to start the contest in response to the overwhelming demand on college campuses for delicious and cruelty-free dining options,” said Ryan Huling, PETA’s manager of College Campaigns and Outreach.

A PETA news release reported that, according to Bon Appétit, the amount of college kids who are vegetarian has doubled and the number of vegan students has increased by more than 50 percent since the Vegan-Friendly College Contest began in 2006. The University was ranked as PETA’s eighth-most-vegan-friendly college in last year’s contest. This year, PETA called Illinois a “standout school” because of the various vegan options in each dining hall. However, the University advanced to the third round before falling to the University of North Texas. Although the University of Illinois didn’t win, many vegetarian and veg-

an students say they are still proud to attend a school that accommodates their lifestyles. “It means absolutely the world to me (to go to a school so accepting of my lifestyle) because outside in the ‘real world,’ it’s sometimes difficult to go out with friends and fi nd places that have vegan and vegetarian options,” said Katherine Rola, freshman in DGS. Jamie Zouras, sophomore in ACES, said dining even played a part in her residency. She said she chose to live in Ikenberry Commons because she knew the dining hall had several clearly marked vegetarian options. “It’d defi nitely be harder (if the dining hall didn’t have vegan options), and

I think it’d impact my health,” Zouras said. “Without having these options, I’d probably resort to less healthy snacking and it’d be really inconvenient if I had to go buy protein substitutes.” Swaminath Srinivas, Ph.D. student in Engineering, said the vegetarian accommodations at the University are especially helpful to international students. “Coming from India, most of us are vegetarian, so it’s really great that there are so many options here,” Srinivas said. With its vegan dining options, the University is doing more than cater-

See VEGAN Page 5A


Sports

1B Wednesday November 14, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Penalty kicks lead to victories

The legacy of No. 73, the honoring of Curtis Speed

BY CHARLIE MANIATES STAFF WRITER

PORTRAIT BY BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois forward Barrera details the significance of what his jersey stands for BY STEPHEN BOURBON AND PATRICK KELLEY STAFF WRITER

The metallic blue Buick careened down the cold South Side Chicago streets. Suspects in a drive-by shooting, Jerry Dean and Joseph Chambers were not focused on anything but escaping the law. With their minds elsewhere, they didn’t see Curtis Speed crossing the street on his way from a dance at Robert Black South Elementary School. Without slowing down, the Buick struck the 11-year-old, dragging him half a block into an almost empty school bus. No skid marks were left. Curtis Speed was killed on Feb. 18, 1995. When Scott Barrera, forward for the Illinois hockey team, dons the No. 73, he is representing much more than himself. Although he never played hockey with Speed — Barrera is five years younger than him — he wears Curtis’ number to commemorate his life. But the tribute began with Barrera’s

older brother, Joe, in mourning of Curtis’ passing. Joe was the captain of the hockey team that Speed played for in 1994-95. Joe said the leadership position was a big deal at the time, so he took it upon himself to take Speed’s number the following season to keep the memory of his late teammate alive. “When you’re at that age and you’re appointed captain, it’s a big deal and you try to be a leader in different ways,” Joe said. “Everyone respected my decision.” Five years older than Scott, Joe was the first Barrera to lace up the skates and play hockey. Looking up to his brother, 5-year-old Scott would tag along to Joe’s 8 a.m. practices, piquing his interest in the sport. “Growing up, for a little while, I was better than (Scott) mainly because I was older,” Joe said. “It quickly became apparent that he had a special talent. ... He basically took it and ran with it.” Scott escalated through the hockey ranks, eventually playing for travel squad Team Illinois at 16. It was at this time he joined his brother, in dedication to Curtis’ memory, in wearing 73 for the first time. The number never left. Scott took the number with him while playing junior hockey in Wasilla, Alaska, and back to Springfield where he played on the Junior Blues. While uncommitted to a university

while playing for the Junior Blues in “I said, ‘Yeah, that wouldn’t be a prob2008-09, then-Illinois assistant coach lem as long as he got straight-As at ParkNick Fabbrini, who had known Joe since land,’” Cassel said. “And he did, so he was his freshman year of high school, reached able to get the number. He also told me out to his Fenwick High School acquain- the story on why he wanted the number tance, Joe, about his brother’s future as well, but I threw that back at him and plans. he was able to do it.” Using his family connection, FabbriScott has made the most of his opporni contacted Scott and tunity playing in orange encouraged him to conand blue. He posted 20 sider playing for Illinois. and 32 points in his first “When I was playing two years, respectively. juniors, you talk to whatAs a senior this year, he is ever schools,” Scott said. an assistant captain and “I had never thought of is tied for the team lead Illinois as an opportunity in points. because of my grades.” Scott has worn No. 73 Needing to improve his for the majority of his academics, Scott’s path playing career at Illinois, to Illini hockey started at the only exception being Parkland College. earlier this season. With While attending the Fabbrini taking over as SCOTT BARRERA, community college, Scott the new head coach, the Illinois forward approached then-Illinois team ordered new jerhead coach Chad Casseys. Unfortunately, they sel about his desire to continue to hon- were stuck on backorder, and the replaceor Curtis’ memory — something that ment orange jerseys didn’t have Barrera’s had become a family tradition. Cassel’s No. 73. From the beginning of the season, custom with numbers was to have one Scott wore 28 until the toughest game of through 32 in stock and not make excep- the year against No. 2 Ohio. tions on a whim. This was the first time “It felt better, it felt like myself,” Barwearing No. 73 had been in jeopardy for rera said. “It felt weird putting on a number that you know isn’t yours.” Scott. After explaining the story to the coach, See HOCKEY, Page 4B Cassel offered Scott a deal.

“It felt better; it felt like myself. It felt weird putting on a number that you know isn’t yours.”

When the Illinois soccer team began practicing penalty kicks, one thing was clear: The postseason was about to start. In collegiate soccer, postseason games can’t end in a tie; following two overtime periods, teams compete in best-of-five penalty kicks with the hopes of advancing to the next round, which ride entirely on just a few 12-yard strikes. The practice has paid off for the Illini, as they have competed in penalty kicks twice in just four postseason games so far. Both resulted in wins: The first was an opening-round victory of the Big Ten Tournament against Minnesota, with a 3-2 score in penalty kicks, while the second was a 3-0 sweep against Missouri in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Saturday. Senior goalkeeper Steph Panozzo saved both shots that were on target, leading the Illini to the second round at North Carolina, head coach Janet Rayfield’s alma mater. “Penalty kicks right now, Steph Panozzo owns,” Rayfield said in a Monday press conference. “When you start a penalty kick shootout on the road with a save by your goalkeeper, it certainly gives you confidence, and you could see in the body language of the Missouri team (that) there was dejection sort of right from the get-go.” Missouri had a number of chances in the overtime periods to grab the win, so advancing to penalty kicks was a relief for the Illini. “The overtime was more challenging on my heart than the PKs were, to be honest,” Rayfield said. One would think that going into a tough situation like this, the pressure is on the goalkeeper to keep her team in it. Panozzo, however, takes a different mental approach when she steps into the penalty box. Following the victory against Missouri, Panozzo said she feels that the weight of the team is on the shooters. She said she simply stays loose and makes the saves that she knows she can, rather than worry about the ones that are out of her reach, something that can be common when opponents are striking from 12 yards out. “I think we have a goalkeeper who has the right mindset going

See SOCCER, Page 4B

Illini fans should have cautious optimism after 2-0 start The first, and perhaps most gratifying sight, is that at long DANIEL last, an Illinois head coach valMILLER-MCLEMORE ues “special teams,” which is what Groce labeled out-ofBasketball columnist bounds situations after the victory over Colgate (for the purfar, so good for the John poses of this column, I’ll ignore Groce era of Illinois the atrocity that is Illinois footbasketball. ball special teams and focus on It’s dangerous to attempt to basketball). glean much meaningful informaFor the better part of Bruce tion about the potential of this Weber’s tenure, Illini fans Illinois team from its two wins watched the team run one fruitagainst Colgate and St. Franless out-of-bounds play after cis to open the season. Colgate another. The players often is a bottom-feeder in the Patriappeared so listless and without ot League, while St. Francis is direction that my friends and I in the middle of the pack in the simply labeled every play “The Northeast Conference. Their Tornado.” I can probably count talent level is simply not reprethe times Illinois scored in those sentative of the rest of Illinois’ situations during my time here schedule. It would be premature on one hand. to draw too many conclusions Groce’s philosophy that every from either game. play, every moment matters, We can, however, learn plenty meanwhile, extends to these about the Illini’s personnel and situations, and the evidence is style of play in the few glimpses already apparent. No more torof the team thus far, and in the nadoes, no more launching a Hail early going, much of it is positive. Mary into the backcourt to avoid

So

a five-second call. Instead, the Illini consistently inbound the ball in the frontcourt and actually score off many out-of-bounds situations. Illinois’ newfound commitment to winning special teams is even more obvious on defense. Groce used situational substitutions, sometimes bringing in 6-foot-11 center Nnanna Egwu solely to attempt to deny the inbounds pass, and often implemented a zone defense when Colgate and St. Francis inbounded the ball. The new head coach’s focus on these seemingly minor, yet critical areas of the game are refreshing after years of watching Illinois slog through them. Groce’s impact can also be seen and felt in the Illini’s style of play through their first two games. The up-tempo style he wants to employ is still a work in progress, but the effects are already finding their way onto

See MILLER-MCLEMORE, Page 4B

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois coach John Groce talks to his team during the Illini’s 75-55 win over Colgate at Assembly Hall on Friday. Groce has won his first two games as head coach at Illinois.

Freshman forward plays big role in women’s basketball opener BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

Illinois women’s basketball forward McKenzie Piper ran out of the tunnel in Assembly Hall for an actual Division I NCAA basketball game for the first time Sunday. Following a parade of cheerleaders, the freshman was greeted by the school song and an above-average sized crowd of 1,625. Just three minutes and 25 seconds into her first game, Piper was taken off the bench and thrust into the action. She didn’t get a rest until seconds were left in the first half. “As a freshman, there’s a lot thrown at you,” head coach Matt Bollant said. In addition to playing 17 minutes in her first half of college

basketball, Piper was forced to play an unfamiliar position. “Sometimes today, Piper was playing the five (center),” Bollant said after Sunday’s 84-52 win over Evansville. “She hasn’t played any five yet, so it’s time to learn and it’s time to step up.” The freshman from Iowa City stepped up when it counted. Because of early foul trouble to starters Kersten Magrum and Karisma Penn, Piper was called on for 25 minutes in her career opener, and she took advantage, scoring 14 points and grabbing seven rebounds. “I’m proud of her,” Bollant said. “You could tell she was tired at times, but she kept fighting.” Piper is listed in the program

as a guard, but the 6-footer has cracked into the frontcourt rotation along with Penn, Magrum and Nia Oden. The former guard showed that she isn’t afraid to make her presence known outside of the paint, converting two of six 3-point attempts and finishing 4-for-4 at the foul line.

Defensive adjustments For the first time this season, Illinois got into foul trouble Sunday. With four starters committing at least two first-half fouls, Bollant decided to switch the defense from man-to-man to the “buzz” defense, which Bollant described as a 2-1-2 zone that

plays the passing lanes. “It’s unique to women’s basketball,” he said. “There’s a lot of teams trying to run it, but not many teams will run it as aggressively as our players. Not many teams will play as hard in it as we do.” Bollant said he didn’t know where the name for the defense came from, but some other teams who run it call it the “twilight” defense. “It needs to be called the “buzz” because nobody runs it as well as we will,” he said. “It’s a style of defense that most teams don’t see. It’s unique to Illinois and it’s going to give people fits.” The Illini ran the “buzz” and their man-to-man defenses well

on Sunday, holding the Purple Aces to 25.5 percent from the field, including 15 percent from behind the arc. Illinois also forced 26 turnovers and outrebounded Evansville 52-36. Illinois’ 25 fouls allowed Evansville 38 free-throw attempts.

Starting off strong Bollant became the fourth head coach in program history to win his first game at Illinois. He joined former head coaches Laura Golden, Theresa Grentz and Jolette Law. Both Golden and Grentz lost their second games, while Law didn’t lose until her third. Sunday’s 32-point margin of victory was the most by any of

the coaches. Law won her first game by 30 points. Illinois’ new head coach also won his first game at WisconsinGreen Bay and Bryant College. Bollant never lost a season opener at Green Bay. None of the players on the current roster had won their season opener at Illinois until Sunday, suffering defeats to Temple, Illinois State and South Carolina, respectively, in the last three seasons. Illinois was one of 10 Big Ten schools to win its season opener. Indiana and Ohio State lost to Valparaiso and Notre Dame, respectively.

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@ dailyillini.com and @jhett93.


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

ILLINI ATHLETES SOUND OFF

Editor’s note: Every Thursday, the Daily Illini sports department will ask four Illinois student-athletes questions pertaining to life off the field. More online: Video available at www.DailyIllini.com

Compiled by Alex Roux

Best Halloween costume seen?

Jackie Wolfe Senior, volleyball

Who is most likely Favorite place to go to be president on for away game/meet? the team?

Ginger-bread man

Hoodies or Crewnecks?

Favorite Thanksgiving food?

Annie Luhrsen

Penn State

Hoodies

Mashed potatoes, gravy and green bean casserole

Jordan Blanton Senior, wrestling

Phil from Duck Dynasty

Matt Ruettiger

Northwestern

Hoodies

Sweet potatoes

Tony Dallago Junior, wrestling

Duck Dynasty brothers

Matt Ruettiger

Penn State

Hoodies

Stuffing

Cow

Sarah Coady

Minnesota

Hoodies

Stuffing

Alison Meng Sophomore, swimming and diving

FANTASY DOCTOR

Utilize waivers, trades as season comes to an end JACK CASSIDY Fantasy doctor

B

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois' Graham Pocic guards Nathan Scheelhaase during the game against Penn State at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 29.

Illini offensive line will have hands full with Purdue’s Short BY SEAN HAMMOND STAFF WRITER

Despite the 17-3 loss to Minnesota on Saturday, senior offensive lineman Graham Pocic thought he saw some improvements from the front five. But when the Illinois football team takes the field for this week’s senior day matchup with Purdue, it may be facing the best defensive lineman the team has seen all season. At 6-foot-3, 315 pounds, senior defensive tackle Kawann Short is an unmistakable presence at the front of the Purdue defense. Short’s 13 tackles for loss are more than double the number any of his teammates have reached. He also has five sacks. To put that into perspective, not a single Illini defender has double-digit tackles for loss, or more than 2.5 sacks on the season. “He’s probably the best defensive lineman we’ll play all year,” Pocic said. “Watching film, he definitely causes trouble for oppos-

ing teams to block. We’ve played against him the last two years, and we expect a dogfight against him.” The Illini will spend a lot of energy trying to contain Short, but he is not the only threat on the Purdue defense. The Boilermakers give a lot of different looks and play a multitude of defensive backs. Sixteen Boilermaker defenders have played in all 10 games and have double-digit tackles on the season. “They’re going to be tough to move,” Illinois co-offensive coordinator Billy Gonzales said. “They’ve rotated six backers consistently. That’s the one thing that they’ve done a good job of, they’ve rotated their players a ton. They’ll play four corners.” The only two defenders who Gonzales expects to be on the field the entire game are safeties Landon Feichter and Taylor Richards. Feichter leads Purdue with 61 tackles. The offensive staff

expects to see a lot of man-to-man coverage from Purdue. Despite the Boilermakers’ weapons on the defensive side, Purdue ranks second to last in the Big Ten in total defense. That would seem to be a reason for optimism for Illinois, but the Illini offense ranks dead last in the Big Ten. “I think that’s one of our biggest issues is that we just haven’t had enough big plays,” co-offensive coordinator Chris Beatty said. “When we get opportunities, it’s like I told our guys, ‘You can’t hit long foul balls.’ When we get our shots, we’ve got to make them count.” Beatty said the Illinois offense is frustrated at this point in the season. He said Illinois running backs need to stop trying to make a big play on every down, settling for a four- or five-yard gain when appropriate, which will eventually open up the field a little bit more. With a last-second field goal to

beat Iowa 27-24 last week, Purdue broke a five-game losing streak and picked up its first conference victory. If the Boilermakers win their final two games, they would become bowl eligible for the second straight season for the first time in 10 years. But with Saturday’s matchup being the final game in Champaign for the Illinois seniors, the Illini want to send them off on a high note. And to do that, they will have to keep an eye on Short. “They’re a heavy blitz team, they defi nitely get after it up front,” quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase said. “They throw a lot of different looks at you to try to get you confused. You have to be able to know the keys and certain tendencies that they have with what they do. They are definitely a team that likes to throw a lot of different looks at you.”

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@ dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

elieve it or not, the fantasy season is rapidly approaching the end. It’s almost playoff time. Start managing like it. If you’re near the bottom of the standings or on the outside looking in at the playoff picture, make some moves. But don’t be reckless. Be sensible. There are two routes for acquiring players: trades and waivers. Utilize both. If you decide to take the trade route, then you need to think about week-by-week performances, taking into consideration lateseason production. Who can you rely on when it matters most, Week 14 and later? You can’t rely on teams coasting through the end of the season with playoff berths already wrapped up (Falcons and Texans). If the team has nothing to play for, the players don’t play. Example: Don’t trade for Roddy White. Excellent receiver, yes, but come fantasy playoff time, he’s on the bench drinking Gatorade and chatting with Julio Jones (don’t trade for him, either) about the Saturday night Atlanta bar scene. He’ll be having a great time. You’ll be losing. An infi nitely wiser decision would be to trade for players in the NFC East and NFC North. Percy Harvin, Aaron Rodgers, Brandon Marshall and others will be fighting to the bitter end for the division title, so their effort will be at top level. Perfect for fantasy production. Leech off that effort for a title of your own. On the waiver wire, the players to look for are those with high ceilings. A Michael Bush-type player — someone who bruises defenses and gets goal-line touchdowns — isn’t the player you want at this time of the season. They’re solid but not special. Instead, you want game breakers. You want a speedster running back who’s just now realizing his potential. You want the big-

play receiver who’s moved up the depth chart and now gets eight targets a game. You want 25-point potential players. These two players bring that type of promise. Jacquizz Rodgers (running back, Falcons, 11.4 percent owned in ESPN leagues) — Michael Turner is done. Completely done. Turner the Burner and I go way back (2010), so I’ve had a hard time coming to terms with it. In fact, I’ve been in denial. But it’s true. He hit that devastating “30 years of age” threshold for running backs and lost all his talent. A running back over 30 is like a horse with a broken leg. Rodgers is the young stallion who is waiting in the stable for trainers to clear Turner’s broken-down body off the track. The Falcons haven’t let him run free yet, as evidenced by his zero rushing touchdowns this year, but Rodgers has all the tools. And they’ll let him run soon enough. How do I know? See “don’t trade for Falcons” section above. Just when Turner hits the bench to rest for the postseason, Rodgers fi nally gets his chance to shoulder the load of the Atlanta backfield. I’m expecting a monster performance from him in the fi nal weeks of the season. Danario Alexander (wide receiver, Chargers, 0.1 percent owned) — Alexander has a long history of knee troubles, which led to him being a free agent for a large portion of this season. But midway through October, he signed with the Chargers. Then he began working his way up the depth chart. Now, he’s the No. 2 receiver in San Diego and the No. 1 target of quarterback Phillip Rivers. And to fi nally prove his return to fantasy prominence, he caught five passes for 134 yards and one touchdown last week. Someone in your league is going to take a chance on Alexander. Make sure it is you.

Jack is a senior in LAS. He can be reached at cassidy8@ dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @JCassidy10.

Volleyball’s seniors remember how they changed Illini culture BY DANIEL MILLER-MCLEMORE STAFF WRITER

Heading into the season’s penultimate week of competition, the Illinois volleyball team (11-15, 5-11 Big Ten) is fighting for its life to make the NCAA tournament. With wins in their fi nal four games, the Illini will become eligible for postseason play. A tough schedule and strong RPI makes it a potential bubble team, but for the first time since 2007, Illinois will not host the first- and secondround tournament games. So when the Illinois volley-

ball team takes the court against Michigan and Michigan State this weekend, it will be the fi nal two times the team’s five seniors — Jackie Wolfe, Annie Luhrsen, Erin Johnson, Taylor Onion and Jessica Jendryk — play under the lights of Huff Hall. “I’m gonna be really sad,” Wolfe said. “I can’t believe that senior night came. Oh, I’m gonna cry, it came so fast. It’s probably going to be really emotional. Everyone’s just been joking, ‘We should just get a bucket to pick up Jackie’s tears on Saturday.’ So it’s really sad. It’s been an amazing

four years and I just don’t want it to end.” The five seniors have been a part of some of the most successful teams in the program’s history. They entered the program at the same time then-assistant Kevin Hambly took over the head coaching position from Don Hardin in 2009. Since that time, the five seniors have helped the Illini to a 93-35 record, three appearances in the Sweet 16 and the lone national championship appearance in the program’s history, finishing second to UCLA in 2011. But Hambly said their mark on

the program was felt more significantly elsewhere. “People are gonna look at the wins and losses and the runs we had,” Hambly said. “To me, it’s more about the culture that they have helped develop. When they came, the culture was established, but it needed to keep evolving. And where it’s evolved to is a place that I’m proud to be a part of, really, and they had a lot to do to that. They’re very strong people.” “It’s kinda been special because our coaches are so willing to decide what we want the program to look like,” Luhrsen said.

“And because our class has stayed together from freshman year all the way through, I think we have been able to make a lot of changes that we’d like to see, mostly in the culture.” The most mentioned evolution in the program relates to the culture the seniors have put in place, which is one that does not recognize or differentiate between classes, from freshmen all the way up to seniors. Freshmen are not hazed, forced to tote gear or clean the bus, and everyone shares an equal voice in team matters. Case in point: Luhrsen,

a redshirt senior and the most seasoned veteran on the team, is almost always the first player to arrive at practice to set up the nets and court. Despite the Illini losing 10 of their last 13 matches, that culture is what has helped Illinois maintain its unity and positive chemistry. And while Hambly said team culture is always evolving based on the personnel and personalities, Wolfe and Luhrsen both hope their mark is one that sticks.

Daniel can be reached at millerm1@ dailyillini.com and @danielmillermc.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

3B

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

FOR RENT

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810

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830 Adoption/Egg Donation 850

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SOCCER FROM PAGE 1B

The class you need starts next week. And the next week. And the one after that.

into penalty kicks,â&#x20AC;? Rayfield said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a team and you see that kind of attitude from your goalkeeper, I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly a situation that we go into with some confidence.â&#x20AC;? The Illiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith when it comes to penalty kicks speaks to their change in mentality in the latter

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Along with the comfort of wearing his own number, Barrera was comfortable on the ice, scoring two goals in front of the home crowd in a 5-0 upset victory over the Bobcats. Scott isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only Barrera still wearing 73. His dad and Joe both sport the number for their respective Chicago Police hockey teams. While the Barrera family has never forgotten about Speed, the number has taken on a significant meaning within the family. Separated by 150 miles of Illinois cornfields, the family is connected by the common number they all represent. Taking the lesson from Speed over 17 years ago, Joe and his dad patrol the same dangerous streets that prematurely claimed the life of the 11-year-old. It represents a hard truth that life is fragile, especially for those constantly in the line of fire. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It encompasses a lot of feelings such as how we might not be here tomorrow,â&#x20AC;? Joe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life is very precious. It also just represents family. It is kind of like our family crest now.â&#x20AC;? That symbol isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going anywhere anytime soon. Both Joe and Scott plan to continue the tradition with their future families by passing the number to their children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to wear it, well weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to have a talk,â&#x20AC;? Joe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is something that I will hold in importance, and they will see that as they grow up.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll force my son to wear it,â&#x20AC;? Scott said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a choice.â&#x20AC;?

the court. Illinois isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t running the floor like a Roy Williams-coached North Carolina team yet, but the pace of its offense, both the fullcourt and the halfcourt, has picked up significantly. Gone are the days when every other possession came down to Demetri McCamey dribbling the shot clock down to its waning seconds before hoisting up a contested jump shot. In Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win against Colgate, the shot clock dipped below 10 seconds only a few times all game. In Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victory over St. Francis, it dropped under 10 just four times and never fell below seven. The Illini scored more than 40 points in the first half against Colgate and in both halves against St. Francis, a feat they achieved only once all last season. This is a team that gets shots up early and often, an exciting style of play for both players and spectators. It would be easy to criticize Illinois for taking too many threes, as the Illini have hoisted up 55 in two games, but almost all of those were good looks that Groce encourages his players to let fly. And as the first-year coach openly admits, this is primarily a jump-shooting team. The personnel left by Weber requires it. Six players hit a 3-pointer against Colgate and seven knocked one down against St. Francis. The slashing and post game needs to develop, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubt this team will live and die by the jump shot. Yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early. The competition is as wanting. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pleasantly surprising to see the Illini already fixing some of the most frustrating aspects of the last few yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shortcomings. It gives cause for cautious optimism and bodes well for this teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-term prospects.

Daniel is a senior in Media. He can be reached at millerm1@ dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @danielmillermc.

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Rayfield said the team is not concerned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done it a couple of times, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure the video is out there,â&#x20AC;? Rayfield said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to now make sure we have more players that are willing and ready to step up and do that, and I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got that in our squad.â&#x20AC;?

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Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini. com and @steve_bourbon. Patrick can be reached at pkelley2@dailyillini.com and @_PatrickKelley_.

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half of the season. The wins have piled up since they began focusing on the things they are good at, and the results are prevalent in penalty kicks. In fact, freshman midfielder Taylor Peterson and junior defender Kassidy Brown have recorded penaltykick tallies in both matches. Illinois will need to change things up, though, to avoid getting into a routine now that the scouting report is out there. But

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MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois goalie Steph Panozzo reaches for the ball on a cross attempt during Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s match against Iowa. The Illini held on to win 2-1. Panozzo has helped the Illini to two victories on penalty kicks this offseason.

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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 58