Issuu on Google+

Homecoming guide: Check out the orange and blue events SECTION C

It’s all up to us now Candidates make push in final debate NEWS, 3A

Tuesday October 23, 2012

The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

High: 78˚ Low: 57˚

Vol. 142 Issue 42

|

FREE

ISS at odds over spending Two senators want to give back funds BY CORINNE RUFF STAFF WRITER

With an extra 40 cents in your pocket, you could buy a stick of gum or 24 minutes of parking. Whatever you might use 40 cents for, two senators from the Illinois Student Senate want to return about that amount of money to you. The proposal, written by senators Matt Gold, senior in LAS, and Max Ellithorpe, graduate student, will be introduced during the senate’s regular meeting Wednesday. They want to refund students the excess money the senate retains at the end of each fi scal year. According to last year’s rollover, that amount would turn out to be just over 40 cents per student. “The student senate has a

ISS spending so far this year For a complete description of these categories, visit Dailyillini.com. › › › › › ›

Name Plates $929.60 Quad Day $3,786.42 ABTS $1,063.62 Summer Supplies $252.40 Stamps $90.00 Travel Around the WorldRA $40.08

Allocated to spend: › GPAC Website $10.00 › Illini Basketball $9,000.00 › Webmaster $1,200.00 › October Events $1,050.00 › Robert’s Rules of Order $22.84 › I-Clicker $7,000 › Political Debate $420.00 Co-sponsorship of reception following the debate includes: › Cookies $120 › Brownies $130.00 › Water $45.00 › Coffee $125.00 SOURCE: FINANCIAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

BY CLAIRE EVERETT STAFF WRITER

Student senate’s surplus grows since ’08 The Illinois Student Senate recieves $39,000 each year from the University through a portion of the service fee. At the end of the year, unspent money rolls over into the next year.

Amount of money rolled over

$20,000

$18,713

$15,000

$12,980

$10,000

$5,000

0

Sustainability Week begins with tours

QUICK REPORT

See ISS FUNDS, Page 3A

$4,481

CLAIRE EVERETT THE DAILY ILLINI

Olivia Webb, sophomore in ACES and Engineering, takes compressed, sustainable paper pulp out of a mold at the Student Sustainable Farm's open house Monday.

$5,332 $3,518

“Orange, Blue, and Go Green Week,” the University’s third annual Sustainability Week, began with an open house at the Student Sustainable Farm on Monday. Members from environmental organizations and projects came to the farm to eat sustainably farmed food, learn about one group’s new sustainable papermaking and take a tour of the farm. Brenda Welch is a chef at Florida Avenue Residence Hall, which buys its produce from the student farm, and said produce from other sources was incomparable to theirs. “Having things fresh and delivered to you the day it’s ripe is just incredible,” Welch said. Anthropology professor Laura Davis encouraged her students to

’11-’12

Fiscal year Source: Rhonda Kirts, ISS adviser and associate dean of students

BRYAN LORENZ Design editor

For 1st time, early voting an option on campus at Union For the first time, students can vote early on campus. Early-voting stations opened Monday morning at the Illini Union in Room 317. “The location of the early voting station on campus has been controversial in past years, and the Union generously made this room available to us free of charge,” Champaign County Clerk Gordy Hulten said on Monday. State Sen. Mike Frerichs, D-52, was also on campus for the opening of the early voting stations. Frerichs led the push to pass legislation to open eight new early-voting locations in Champaign. Frerichs said he

INSIDE

the University’s Student Sustainable Farm apart from those of other universities. At the end of the event, Grant gave a tour of the farm’s high tunnels, greenhouses used to prolong growing seasons, and explained the benefits of the newly expanded space. Students for Environmental Concerns president Emily Cross, senior in LAS, said she was excited for what was to come from this year’s Sustainability Week. “I’d really like to see students getting active and working with the University to make our footprint more sustainable,” Cross said. “Sustainability Week helps with raising awareness and showing students how they can get involved.”

Claire can be reached at everett5@ dailyillini.com.

SNL’s Meyers comes to Assembly Hall on tour BY ALISON MARCOTTE

STAFF WRITER

Agricultural waste and indigenous fibers, such as prairie grass, sunflower stalks and tomato vines, are dried, chipped, “beaten into pulp” and pressed for stabilization, Benson said. Fibers are then placed in a vat of water where a mold in the shape of a rectangle collects the fibers. Steve Kostell, co-creator of Fresh Press and Art and Design Lecturer, said the goal of the initiative is to create a “make and take” cooperative. “Students can come and prepare the fibers and make the pulp, then make sheets of paper and take it with them to do whatever creative process they’re interested in,” Kostell said. Farm manager and University alumnus Zack Grant said the multidisciplinary collaboration between departments is what sets

Q&A: SETH MEYERS

’07-’08 ’08-’09 ’09-’10 ’10-’11

BY MATT RICE

come to the open house and sample the produce. Davis said, “To think a little more deeply about where our food is coming from and what it’s becoming is a major concern of mine.” Nearby the food tent where attendees were able to try out the food, a papermaking tent was set up. At that tent, the Fresh Press, an agri-fiber papermaking group started by two University Art and Design employees, demonstrated how to make environmentallyfriendly paper. “Papermaking from trees is a very intensive process of water and energy, so we’re looking to mitigate that by changing the way paper is made,” said Eric Benson, co-creator of the papermaking initiative and assistant professor of graphic design.

What: Early voting Where: Illini Union Room 317 When: Oct. 22 through Nov. 3 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Polls are closed Sundays. took up the cause because having a polling place in a high-traffic area of campus is beneficial to the democratic process. It would also be a welcome change from the inconvenient locations of past campus stations, he said. “Two years ago, the previous county clerk turned down the free location being offered by the Union and opted instead to

See EARLY VOTING, Page 3A

ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

“Saturday Night Live” head writer Seth Meyers is coming to Assembly Hall on Tuesday as a part of his stand-up comedy tour. Meyers is in his sixth season as SNL’s head writer and “Weekend Update” anchor and his 11th season as an SNL cast member. A Northwestern University graduate, Meyers has performed at iO, an improv comedy theater in Chicago, and toured internationally with Boom Chicago. Meyers headlined the 2011 White House Correspondents Association dinner and hosted the 2010 and 2011 ESPY Awards. The Daily Illini recently interviewed Meyers about his tour, SNL and comedy in general.

Daily Illini: Could you tell me more about the stand-up tour, and what inspired you to start the tour? Seth Meyers: I’m not really on

tour as much during the SNL season. I only have a few weeks off here and there, but I try to get out and do as much stand-up as possible. I always like doing

college shows. It’s such a great audience for me. And so it’s just lucky that Illinois had a date open when I was coming, when I was available.

DI: How does performing stand-up compare to writing for and acting on SNL? SM: The great thing about writ-

ing on SNL is that we have this incredibly talented cast, and it’s such a gift to be able to put words in their mouths. It always makes whatever you write so much better. Whereas the nice part about stand-up is you get to spend time with the audience. It’s just yourself for an hour. And so for me, it’s really nice to be able to step out behind the desk and have that freedom to have a little bit more open interaction with people, as opposed to just talking to a camera.

DI: How is writing for SNL during election season? How does this year’s election differ from the last one? SM: Four years ago, we knew we had something pretty special

PHOTO COURTESY OF NBCUNIVERSAL

happening when John McCain picked a running mate that looked exactly like Tina Fey. We were aware that we were probably getting luckier than we had any right to get. This year is also fun, though. It’s a little bit more fun when there’s no incumbent because you have two new kinds of characters enter the political scene. This year obviously we have President Obama, who we’ve spent four years with already, but we have a new actor playing him, so that’s kind of exciting. And then on the other side, we love

Jason’s (Sudeikis) Mitt Romney.

DI: I read that you were a member of Phi Gamma Delta at Northwestern. U of I has one of the largest Greek communities in the country; how was your own experience with Greek life? SM: It was great. I really enjoyed it. Northwestern was a pretty Greek school when I was there. And the friends I made there are still some of my closest friends, although they’re behaving in a much different way than they did when they

See MEYERS, Page 3A

Police 2A | Corrections 2A | Horoscopes 2A | Opinions 4A | Crossword 5A | Comics 5A | Business & Technology 6A | Sports 1B | Classifieds 3B | Sudoku 3B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300 The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editor Bryan Lorenz )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Asst. design editor Eunie Kim Michael Mioux Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Samantha Kiesel Photo night editor: Melissa McCabe Copy editors: Lucy Brace, Audrey Majors, Kirsten

Keller, Rob Garcia, Ilya Gurevic, Lauren Cox Designers: Scott Durand, Maddie Cole Page transmission: Natalie Zhang

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM damaging 11 items. ! Residential burglary and criminal damage to property was reported in the 1300 block of Maplepark Drive around 4:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender forced entry into the victim’s residence and stole 78 items and damaged five. ! Residential burglary was reported in the 2100 block of West White Street around 6:30 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, an unknown offender entered the victim’s residence and stole eight items. ! A 20-year-old male was arrested on the charge of retail theft at Walmart, 2610 N. Prospect Ave., around 4:30 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, the suspect stole 2 items and was issued a notice to appear for retail theft. ! A 31-year-old female was arrested on the charge of retail theft at County Market, 331 E. Stoughton St., around 6 p.m. Friday. According to the report, the suspect attempted to leave the store without paying for her merchandise. The suspect was stopped by loss prevention and

was issued a notice to appear for retail theft by the police. ! A 19-year-old male was arrested on the charge of possession of cannabis at the intersection of North Fifth Street and University Avenue just before midnight Saturday. According to the report, a police officer approached the suspect while he was walking down the sidewalk. A search was done and cannabis was found. ! Residential burglary was reported in the 1100 block of West Bradley Avenue around 6:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender forced entry into the victim’s home and stole 16 items. ! Arson was reported in the 1200 block of Garden Lane around 8 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unoccupied house caught fire. University ! A 19-year-old male was arrested on the charge of driving under the influence of drugs near Fourth Street and Kirby Avenue around 9 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the suspect was initially pulled over for speeding.

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

understandings. Don’t despair if you’re not getting a response just yet. Replies come in later.

The coins keep flowing in this year ... use them to pay down debt and stash into savings. Adapt to constant change at work, as new opportunities arise. Reassess habits and practices for a healthier lifestyle; a subtle tweak can make a big difference.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Today is an 8 -- This week is good for travel, but there could be delays or errors. Difficulties with family members get resolved later. Make long-range plans. Invest in your future.

day is a 9 -- Things fall together, with expert help. Stir things up, even if it’s just in your imagination. Consider opening new channels of communication.

Champaign An 18-year-old male and a 21-year-old male were arrested on the charge of possession of cannabis in the 00 block of East Armory Avenue around 2 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspects were issued notices to appear for possession of cannabis. ! Residential burglary and criminal damage to property were reported in the 1300 block of Theodore Drive just before midnight Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender entered the victim’s residence and stole nine items and damaged one item. ! Theft from a motor vehicle and criminal damage to property were reported in the 1000 block of South Fourth Street around 3 p.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged the victim’s car and stole the car’s front license plate. ! Burglary was reported at TruGreen, 108 Petry Court, around 6 a.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender burglarized the business of one item while !

Copyright © 2012 Illini Media Co.

Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

POLICE

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (Mar. 21-April 19) -- Today is a 6 -- There’s no time for gossip; it’s too much to handle. It���s not a good time to travel for the next few days. Postpone expansion. Acknowledge successes, even if tiny. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -- Don’t stop learning as you go along. Consider all possibilities before giving up. If you’re still stuck, listen to friends for advice and comfort. Make fun a priority. Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Today is an 8 -- Take on new responsibilities today and tomorrow. There’s room for mis-

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- Tackle detailed tasks and negotiations for the next few days. Define objectives. Stick to the budget without gambling. It may require digging into savings for a career investment. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- It’s never too late to learn a new trade or language, or how to play an instrument. Let others help you. Choose something fun and immerse yourself. Get wet. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- A breakdown in communication could happen, but you can deal with that. The more intricate the work is, the more rewarding; especially for the next two days. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- To-

The College of Business will host an inaugural conference Friday for students in the Business Honors Program. The event will include short TEDTalks style presentations from 19 speakers. Click to dailyillini. com for more.

CORRECTIONS

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 7 -- You don’t have to go out of your way to dream, as fantasies abound. Improve your living conditions, but wait until later to close the deal. Toss the ball to a teammate.

In the Oct. 22, 2012, issue of The Daily Illini, the preview box supplementing the article “Scrimmage will show Groce’s hoops philosophy” states that the game would be televised on ESPN at 7 p.m. when in fact the game was not aired on TV. The Oct. 17 article that ran online “Local makeup artists kick start business with a personal touch” stated the name of the company as Prime Artistry Design. In fact, the business’s name is Prime Design Artistry. Further, the article said the business owners could accommodate two to six clients, when in fact they can serve one person and more than six. Further, the article stated the girls are “on their way to becoming makeup artists.” It should have stated they are currently working as makeup artists. In the Oct. 15 edition of The Daily Illini, the article “Disability expo raises awareness, fights stigmas” contained several errors. The expo was sponsored by the Champaign County Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Boards and community donors, not the Anti-Stigma Alliance. Also the Amtryke bicycles, like the one that was presented to a child at the event, are specially designed to meet an individual child’s needs and is not specifically for people with lower-body paralysis. The Barking Angels Service Dog Foundation exhibited at the expo but did not present at the event. Ministry in Motion presented as part of entertainment in 2011, not 2012. The Daily Illini regrets these errors.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 9 -- You have extra confidence today and tomorrow, which helps you put together the best team possible. You all do the seemingly impossible. Make magic.

When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

Compiled by Klaudia Dukala

HOROSCOPES BY NANCY BLACK

Inaugural business conference to start Friday

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -Today is a 9 -- You don’t need to worry; just get busy. It’s easy to overlook an important detail, so take notes and double-check your calendar. Discover your own truth. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is an 8 -- Don’t waste words or money. And don’t dwell into the past either. Your intelligence is easily accessible now, so use it to your advantage. Accept a sweet deal.

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

General contacts: Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production................(217) 337-8320

Newsroom Corrections: If you think something is incorrectly reported, please call Editor in Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337-8365. News: If you have a news tip, please contact Daytime editor Maggie Huynh at 337-8350 or News Editor Taylor Goldenstein at 337-8352 or e-mail news@DailyIllini.com. Press releases: Please send press releases to news@DailyIllini.com Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact Photo Editor Daryl Quitalig at 337-8344 or e-mail photo@ DailyIllini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call Sports Editor Jeff Kirshman at 337-8363 or e-mail sports@dailyillini.com. Calendar: Please submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com/calendar. Employment: If you would like to work in the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact Managing Editor Reporting Nathaniel Lash at 337-8343 or email mewriting@DailyIllini.com. Letters to the editor: Contributions may be sent to: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820 or e-mailed to opinions@ DailyIllini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. UI students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Daily Illini On-air: If you have comments or questions about our broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please call 337-8381 or e-mail meonair@DailyIllini.com. DailyIllini.com: Contact Managing Editor Online Hannah Meisel at 337-8353 or meonline@DailyIllini. com for questions or comments about our Web site.

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. ! Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. ! Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com.

Pizza costs dough. Find a job to pay for all your extras  !"#$%&#'(#)*+,,!-#&.,/#0!".#!$#!"#$%&# '(#)*+,,!-#&.,#+".#1"*!"&#+$# .+!*2!**!"!/314

DADS WEEKEND Nov. 9-11 2012

Pop open the SIX PACK with your Dad! Six events sponsored by the Dads Association

!"#$%&'()*'+,Y O U R C A M P U S H E A LT H C E N T E R

www.illinidads.com

Dads Welcome Reception

FREE!

Illini Union, South Lounge Co­sponsored by Illini Union Parent !"#$"%&'()*+(,-.(/-*"-'0&-12'3( event tickets, awards and the crowning of King Dad

5 PM­ 7 PM

illinois men’s basketball

for tickets visit: !"#$%&'#&((&'&)*+,

Assembly Hall Watch the Fighting Illini take on 4#5$%2-(61(20-(7%86(45%''6,.(!"-'-12-9( by the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics

7 PM

.%/0"$%&'()*'12,mckinley.illinois.edu

Annual Dads Association Pre-Game Barbeque

SOLD OUT!

:,26;626-'(<(/-,"-%26#1(4-12-"(=:/4> 2 hrs before Enjoy great barbeque from Hickory kickoff /6;-"(<(-12-"2%61&-12(?620(#20-"(*%&656-'

89TH DADS DAY FOOTBALL GAME: ILLINOIS VS MINNESOTA

for tickets visit: !"#$%&'#&((&'&)*+,

Memorial Stadium The original & best celebration for Dads, on any campus, continues with Big Ten Football

TBA

TCF BANK, CLASSIC ROCK 105.9 WGKC & THE ILLINI UNION BOARd PRESENT

SOLD OUT! Gates: 6:30 PM

AMERICAN ENGLISH Follinger Auditorium The world’s greatest Beatles tribute band

mckinley.illinois.edu

SUNDAY BRUNCH WITH DAD

SOLD OUT!

Buy tickets, check out the latest events, and learn about the Dads Association at our website:

www.illinidads.com


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

3A

Tech Zone store launching at Illini Union on Friday BY GARRETT WILLIAMS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

University students will soon have another option when shopping for electronics around campus. The Illini Union Tech Zone will have its grand opening celebration this Friday at the new store in the Union. Rebecca Salzman, assistant to the director of the Illini Union, has been working on the project since its inception and is excited to see it so close to launching. She said she hopes students will benefit from the improvements made to the store. “I hope we are able to offer more of what students are looking for and offer it at educational pricing,” Salzman said. “We want to put the students in the best position possible.” Though run by the same company, the new store will replace the smaller Flash Drive — which was also located in the Union — but will offer new services the old venue couldn’t provide. “We’re going to have a much more robust service department,” Salzman said, “So if you have issues with your devices you can bring them and schedule appointments to bring your devices in for service.” Christine Dietrich, assistant director of retail technology, said the business has increased the number of technicians to three, while Flash Drive only had one. Dietrich said the Flash Drive

ISS FUNDS FROM PAGE 1A bad habit of wasting money,” Gold said. “We really need a big push to get us back on track to fi scal responsibility. What we hope to come of (the proposal), whether it passes or fails, is a reminder to the senate to be accountable.” Rhonda Kirts, senate adviser and associate dean of students, said the senate receives a fi xed budget of $39,000 per year. Kirts said this money comes from a part of the service fee. Kevin Seymour, treasurer and graduate student, said a small percentage of what students pay in fees per semester goes to the senate, but students defi nitely get their value through co-sponsored events, advocacy and the student code, which makes sure students are treated fairly. The most recent contract between the senate and University administration from 2007 also states that “any unused portions of the ISS budget shall be maintained and included in the budget of the following fi scal year.” Last fi scal year, $18,713 was left over, a $15,195 jump from 2008. Seymour said he thought the treasurer and fi nancial affairs committee last year set the tone to be more conservative than necessary. He said he thinks some of the events the senate chose not to fund were worth spending money on. “I personally plan on spending it down to (4,000) or 5,000 (dollars), enough to hold a buffer,” Seymour said. Seymour said it would actually cost more money to refund the students the money than the actual amount students would receive. He said he thinks senators have been asking for money for necessary events and com-

MEYERS FROM PAGE 1A were in the Greek system. Now they have families and stuff, so they’ve kind of toned it down.

DI: Who have been your favorite SNL hosts, musical acts and cast members to work with over the years? Meyers: My favorite cast mem-

ber has always been Amy Poehler. We came in together. She was just one of the best people to work with for many reasons. And then hosts — it’s great. Like, anyone will give you a week of their time and just hang out and be an idiot, like they’re the best. Jon Hamm’s a guy I’ve always really enjoyed working with, obviously Justin Timberlake. You can’t do much better than JT.

DI: What initially sparked your interested in comedy? Meyers: My parents were really

funny people, and they were big fans of the shows like “Monty Python,” “Saturday Night Live,” and Steve Martin and Woody Allen. So at a very young age they sort of introduced us to that stuff, and it was just one of the things where you realize that life’s better than when people are laughing at what you’re doing. At least if you’re trying to make them laugh .... If they’re laughing at you then it’s awful.

was limited in what services they had to offer because of space, but the new store is 2,500 square feet and features a demo room where customers can try out products. David Chambers, Tech Zone employee and senior in LAS, said the demo room was something customers have wanted for a while. Chambers said he is one of many employees excited about the switch from Flash Drive to Tech Zone. He said the new tech center is an alternative to other electronics stores because it offers a greater variety of products geared toward students. “It’s nice seeing more inventory, more products that we can show customers, get them interested in new brands and new types of gadgets and new cases for phones,” he said. “(Students) have to be around this area because this is where their studies are going to be. Our needs and our thoughts have to be with the students because they’re always around us.” The grand opening of the Tech Zone will be on Friday at 10 a.m. and will feature prizes, food and giveaways. “I am extremely excited to see this finally take off,” Salzman said. “It’s been a long time coming and it’s been a lot of work, and just to watch it evolve has been a really exciting process.”

Garrett can be reached at gwillms2@ dailyillini.com. ing up with a lot of imaginative ideas this year, such as sponsoring the men’s basketball team to increase publicity. “Public service announcements during the basketball games is a new idea we’re trying,” he said. “Most people don’t know about us, and if they ever had an issue, they’d need to know who to go to to talk about these issues.” Gold, however, said these announcements make up part of what he considers the senate’s wasteful spending. “Advertisements to promote ourselves are a waste,” he said. “I think the senate should publicize itself through helping the community, volunteering and being out and about. That’s how they should know about us, not because we make commercials at basketball games.” Brock Gebhardt, student body president, said the purpose of the student senate is to look deeply into student issues and speak as the voice of the student body. “We are not a programming board; we are not a funding board,” he said. “We have one mission, and that is student representation and student advocacy.” Gold said he thinks that if there are no worthwhile senate expenditures, they should reconsider their “huge” budget. However, Gebhardt said out of all Big Ten schools, the University receives the least amount of funding for its student government. “Our budget is central to our mission,” he said. “If we ever have an administration that is hostile to listening to student concerns, we need to be able to do it ourselves. It’s something that is very, very important.”

Corinne can be reached at cruff2@ dailyillini.com DI: What has been your favorite part overall of being a part of SNL? Meyers: Just the people you get

to work with. Both the ones that come in for a week at a time, and the ones you spend years working with. The hardest thing about this year has been not having Andy Samberg and Kristen Wiig here. Because the greatest thing was every Wednesday, I would get to be at the table read where they would try their stuff out for the first time, and I felt really lucky about that.

DI: What advice would you give to students aspiring to be writers, comedians or actors? Meyers: Just using the time

when you’re young to do as much as possible. As life moves forward, you just have less and less time to take risks and try new things. A lot of comedy is you have to fail a lot to learn how to succeed. So, it’s way better to fail at 21 than it is to fail at 31. So I would just get on stage as much as possible or write as much as possible. If you’re a writer, the best thing you can do is fi nd the kind of people that will want to perform the things you wrote, and college is the time to meet those people because obviously you’re surrounded by people your own age.

Alison can be reached at akmarco2@ dailyillini.com.

JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

Marsha Purchase, of Champaign, looks on at a presentation during the Resource and Information Fair put on by the Information Technologies Department at Douglas Branch Library in Champaign on Monday.

Fair promotes technical literacy BY CHRISSY PAWLOWSKI CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The city of Champaign’s Information Technologies Department facilitated the Digital Divide Resource Fair on Monday to showcase local businesses and agencies that provide residents with public computing resources. Those who visited this free event at the Douglass Branch Library, 504 E. Grove St., were able to learn about these resources directly from the providers. Jeff Hamilton, telecommunications and AV technician for Champaign, said the city wanted to hold the fair to teach residents about free computer resources and services available to them. “A lot of people probably know about the Champaign and Urbana libraries having computer services,” he said. “But there are dozens of computer

labs throughout the community available to them.” Hamilton said he believes this is important so that members of the community do not fall behind with technology. “There’s defi nitely a certain segment of the population that’s getting left behind on the other side of the digital divide,” Hamilton said. “Those are the people who can’t afford Internet access ... (or) to have a computer at home, or they think that they can’t.” Arthur Svymbersky, manager of government and regulatory affairs for Comcast, said residents of the area are falling behind with technology. “Thirty percent of Americans remain on the wrong side of the digital divide,” he said. Agencies presenting at the fair, though, aimed to show residents of Champaign-Urbana that the Internet is accessi-

ble to them. Some agencies that presented included the Champaign Public Library, Parkland College, UC2B, Comcast, VOLO Broadband and the UrbanaChampaign Independent Media Center. Aside from making their services known to the public, Hamilton announced a grant opportunity that is now being offered by Champaign. All agencies are encouraged to apply for grants of up to $3,000 between now and Nov. 13. Hamilton said instead of telling residents what they need, the city wants to correct whatever it is that keeps the public from using the computing resources, whether it is a lack of current software or uncomfortable chairs. “We need people to tell us what they need,” Hamilton said. Turance Cobb, member of Access Initiative of Champaign

County, attended the fair to learn more about what the community had to offer. He agreed more needs to be done to encourage the public to become more digitally literate. “I think there could be a lot more,” Cobb said. “I personally work with families and parents who could benefit from learning things about computers – learning how to do a resume, learning how to troubleshoot, things that go along with that. It’s good to know what’s going on.” Hamilton said that while grant applications are being accepted through mid-November, they will be awarded in January 2013 to agencies that provide a detailed plan, demonstrate the expertise to implement their project and the ability to maximize benefits versus costs.

Chrissy can be reached at capawlo2@dailyillini.com.

Third, final debate focuses on foreign policy BY DAVID ESPO AND KASIE HUNT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOCA RATON, Fla. — President Barack Obama sharply challenged Mitt Romney on foreign policy in their fi nal campaign debate Monday night, saying, “Every time you’ve offered an opinion you’ve been wrong.” The Republican coolly responded, “Attacking me is not an agenda” for dealing with a dangerous world. Romney took the offensive, too. When Obama said the U.S. and its allies have imposed crippling sanctions on Iran to halt nuclear weapons development, the Republican challenger responded that the U.S. should have done more. He declared repeatedly, “We’re four years closer to a nuclear Iran.” Despite the debate’s stated focus on foreign affairs, time after time the rivals turned the discussion back to the slowly recovering U.S. economy, which polls show is the No. 1 issue for most voters. They found little agreement on that, but the president and his rival found accord on at least one international topic with domestic political overtones — Israel’s security — as they sat at close quarters 15 days before the end of an impossibly close election campaign. Each stressed unequivocal support for Israel when asked how he would respond if the Jewish state were attacked by Iran. “If Israel is attacked, we have their back,” said Romney — moments after Obama vowed, “I will stand with Israel if Israel is attacked.” Both also said they oppose direct U.S. military involvement in the efforts to topple Syrian President Bashar Assad. The debate produced none of the fi nger-pointing and little of the interrupting that marked the presidential rivals’ debate last week, when Obama needed a comeback after a listless performance in their first meeting on Oct. 3. But there was no mistaking the urgency. The two men frequently sniped at one another even on issues where they agree, and reprised their cam-

EARLY VOTING FROM PAGE 1A hold early voting all the way on the edge of campus, and we actually had to pay for that while the Union was free,” Frerichs said. “Why? I don’t know, it doesn’t make sense to me.” In 2010, then-County Clerk Mark Shelden turned down the

POOL-WIN MCNAMEE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama answer a question during the third presidential debate at Lynn University on Monday in Boca Raton, Fla. paign-long disagreements over the economy, energy, education and other domestic issues despite ground rules that stipulated the debate cover international affairs. On the Middle East, Romney said that despite early hopes, the ouster of despotic regimes in Egypt, Libya and elsewhere over the past year has resulted in a “rising tide of chaos.” He said the president has failed to come up with a coherent policy to grapple with change sweeping the Middle East, and he added ominously that an al-Qaida-like group has taken over northern Mali. Anticipating one of Obama’s most frequent campaign assertions, Romney said of the man seated nearby, “I congratulate him on taking out Osama bin Laden and taking on the leadership of al-Qaida. But we can’t kill our way out of this. ... We must have a comprehensive strategy.” More than a half hour later, Obama returned to the subject, saying that Romney had once said it wasn’t worth mov-

ing heaven and earth to catch one man, a reference to the mastermind behind the 9/11 terror attacks. Obama said he had ended the war in Iraq, was on a path to end the U.S. combat role in Afghanistan and has vowed to bring justice to the attackers of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi last month — an assault that killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans. He also jabbed at Romney’s having said during the campaign that Russia is the United States’ No. 1 geopolitical foe. Obama was snippy after Romney, criticizing the administration’s Pentagon budget, said disapprovingly the U.S. Navy has fewer ships than at any time since the end of World War I. “I think Governor Romney maybe hasn’t spent enough time looking at how our military works. You mentioned the Navy, for example, that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. Well, Governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because

the nature of our military has changed. We have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them.” Romney offered unusual praise for Obama’s war efforts in Afghanistan, declaring the 2010 surge of 33,000 U.S. troops a success and asserting that efforts to train Afghan security forces are on track to enable the U.S. and its allies to put the Afghans fully in charge of security by the end of 2014. He said that U.S. forces should complete their withdrawal on that schedule; previously he has criticized the setting of a specific withdrawal date. The two men are locked in a close race in national opinion polls. The fi nal debate behind them, they intend to embark on a fi nal two-week whirlwind of campaigning. The president is slated to speak in six states during a two-day trip that begins Wednesday and includes a night aboard Air Force One as it fl ies from Las Vegas to Tampa. Romney intends to visit two or three states a day.

Illini Union’s offer to host early voting, choosing instead to hold it at a vacant storefront at 700 S. Gregory St. in Urbana. Champaign resident Cindy Pippinger was one of about 10 people to show up when polls first opened. Pippinger called the polling station easily accessible. “It’s convenient for the area where I live,” she said. “I come because I figure we might have 5

feet of snow by Nov. 6.” Election judge Felix Harris said early voting offers him a way to cast his ballot before the hustle and bustle of Election Day. “I come in early because on Election Day, it’s really hard to get time to vote. It’s so packed,” he said. Student trustee David Pileski, who said he has worked on getting a station at the Illini Union, was

also present to vote. “Two or three years ago, I started working on this initiative. This is something we’ve been working hard to get: a polling location on campus, in the center of all the action,” he said. The station will remain open until Nov. 3.

Matt can be reached at news@ dailyillini.com.


4A Tuesday October 23 , 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

POLITICAL CARTOON

Editorial

Teach kids healthy eating early

LANGSTON ALLSTON THE DAILY ILLINI

Public voice absent in new campuswide smoking ban

In

a historical move — which isn’t all that historical — the University announced that the campus would become free of tobacco smoke at the end of next year. This policy stems from an Illinois Student Senate resolution that took form over the course of last year. Despite the deliberation among administrators over the course of so many months, the University concluded that this was the best decision for the campus as a whole. But it’s not. Although it is a good gesture to “ensure a healthy environment for our entire campus community,” as Chancellor Wise said in a mass mail, this was a disappointing solution to providing a more healthy environment for students and faculty. First, we take issue with the lack of public input into the final decision. Students voted on a referendum at the end of 2011 that showed if they supported a ban of some kind, but that’s pretty much where our input ceased. The community did not receive much information from the University about this issue that affects the whole campus. Unquestionably, this is an important statement by the University to try to do something good for this campus, but the final result can’t be realistically enforced. Five other Big Ten universities have a similar smoking ban, but there are student senators, like Matt Gold, who said they have seen smoking on those campuses. As is, this plan is unenforceable. Monitoring a campus so large for something that is generally discrete is unfeasible. There is no systematic way to inform visitors, such as those who come for home football games, a weekend with their students or a tour of the University, that this campus is smoke-free. Expecting someone to abide by such a policy, especially if they are new, cannot work. More than that, policy-makers should have been more mindful of the personal liberty infringements from instituting a smoking ban. If students want to smoke, there are no reasonable places for them to go. We need designated areas for smokers, not an outright ban. In Wise’s mass mail, she stated she plans to set up subcommittees to address further issues of this ban. She, and the rest of her administration, need to understand that this is a public matter, not something reserved just for inaccessible committee meetings and discussion. Disagreement with the ban is not unknown — students and faculty have expressed their disdain for the neglect of personal choice. Smoker or nonsmoker, this policy affects everyone and should demand some sort of public forum. As far as this policy’s announcement, smoking is legal in this country, and there is no reason the University should feel the need to use their power and ban it from campus. A ban is not a solution. By creating and enforcing this, the University is not being mindful of the students and faculty that are on this campus, nor is it respecting the opinion of those here. If the University wants to maintain support for other rules that some may be uncomfortable with, this is not the way you set a precedent. Either provide a transparent way for the public to voice an opinion that the University will value, or don’t do anything at all.

SHARE YOUR

THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

RENÉE WUNDERLICH Opinions columnist

A

often attributed, but not entirely accurately, to Thomas Jefferson in his email to his staff: “‘Democracy’ will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.” The point of his email was not to call the middle class a bunch of moochers, but rather to criticize how Obama views the employeeemployer relationship. You cannot take from the employers without simultaneously harming the employees. Obama looks to raise taxes on the wealthy and even raise the capital gains tax, which will further discourage businesses from making more investments. That will not prompt a stronger middle class, but rather a weaker economy as a whole. When demonizing success is part of the American culture, we need to re-evaluate our priorities. What does Obama think the wealthy do with all of that money? Bathe in it? Employers will either spend it or invest it. Both would lead to a stronger economy. If you spend money, you are circulating money throughout the economy, and if you invest it you using that money, you provide more jobs and expand business. The war on success is in full swing, and Siegel’s dissent is just one of many.

nd the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine 2012 Golden Carrot Award goes to ... Jean Ronnei of St. Paul Public Schools in St. Paul, Minn.! She’d like to thank the PCRM, the school board, the peas, the carrots, the whole-grain pasta .... I am pretty big on nutrition, so I applaud the healthy-eating standards that Ronnei instituted in her new menus. It’s going to take more than a healthy school lunch to end childhood obesity, but it’s an important step — one of many toward the finish line. Back in my day, chicken nuggets bounced. Milk came in a plastic pouch and had that old-time, homey flavor of artificial coloring and chemical aftertaste. School lunches were what you bought as a last resort if you or your parents didn’t want to pack a brown bag. For much of first grade, I lied to the lunch ladies and my own mother, saying that I had eaten my lunch when indeed I had not. I wasn’t watching my figure — the food just tasted that bad. Since then, I have been all over the world and have eaten everything from Moroccan-spiced goat testicles to live Caribbean termites, but I’m still convinced nothing is as repulsive as the meals my elementary school’s pink lunch ticket would buy. But it’s a different story in St. Paul. Not only is this school system’s menu vegetarian- and vegan- friendly, but it is also allergy-conscious and seasonal. There is even a little carrotshaped icon (wonder if that’s a coincidence) that designates locally grown produce. There is always unlimited access to the multiple options for fresh fruit and vegetables. Anything that is vaguely starchy is whole wheat; anything that takes the form of animal protein is lean, such as Turkey Sloppy Joes. I have no desire to relive high school, but can I go back just for the food? But I’m 21 and enjoy eating a pescetarian diet — it’s vegetarian with seafood protein. Both my parents cooked dinner for my brother and me after school, and fast food was reserved for long road trips when nothing else was available. I’m neither a child in primary school nor a parent, so I am a bit out of touch with exactly how I would function in either role in today’s health-conscious yet food-obsessed nation. But I do see now the results of poor food choices and destructive eating habits that manifested years ago. I have a long list of friends and coworkers who want me to make them meal plans. They say they want to eat what I do but can’t seem to get away from their simple-sugar, lowfiber diets that center around animal protein and minimal fresh vegetables. If you fear the tofu, that’s one thing. But if you grew up solely on McDonald’s Happy Meals and Kid Cuisine, how easy do you think you’ll transition to spinach salad and lentil soup? I’m not saying it can’t be done, just that eating healthy is easier the earlier you start. Nutritionists know this, and so does Ronnei. There is one other thing: Ronnei got $3,000 from the PRMC to boost her new nutrition plan at St. Paul Public Schools. As far as I’m concerned, she earned it. But realistically, if the school district can fund fresh, seasonal food to be cooked Monday through Friday, they don’t really need that money. Not all city schools can afford to revamp traditional mystery meat meals into black bean and edamame salads. Eating healthy isn’t cheap, though Ronnei’s plan does market itself as a cost-friendly program. Even though St. Paul Public School’s Food Service is only 4 percent of the district’s total expenditures in their 2012-13 budget, that’s still more money spent on food than some inner-city schools are willing or even able to pay. And even if the money is there, food may not be considered a priority. The arts are all too soon to take the hit when cash flow starts to trickle, later followed by sports and other after-school programs. But food budgets get skimped as well. The Twin Cities are pretty progressive in the environmental and health spectrums. Enough conviction is behind a solid student meal plan in schools like St. Paul, so school board priorities and administrative decisions reflect that. In the home, the school cafeteria and at the bank, childhood obesity can be overcome in America, but only if the elements of family life, school instruction and proper funding come together to make it possible.

Brian is a junior in Media. He can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Renée is a senior in Media. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Labels enable separation, discrimination SARAH FISCHER Opinions columnist

I

couldn’t sharpen my pencil, a yellow, knock-off Ticonderoga, the eraser long gone. On any normal day in my elementary school class, I could rise from my seat and use the sharpener mounted to the door frame, a basic privilege for all students. Except on that Friday. We’d been learning about segregation, about the civil rights movement, about the danger of labeling human beings, and our teacher enacted her own policy of segregation: Blueeyed students were now superior. They were smarter, they worked harder, and as a result, they had more rights. As I stood up to sharpen my pencil in the middle of the day to prepare for a new math lesson, my teacher, her voice stern, ordered me to sit back down, angry I had broken the rules and not raised my hand. Embarrassed and hurt, I slunk back to my seat. I was not allowed to sharpen my pencil. I sat with my eyes on my desk. I ate lunch alone and didn’t play with the other students at recess, even though the segregation was in our classroom only. Later, my teacher took me into the hall to remind me it was just an activity. It wasn’t real. There was no difference between students with blue eyes and those with brown. She had to take me into the hall to remind me of something I already knew. Of something it was absurd not to know. A decade later, I still remember the exercise. Still remember how it felt to be separated from my peers. The shame I felt for having brown eyes. The desire I had for blue eyes like my mom’s, instead of brown eyes like my dad’s. I was less of a human because of something I had no control over. Stigmatized. Defined by my label. Australia has recently released a LGBT ad that follows a similar experiment. In the ad, left-handed boy is chided by his teachers, called

out by his parents as “not normal,” mocked on Facebook and threatened by classmates. He forces himself to eat and brush his teeth with his right hand so his parents won’t catch him being “abnormal.” He writes with his right hand in class, even though his grades fall as a result of messy handwriting. Toward the end, a group of bullies attack him in a woodworking class and make to smash his hand with a hammer before a teacher walks in and they relent. The ad ends with the message, “Stop. Think. Respect.” The blue-eye-brown-eye experiment and the Australian ad address similar phenomena: The stigmatization of those relegated to second-class citizen status, whether it’s AfricanAmericans, the LGBT community, left-handed students or those of us with brown eyes. They call attention to labels. Labels are incredibly harmful. They distort reality into stereotyped constructs based on collective evaluation, bias, fear and “the inability to separate the person” from the label, wrote Kim Davis, a research associate at Indiana University. It’s how we come to define students with handicaps by their handicap (e.g. “he’s bipolar”) rather than a human with a given condition (e.g. “he has bipolar disorder”). It’s how we see individuals with HIV as disgusting or at fault rather than unfortunate. Of course, some labels are necessary. The United States Congress and Supreme Court can’t discuss gay marriage without being able to label certain individuals as “gay” as opposed to “straight,” or being able to label

some as “married” and others as “single.” These are considered “good” labels, “required” labels. They are labels necessary for identification and communication. However, while these labels may be necessary, are they any better than those we use to separate ourselves from one another? To stigmatize? According to linguist Benjamin Whorf’s linguistic relativity hypothesis, “the words we use to describe what we see aren’t just idle placeholders — they actually determine what we see.” Labels define you, even “positive” labels. The fact that you are “white,” “student,” “American,” only serves to separate you from those who are “not-white,” are “non-students” or are from another country. When you see yourself as the label, you define yourself, as Nietzsche said, by “the Other,” no matter how much you rebel against it. There are no positive labels. Every label, even if it has been embraced by society or by you personally, serves only one purpose — to distinguish individuals from one another, to create another form of separation. My elementary teacher wanted to manufacture an atmosphere where I, as a 10-yearold, could experience segregation. It was remarkably successful in that endeavor, but it also expounded on the danger of labeling in general. Labels provide us a reason to discriminate, a reason to create new caste and class systems. In many cases, they provide the only grounds on which we discriminate.

“Embarrassed and hurt, I slunk back to my seat. I was not allowed to sharpen my pencil. I sat with my eyes on my desk. I ate lunch alone and didn’t play with the other students at recess, even though the segregation was in our classroom only.”

Sarah is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

‘War on success’ will weaken economy BRIAN SIEGEL Opinions columnist

T

here is one part of David Siegel’s job that he hates, and that’s laying people off. Siegel is a 77-year-old millionaire — and no, he is not my relative. However, I do actually have an uncle David Siegel, but the last name is just a strange coincidence. Siegel probably doesn’t have the best rapport with the outside world. He is known for building the biggest home in the nation, a 90,000-square-foot mansion he calls Versailles. Probably a little excessive, you might say, but this CEO of Westgate Resorts worked hard to nurture a once-small company into a million-dollar business. But, it is his most recent business email that has gotten people stirring. He told his roughly 7,000 employees that though the tough economy will not threaten their jobs, but the outcome of this election will. If Obama gets re-elected, Siegel said he will likely let go of part of his staff and reduce the size of the company because of what Obama may do to increase federal taxes on companies. He does not tell his employees who to vote for, but rather gives them a basic overview of what happens when you overtax job creators. If the Obama tax plan were put in

place, Siegel says he would be giving almost half of his income to the government, and that would curtail his business passion. “My motivation to work and provide jobs will be destroyed, and with it, so will your opportunities. If that happens, you can find me in the Caribbean sitting on the beach, under a palm tree, retired, and with no employees to worry about.” While Siegel’s personal financial situation might be on the extreme end of the spectrum, it still teaches us a valuable lesson about the employer-employee relationship and job creation. President Barack Obama’s fiscal policies discriminate against success. They do the exact opposite of what his rhetoric says. The top percent of the nation are, by nature, the job creators: The president alone cannot create jobs unless it is some federally funded program. Simple economics says that if you take money away from them, they will cut jobs and spending on their businesses to compensate because they won’t have as much money to grow the business. So, in essence, you are making the middle class struggle more by taxing the upper class. Instead of giving the money to the black hole of federal spending, as Siegel likes to call it, you could give it right back to the corporations who can spur the most economic growth. To add some historical merit to his argument, Siegel used a quote


Edited by Will Shortz

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

No. 0918 5A

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

NEW64YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across 37 Coral island Prince Valiant’s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 wife 1 Rock legend 39 Number of prime ACROSS Jimmy ministers on 65 Word after 13 14 15 16   1 Rock legend Jimmy Downing Street? running or jump 5 In the midst of   5 In the midst of 17 18 19 40 Lindsay of “Mean 66 Sault ___ Marie 10 Ruckus 10 Ruckus Girls” 67 Martini’s partner 13 Extract with a solvent 13 Extract with a 20 21 22 41 Signs of deep 15 Manuscript in wines solvent sheet sleep on an 68 “___ expert, but 15 Manuscript 23 24 16 One of…” the Manning electroencephalosheet brothers gram 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 16 One of the 17 Wanted poster word 44 Growl Manning brothers Down host 18 Longtime “Nightline” 32 33 34 35 36 45 Old name for 17 Wanted poster 20 “Stop frettingas over that” 1 Ring, church Tokyo word 22 Govt. bells divisions 37 38 39 40 46 Any ship 23 Bravery 18 Longtime 2 Eased 47 Gradually 24 Woodworking tool 41 42 43 44 “Nightline” host 3 Standout slowing, in mus.25 Lancelot’s title 20 “Stop fretting over performance for 45 46 47 48 49 49 Letters after a 26 Long-running PBS film that” 1-Across showcase long-ago date 22 Govt. divisions 4 Amazon 50 51 52 50 ___-Aztecan 28 Pub pour 23 Bravery e.g. 29 Lively transactions, dance language 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 32 “Qué 24 Woodworking tool 51 Snacks with 5 ___?” Old Spice 34 Succeed, but just barely alternative 25 Lancelot’s title shells 60 61 62 37 Coral island 6 Homer’s 26 Long-running 53 Cornered, as a 39 Number of prime ministers hangout on “The 63 64 65 PBS film wild animal on Downing Street? Simpsons” showcase 40 Lindsay of “Mean Girls” 56 Cotillion V.I.P. 66 67 68 7 of 88deep or 98, carwise 28 Pub pour sleep on an 60 Henrik Ibsen, for41 Signs electroencephalo-gram 8 Suffix with neat or 29 Lively dance one PUZZLE BY ANDREW REYNOLDS MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI 44 Growl Puzzle by Andrew Reynolds beat 32 “Qué ___?” 62 Workout 12 Rocker Lofgren 36 Eggy drink DOWN Minneci’s Ristorante, on the corner of First Street and Springfield Avenue, serves traditional Sicilian cuisine. The 45 Old name for Tokyo   1 Ring, as church bells 28 “Li’l” comics 54 Precisely reminders 14 Legally bar 38 The recent past 36 Eggy drink restaurant’s most popular dish is the chicken saltimbocca. 34 Succeed, but just Bargain hunter’s 46 Any9ship 2 Eased   19 Candy with a 42 Sci-fi’s “Doctor ___” fellow barely 63 Red sushi fish 47 Gradually 38 The recent past goalslowing, in mus. 55 Spreadable collectible dispenser 3 Standout  29 43 In ___ (as found) Bandmate of 49 Letters after a long-ago 42Ship’s Sci-fi’s “Doctor cheese 10 Johnny who performance for 21 front 48 Goodbyes 1-Across ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE date ___” ___ Khan 1-Across played Sweeney 24 Prince 50 Motor Cityon org. 56 Passes 50 ___-Aztecan language Polish-born 4 Amazon transactions, 25  30 43Jack In ___ (as found) 52 Prickly plants that’s one-eyed M E T A P A S S E M A M 51 A SnacksTodd with shells violin master e.g. 57 Vittles lacks a heart 48and Goodbyes 53 Small marching A A H S A R E A S R T E 53 S Cornered, as a wild 11 Abba’s “___animal the 5 Old Spice alternative  31 Category 27 Curriculum ___ band? 58 ___ B’rith T R E S R E E L S P E T 56 S Cotillion 50 Motor City org. V.I.P. Speak” Music 6 Homer’s hangout on  33 28 “Li’l” comics 54 Precisely PC key Ibsen, for one A S P A R T A M E M E A R 60 A Henrik “The Simpsons” 52fellow Prickly plants 59 This, to Tomás 12 Rocker Lofgren 55 Spreadable cheese side of the 62 Workout reminders 7 88One or 98, carwise  35 L I E L E M M E A T E M 29 Bandmate of 56 Passes on 53 Small marching 61 Shine, in product 14 Legally bar Hoover Dam: BY ROHAINA HASSAN It is then basted in the oven 63 Red sushi fish self “Italian by digestion.”He   8 Suffix with neat or 1-Across S C A L E S U R N 57 Vittles STAFF WRITER has been very close to the Min- until the cheese is melted and 64 Prince Abbr. band? names beat Valiant’swith wife 30 Polish-born 19 Candy S OandY the Swine Y is N boiling. O D SFinally, U G I 58 ___ B’rith Though customers might not neci family since he was born theL 65 9 Bargain hunter’s goal   Word a after running or jump violin master collectible For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or,towith a credit 59 This, Tomás hear Vito Corleone whispering said his family members T were H E chef R E has S Na 30-second O I I N window T E A M 10 Johnny who played 66 Sault ___ Marie 31 Category card, 1-800-814-5554. dispenser in the booths, the Sicilian tradi- regulars at the restaurant. At to grab it out of the oven and 61 Shine, in product S O R E T E N A C E T W 67 A Martini’s partner in wines Sweeney Todd 33available PC key Annual subscriptions are for the best of Sunday tion rings loud throughout Min- one point, he even started work- ensure it is properly cooked and names 21expert, Ship’sbut front 11 Abba’s “___from the Music D I E A A R O N S 68 “___ …” 35 One side of the crosswords the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. neci’s Ristorante. The restaurant ing there for food and became ready to serve. Speak” Dam: Abbr. puzzles, or visit H E C All K ingredients M A T E are as L local A Vas 24 Prince ___ Khan AT&T users: Text NYTX toHoover 386 to download is located at 401 S. First St. and impressed by the MinneciCtradinytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. has been standing in Champaign tion of care and comfort. L O R possible, andI dishes R E M N C are E Mmade E A T 25 Jack that’s oneThe crossword solution is in the Classified section. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past for 30 years. The ownership transition A went N N on O theCspot A for L Leasy A tailoring. A R T I eyed and lacks a puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). About three decades ago, the smooth; the Minnecis trained A lot of thought goes into choos- MARCO AND MARTY BILLY FORE R O I S O N E A L D I O N heart Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Minneci family stepped on Amer- Meister and retained all of their ing ingredients. The restaurant A R E strives S BtoAnotS only I Lget the A best T M E 27 Curriculum ___ Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. ican soil from Sicily, Italy, and original staff. One staff member, DISH OF THE WEEK

Treat yourself to 30 years of Italian tradition at Minneci’s

started working at the restaurant Manzella’s Italian Patio in Champaign. They fell in love with the restaurant business and decided to start a restaurant of their own. The Meister family, who is the current owners, and the Minnecis converted a former auto body shop into Minneci’s Ristorante, which has now become a longstanding family getaway. While still working at their day jobs, the two families worked on creating the restaurant from 10 p.m. to 3 or 4 a.m. for a few months, said Rob Meister, manager and owner. They would then return to their regular jobs at 9 a.m. after a few hours of sleep. As years passed, the Minneci family found it was time to take a break from the business. Putting the Minneci restaurant on the market, Meister was quick to obtain the business and keep it running. Meister calls him-

Leslee Karch, has been a server at the restaurant for almost 10 years. “You get to meet a lot of different people,” Karch said. “The food is really good. It’s different every day.” The most popular dish is the chicken saltimbocca, but just by a little, Meister said. “It is cooked in a white wine sauce that has two chicken breasts, Swiss provolone cheese and a little bit of prosciutto ham on top,” Meister said. “So it is probably nothing that is really good for you, but it’s very delicious.” The process of creating this dish is very intense and requires precise timing. First, the chicken is filleted into thin pieces by hand. The slices need to be thin to boil the alcohol out of the Chablis wine, which is baked with the chicken, and cook the dish at the same time.

parsley, but the best Italian parsley. Because it follows the tradition of Sicilian food, everything is homemade and traditional, with big portions that are supposed to fi ll you up, Meister said. However, half sizes are now an option at Minneci’s. The menu taste differentiates, but in comparison with other Italian regions’ foods, Sicilian is considered the healthiest. For example, they use extra virgin olive oil instead of butter, or white wine sauces with citrus hints instead of creamy and cheesy ones. The restaurant has come a long way since fi rst opening, and the Meister family will continue to provide Champaign-Urbana with traditional Sicilian cuisine.

TECHNOLOGY

and he knows a couple of us by name.” Bell also acknowledged the intangible skills he has learned from the business side, such as dinner etiquette, how to give business cards and how to pitch ideas to upper management. In addition, Bell began to understand how business works beyond the technological level. The program also offers a trip to China. Corporate sponsors invited students to visit their China branches, and this international experience helped them understand how business is conducted in a different culture. “The trip to China with T & M taught me how to deal with Asian culture and business, and many of the things they taught us there were related to the respect of this uniqueness of Asian business,” Bell said. The program recruits about 25 students from both tracks each

year. Students who fit best for the program are those who display leadership and academic achievement, Sementi said. Peter Ninchich, sophomore in Business, is preparing to apply for the program next semester. He believes he is qualified for the program because of his achievement and passion. “I’ve involved myself in a lot of leadership activities on campus. I’ve worked hard to make an impact on the College of Business,” Ninchich said. “This is something I wanted to do since the very first semester.” On Nov. 27, Sementi will host an admission information session for the program in Digital Computer Lab 1320. The next Stoppelman could be among those in the room.

FROM PAGE 6A you don’t think about in your daily life that engineers have had a hand in, and as a business major you don’t really appreciate that,” Ladner said. “But having the classes and the courses in which we are working with the engineering majors, you see and start to think about that more.” Andrew Bell, senior in Engineering, appreciates the opportunities of getting exposed to corporate sponsors of this program. Senior executives from major companies like Walmart, BP and John Deere will come to the program and work closely with the students. “One of the benefits is that we get a lot more confident with people who are on the executive level,” Bell said. “One of our sponsors is the head of trading in BP,

Xing can be reached at xzhuo2@dailyillini.com.

Microsoft’s new tablet poised to challenge iPad and smartphones

T

TECHNOGRAPH COMLUMNIST

he new Microsoft Surface tablet, Microsoft’s first major foray into hardware since the Microsoft Xbox, is scheduled to be released this Friday. The tablet is designed to complement Microsoft’s upcoming tablet-oriented operating system, Windows 8. Anticipation has been so great that preorder delivery is expected to be delayed up to three weeks. Despite this success in sales, the Surface will be released without much fanfare from the mainstream media. Just like the rest of the world, you may be more interested in the release of Apple’s next generation of iPad, but as a student at the University, here are three reasons why you should be excited about the release of the Microsoft Surface:

Windows 8 The Microsoft Surface RT will ship out with a specialized version of Windows 8, Windows RT. While Windows RT does not have all the features of the full version of Windows 8, it still offers many benefits that iOS

and Android cannot. For example, the Surface will feature a full-fledged browser unlike the mobile browsers used by other tablets. This will enable the Surface to run webpages - like Compass - that do not have a mobile version, without the compatibility issues. Full versions of Microsoft Office will also be able to run on the Surface, allowing it to become more of a mobile laptop replacement.

Touch and Type Cover Improving upon Apple’s Smart Cover, the Surface will offer the option of a Touch or Type cover for an extra $119 and $129 respectively. Tablets tend to offer a subpar typing experience due to the pop-up display keyboard obscuring content as well as providing no tactile feedback. The Surface’s Touch and Type cover provide physical keyboards while serving as a protective cover without adding noticeable thickness to the tablet. This will allow the Surface to better serve as a total laptop replacement, instead of awkwardly straddling the line between phone and laptop as most tablets do.

GARRY TRUDEAU

Rohaina can be reached at rhassa7@ dailyillini.com.

TECHNOGRAPH

BY BRIAN YU

DOONESBURY

Ultrabook capabilities at budget laptop prices The Surface and Touch Cover combo will run you $599 for the 32 GB version and $699 for the 64 GB version. Not only are these prices comparable to the Apple iPad, the Microsoft Surface will provide a more comprehensive computing experience, allowing you to use it in lieu of an actual laptop or desktop. At 1.5 pounds, the Surface will weigh less than a Macbook Air (2.38 pounds for 11”) and still provide almost the same capabilities at a fraction of the price. These only scratch the surface of the capabilities of the Surface. While most tablets require the use of a separate computer for more advanced functions, the Microsoft Surface makes the first step toward computer-free tablet computing. While there are many different options in the tablet market, the Surface should prove to be a popular choice.

Brian is a junior in Engineering. He can be reached at brianyu1@readtechno.com

BEARDO

DAN DOUGHERTY

A 30, 60 OR 90 MINUTE MASSAGE

weekly entertainment magazine Look for it on stands every Thursday www.readbuzz.com

!"#$ !"#$%&'% !"#$%!&'()*+(*()

150

The Morrill Act at The Future of Public Higher Education

OCTOBER 26, 2012 | 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. | Illini Union Rooms A, B, and C

RSVP ONLINE AT www.morrillact.illinois.edu


Business Technology

Dish of the Week Minneci’s Ristorante, a restaurant that has served great Italian food for 30 years, features its most popular dish, chicken saltimbocca. Read more on Page 5A.

6A | Tuesday, October 23, 2012 | www.DailyIllini.com

Technology & Management combines business, engineering

"#$%&'

BY XING ZHUO STAFF WRITER

idea

BY MOHAMED ELRAKHAWY STAFF WRITER

University celebrates the 50th anniversary of Holonyak’s LED

!

ou may not know his invention, but you use it every day. From the iPhone and iPad, to laptops, fl at-screen TVs, traffic lights and alarm clocks, this invention has been prevalent in modern life: the light-emitting diodes, better know as LED. Fifty years ago this month, the work done by alumnus Nick Holonyak Jr. at General Electric transformed the science of light as we know it. Although most know Thomas Edison as the inventor of the incandescent light bulb, Holonyak now stands on his shoulders with his invention of this solid-state device that can emit visible red light without generating heat like a lightbulb. While other groups have developed light-emitting devices, Holonyak’s device was the fi rst practical one to emit light in the visible range, rather than the invisible, infrared light. “It is the ultimate lamp,” Holonyak said. “You can maybe rival it, but you can never improve on it. If I know how to build mine right, it will have 100 percent conversion of electrical energy to light energy without any loss. It’s just a little heat loss of moving electrons that I’m paying the price for ... but that’s it.” The LED 50th Anniversary Symposium starts Wednesday at the I Hotel and Conference Center to honor Holonoyak’s work, achievements and other developments over the past 50 years. Brad Petersen, associate director of external relations in the department of electrical and computer engineering, said many lectures will be held about the history and the future of LEDs, solid-state lighting and related work. Many people who are considered pioneers in the field will speak about their work, including multiple Nobel laureates in physics from around the world. “It’s particularly a celebration of

Nick and his initial development of the LED, but it’s also much broader than that,” Petersen said. “The event is intended to celebrate all 50 years of the development of the LED ... from Nick’s fi rst invention to the work people are still doing today.” Holonyak’s story shows the power of knowledge and research that come along with hard work. Born to immigrant parents from Ukraine, he came to the University and received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate in electrical engineering. He developed a background studying under John Bardeen, a two-time Nobel laureate who coinvented the transistor. Now Holonyak holds the title of his mentor: He is the John Bardeen Endowed Chair in electrical and computer engineering. “I was Bardeen’s student. He came in 1951 when I was already a grad student. We set up a lab in 1952, and for two years I’m ... learning about semiconductors and transistors,” Holonyak said. “Then I went to Bell Labs working on electric switches and silicon material, the same stuff that later went into making Silicon Valley that became Intel and all the chips used in phones and computers nowadays.” After serving in the U.S. Army for a couple of years, Holonyak went to work for General Electric for six years. During this time, he got involved with advanced semiconductor devices and invented the fi rst visible semiconductor laser in 1962. Back then, LEDs were only capable of emitting infrared light. Holonyak suggested using a mixture of gallium arsenide and gallium phosphide to create a semiconductor that could produce visible light. His invention has revolutionized the way light is delivered. Milton Feng, research professor

in ECE who works with Holonyak, in their automobiles,” Petersen said. said the uses of LED technology “So it’s kind of cool to see the range extend far into the future, in every- of different applications.” thing we use that needs light. He Gov. Pat Quinn is also scheduled said, however, that the change will to attend Wednesday around lunchcome about gradually, as prices of time. Holonyak will be interviewed LED go down and the availability on stage by a journalist from NPR. becomes widespread. Petersen said he expects this inter“This technology will probably be view to go by quickly because Holused for the next 100 to 200 years. onyak is a good talker and great TVs, old computer screens, lighting storyteller, with a sharp memory systems, all these lighting systems and a great sense of humor. will be replaced (with LEDs) — it’s “I’d encourage all the students just a matter of time,” Feng said. to come and meet once in your life“The fi rst country to do this will be time, the most important people Germany; they don’t allow you to who invented this technology. This buy the regular incandescent light- is to honor the true inventor, who is bulb. LEDs save 75 percent of the here, and we’re very lucky to have power and last 25 times longer, so world-renowned professors at the you don’t have to replace them, and University,” Feng said. “Seldom do the maintenance cost is very low.” you have this many famous people The slow change is mainly coming to the same place at once.” When asked about because of price, the future of LEDs, Feng said. Right Holonyak said he now, a GE LED lightbulb costs $40 sees no limit to for 100 watts, and the possibilities of he predicts the price using this technolowill drop down to gy. Because of how it generates light and $10 in two years. Once they are below its fl exibility, effi $10, which is kind of ciency and the cola psychological baror ranges, the possirier, everyone will bilities of its use are MILTON FENG, be inclined to buy professor in electrical and computer endless. He credits them. all of his work to engineering Riding the wave having a place to of these changes are learn and become companies who see informed, and he the potential in changing their prod- emphasized that future generations ucts to LEDs and leaving incandes- of students should take advantage cent lightbulbs behind. The sympo- of the opportunities offered at the sium has 10 corporate sponsors, all University. eager to show off their new prod“Your adventure is now going to ucts and discuss how to commer- be different. The Earth has been cialize LED technology. covered with people and has been General Electric, where Hol- discovered here and there. Your onyak invented the LED, will be adventure is what you can learn,” heavily featured, as will automotive Holonyak said. “Every person’s companies such as Audi, which will mind is unique, and the learning display their new A8, which com- process ... to be able to work in fresh, pletely uses LEDs as light sourc- original material and the world of es, including the headlights and ideas — that’s an adventure.” taillights. The LED 50th Anniversary Sym“It’s a great mix because you have posium will be Wednesday. For the people like Philips Lumileds and location and registration informaGE working on commercial light- tion, visit led50years.illinois.edu. ing and residential lighting applications, and you also have compa- Mohamed can be reached at elrakha1@ nies like Audi who are using LEDs dailyillini.com.

“Seldom do you have this many famous people coming to the same place at once.”

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT DURAND AND DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

In 2004, Jeremy Stoppelman and Russel Simmons, schoolmates at Harvard Business School, co-founded Yelp, a $1.7 billion Internet giant which now penetrates everyday lives of many. Although their success might be attributed to their MBA education, both Stoppelman and Simmons also graduated from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois. Max Levchin, University alumnus and co-founder of PayPal, also helped with the creation of Yelp. Levchin, a 34-year-old entrepreneur, exposed himself to the blending of business and engineering in college when he took a minor offered by both the College of Business and College of Engineering: The Hoeft Technology & Management Program. According to Darcy Sementi, director of this two-year minor, the program developed out of the generosity of Leonard Hoeft, an alumnus of the College of Business. Hoeft credited his success to the opportunities he had in studying both business and engineering at the University, Sementi said. He made the first donation of $1 million to his alma mater to create an interdisciplinary minor that allowed both business and engineering students to work together. “As I get older, I appreciate more and more what the University of Illinois has meant to me,” Hoeft said when giving the $1 million donation to the University, according to the College of Business website. “Without the education I got there, I could not have done what I did. So I wanted to give something back to the institution that has done so much for me.” Based on this idea of interdisciplinary approach, the program has developed a unique curriculum. It offers three engineering courses for business students and vise versa, along with three other courses students of both majors take together. Upon graduation, students will finish an integrated project that has elements of both engineering and business. “Business and engineers have to work together all the time in corporate America,” Sementi said. “It exposes (business students) to the way engineers think, and a lot of engineering students that come to this program aspire to become leaders in business.” Stephen Ladner, senior in Business, thinks the program has provided him with a basic understanding of engineering, and more essentially, why engineers do what they do. “There are a lot of aspects

See TECHNOLOGY, Page 5A

Are You Up To The Challenge? New York Times Crossword Puzzle Every day in The Daily Illini.

OPENING IN AUGUST OF 2013

BE A PART OF THE Hollywood Makeup, Real‐Life Wigs, All Sorts of Tattoos and Masks!

Hottest Licensed Costumes AND plus size costumes! Floor to ceiling of EVERYTHING to suit your HALLOWEEN needs! BEST Selection, BEST Prices

costume for rent and purchase, wigs, make-up, masks and accessories

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/dallasandco Hours: Monday-Wednesday 10am-7pm, Thursday-Saturday 10am-8pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm 101 E. University Champaign- corner of 1st and University 217-351-5974

Now accepting I-Cards!

CHARTER CLASS! FORT WAYNE, INDIANA www.IndianaTech.edu/law 855-TECH-LAW


1B Tuesday October 23, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Fans gets 1st glimpse of Groce’s up-tempo system

The short game

BY THOMAS BRUCH STAFF WRITER

John Groce, Illini men’s basketball head coach, hovered between both benches during the Orange and Blue Scrimmage on Monday at Assembly Hall, acting as the omniscient coach of both squads for the intrasquad matchup. As expected, with 10 days of practice under the team’s collective belt, the first-year Illinois men’s basketball head coach saw upside and more than a few downsides. He also wanted to see an extra quarter after the scheduled three quarters expired. “I thought we took better care of the ball better the first three scrimmages than we did the last (one),” Groce said. “We weren’t going to go to the fourth one, but I wanted to get some extra conditioning. “Honestly, that’s about all we got out of the fourth one was conditioning.” The Orange team won the scrimmage, though the result hardly mattered with players rotating between both squads after each quarter. The more prescient aspect of the night unfolded on the court instead of the scoreboard. Nearly 4,500 fans witnessed their first glimpse of Groce’s new system and players grappling with that system in front of a crowd. Senior guard D.J. Richardson led all players in scoring with 18 points while also leading the team in a statistic that normally eludes the guard — free throws made and attempted. Richardson attacked the basket, splitting double teams on some occasions en route to an 8-of-10 performance from the free-throw line. Taking his defender off the dribble is an area that Richardson focused on in the offseason with assistant coach Jamall Walker. “Coach Walker has worked with me on that, and I’ve done a good job being more confident with the ball,” Richardson said. Nnanna Egwu stood out both in the box score and intangibles, recording 14 points and six rebounds coupled with a high-energy output on defense and in transition. “I thought Nnanna was really, really good, particularly in the first two eight-minute scrimmages,” Groce said. “He shot the ball well, kept balls alive, ran well.” Egwu said the team needed to work on executing plays better, a notion Groce agreed with in terms of setting screens in the halfcourt. Fans accustomed to seeing half court-oriented offense caught a peak of the up-tempo style of play that defines Groce’s system: Rebounds were followed by quick outlets and drives to the basket. The quicker pace yielded mixed results, with 23 turnovers on 18 assists. The elevated pace wasn’t even fast enough, according to Groce — a telling indication on how fast the new head coach would like to see in future games. “I thought we were picking and choosing how hard we ran, even early when I thought conditioning was less of a factor,” Groce said. “You say, ‘You want to run?’ and every player raises their hand before they realize what that really means. “Whether you’re receiving the pass in advance or not, you still got to run every time. I think we were just OK with that tonight, but we can get better for sure.”

Thomas can be reached at bruch2@dailyillini.com and on Twitter @ThomasBruch.

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

D.J. Richardson (1) looks for an open teammate as he is surrounded by the defense Monday night in the Orange and Blue Scrimmage at Assembly Hall.

The follow-through should not go much past parallel to the ground. Posture and foot position should be maintained.

The back swing should only go up parallel to the ground with loose wrists.

Eyes should never leave the ball. The wedge and club should make a straight angle. A smooth yet controlled hit will help with control.

The angle should slightly close with the club hand landing under the ball. MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Slone focuses on putts, chips Short game stays in shadow of power swings, long drives BY ALEX ORTIZ

T

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

here is seemingly a no more undervalued aspect of any one sport than the short game in golf. So much emphasis is put on long drives, strength and power, but the finesse and precision of a well-executed putt or chip can be the difference between winning and losing. “The short game is how a player scores so that’s where the scoring takes place, within 120 yards of the hole is how a player really makes pars and birdies,” Illinois women’s golf head coach Renee Slone said. Illinois spends nearly all, if not 100 percent, of team practice time on its short game. The team knows that even with a good, long drive, to get the ball on the green from the fairway, it needs accuracy as opposed to length in its swing. Then, of course, solid putting is needed to actually hit the ball into the hole. Even though past tournaments have not ended as the team wished, Slone points to this aspect of the game as the focal point. “We discussed that this is an area that we really, really need to focus on because it’s an area that we can improve in, and it will have a

significant impact on our overall score,” Slone said. “So that’s why we spend so much time on this part of the game.” As for practice, the team utilizes numerous drills and always has an objective going into each session at the forefront of its priorities. “One thing that we try to do is make practice as much like play as we can,” Slone said. “We do have some drills that ... you’re just focusing on that one aspect of it, but then we also incorporate drills where there’s a target goal in mind. There’s a target score in mind and so that’s one thing, I think, for the average golfer that goes out to practice. They don’t have a purpose to their practice, and that’s one thing that our entire team (does), every single day. They come out with a purpose.” Such an objective is executed in many different ways. Sophomore Samantha Postillion, who may have the best all-around short game on the team, said she tries to emulate during practice what she feels are key points during a round of competition. “Individually, I would say with putting I also like to focus on 3- to 4-footers because those are the ones you can get nervous over in a tournament,” Postillion said. “And I also focus on getting the ball past the hole, so I can have good birdie chances. And when it comes to chipping, I would say I focus a lot on the basic chips just because I would like to be able to guarantee that I get those up and downs in tournaments.” With the course reading of angles, elevations

RENEE SLONE, head coach

See GOLF, Page 4B

Brown returns; football uses bye for soul searching

Volleyball struggles to find balance in mid-net offensive

BY SEAN HAMMOND STAFF WRITER

Illini fall out of Top 25 for 1st time since 2008, 1st time under Hambly BY DANIEL MILLER-MCLEMORE STAFF WRITER

Among the myriad of struggles the Illinois volleyball team experienced during a decisive three-set loss to Nebraska, one of the most glaring was the lack of an attacking presence from the middle of the net. Middle blockers Erin Johnson and Anna Dorn recorded only 11 and eight attacks, respectively, as freshman setter Alexis Viliunas continues to acclimate to running the Illini offense. Johnson’s 11 attacks matches her fifth lowest total of the season, while Dorn’s eight was her lowest since Illinois’ season-opening loss to Dayton. Dorn in particular was surprisingly underutilized and ineffective against the Cornhuskers, recording only three kills — her lowest mark all year — and two errors. Head coach Kevin Hambly said after the game that the dearth of attacks was uncharacteristic and something he hopes to see change. “We’re just trying to get the connection,” Hambly said.

“One thing that we try to do is make practice as much like play as we can. We do have some drills that ... you’re just focusing on that one aspect of it, but, then, we also incorporate drills where there’s a target goal in mind.”

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Erin Johnson spikes the ball during the match against Nebraska at Huff Hall on Sunday. “That’s the hard thing about changing a setter mid-season. You saw Annie (Luhrsen) had a good connection with Anna. Lex and Anna need to work on that and get better at it. Lex needs to have courage. That’s what I’m talking about with courage, is just to go to it from off the net and make sure she gets involved. We need balance.” The lack of balance for Illinois was exposed further in light of a Nebraska attack, led by senior setter Lauren Cook, that featured five players with more than five kills.

Illinois tumbles out of Top 25

After clinging to a top-25 ranking for the majority of the season, Illinois finally dropped out of the poll this week for the first time since 2008. Illinois was ranked No. 7 to start the season, but as the only ranked team without a winning record, voters no longer felt the Illini deserving. It marks the first time in Hambly’s vastly successful tenure as head coach, which began in 2009, that the Illini have not held a top-25 ranking. This year’s Illini have experienced the longest

losing streak in Hambly’s time at the helm and as many home losses, five, as in his previous three seasons combined. With Illinois no longer ranked, the Big Ten now boasts only five teams in the top 25, tied for first with the Pac-12, although all five of the Pac-12’s ranked teams are ranked seventh or better. Penn State held on to the No. 1 ranking for the fifth straight week, followed by Stanford, Oregon, Nebraska and Washington.

Daniel can be reached at millerm1@ dailyillini.com and @danielmillermc.

After playing through an ankle injury the last two games, Jonathan Brown finally feels like he’s back to his old self. Following the bye week, the Illinois linebacker had an extended recovery time to get ready for this week’s Homecoming game against Indiana. “I don’t think you can go through a Big Ten season 100 percent,” Brown said. “You’re always going to have some type of bruise, bump or something. This week definitely got me closer to 100 percent.” Head coach Tim Beckman thought Brown looked like “the old Jonathan Brown” in practice Sunday night. Brown said the ankle injury was more nagging than painful. The 51-person panel of the Butkus Award certainly doesn’t think the injury has affected Brown’s play. On Monday, Brown was announced as one of 12 semifinalists for the Butkus Award, honoring the nation’s top linebacker. “It’s great honor to be a semifinalist,” Brown said. “Hopefully, I can keep playing at a high level and win it.” Brown will have to beat out the likes of Notre Dame’s Manti Te’o, Alabama’s C.J. Mosley and Georgia’s Jarvis Jones if he wants to bring home the award Dec. 4. Brown hasn’t been the only

Illini struggling through injury. Beckman said in his press conference Monday that cornerback Terry Hawthorne and quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase are both “full go.” Hawthorne was taken off the field in an ambulance against Wisconsin on Oct. 6 after hitting his head on a hard tackle. He was dressed in Illinois’ last game against Michigan on Oct. 13 but did not play. Against Michigan, Scheelhaase was tackled to the ground headfirst early and did not return. “Guys needed this time off just to recover and heal their bodies from all the beating that we’ve been taking,” defensive back Ashante Williams said. “Also, I feel like guys needed this week off to do a lot of soul searching. We’ve been doing that a lot as a team.” Williams said the Illini met as a team and discussed how to pull things together and make a run at a bowl game. When asked if they found an answer, Williams said, “Not quite, we’re still searching.” The coaching staff is struggling with the same question. Beckman said the bye week was more of a self-evaluation week than a week off. He met with both the offense and the defense in the film room and showed the units their best plays of the season and their

See FOOTBALL, Page 4B


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

OUT OF BOUNDS

Time for flexing school spirit muscle has come EMILY BAYCI Sports columnist

I

hope you all had a good bye week. It was nice to take a break from Illini sports and not have to watch another embarrassing football game, right? Right about football, wrong about Illini sports. I don’t know what you were doing, but I had a pretty jammed pack weekend camped out at Illini athletic venues. It was me, my bike and the athletes in a solo sports crawl of sorts, formally referred to as My Super Sports Weekend, in which I navigated from event to event to see the best and the worst during a weekend of Illini athletics. I know everyone vigilantly follows me on Twitter and caught all 40 of my live Tweets — in case you missed any, check out #supersportsweekend. I hit every home sporting event offered this weekend: swimming and diving against Northwestern, cross-country’s Illini Open for both the men and women, women’s tennis regionals and soccer and volleyball, both against Nebraska. I was there, where were you? I watched a dozen track sprinters rooting like crazy for their cross-country counterparts. I felt the high pressure the women’s tennis players experienced during regionals. I listened to the crowd roar with excitement as Shayla Mutz scored the first two goals

for soccer on senior night. I dripped with sweat from the humidity at the swimming meet, only to gaze with disbelief at cross-country runners braving the cold weather elements in nothing but shortshorts and a tank top. I suffered with anguishing hunger through swimming and cross-country and tennis to finally quench it with a Huff Hall hotdog, which you should get because it is legendary. I saw some pretty cool things this weekend and I had a great time. But you know what I didn’t see? Illinois student fans. The die-hards were there of course; men dressed in crazy colored wigs at swimming, two girls huddled together for warmth at cross-country and the ever-faithful Spike Squad at volleyball, complete with 10 men in the front row body painted up to spell out “#Illinoise.” But at every event, there was a plethora of empty seats in the student sections, people chatting with each other instead of paying attention to the game and clusters of students exiting early. The family section far out-ranked the student section at the swim meet, most noticeable being Don Lamb, a parent wearing orange and blue overalls and banging a drum who strolled over to the Pool Sharks, the student section, to drum up excitement. There were more track athletes than any type of student at cross-country, which along with golf is the only sport without an Illini Pride sponsored student section. This is your school, your classmates, your teams. It is your personal responsibility to

support them. When you clicked accept on your admission to the University of Illinois, you also accepted a role as an Illini fan. A lot of our athletes are from other states, even countries. They don’t have family who can come support them at every home game. But they do have 40,000 students who can make a 15-minute walk for a 40-minute cross-country meet — or any other sporting event for that matter. I know, it’s been a lukewarm season for Illini athletics to put it mildly. The smaller sports haven’t been nearly as horrendous as football, but there’s not much to write home about. My best way to describe this season would be our Illini of the Week voting sessions at Sunday sports meetings. In my first eight semesters on the sports staff, nearly every week there would be a high-spirited debate to determine the winner and honorable mentions. This season, the process has been done in the most methodological matter ever: the winner is clearcut and the closest we get to an argument has been over who actually deserves an alternate slot. I understand your pain, and the lack of desire to go watch a lackluster sporting event that could easily turn embarrassing in a matter of seconds, like Thursday night’s soccer game, when Northwestern scored the winning goal in the last seconds of the game. There is no excuse, though. Despite the lack of major successes, now is not the time to give up on Illini sports. It’s the student body’s responsibility to

be there for its teams when the athletes need a renewed sense of energy. Now is the time to help pump up these athletes, to help them remember that they are here to represent them. We need the athletes to know we support them and want them to do well, so they have something to play for. I talked to Illini Pride president Daniel Borup on Monday about how it can be a struggle to get students excited about sports, specifically in seasons like this one and even more so for the smaller sports. “I think it’s incredible how much work these athletes put in to represent our school,” Borup said. “People should try attending these sporting events at least one time. It’s the best way for them to see what it’s like and experience it. This is a Big Ten school and no matter what the sport is, they are top-tier athletes. This week is Homecoming week, which is the perfect time to get into school spirit. Show the alums that come back for Homecoming how we are loyal Illinois fans, how we care about our teams, big and small. Saturday morning is the Homecoming football game against Indiana. There’s also a swimming and diving meet Friday night and the first men’s basketball exhibition game Saturday night. As easy as it is to be apathetic about these sports, remember these are our Illini and they need our help. If the students don’t support them, who will?

Emily is a graduate student. She can be reached at bayci1@dailyillini.com. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyBayci.

The best and worst of #supersportsweekend Best student section — Spike Squad, women’s volleyball: I’d even go so far to say that there’s more volleyball die-hards than any other sport. Worst student section — Illini Aces, women’s tennis: who cheers for tennis anyway? Best venue — Arboretum, men and women’s cross-country: perfect place to combine a date and a sporting event. Worst venue — The ARC, swimming and diving: It feels like you’re in a boiler room. Best concessions — Volleyball, there is even an express concession line. Worst concessions — The nonexistent concession stands at cross country, swimming, tennis. Best T-shirt — Jawesome with a giant shark for swimming: it takes cheesy to a jawesomely new level. Worst T-shirt — The orange Illini athletic T-shirts for fall. Talk about boring. Best halftime entertainment — When the Illini cheerleaders and dance team made a rare appearance at the volleyball game. Worst halftime entertainment — A youth soccer team, “the green machines,” playing a scrimmage during the women’s soccer game. Yes, kids are cute but this was too boring to handle.

Tweets from #supersportsweekend @emilybayci Oct. 19, 3:15 p.m. — The spectators comments are about how hot it is in the ARC pool area. This is the first time I’ve been warm all week. #supersportsweekend Oct. 19, 5:19 p.m. — Keeping up with these xc dudes is enough of a work out for my entire weekend. #supersportsweekend Oct. 19, 5:46 p.m. — At tennis meets they need waffle fries because they look like rackets. “Running” tacos for xc (get it?) And freeze pops for swim meets #duh Oct. 21, 1:29 p.m. — Waiting for a full out brawl to happen on this soccer field. First yellow card issued to Nebraska #supersportsweekend Oct. 21, 4:01 p.m. — Well that volleyball game was the most depressing event of #supersportsweekend

Breaking down women’s basketball BY MICHAEL WONSOVER STAFF WRITER

Although the Matt Bollant era has been brief so far, he’s already begun to make his mark. “We’re already 10 points better then we were last year,” senior forward Karisma Penn said of what Bollant preaches. “Now

we’re just a lot better individually. If you stand us up to how we were last year, we’re a lot better and a lot more well-rounded basketball players.” “We’re a long way ahead from where we were at this spring,” Bollant said during the team’s media day on Monday. “Their level intensity, their coming ready to practice,

each and everyday we’ve been really consistent with that.” With Bollant’s successful record in past coaching stints, Illinois heads into this season expecting to improve on 2010-11.

Michael can be reached at wonsovr2@ dailyillini.com.

X-Factor — Kersten Magrum

2011-12 record — 11-19 (5-11 Big Ten) Important stat — 15.6

15.6 is the points per game senior guard Adrienne GodBold averaged during the final eight games of the season. The do-it-all guard won the Big Ten’s Sixth Player of the Year award last season. She also earned team MVP and shared the team’s Defensive Player of the Year honors with Karisma Penn. GodBold is coming off a career year in which she averaged 9.6 points, 4.2 rebounds, 1.9 steals and one block per game.

Player most likely to breakout — Alexis Smith

The sophomore guard barely played last season, appearing in only 5.6 minutes per game. Without Lydia McCully, who was last season’s assist leader, Smith will be expected to lead the team at point guard. “Alexis has been outstanding,” Bollant said. “If there was anything that will change from last year, (it) would be Alexis playing the point. I don’t think people understand how good she is right now. She’s in great shape, she’s as quick and as strong as any point guard. There’s a lot of point guards that have great quickness. There’s not a lot of point guards that have that quickness and that speed with the strength that she has. I think she’s gonna have a great year.” PETER DEJONG THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lance Armstrong waves on the podium after he won his fifth consecutive Tour de France cycling race in Paris in 2003.

Armstrong stripped of all Tour de France titles because of doping BY GRAHAM DUNBAR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GENEVA — Seven lines of blanks. From 1999 to 2005. There will be no Tour de France winner in the record book for those years. Once the toast of the Champs-Elysees, Lance Armstrong was formally stripped of his seven Tour titles Monday and banned for life for doping. As far as the Tour is concerned, his victories never happened. He was never on the top step of the podium. The winner’s yellow jersey was never on his back. The decision by the International Cycling Union marked an end

to the saga that brought down the most decorated rider in Tour history and exposed widespread cheating in the sport. Armstrong’s fiercely defended reputation as a clean athlete was shattered by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency two weeks ago, when it detailed evidence of drug use and trafficking by his Tour-winning teams. USADA released its report to show why it ordered Armstrong banned from competition back in August. Monday’s judgment by the UCI was just the necessary next legal step to formalize the loss of his titles and expel him from the sport.

Returning starters — Amber Moore, Ivory Crawford, Kersten Magrum, Karisma Penn

Four of Illinois’ five starters return from last season. In Penn alone the Illini return its leading scorer, rebounder and shot blocker from a season ago. The incumbent players from last season made Illinois an attractive destination for Bollant. “Your first year is about the players,” Bollant said. “Having players here that are gonna lead and do the right things is really important. That’s one of the first things we said to our juniors and seniors is we’re only gonna be as good as our seniors. You guys have to practice the right way for us to be great. Karisma’s done that and Adrienne’s doing that. Kersten and Amber, our juniors, are doing that as well. That’s something that was attractive in the job, the talent that was here.”

Player with most potential — Karisma Penn

The senior has had an up-and-down career so far at Illinois. Heading into last season, the Illini had All-American aspirations for Penn. Her sophomore season was among the best in program history after she averaged 17.5 points, 10 rebounds, 2.4 blocks and 1.8 steals per game. Her 78 blocks broke the Illinois single-season record. Penn had a considerable drop-off her junior season, averaging only 13.4 points, 7.3 rebounds, 2.1 blocks and 1.5 steals per game. Penn said her old self will return this season under Bollant. “My sophomore year I really believed in the system,” Penn said. “I really believed what the coaching staff was telling me. I think last year I was frustrated with a lot of things, so this year I think I have that same mentality as my sophomore year. Last year, I slacked off in a lot of areas and just getting back to that form and playing like I know I can play and just being consistent all year long.”

Magrum was in the midst of a career year last season despite battling through injuries along the way. The junior forward has had to deal with a rash of injuries throughout her career. After missing all but three games of her sophomore year with a stress fracture in her right foot, she suffered a myriad of injuries last season including a concussion and a separate head injury that forced her to miss a combined nine games. When she played, she was among the Illini’s biggest contributors. In 21 games, Magrum averaged 11.4 points and 5.7 rebounds per game, while leading the team in free throw percentage (.817). Heading into this season, injuries may still linger. Magrum suffered another concussion about a week and a half ago while practicing against Kierra Morris. Dealing with injuries has not been easy for Magrum. “Well, it’s been pretty awful,” Magrum said. “It’s been just hard because you get five steps forward then 10 steps back. But with every injury it’s a new learning experience, mine’s still concussion-related, so it’s kind of a thing being undersized in the post with your head being right where their elbows are. Hopefully, after this one, my brain heals, and, hopefully, I pass the test today and have this whole season healthy. It should be a nice relief to have a whole season in.”

Best quote

“The six boosters that came at the end of (the golf outing) stood around and they said I can’t believe the change. And these are people from our courtsiders, who have been around this team for several years. They said I can’t believe in the change and how they carry themselves. The smiles on their faces, the joy that they have, the togetherness that they can see has been really, really evident.” - head coach Matt Bollant

Giants defeat Cardinals in Game 7 for World Series spot THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Hunter Pence hit a bizarre, two-run double, Matt Cain pitched his second clincher of October and the San Francisco Giants won their record-tying sixth elimination game of the postseason, beating the defending World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals 9-0 in Game 7 of the NL championship series Monday night. Marco Scutaro matched an LCS record with 14 hits in the series and Pablo Sandoval drove in a run for his fifth straight game. The Giants returned to the World Series two years after winning it all, getting the final out in a downpour. Pablo Sandoval’s run-scoring groundout in the first gave him an RBI in five straight games, matching a Giants postseason record. Home run king Barry Bonds set the mark in 2002. Matt Cain worked out of a jam behind a strong defensive effort and extended San Fran-

cisco’s lead with a two-out single in the second. A Giants pitcher has driven in a run in three straight games. During that same span, St. Louis has scored one run as a team. Lohse left after he walked Buster Posey to load the bases with no outs in the third. Pence then connected on a pitch from reliever Joe Kelly that broke his bat. The ball hit his bat twice more creating an awkward spin that fooled shortstop Pete Kozma, who first broke to the right. Kozma could not recover to field the slicing ball and it went for a double. A third run scored when center fielder Jon Jay misplayed the ball for an error. The hit highlighted a run-scoring blitz that put the Cardinals in a major hole and whipped an orange towel-twirling crowd at AT&T Park into a frenzy. The Giants were going for their 20th pennant while the Cardinals were chasing their 19th. In winner-take-all Game 7s, the Cardinals are 11-4 and the Giants are 0-5.

Since 1976, 14 home teams have won a Game 6 to force Game 7, with 13 of the 14 going on to win Game 7, according to STATS LLC. The lone loser was the 2006 Mets against the Cardinals. Then-Met Carlos Beltran struck out looking with the bases loaded on Adam Wainwright’s curveball for the final out in New York’s 3-1 loss. The only other time the Cardinals opened a 3-1 lead in the NLCS came in 1996, when they lost to the Atlanta Braves in seven games. San Francisco, which never faced an elimination game in winning the 2010 World Series title, is 5-0 when pushed to the edge during this postseason. St. Louis has won its last six games when facing elimination. The Detroit Tigers, who have been waiting on their opponent since finishing a four-game ALCS sweep of the Yankees last Thursday, get another trip to the Bay Area after clinching the division series in Oakland.

DAVID J. PHILLIP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

St. Louis Cardinals’ starting pitcher Kyle Lohse reacts during the Cardinals’ 9-0 Game 7 loss in the NLCS on Monday.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

3B

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

FOR RENT

Employment

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Services

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

110 120 130 140 150 160

Rentals

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Apartments

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

Announcements

710 720 750

Campus Events Community Events

Classes

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830 Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

420 APARTMENTS

! "#$$!%&'(! !

!"#$%&'(%&') 104 E. John 312 E. White 1103 S. Euclid *$+',-../) 508 S. First 108 W. Charles 104 E. John 103 E. Healey 105 S. Fourth 108 1/2 E. Daniel 310 E. Clark 106 E. Armory 308 E. Armory 312 E. White 507 S. Elm, C.

0$+',-../) 104 E. John 105 S. Fourth 208/210 E. White 308 E. Armory 312 E. White 1103 S. Euclid

2$+',-../) 308 E. Armory 1103 S. Euclid 807 S. Locust 208/210 E. White 306 E. Armory 3$+',-../) 1103 S. Euclid 306 E. Armory

1$+',-../) 1103 S. Euclid 807 S. Locust 208/210 E. White 312 E. White 306 E. Armory

SUBLETS RIGHT APARTMENT!

Flat Screen TV Cathedral Ceilings Balconies Free High Speed Internet

Video Intercom In Unit Washer/Dryer Granite and Tile Satellite TV*

!"#$$%&

6

7

9

:

(

4

8

(

"

5

5

6

4

(

8

"

9

<

6

!

5

"

'

!

5

9

6

4

7

(

8

!

4

9

6

7

8

8 8

9

"

(

!

(

4

7

9

5

7

(

!

"

5

5

'

"

8

"

6

7

9

( ! 4 8 5

7

!

6

4

"

(

5

9

4

8

(

6

4

9

5

8

-

;

(

(

7

8

:

9

9

:

8

!

'

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

6

9

8

(

4

7

P E A L

"

9 5

!

"

8

7

6

(

4

8

"

4

6

"

7

5

!

8

-

7

" 4 7 8 ( 6 9 ! 5

5

6

!

9

6

(

7

5

"

7

4

8

!

4

4

5 8

(

6

5

"

9

9

!

7

7

8

8

9

!

(

6

!

7

5

6

9

"

(

7

9

4

8

( 5

9

4 7

8 "

!

(

9

8

7

4 " 6

6 4 ! 5 7

4

(

7

6

(

!

4

5

6

"

5

!

"

4

! 5 9

8 6

(

(

9

8

9

!

(

! "

8 " 9 6 7

" ( " " 7 !

6

( 8

5

7

4 !

" 4 ( 6

6 7 5 9 !

9 4 ! 6 7 5

5 7 " ( 9 ! 8

! 8 5 6 " 4 (

8 4 " 7 5 ( 6 9

" ( 6 ! 9 4 8 5 7

5

6

(

9

"

7 6 ( 8 ! " 4

7

4 ! 5 8 9

8

4

5

6

( 9 " 7 !

9

!

7

"

8 5 ( 4 6

7

9

4

8

5 " 6 ! (

(

5

8

!

6 4 9 " 7

"

6

!

9

7 ( 4 5 8

5

7

(

4

! 6 8 9 "

4

8

9

(

" 7 ! 6 5

!

"

6

5

9 8 7 ( 4

!! ( " 9 8 7 4 6 ! 5

6 7 ! " 5 ( 8 4 9

5 8 ( 7 4 " ! 9 6

" 4 6 9 ! 8 ( 5 7

! 9 7 ( 6 5 " 8 4

7 ! " 5 ( 9 4 6 8

9 6 4 ! 8 7 5 " (

8 ( 5 4 " 6 9 7 !

6 5

"

8

(

8

!

!)

(

8

5

"

7

( 7 4 6 " ! 5 8 9

8

4 9

! 4

7 "

6 (

9 !

8 5

( 6

7 9

9 4

(

6

"

9 4 7 ( !

(

8

! 7 6 " 5

9

(

6 " 5 7 8

5

9

4 8 !

8

7

5 ! 9

4

5

7 ( "

7

4

" 6 (

"

!

8 9 4

(

4

! " 8

! 9 5 8 7 " ( 4

( 5 7 " 4 6 ! 8 9

8 " 4 ( 9 ! 6 5 7

7 9 " 4 ! 8 ( 6 5

4 6 ( 7 5 " 8 9 !

! 8 5 6 ( 9 4 7 "

5 7 6 8 " 4 9 ! (

9 4 8 ! 7 ( 5 " 6

" ( ! 9 6 5 7 4 8

!( ! " 8 9 5 ( 6 7 4

6 5 9 7 8 4 ! " (

8 ! ( 5 4 6 7 9 "

9 6 7 ( ! " 4 5 8

5 4 " 8 7 9 ( 6 !

" 8 6 4 ( 7 9 ! 5

4 9 ! " 6 5 8 ( 7

7 ( 5 ! 9 8 " 4 6

4 5

6 9 ! 7 6 5 8 4 " (

8 " 6 ( 4 7 ! 5 9

( 4 5 ! 9 " 6 8 7

4 7 9 " 6 5 8 ( !

5 6 ! 8 7 ( " 9 4

" 8 ( 9 ! 4 7 6 5

! 5 8 4 " 9 ( 7 6

6 9 " 7 ( ! 5 4 8

7 ( 4 5 8 6 9

!

"

" 8 6

4 5

6 7

" 4

! (

5 8

( !

9 "

!

5

7 ( 9

"

6

8 9 !

5

9

4 ! (

8

7

( 6 5

9

8

" 5 7

7

!

6 4 "

4

"

9 8 6

6

(

5 7 4

! ( 6 9 7 " 4

8

4

7

6

! 5 "

9

5

"

(

4 8 7

"

!

8

7

9 ( 6

6

7

(

5

" 4 9

4

9

5

8

6 ! (

5

8

9

"

( 7 !

7

"

4

!

5 6 8

(

6

!

4

8 9

6

(

4

"

8

6

!

9

5

7

6

5

"

4

7

(

8

"

5

9

!

4

6

(

9

5

7

!

8

8

5

(

9

6

!

5

4

!

8

"

7

4

6

9

5

(

7

"

9

!"#$%&'$()!)$$$$$$$$$$*+,-$.$$$$$$$/01223$

WITH A FREE COPY OF THE

Daily Illini

; 7

5

9

"

8

'

9

8

(

4

8

"

!

7

8

-

6

:

(

8

9

7

6

7

:

!

9

6

(

7

!

4

;

5

4

;

-

7

9

9

STAY CONNECTED

620 Eighth Av For Informa For Wedn

Across 31 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Third Uncleâ&#x20AC;? singer 1 ___-on-Don, Russian port of 32 When repeated, 1+ million cry after an award is 7 Tycoon, bestowed informally 33 Alphabet run 13 Theoretically 34 Clay pigeon 15 Maryland state launcher symbol 35 End of the saying 16 Wassily ___, Russian38 Persevering, say American 41 Dictionnaire entry Nobelist in 42 Shade of red Economics 46 Single dose? 18 Like the Kremlin 47 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Got milk?â&#x20AC;? cry, 19 Comics outburst !"#$%&#'$&"()*$%+&,-.&/"&#'$&*01"2&+314$+&+5&#'1#& perhaps 20 Conservative 48 Cerumen $14'&%567&450()"&1"8&9:9&+;(1%$&45"#1/"+&5"0<&5"$& leader? 49 â&#x20AC;&#x153;For hireâ&#x20AC;? org. of 5=&$14'&"()*$%>&?'$%$&/+&5"0<&5"$&+50(#/5">&@+50(21 Divulges the 1930s #/5"&/"&A01++/=/$8+&1"8&5"0/"$&1#&666>81/0</00/"/>45)B>& 22 Nouri al-Maliki, 50 Picker-upper for one 52 Watts in a film 25 Pro ___ projector? 27 Highest-rated 53 Drill instructors? 28 They may be sold 55 What may be by the dozen caught with bare 30 Desirous look hands?

;

Email opinions@dailyillini.com

;

'The New York Tim

'

9

'

:

8

!

6

Most apt. furnished, parking available, laundry available

4

$1,305

"

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or to set up an appointment call 217.328.3770

9 (

$1,100 $890 $950 $685-745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775

3 Bedroom Apartments 201 E. Armory, C.

Now Leasing!

'()&*+,&-.'.&&&&&&&&&&/012&3&&&&&&&

7

4

$700 $620 $490-540 $510 $540, $660 $515, $565

2 Bedroom !-$.&$'(/012*3,$'&$4.%5 58 E. Armory, C. 201 E. Armory, C. !77$%&$'()*+(,$'& 8"?$%&$9:;)<(:;=,$>& 7""?$9&$@;+)3:,$'& 7""B$%&$'0/*C,$>& 7"7"$%&$'0/*C,$>& 7"7D$%&$'0/*C,$>&

Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

Sudoku '

8

1 Bedroom !-$.&$'(/012*3,$'&$4.%5 58 E. Armory, C. !"#$6$!77$%&$'()*+(,$'& 87"$%&$9:;)<(:;=,$>& 7""?$9&$@;+)3:,$'& 77"8$9&$92+;=A,$'&

Letters to the Editor

A program of the Office of the Dean of Students

!

$410 $365

LANDLORD COMPLAINT RECORDS

!"#$%&'%()*"%+"##%*,'+,%'-%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(5 6'/%#2*"%&72.%+"8.2&"9%:7",%;"3'((",0%2&%&'%<'/;%-;2",0.4 =-%<'/%'+,%<'/;."#-%)%+"8.2&">%$#)3"%)%#2,*%&'%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'( =-%<'/%$;2,&%'/&%&7"%./0'*/.%&7",%$;2,&%&7"(%&+23"%),0%?2@"%',"%&'%',"%'-%<'/;%-;2",0.4 :"##%<'/;%)3A/)2,&),3".>%-;2",0.%),0%&")(()&".%)8'/&%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(4 B/.&%7"#$%&'%()*"%&72.%.2&"%+"##%*,'+,45

217-344-3008

201 E. Armory, C. !"#$%&$'()*+(,$'&

G E T T H E FA C T S

TenantUnion.illinois.edu

Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

Efficiency

APARTMENT HUNTING ???

TENANT UNION

www.BaileyApartments.com

www.smithapartmentsâ&#x20AC;?cu.com

830

LEASE REVIEWS

Digital Comp. Lab, Grainger, Siebel 2 1/2 Blocks

Smith Apartments 217â&#x20AC;?384â&#x20AC;?1925

!

NINQSPQFSUJFTDPN 

Close In Urbana Locations

NOW RENTING FOR 2013­2014 SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING NOW!

MISCELLANEOUS

www.mhmproperties.com

Leasing for Fall 2013 Engineering Campus

1,2,3&4 BEDROOMS

announcements

7

!"#$%&'()&'(*&+,$#-''%&.,/#0

*Available

Do You Want Close? Illini Union 3 1/2 Blocks Mech. Eng. 3 Blocks

Share Your Thoughts

(217)337­8852

*C as h N -in yo o re -ad u fu va m n n yo ay ds, ce ur ca bu on ad nc t ly. . el

Wine Cooler In-Unit Wi-Fi Mirror Closet Doors Covered Parking*

5

!!!"##$%&'(")*$+++ +,-."/0-"-122

420

Furnished

606 E White, Champaign

(White near Wright, Across from future ECE Building!!)

GUARANTEED COMPLETION! 1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms on campus

PORTS

6

APARTMENTS

ILLINI S

7

!"#$%&'())&"*%&"#& )+,-(./&0"#*),)&1"2& /,.)(#3&#"45

!"#$%&'()*+&(*,*&%-.$%/ !"#"$"%&'())*+",-(./"-.,-(.+"0122" 2345.'&'"678"9:5..&;<"95=;&">?+" 0122"@AB:"C4&&'"D.E&(.&E+"0122" F5E&(+"@&5E"5.'"E(5<:"(&*)G5;H""I,,J <E(&&E"45(KA.B+"A.'))(";5-.'(L+"4));+" E&..A<"M)-(EH"I."N"O>P"=-<"()-E&<H"" C*5;;"4&E"IQH"OJ0"RJSTU7+"C5E"!7JSH" $!7V"FH"F:AE&"CE(&&E"" !"#$%&'(%)"*+#,-&./#0& $!WJUSRJUW!U" " XXXH*L545(E*&.E:)*&HM)*"

Luxury 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Loft Apartments with Private Baths

9

Furnished/Unfurnished

$20 $10

TO

!

410

20 Words, 5 Days 10 Words, 5 Days

(

APARTMENTS

Roland Realty  217­351­8900

510

6

rentals

HOUSES FOR RENT

<#,$=0$0>-:-=>0$;()$ (")$4903-%>$<3.-(#$ <,$9)-30?@

! !

FOR RENT

Coming in August, 2013

440

!"#$%&$'()*+,)$-./&$0$12$343567/)6$ 8+5$9:;,/6$945()<=$9:77/5$>"0?&$@:5A )(9B/C&$DEFE=7+)6B$()*,:C()<$:6(,(A 6(/9&$G73(,$'G%%0H(,,()+(9&/C:&$

RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT PRICE! RIGHT LOCATION!RIGHT RIGHT PRICE! PRICE! RIGHT APARTMENT!RIGHT LOCATION! merchandise RIGHT PRICE! 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com RIGHT LOCATION! (217)(217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com RIGHT PRICE! QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY (217)RIGHT 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com QUALITY HOUSINGTO TOTHE THECHAMPAIGN-URBANA CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY QUALITY HOUSING UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY PRICE! RIGHTAND APARTMENT! (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY ROLAND  RIGHT LOCATION! (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY BOOKS 220QUALITY RIGHT PRICE! R EAND AUNIVERSITY L T Y OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA !"#$%&'"($)"*+($,--.$/(&*0$ SS (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com House Leasing is  ESS PA 123'('*45(6.7$183"(496-:*4$ OUORTRS PR Y ;6+-5*4$<849=<>+"$ QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY SP Underway! Stop  !"#$%&#$'()*#+,# 901 S. First St. for more details.

"#$%&'$!(!)*++$! ! ,-.!(!/.#-+! ! 01-!(!23$#+'! ! 435!(!6&.$! ! 7-.!(!8'3*5! ! 90:;<<:;==,9! ! >>>?@.@A*&A+*-#+1?%&@!

351­1767

1 BR-CAMPUS-JAN 2013

?%@=>!@A$B4*C$D(&&$

!"#$%$&'$()$*'$ +(),$%,$-#$./0$ 10)2-3045$60)3/%#7 ,-40$()$8)%#49().%7 .-(#$3%.0:()-04$;()$ !"#$"%&'()))

!"#$%&'

Call for an appointment

503 E. Springfield, C. Newer building, C/A, D/W Washer/Dryer, $795 www.ppmrent.com 351-1800

ADS!

! !"#$%&$'()*+%,$(%,-$(,*!%.($(/%%%%%%%%%%%-'0(%#+%")%&,1(2""0/

www.johnsonrentals.com rentals@jrpm.comcastbiz.net

!"#$%&''(%)*++,--,*.-%/0,1% 20,345%!06.%78''%9*%7&:'''%0%;<<=% >6*+%?*+<@%"A9*+09<1%B4-9<+@% ;*631;,1<%CDD*69A.,94@%EA-9%7F8%9*% B90695%>6<<%G60,.,.H@%% % I99DJKKLLL@&'''033,.@.<9%

ACTION

PARKING / STORAGE 570

4.5)') 509 S. Elm, C. 314 E. White 106 1/2 E. Armory 106 E. Armory 108 E. Daniel

4

!"#$%&'(##)$*+,,-$*+(./01&'$$ 232(4)&.40$*#($,&20&$/.$56789567:$ 0;1##,$-&2(<$"""<&204=/&"9234<;#)$

Fall 2013 Apartments

8

030

Full/Part time

Property Management

"

HELP WANTED

Johnson Rentals

9

!"#$%&'()*'#$!*+$(,$*--#.'(+/$ $*..&(-*'(0+,$102$3*2'$!()#$,*&#,$ $*,,0-(*'#,$4('"$0.#+$ $*5*(&*6(&('7$(+-&89(+/$9*7,:$ ;..&7$(+$.#2,0+$*'$ !"#$#!%&!'()*+,-./0!

1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments priced for every budget. Come in today!

900

!"##$%&'())'(*))'$+,$-(."/#$$ !"#$%&&"'(!&)"$$"*"+(!"%,#-+./-.. &01+"/.2-03.-4*.5677.&8-0/-0/9.

! "#$$!%&'( ! "#$!%&'()*(! ! +,-!#!+,"!.!/01'2! ! "34!#!"35!.!6789&! ! +3+!:!;8<97! ! =0)>2!<')?!/)@*9A!B1'2&9C! ! )))*+,+-./-0.1203*4/+ ++4#DDE-!

5

!"#$%&'&(#)*+,-# !"#$%&'()*(+,("-(./..0,1.'(( "23(%&.(/45%6(7).+(8/("-29:6(( ;,<*=/+/(5,<*)+/&284./>(+/.+.6(( ?1>/&@,(7AB(.541.6(( C<40=(5,@+&401=48D@<40=65,<6(

shout outs

SHOUT OUTS

(

'&%!)*!+,-./$-0!1*! ! '&'!)*!234560!1*!! ! '&'!7!8#-,5$0!9*! ! :&:!)*!;#<0!9*! ! :&=!)*!+/.34>0!9*! ! %&(!)*!"/3?>@0!9*! ! (''!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! %&=!)*!),A>@0!9*! ! B&=!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! -./0!B&B!7*!C@,>50!9* ! 1112343*56*75+87,2963& ! %'DE((DE::=%!

!"#"$#%&'()*$+,,'-,'.-$-&/'01$'2%33' 4-,-5' 6667,"#"$#%&+)*$+,,7819:;1#,'

!"#$%"&"'(%)**+",*-.(."" *$"/#+0-.1"2-334"5-)$6.,(%1"" 23#7"./)(($"89.1"" :;<=:>;=?;&<" ./,$(6%()=0)*0()76(.1/*+"

!

!

Ap

!"#$%$&'()*+,("-.$/0 !"#$%&'()*+$,"-$,'%%$./012$3&%45&$ 6-'*7$*&#$,4%%8$,4-*)(9&7$.$:;$$ '<'-=>&*=(?$(=')*%&(($'<<%)'*@&(?$$ 7)(9#'(9&-?$#'(9&-A7-8&-2$B)()=$$ ###2!&'-!"-=9CD2@">?$"-$@'%%$ .0EFGHIF/EG0$,"-$7&=')%(2$

!"#$%&'(%&)*'$+ !"#"$%& '()"*(&+&,(-.//0&1&,2%34&5& ,(-.//0&6&,2%3& !"#$%"&'()&*+$)&",'-../'0..&1,'0#$' $7.((84&$%298)($$&$%(()&:9%73(8;&<./0 &=1>?@A(.$/8;&B(-&CD(DD(.&>EEF?6GH&

Choices Grim? t n me art

830

!"#$%&'%()%*+,$-((#. !"#$%&&'(#&)*+",-.,--,/,0 *(//(0%&'%()%10"22$3. 12,11$3(#&)*14$+",-.,--,/,0 *")4%&'%()%1&5-/3. +",-.,--,/,(15)%-3(#&)0

!"#$%&'()*+*,$)*-*.()#//0*'/"&(&* /$*1,02"&*$(,#*34/"5'4/$*,$)* 3%64'*,$)*7'%/*,$)*8%$1/9$:* !,99*;<=>?;<=+* @,99*>-A?=+<B*

5

!"#"$"%&'(&)*+,

510 MISCELLANEOUS

7

!"#$%&'()*+%,"-*(.%/**$*$%#/%0(1"2 /"3% 4556% 7899% :;% <;#/3% =>#?-% ;/% &'()*+.3%

!"#$!"%&'(&)*+,-./&0( !"#$%&'((('"))*+,-.'*)/#,*-#01'2'3'4' 5*6+""7'898+&7*-&%')"+':;2<=' >"7*'$-,&%'9*&')+,*-6?0='>#@*6$?*'8-' 899",-&7*-&'&"680A' :2BC<DBC:;;E'FFF=&+,#"$-&07.=#"7'

430 HOUSES FOR RENT

Unfurnished

4

!"#$%&"'()*#"!+,*-

430 APARTMENTS

Unfurnished

Furnished

!"#$%&$'()*+$%+&,$!"#"$"%&'())*"+,(-./0&'"121(3*&-3/" +)("456!7"8)"2&3/7"9:0&',;&"3)"/&&" 30&*"%&+)(&"30&<=(&">)-&?"" 46@A!B@A455C"DDD73(.:),-3<*>7:)*"

020

Part time

420 APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

8

Furnished

"

HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS

6

employment

HAVE SOMETHING

:G E

S P A D E

A L L E V I A T E D

U I T A R S O L O

A N T S

T O A T

U B A R W I E

; 8

'

T A I L A L T

A E F S T T P A O R P O V W I L T A W A S H E T O Y D E G I A L E R O S

: 8 ;

M O E S

N E V

E A T S

9O N G

L I O D K O P S D E A D Z A L E B Y A N N L O E S G R I T T A C B U T A N A C A S T I I

D E P P

I L E T

N I L S

; OJ SI GE

(

H A N

- NB CA RE O N H A M

S T E R N

E S T O

<

SELL IT IN CLASSIFIEDS

TO SELL? WITH THE

DAILY ILLINI

57 58 59 62

Treadmill Half Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not re Info on a personal Abbr. 63 Mandela portrayer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invictus, 64 Long Isla county 65 Certain ra

Dow 1 Product w commerc for a spel 2 Undiversi a farm 3 Expo â&#x20AC;&#x2122;74 4 Go for the bronze? 5 Go (for) 6 Red Cros line? 7 Start of a part sayin 8 Unpaid d 9 Window treatment 10 Ride up a down? 11 City in the Allegheni 12 Justin Bie genre 14 Ship haza 17 Part 3 of saying 23 Search 24 Intense d 26 Silver Sta


4B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

FOOTBALL FROM PAGE 1B worst. He said missed tackles have been the biggest problem for a defense that ranks near the bottom of the Big Ten. “It’s very important for our players to see that success is just a step away if we do it the way we’re supposed to do it,” Beckman said. Beckman has challenged his team to “own the day.” He wants his players to take things one day at a time and try to win each individual day. Illinois has five games remaining, three of which are at home against teams with a combined 0-9 record in Big Ten play. If the Illini still have ambitions of a bowl game, as Williams says they do, they will need to win four of those remaining games. “It just hurts having the season we’re having, knowing that we’re a way better team than we show on the field,” Williams said. “The way we prepare Monday through Friday, the fans don’t really get to see the dedication and the determination that we put in during the week.”

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@ dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

GOLF FROM PAGE 1B and the predicting breaks such vital aspects of putting, Postillion acknowledged that superior putting can make up for other parts of one’s game that are not as effective. “If you’re able to one- and twoputt every green, you’re going be saving a lot more shots than you would trying to work on your swing,” Postillion said. “I mean, even if you hit a bad chip, if you’re making things within 10 feet, you’re OK.” Most casual golf fans may think of putting situations in which the ball is only a few feet away from the hole, but sophomore Michelle Mayer said the process of getting the ball that close in the first place is also a time-consuming skill to improve in. She said this is a part of her game that she has put much of her effort into lately. “What I worked on a lot over the past year has been lag putting (putting from longer distances) because I feel that my short putting is really strong,” Mayer said. “But it can only take me so far if I’m hitting my first putt to six feet (away). You’re not going make all of those.” When it comes to putting drills, the team zeros in on hitting the ball past the hole to increase the chances of made birdies and pars through easy tap-in opportunities. Golfers never want to leave the ball short. Slone will not let a practice go by without a seemingly endless amount of putt and chip shots, but the team knows that this needs to happen if it can have any chance of improving in and eventually winning tournaments. “It is always fun to hit that 300yard drive, but if you can’t make the putt, it doesn’t count for anything,” senior Ember Schuldt said. “It’s always like that saying, ... ‘drive for show, putt for dough.’”

Alex can be reached at ajortiz2@ dailyillini.com.

Seniors keep soccer consistent in win BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

Keeping composure through a physical battle is what led the Illinois women’s soccer team to a 4-1 victory on Senior Day. Having struggled in the past with ball control, the Illini kept possession for more than half of the match against Nebraska. As a result, Illinois recorded 16 shots in the fi rst half and eight in the second. The 24 shots matched the amount the Illini attempted against Purdue earlier this season. The four goals — the highest scoring output for the Illini this season — were scored by three different players on the Illinois roster: junior Vanessa DiBernardo and seniors Shayla Mutz and Niki Read. After Mutz scored the fi rst two goals of the match, Illinois’ seniors kept composed as Nebraska began to heighten its intensity. “Playing against Nebraska, you know you are going to get your looks,” Illinois head coach Janet Rayfield said. “I thought what we did, especially in the second half, was fi nd the composure when they wanted it to be chaotic. I think our seniors really did a great job (Sunday) in terms of leading the composure, leading the energy and leading the competitiveness. All those things that it takes for us to be successful, I think you saw it in our seniors.”

Physical games require strategy At halftime, the Illini were only up 2-1, and at the start of the second half, the Cornhuskers showed frustration and anger on the field. Nebraska only tallied one foul in the fi rst half but was assessed 10 fouls in the second period, including a yellow card. Though the physicality from the Cornhuskers was relentless, the Illini used strategy to keep control of the game. “I think the biggest thing for us is that you want to keep the ball moving,” Rayfi eld said. “It is what frustrates teams because when they’re coming hard to try and pressure like

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Shayla Mutz (10) celebrates with Allie Osoba (17) and Vanessa DiBernardo (20) after scoring her second goal against Nebraska at the Illinois Soccer Stadium on Sunday. The Illini won 4-1 to end their three-game losing streak. Nebraska does and they want it to be kind of a high-paced game, the more you move the ball and the more they have to chase, the harder it is. It’s also hard to hit a moving object, so if we can keep the ball moving, then the ball doesn’t get stolen and we don’t get hit.”

Energy focused in right direction Mutz’s fi rst goal was tallied

only 20 minutes into the game. Before the goal was scored, the Illini recorded six shots and five corner kicks. DiBernardo earned Illinois’ fi rst shot in the seventh minute, as the team showed offensive drive early, Read said the type of energy is what made the difference. “I think we had a high energy, but I think it was focused more in the right direction,” she said. “I wouldn’t say we ever come out

here with no energy or less energy, I think it’s just what kind of energy. (On Sunday,) it was really positive, and we believed in everyone. We wanted to get a common job done.” Illinois broke its three-game losing streak after defeating Nebraska. The Illini struggled to connect passes, fi nish opportunities and play with passion last Thursday against Northwestern, but things came together the following match.

“We weren’t playing how we know we can play the past three games, and this still isn’t the best team,” Mutz said. “We still did not put the best team that we have out on the field (Sunday), but we were better. We are just going to keep getting better, and I feel like this is a good step in the progress that we’re going to keep making this season.”

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Volleyball discusses new setter Viliunas Editor’s note: The following is a partial transcript from an Illini Drive interview with Illinois volleyball assistant coach Dan Conners and sophomore Anna Dorn.

we needed to do all the time.

ID: Obviously, with a new setter, you’ve been hitting really well with your connections with Annie (Luhrsen). I don’t have a number Illini Drive: What did you guys take of what you are hitting in the last (three) matches with Alexis (Viliaway from that Wednesday (win unas). But what is it like as a hitter against Northwestern)? to develop a new chemistry with a Conners: Well, I think one of the new setter? challenges with Northwestern is Dorn: I think, especially for midthey don’t make a lot of mistakes and they make you beat them, and actually that’s the same thing with Nebraska, and we were able to come out and execute at a little bit of a higher level on Wednesday than we were (Sunday), and I think that was a difference. What

dles, it is different than outsides just because the height of the sets I think Lex has to get used to Erin (Johnson) and I jump a lot higher and have to hit higher to get around the Big Ten blocks. I think it’s a challenge, especially just kind of in the middle of

the season to have to figure out how to get a bunch of kills and stuff is defi nitely way different. I guess it took us most of the season last year even for Annie and I to get that connection.

her know and let her remember that because if she can remember how to do it once, it will boost her confidence and she can remember to do it again.

ID: Is it a long and lengthy process? AD: Yeah, it just takes time.

ID: Question for you Coach Conners. Did Hambly consult you on the decision to play Alexis? DC: We have been discussing it

It’s not something you can rush because it takes reps after reps to get it.

ID: Even if you have an off game, how do you encourage (Viliunas) and keep saying, ‘Hey, you’re doing a good job?’ AD: In practice, when we get a good connection, just let

Having a good hair day? WPGU 107.1’s Frattle Of The Bands 4

ROUND 4

»

as coaches, and with the challenges that we’ve been going over the whole season, we just thought it was the time to give Lex an opportunity and see what she can do out there.

More online: To listen to the

full episode of Illini Drive visit DailyIllini.com

» » » » »

on you and talked about how you lived with Coach Hambly for a month? Do you want to talk about that for a little bit? DC: Coach Hambly’s great.

He was very hospitable to me. Mary’s (Hambly) the one that runs the household. She’s amazing and she was welcoming and fed me. It was excellent food and an incredible place to stay.

» » » » »

ID: Now Coach, one of the volleyball beat reporters did a story

Illini Drive can be reached at illinidrive@dailyillini.com and on Twitter @IlliniDrive. y laundr -site ors, on

y ood flo U. laundr hardw -site Green, units, rch, on ! large ors, po 706 W. Very 3 F " N, U ood flo ! !! hardw GREE ! " units, 714 W. Large 4,5+ F 3 N, U 767 "! !! -1 Sprin NCOL 1 ! LI U. 5 W. , 6 80 911 ield 4 F 2,3,4 217-3 luded uses ringf om W. Sp na Ho g Inc Urba tals.c 1010 Parkin 3,4 1,2 U. n, U. !" ed sonren Elm, Lincol Includ "! " john , U. king 606 W. 111 S. ed www. F ! 1 da, U. gfield " Par int Includ Neva 217 ! "! Sprin vator, Space U. asher tals king ! " ny, ele com 714 W. dishw en 901 W. ield, 1 Par s. 1 Balco F or, R 4 gf er ing pt vat n rin ash ! !! Build iera "! !! ry, ele dishw ured W. Sp hnso "! " ! "! bank , U. 3 om ent entry, " Jo t, Sec ! ld w. 2, erc C. 1004 ie om Lof 1, Int B , ww erc F " ringf ! !! aley or, int ilding ents ! "! W. Sp "! " E. He elevat " d Bu ! 3 ry ! tm ny, 10 ure " C. 2 " ent 10 lco ar 10 ed Sec 1, Ba B 1,4 St., F ercom Includ ! !! er Ap "! !! er John and int Space "! " ! "! hwash king asher er Banki n, C. 104 E. 1 Par ry, dis 1 Dishw F " , C. hwash 1,4 B ! ilding om ent ry, dis "! !! d Bu Fourth "! !! Gree interc om ent 4 ! "! Secure ! "! nies, interc 105 S. 202 E. ed Loft, , C. 2,3,4 Balco s, C. F " 1,2,3, F " luded, Includ asher cond ! !! "! !! le inc Charle dishw Space S. Se "! " ! "! king g & cab entry, 108 W. 1107 1 Par C. 2,3,4 Parkin B " 1,2,3 ercom , F ! C " int te !! ! k, ! hi " W " ilding vator, Clar er d Bu ! "! ! "! ny, ele hwash 210 E. 508 E. Secure 1 Balco y, dis F " C. 3 , C. F " ry balcon ing "! !! White "! !! om ent Green, entry, Build ! "! interc 8 E. ! "! 3 ured " 2, " ercom 20 and 408 E. ed Sec 1, Int F ce C. 2 B U. lian Includ ! !! ! !! Clark, el app Coler, Space "! " "! " king ess ste 310 E. 106 S. 1 Par 2 stainl B ! 1,2,3 , C. F ! , C. Armory "! !! White ry "! !! Healey ! "! 4th and ! "! om ent y 312 E. C. 55 E. Near 1 Interc C. F " 1,2 F " balcon ! !! mory, ! !! town een, " Ar ry and " wn ! Gr ! Do ent " E. to !" om "! asher 308 303 W. Close 3,4 Interc 1,2 C. F " , C. dishw + F ! !! ! !! First, ry and Fourth ,3,4,5 "! " U. "! " House om ent 508 S. 505 S. ton, Group Ef.,1,2 vator Interc U ! 1,2 F ! st, C. ! !! ough ! !! and ele Locu W. St entry "! " House ! ! " lights ercom 807 S. C. 1106 Group 2 y, sky F " 1 F ! , C. clid, !! Int ! !! balcon Armory Fourth ! "! S. Eu ! " entry, area 4th and "! " ercom 1103 805 S. quiet Near 5+ C. Int F C. 1 e, F , st slin ! !! ! !! gan, Locu hts, bu 08 "! " "! " E. Lo ty lig ! 3 ! C. uri 11 2, 911 S. 9-61 5+ B 1, , C. F s, sec Green, g fan 7-35 Krannert Center White 1 2 E. 2 E. , ceilin C. ry led 4 1/ y, new 31 56 Near ess ent 3,5+ remode Like C. 4 829 Armor 0 ts.com newly ! !! lled acc "! !! Green, 52-3 -231 contro een TV, jsmap U "! " 368 106 1/2 E. ! "! led ning, 410 E. ton, Flat scr www. remode )239 F " 217-3 y, C. 67-7 B ! ter, tan ough newly tore "! !! t Armor (217 ess cen W. St 217-3 ual leases Books een TV, ! "! e, fitn T.I.S. emen 306 E. 1109 0.com Flat scr 1,2 Garag F " unyan 1 ag rs.com ivid 31 R above !! te ind " , m ! an ! a ar ted " ts ha M " ar qu ova e, and ! "! burn tmen ! "! theatr tone JSM wly ren Barb alows 3,4 B " www. F " movie e Apar on !! Ne w.caps Bung pool, locati ! "! y Plac reet stown lty ww Fitness center, "! " Gregor 10 C. 5th St Campu ea t 4 F , 3 1,2,3 R on Wrigh locati "! !! Healey ld & "! " ham Street stown ! "! ingfie ! "! Burn 201 E. Campu 1,2 11. Spr B " B " St. reen in 20 310 "! !! Fifth ts ters/G 2,3,4 tely new ham ! "! Quad 6 207 S. artmen Burn Comple ering 4 B " Quar 1, Engine -242 "! "! !! ace Ap "! !! one 7 Pl ! near 1 st U. o " pet on , p ! ! car ati e. Ca Land New 3 at loc F " 217-4 F " oln Av 070 ! !! led, gre "! !! Healey N Linc "! " remode ents ! "! 40-1 508 E. 1901 Newly ed 1,2 F " 4 artm F ! 17-8 3 Healey p 2 1 ! provid A E. 7 et " ! ern 505 9-3 & int "! " Castle 501/ Cable 7-35

y

Armor ents artm y Ap , U. Baile gfield

d 2nd an

en

Gre n and ! "! ld Lincol ! " ingfie Near and Spr ! !! coln "! " of Lin Corner F ! ! !! th "! " /mon $499 F ! ! !! Quad " ! to " cks 2.5 Blo F ! asher 0 ! !! dishw "! " -377 entry, ercom F ! -328

! 1

F

"#$%&#'(

!"#$$%&'()$*)#%"+%""%,%*!-./01%!2"%$3 21

Brought to you by KAM’s, Jet’s Pizza, Budweiser, BAM Energy Drink, AND Samuel Music

Delta Tau delta acacia Sigma Chi ALPHA TAU OMEGA Wed Oct 24th| Starts at 9PM @ KAMS

$1000 dollars cash Drink specials 2.50 Bacardis 3.00 Bombs 1.50 Bud-U-Call-Its 2.00 Platinum and Limeritas

Play Hard! Frat Harder!

Earn MONEY, Gain FRIENDS & Become a LEADER

There’s no better time to get your senior picture taken. Appointments Available October 22nd to November 9th Illini Media 512 E. Green Champaign

Come to the Information Session TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23 from 5­6 p.m. at ARC MPR 7 ­ OR VISIT ­ www.odos.uiuc.edu/newstudent to apply online!

»


The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 42