Issuu on Google+

Brewin’ it local: Support the drink that built America by drinking local beer OPINIONS, 4A

It’s taco time Tacos for $1 at El Charro make this authentic Mexican grocer and restaurant a lucky find BUSINESS & TECH, 6A

Tuesday October 16, 2012

The Daily Illini

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

www.DailyIllini.com

High: 72˚ Low: 55˚

Vol. 142 Issue 37

|

FREE

GEO hosts ‘work-in’ in public, may strike BY CHRIS SIMON CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Graduate Employees’ Organization and Champaign Federation of Teachers joined forces Monday to raise awareness about their ongoing contract negotiations. The two unions gathered at Panera Bread, 1765 W. Kirby Ave., to stage a “work-in,” where they did their outside-of-classroom work in a public setting to bring attention to what they call unpaid work. “Grading papers, writing letters of support for my students so they can get into graduate school, lesson planning, all the reading — a lot of times you do that at home,” said Stephanie Seawell, graduate student and GEO spokeswoman. “And so the public doesn’t see that work that we do.” Seawell said the public needs to know the unions care a lot about quality public education. She said the University administration needs to stop stalling on the GEO’s contract negotiations. Ingbert Schmidt, member of the bargaining team and of the GEO, said the most important contract component the two sides have agreed on so far is harassment protection, but other impor-

See GEO, Page 3A

PRITEN VORA THE DAILY ILLINI

Josh Young, a graduate employee of the University of Illinois and GEO member, grades some exams while having dinner at Panera Bread on Green Street in Champaign. Several teachers and GEO members were at Panera on Monday to raise awareness of the fact that they often work outside of school and during off hours.

Committee: University should not be limited in how to classify employees BY LAUREN ROHR STAFF WRITER

PRITEN VORA THE DAILY ILLINI

Professor Mark Neubauer gives a lecture in the National Center for Supercomputer Applications on Monday as part of “Petascale Day.”

NCSA celebrates new supercomputer BY MADDIE REHAYEM STAFF WRITER

As Blue Waters, a supercomputer on campus able to calculate in the quadrillions, undergoes fi nal testing, Petascale Day was held on Monday to help the public put those number into perspective. The event was put on by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications which operates Blue Waters, and planned for Oct. 15 because 1 quadrillion equals 10 to the 15th power. The NCSA held events throughout the day at its building to educate the campus community about a petascale computer’s capabilities. Events included film screenings, lectures and demonstrations. The NCSA also tweeted throughout the day, many times defi ning a quadrillion through various comparisons

INSIDE

to help the public understand the size of the number. One main event was a tour of the National Petascale Computing Facility where members of the public could receive information about the computer. “Our tours of Blue Waters help put in perspective just how grand the supercomputer is, how large it is (and) how it feels to be around it,” said NCSA spokesperson Liz Murray. “There’s defi nitely an energy and a presence to it.” Murray said the supercomputer is still in testing phases, so researchers have not had full access to it yet. Research scientist Brian Jewett works in the University’s atmospheric science department and will use the supercomputer once it’s ready. He said Blue Waters is going to make

detailed analysis possible, and “big data,” from Blue Waters will help him better explain tornado behavior and improve tornado forecasting. “We are trying to take conditions associated with a long-lived tornado ... and we’re going to try to run it at ten times the resolution than we ever have before,” Jewett said in a lecture he gave for Petascale Day. “When you have higher resolution, you can actually capture those small scale features (of tornados).” Other Petascale Day events included fi lm screenings and 3-D scientific visualizations by NCSA’s Advanced Visualization Laboratory, which aids researchers with simulations and helps them examine data with more detail.

Maddie can be reached at rehayem2@ dailyillini.com

The Senate Executive Committee is opposing a potential statewide change that would limit the University’s ability to classify employees as civil service workers or academic professionals. The SEC approved a statement Monday against the potential loss of exemption authority. According to the statement, the State Universities Civil Service System is considering adding an amendment to its administrative code that removes exemption authority from state universities. The changes would need to be made by the SUCSS Merit Board, which is made up of 11 trustees from state colleges in Illinois, three of them from the University. The statement said the University needs to maintain the ability to exempt employees from civil service status.

“Key decisions such as which positions to exempt should not be determined by a centralized agency but by the skilled, experienced human resources professionals who work at the University,” according to the committee’s statement. Last week, the Urbana-Champaign Senate endorsed a statement from the Council of Academic Professionals against the removal of exemption authority, an endorsement the SEC said “reinforced concerns that losing flexibility in hiring academic professionals would severely inhibit the teaching, research and service functions of the university.” Nicholas Burbules, SEC member and chair of the General University Policy Committee, said the committee made its own statement on behalf of faculty members to strengthen the committee’s stance on the issue.

See SEC, Page 3A

Danville community college, UI partner in admissions program BY JANELLE O’DEA CONTRIBUTING WRITER

A new program that will give Danville Area Community College students a path to the University. Though no one has applied yet, once they do, University advising staff are prepared to make visits to Danville. The program, Danville Area Community College Pathway to Illinois, was finalized Aug. 31. Stephane Potts, transfer coordinator at the college, said the program makes coming to the University easier because students can meet with University advisers before registering for classes. Advising staff will make visits to Danville twice a semester to help students choose classes with credit

transferable to the University. University admissions staff may also visit the college based on the needs of students in the program. Potts said this new program has more flexibility than existing programs, such as Parkland Pathway to Illinois at Parkland College. Unlike Parkland Pathway to Illinois, DACC Pathway to Illinois students don’t have to know right away whether they will enroll at the University. “We certainly hope they apply here as a transfer student, but if plans change, plans change,” said Kristin Smigielski, assistant direc-

See COLLEGE, Page 3A

Police 2A | Corrections 2A | Calendar 2A | Opinions 4A | Crossword 5A | Comics 5A | Business & Technology 6A | Sports 1B | Classifieds 3B-4B | Sudoku 4B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300

Urbana

The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editor Bryan Lorenz )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Asst. design editor Eunie Kim Michael Mioux Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper

Residential burglary was reported in the 600 block of South Poplar Street around 4:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender entered the victim’s residence and stole two items. ! Theft was reported in the 600 block of North Broadway Avenue around 8 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the offender took the victim’s property from the residence without the victim’s permission. !

Theft was reported in the 1400 block of Wiley Road around 7 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender deceived the victim and convinced the victim to send a large sum of money under false pretenses. ! A 29-year-old female was arrested on charges of theft and domestic battery in the 2000 block of Vawter Street around 9 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the suspect and the victim are cousins. After an argument, the suspect stole the victim’s cell phone. !

Copyright © 2012 Illini Media Co.

Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

POLICE

University ! A 21-year-old male was arrested on the charge of trespass-

ing on state-supported land in the 800 block of South Mathews Avenue around 6 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an officer recognized the suspect and was aware the suspect was issued a prior University notrespassing notice. ! Theft was reported in Lot E-28, 49 E. Armory Ave., around 12 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, a University student reported that an unknown offender had stolen items left inside an unlocked vehicle parked in the lot. The stolen items are valued at $350.

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE

your resources, even if you think you have plenty. Learn from an expert.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

You’re the birthday star, so make a wish (or several) as you plant your seeds by the moonlight for future thriving. Include specific career goals, travel possibilities and educational passions to pursue. This year is all about learning. Fill it with adventure. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MAR. 21-APRIL 19)

Today is a 5 — Work with a powerful team, and listen with intent. Don’t act like you already know the answer or you’ll miss a great opportunity. Creative work has a bittersweet flavor. Every little bit counts.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 7 — Gain experience and mastery. Share the load today and tomorrow, but hold on to the responsibility. And leave time in your schedule for romance. A bit of glamour won’t hurt.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is a 6 — Today and tomorrow, delve into the details. Hot soaks relax stressed muscles. Don’t squander

Today is an 8 — Reserve the next two days for fun that’s balanced with creative productivity. Extend your psychic antennae. Don’t believe everything you’ve learned. Put in the work to reap rewards.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is an 8 — Stick close to home for the next two days. Clean up and discover a treasure. Make room for love. Friends can help you find the perfect expert.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 7 — Practicing something you love goes very well now. Make sure you get all you earned. People know they can trust you to get down to the truth. Waste not, want not.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is a 6 — The air is filled with romance. Postpone travel for a few days. Start computing expenses. It’ll be easier to make household changes soon, but don’t obsess about it.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 — Your power is intense over the next few days. Handle it as

well as you can. It’s best to have a plan in place, even if you don’t follow it. Everyone benefits at the end.

Audrey Majors, Kirsten Keller, Chelsea Clark, Lucy Brace, Lauren Cox

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is a 5 — You’re under pressure to complete a project that you’ve been avoiding. Roll up your sleeves and procrastinate no more (at least until later). Find out what rules apply. You win again.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 7 — You can find the right balance between work and friends. Listen to those who support you, and let your self-esteem rise. Don’t forget to support others.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 7 — Help comes from far away, possibly financial. Time to refinance? Do the homework and provide necessary information. Bring your quest for truth and social justice to work.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 7 — Adopt rules you can keep and let go of the ones you know you won’t. New opportunities arise. A private conversation soothes. Acceptance is key (and humor).

Night editor: Danny Weilandt Photo night editor: Joseph Lee Copy editors: Kevin Dollear, Johnathan Hettinger, Designers: Michael Mioux, Maddie Cole, Scott Durand, Eunie Kim Page transmission: Natalie Zhang

See an error in today’s paper? Or remember one from last week? Let us know! Email factcheck@dailyillini. com with any factual errors you see in the paper for a chance to win a gift card to Noodles & Company. With your help, we hope to make fewer mistakes — like messing up how old Harry Potter was when he went to Hogwarts (see below). Check out the opinions page at the end of the month to see how many errors our readers caught.

Compiled by Klaudia Dukala

HOROSCOPE BY NANCY BLACK

Win a gift card in our fact check contest

Are You Up To The Challenge? New York Times Crossword Puzzle Every day in The Daily Illini.

Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the CORRECTIONS Daily Illini Vidcast.

In the Oct. 12, 2012 edition of The Daily Illini, the column, “‘The Boy Who Lived’ and ‘The Girl on Fire,’” suggested that Harry Potter first attended Hogwarts at the age of 12. Harry received his letter for attendance on his 11th birthday and attended the school soon thereafter. The Daily Illini regrets this error. When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

General contacts: Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production................(217) 337-8320

Newsroom Corrections: If you think something is incorrectly reported, please call Editor-in-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337-8365. News: If you have a news tip, please contact Daytime editor Maggie Huynh at 337-8350 or News Editor Taylor Goldenstein at 337-8352 or e-mail news@DailyIllini.com. Press releases: Please send press releases to news@DailyIllini.com Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact Photo Editor Daryl Quitalig at 337-8344 or e-mail photo@ DailyIllini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call Sports Editor Jeff Kirshman at 337-8363 or e-mail sports@dailyillini.com. Calendar: Please submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com/calendar. Employment: If you would like to work in the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact Managing Editor Reporting Nathaniel Lash at 337-8343 or email mewriting@DailyIllini.com. Letters to the editor: Contributions may be sent to: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820 or e-mailed to opinions@ DailyIllini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. UI students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Daily Illini On-air: If you have comments or questions about our broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please call 337-8381 or e-mail meonair@DailyIllini.com. DailyIllini.com: Contact Managing Editor Online Hannah Miesel at 337-8353 or meonline@DailyIllini. com for questions or comments about our Web site.

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. ! Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. ! Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com.

!"#!$%&'($%)*+$,-.$/*&01-*$%+$230-(+(45$

READ BUZZ dot

Hollywood Makeup, Real‐Life Wigs, All Sorts of Tattoos and Masks!

Hottest Licensed Costumes AND plus size costumes! Floor to ceiling of EVERYTHING to suit your HALLOWEEN needs! BEST Selection, BEST Prices

costume for rent and purchase, wigs, make-up, masks and accessories

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/dallasandco Hours: Monday-Wednesday 10am-7pm, Thursday-Saturday 10am-8pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm 101 E. University Champaign- corner of 1st and University 217-351-5974

Com

Now accepting I-Cards!

Senior Portraits

06*$72/2&0%&$&*+0*-8$

1+9*%/%+7$06*$6*2-0$(:$(1-$72/2;5

!"#$%&'()"*'&+,*-.&/01' 1'/"*(&2%&1*30,45'(&6&'"4,/"&*%&1*73(*& 0,'3"&3(&'84"#!,98308

:!5.&4#(3+,4

13(0#1(&,'11&4,*'4*" !"#$%%$&"$'#()*+,-(&.(/0*1(

New Session!

Mon­Fri 9:30 ­ 5pm  & Sat. 10 ­ 2pm  October 22­November 9 at the Illini Media Building 512 E. Green

WPGU 107.1’s Frattle Of The Bands 4

ROUND 3

Check in on the 2nd floor

Brought to you by KAM’s, Jet’s Pizza, Budweiser, BAM Energy Drink, AND Samuel Music

Need to reschedule? No problem.  Go to illioyearbook.com to make an  appointment; shoot us a direct email to  illio@illinimedia.com, or call our office at  217­337­8314

readbuzz.com

Illio Yearbook of the University of Illinois ATTENTION STUDENTS, FACULTY, & STAFF FREE FLU SHOTS Students who paid the health service fee. - Present I-card at time of service. State Employees & Retirees - State employees must present health insurance card and Icard. - Retirees must present health insurance card and another form of ID.

Get your fLU SHOT NOW! Don’t Wait to Vaccinate Other Flu Outreach Locations Activities Recreation Center (ARC)- Main Atrium Monday, October 15th, 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. Grainger Library - Reference Area Tuesday, October 16th, 3:30 - 6:30 p.m. Undergraduate Library - Reference Area Wednesday, October 17th, 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. Undergraduate Library - Reference Area Thursday, October 18th, 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Visit McKinley Health Center during these hours for the flu shot 1109 S. Lincoln Avenue Monday - Friday 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Chi Rho Kappa Delta Rho Sigma Chi Wed Oct 17th| Starts at 9PM @ KAMS

$1000 dollars cash Drink specials 2.50 Bacardis 3.00 Bombs 1.50 Bud-U-Call-Its 2.00 Platinum and Limeritas

Play Hard! Frat Harder!


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

3A

GEO FROM PAGE 1A tant issues have yet to be addressed. The previous working agreement between the University board of trustees and the GEO expired Aug. 15. The organization recently voted almost unanimously to file a notice of intent to strike to the Illinois Education Labor Relations Board, which gives the GEO the option to strike in the future. “We have to show them (the University) that we’re serious enough about this (so) that they will be willing to change their mind,” Schmidt said.

Chris can be reached at casimon2@dailyillini.com.

COLLEGE FROM PAGE 1A

GREGORIO BORGIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, on Sunday. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012, tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grossetoon Monday. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing.

Survivors, families go to hearing of captain of shipwrecked cruise ship BY FRANCES D’EMILIO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GROSSETO, Italy — A theater in Italy turned into a courtroom Monday, providing extra space for all those who needed to hear the evidence against the captain of a shipwrecked cruise ship. The case of Francesco Schettino, 51, has generated such interest that the Tuscan city of Grosseto chose the larger space to accommodate all those who had a legitimate claim to be at the closeddoor hearing. Thirty-two people died after Schettino, in a stunt, took the Costa Concordia cruise ship off course and brought it close to the Tuscan island of Giglio on Jan 13. The ship then ran aground and capsized. Schettino himself became a lightning rod for international disdain for having left the ship before everyone was evacuated. Schettino appeared at the hearing Monday, as did passengers who survived the deadly shipwreck, the families of those who died in it and scores of lawyers trying to get more compensation for them. “We want to look him in the eye to see how he will react to the accusations,” said German survivor Michael Liessen, 50, who attended with his wife. Another survivor said he even talked with Schettino.

“When he looked at me, I told him I was on board the Costa Concordia. He stood up and we shook hands, as it is normal between two polite people,” Luciano Castro, 48, who has published a book in Italy about the disaster, told The Associated Press. “I told him I hoped the truth would come out soon. In that moment, he replied, ‘Yes, it must be established.’” Castro added that Schettino appeared to be “very embarrassed. He was very cautious, probably not expecting that somebody would approach him.” Wearing dark glasses and a suit, Schettino used a back entrance to slip into the theater, making no comment to reporters outside. Lawyers said he listened intently to the proceedings, where his attorneys raised some objections to the evidence being submitted against Schettino and eight others accused in the shipwreck, including crew members and officials from Concordia owner Costa Crociere SpA. Nevertheless, one member of Schettino’s defense team, Francesco Pepe, seemed confident, saying during a break that “responsibilities that aren’t all Schettino’s are beginning to emerge.” Hearings this week through Wednesday will help decide whether the judge will order a trial for Schettino, who is accused of manslaughter, causing the shipwreck and abandoning ship while passengers and crew were still aboard. He denies the

accusations and hasn’t been charged. Any trial is unlikely to begin before next year. Off the Tuscan coast and just outside Giglio’s port, the hulk of the Concordia still lies on its side, resting on a rocky seabed ledge, the object of gawkers and a painful symbol of the disaster for islanders and survivors. Experts are carrying out a complicated salvage plan to get the 1,000-foot-long vessel upright so it can be towed to the mainland. A key question is how much of the blame should Schettino bear alone and how much responsibility for the disaster lies with his crew and employer, Costa Crociere, a division of the Miami-based Carnival Corp. Costa Crociere has denied that it was negligent and has distanced itself from Schettino, firing him in July although he is fighting to get his job back. Last month, court-appointed experts delivered a 270-page report of what went wrong that night based on an analysis of data recorders, ship communications equipment, testimony and other evidence. The experts, who included two admirals and two engineers, laid most of the blame for the collision with the reef and the botched evacuation on Schettino. But they also noted that not all crew members understood Italian, not all had current safety and evacuation certifications, and not all passengers had had the chance to participate in evacuation drills.

California Science Center is now home to space shuttle BY ALICIA CHANG AND CHRISTOPHER WEBER

tor of the University’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions. DACC students also are not required to decide on a major upon applying. With DACC Pathway to Illinois, however, students can only take classes at DACC until officially transferring, unlike with Parkland Pathway to Illinois. Parkland Pathway students can take up to five hours at the University while taking general education requirements on the Parkland campus. For those hours, Parkland Pathway students pay tuition to the University price matched to Parkland College tuition. Parkland students are offered an i-card and the option to live in University certified housing. However, other services enjoyed by University students, such as access to CRCE and the ARC, cost extra for students in the Pathway program. Smigielski said the only reason DACC Pathway to Illinois students do not receive the same benefits as Parkland Pathway to Illinois students “simply because of location.” She said the University is open to creating similar Pathway programs with other community colleges in the area. DACC already has similar programs, called “2 + 2” programs, with other universities. DACC has these programs with Eastern Illinois University, Illinois State University and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, along with other universities and nursing colleges.

Janelle can be reached at jnodea2@dailyillini.com.

SEC FROM PAGE 1A Burbules said University human resources professionals already have sufficient hiring and retention strategies. He said removing exemption authority will only slow down the hiring process. “The ability to hire people quickly and flexibly is an important part of doing our business as a research institution,” Burbules said. “Removing the authority entirely from the campus ... is an overreaction that would significantly impede our ability to perform our mission.” That statement was approved at the SEC meeting Monday, where Chancellor Phyllis Wise also presented her results from last year’s Listening and Learning Tour. Wise said the most common issues found throughout the tour were categorized in six topics: energy and the environment, social equality and cultural understanding, economic development, education, health and wellness, and information and technology. For each category, Wise said her plan is to gather groups of about 30 faculty members and administrators. Each committee will discuss how to implement and execute long-term and short-term goals regarding these issues. Brock Gebhardt, student body president, said he agreed with Wise’s plans but recommended adding students to these committees as well. “Students would definitely be a benefit to the committees, if nothing else, bringing new ideas or asking questions that might provoke some good discussion,” Gebhardt said. Wise said she would consider his recommendation and look into appointing staff members to the committees. Burbules said the goals determined by the tour are not campus-specific but affect the rest of the world. “Let’s make this clear, to the external audience as well, that the University of Illinois addresses these fundamental substantial concerns of the state, of the country, of the world, and that we’re actually doing specific things to address them,” Burbules said. “These are the basic challenges based in humanity, and we’re engaging those directly and seriously as an institution.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Space shuttle Endeavour was fi nally lodged at its retirement home Monday following a slow weekend parade through city streets that turned out to be a logistical headache. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, fl ashing cameras and even the fi lming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday — about 17 hours behind schedule. “It’s just a crazy thing that we did but we pulled it off,” said Kenneth Philips, curator of aerospace science at the museum. Movers had planned a slow trip, saying the shuttle that once orbited at more than 17,000 mph would move at just 2 mph in its fi nal voyage through Inglewood and southern Los Angeles. But that estimate turned out to be generous, with Endeavour often creeping along at a barely detectable pace when it wasn’t at a dead stop due to difficult-to-maneuver obstacles like tree branches and light posts. Despite the holdups, the team charged with transporting the shuttle felt a “great sense of accomplishment” when it made it onto the muse-

Lauren can be reached at rohr2@dailyillini.com.

Fungal meningitis cases to increase in Ill., doctor says ALEX GALLARDO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The space shuttle Endeavour moves on Bill Robertson Lane in front of the Coliseum in Los Angeles on Sunday. In thousands of Earth orbits, the space shuttle traveled 123 million miles. Endeavour’s 12-mile crawl across Los Angeles to the California Science Museum hit repeated delays Saturday, leaving expectant crowds dwindling. um grounds, said Jim Hennessy, a spokesman for Sarens, the contract mover. “It’s historic and will be a great memory,” he said. “Not too many people will be able to match that — to say, ‘We moved the space shuttle through the streets of Inglewood and Los Angeles.’” Transporting Endeavour cross-town was a costly feat with an estimated price tag of $10 million, to be paid for by the science center and private donations. Late Friday, crews spent hours transferring the shuttle to a special, lighter towing dolly for

its trip over Interstate 405. The dolly was pulled across the Manchester Boulevard bridge by a Toyota Tundra pickup, and the car company fi lmed the event for a commercial after paying for a permit, turning the entire scene into a movie set complete with special lighting, sound and staging. Some 400 trees had been removed along the route, but officials said most of the trees that gave them trouble could not be cut down because they were old or treasured for other reasons, including some planted in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.

BY CARLA K. JOHNSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — A Chicago doctor who has done spinal taps on two patients to rule out fungal meningitis said Monday that he expects to see more cases of the illness in Illinois as testing continues. Dr. Rahul Khare, an emergency physician for Northwestern Medicine, said the patients he tested were frightened, but the tests showed nothing abnormal. The patients had received back injections of a possibly tainted steroid from a Massachusetts pharmacy that’s been linked to an outbreak of deadly meningitis. They had symptoms that could indicate the illness. It’s confusing and frightening for patients, he said, because their back and neck pain, for which they were getting the steroid shots in the first place, can mimic symptoms of meningitis.

Landowners seek fair prices for land seized for US-Mexico border fence BY PAUL J. WEBER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BROWNSVILLE, Texas — When the federal government began seizing private land along the U.S.-Mexico border to build a towering fence, Teofilo Flores was offered $1,650 for a slice of his backyard. At first, it seemed like a square deal. But then the cotton grower learned that his neighbor had received 40 times more for a similar piece of land. And another nearby farmer pocketed $1 million in exchange for his cooperation. Since 2008, hundreds of landowners on the border have sought fair prices for property that was condemned to make way for the fence. But many of them received

initial offers that were far below market value. And dozens accepted those amounts without seeking any legal help, only to discover neighbors had won far larger settlements after hiring attorneys. “You get angry. But that’s the way of life, I guess,” Flores said of the bigger payouts won by other landowners. “You know, people that got more money can afford to do more things.” The disparities raise questions about the Justice Department’s treatment of hundreds of landowners from Texas to California who couldn’t afford lawyers and must now live with a massive steel barrier running through their farms, ranches and yards. The wide variation in price

“underscores how unfair these original offers were,” said attorney Corinna Spencer-Scheurich, who represented poor and middle-class landowners when the seizures began. The federal government “is using its power, its clout, to try to take land from people at a price that is unfair. I think that is clear based on the settlements,” she said. Federal attorneys say the initial offers represented only a starting amount that would permit the seizures to begin and could be adjusted later. In 2006, Congress ordered construction of 670 miles of heavy metal fence to help curb illegal immigration.

ERIC GAY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cotton farmer Teofilo “Junior” Flores stands on Sept. 6 on one side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence that passes across his property in Brownsville, Texas. Since 2008, hundreds of landowners on the border have sought fair prices for property that was condemned to make way for the fence, but many received initial offers far below market value.


4A Tuesday October 16, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions POLITICAL CARTOON

The Daily Illini

Editorial

Negative ads leave voters uninformed

LANGSTON ALLSTON THE DAILY ILLINI

University needs to focus on giving its graduate employees proper contracts before another strike

SARAH FISCHER Opinions columnist

T

hough the University can find the money each year for plump salaries for its administrators, somehow it can’t put in place the proper system to renegotiate contracts with its graduate employees, let alone do it in a timely matter. And now, two months after the expiration of the last contract, the threat of another strike looms. In 2009, roughly 1,000 members of the Graduate Employees’ Organization went on strike for two days because the union and administration were unable to reach an agreement regarding explicit tuition waiver protection for graduate student employees — something that keeps graduate students focused on their work without having to dedicate more time to a second job simply to make ends meet. The strike was among the largest in the country that year. The GEO eventually won the contract language necessary to protect the waivers, but less than a year later, tuition waivers were again in question for graduate employees from out-of-state. Luckily, an independent arbiter ruled in favor of the GEO, protecting the rights for all graduate assistants. Representatives from the GEO, which is again fighting to have its contract renewed, have optimistically told The Daily Illini that the slow speed at which the University is handling the negotiation is due to poor communication between union leaders and the administration. More realistically, the University is complacent about its graduate students’ employment, never mind that without them, this University would not be able to function at the capacity it does now. At that, with the brain drain this campus now experiences — with more faculty leaving than can be replaced effectively — the value of the graduate student workers is all the more important. But even if the University were to suddenly give these workers the time of day they deserve, they would be meeting to discuss minimal standards that the GEO expects. Namely, that the members of the GEO want to be able to eat and pay their rent, which is not an inconceivable demand. The University needs to see graduate employees as people, not just numbers. These are people that have put their lives on hold in pursuit of higher education — many are adults that might not be able to depend on money from their parents, grandparents or other family members for support. Furthermore, taking out more loans just isn’t an option for others, as they already have tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt from their undergraduate education. Frankly, the GEO is being awfully understanding to this campus by waiting this long to consider a strike. In reality, the paperwork for a strike should have been filed Aug. 16, the day when the 2009 contract expired and when there was no new proposal or any productive communication between the University and the union. Truthfully, the current demands and expectations of the GEO sit far below any standard they deserve. Tuition waivers in higher education should be a given, especially at a research university like this one. To expect that this University can maintain its high quality while its workers are struggling to provide food for themselves, and sometimes their families, is an irresponsible oversight. But it seems that the only way that the University will reasonably listen to any talk of tuition waiver protection is when a strike looms on the horizon. If that’s the case, then we hope the GEO goes on strike. Better yet, we expect that the University will come to the table and sign an agreement that affords its bright graduate students exactly what they deserve: a speedy contract agreement including tuition waiver protection and a reliable system for renegotiation in the future. Time is ticking.

W

nation was conceived, Christianity was the dominant ideology because it sneaks its way briefly into some of the texts written by the founding fathers. However the founders did not want the country to have a national religion and wanted tolerance for all beliefs. This does not mean we should use Christianity to write our laws. The Republican sentiment against gay marriage comes from biblical texts, like Leviticus in the King James version, which prohibits lying “with mankind, as with womankind.” A good portion of the United States does not believe in the Bible. The religious right makes the argument that homosexuality is a choice, but if homosexual behavior is displayed at the animalistic level, as seen in countless research studies, then it is not a choice. People don’t wake up one day and decide to be gay. As the younger Republican generation is accepting of different marital beliefs, it gravitates toward candidates like Ron Paul who respect civil liberties to an extent not seen in mainstream Republican platforms. In the Republican primary Ron Paul took almost half of the 18-29 demographic in a handful of states, so there is a growing sentiment in young Republicans to move away from the archaic ways of the religious right. My hope is that the Republican Party will eventually shed its dependence of the religious right and return to its roots, protecting the country’s liberties.

hether you agree with Romney’s critiques of PBS and NPR or think they missed the larger issue, it is difficult not to revolt against President Barack Obama’s recently released ad consuming national airtime. It lists the Wall Street Infamous, then states “the evil genius who towered over them” was Big Bird. “Big, yellow, a menace to our economy,” pitches the ad. The newest attack ad aimed at Mitt Romney exemplifies much that is wrong in the current political campaign system. Big Bird is not the menace to society the ad facetiously claims. Romney is not claiming that he is. Romney’s now famous comments regarding the bird discuss his opinion on the federal subsidy of PBS. The Big Bird ad only serves to take Romney’s comments out of context. It undercuts the president’s professionalism. And worse, it makes no comment. There is no connection between Wall Street and Sesame Street. Instead of spending campaign resources producing ads that ask for clarification on Romney’s economic policy or his stance on abortion, the Obama campaign runs this. All the time. PBS accounts for 0.012 percent of the entire federal budget. The budget is the issue. The deficit is the issue. And while Obama’s intention is surely to comment on Romney’s fiscal sense, all the ad serves to do is detract from the issues Americans care about: health care, women’s rights, job availability, economic growth and sustainability. Since the merging of television and politics, negative ads have become a national pastime. As early as 1952, negative attacks ruled the political sphere. While some have argued that Obama’s campaign has run the most negative attack ads in history, he falls behind both John McCain and, surprisingly, Dwight Eisenhower, who ran negative content in 69 percent of his ads. And there were no super PACs in 1956. During the 1960 race between John F. Kennedy and then-Vice President Richard Nixon, Kennedy ran an ad in which incumbent president Eisenhower failed to think of a single idea Nixon contributed. The ad effectively challenged Nixon’s claim that he had “actually made decisions in the White House.” One of the more famous attack ads was the “Daisy ad” run by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, the first election season to completely embrace the negative ad. The genius of Johnson’s ad, which only ran once, was that it never mentioned his opponent, Barry Goldwater, by name, but instead insinuated through the ad that a vote for Goldwater was a vote for nuclear destruction of the planet. George H. W. Bush’s “Willie Horton” attack ad against Michael Dukakis proved to be one of the most effective negative ads. Claiming to draw attention to the candidates’ different ideas about the death penalty, the ad connected Dukakis, who supported “weekend passes from prison,” to Willie Horton, an inmate sentenced to life who murdered a young man on one of his “weekend passes.” Sadly this type of rhetoric is not contained to our national politics. The Senate race between Republican Jeff Flake and Democrat Richard Carmona spits personal ads about mental health back and forth, shrinking Flake’s early lead into a competitive race. The Senate race in Montana between Democratic Sen. Jon Tester and Republican challenger Dennis Rehberg has focused on a boat crash in which alcohol may have been involved. A debate between Reps. Howard L. Berman and Brad Sherman, two Democrats fighting for the San Fernando Valley congressional district, nearly turned physical. What might be most depressing about this scenario is not that it is increasingly common, but that the crowd cheered on the pugilistic politicians. All these ads do is create a terrified and uniformed electorate. None of this is to say that informational content should be the only factor in political rhetoric or when considering a candidate. Yes, we want politicians who look presidential, who look like leaders. Yes, we want them to be steadfast in their opinions. Yes, we want to know that they fight for themselves and for what they believe. We want to know they have a team of competent individuals around them, helping them to make the correct decisions for our nation. But at what cost? And to whose detriment? In his book “Up, Simba!” David Foster Wallace writes, “If you are bored and disgusted by politics and don’t bother to vote, you are in effect voting for the entrenched Establishments of the two major parties, who please rest assured are not dumb, and who are keenly aware that it is in their interests to keep you disgusted and bored and cynical.” When the political discourse in our country focuses on sensationalism rather than knowledge, we are left with a populous that doesn’t know the facts — and a legislature that seems content to keep it that way.

Brian is a junior in Media. He can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Sarah is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Raise your glass to the great American pastime: Beer RENÉE WUNDERLICH Opinions columnist

F

ew things short of sex scandals, chocolate and Honey Boo Boo grab hold of general interest like alcohol, and for this I am pleasantly amused. Beer is European by heritage, American by attitude, and has been enjoying a recent upswing in public favor. The same can’t always be said for President Obama. And beer, unlike Romney’s candidacy, is something nearly everyone can relate to. So with the end of Oktoberfest, onslaught of election season and the general progression of my senior year, it’s time for this columnist to think a bit about beer. Even those (like me) who don’t particularly enjoy the taste can still appreciate that beer and its brewing is part of our history — just ask the Discovery Channel. This September, they launched “How Booze Built America.” TV personality Mike Rowe hosted the three-part series that liked pilgrims to Pilsners (OK, so historians say it was ale, not pale lager) and, according to Rowe’s DIY Promo, “more than mere gratuitous drinking.” After seven years of wading through sewage on the show Dirty Jobs and countless corny Viva paper towel commercials, I say the man deserves a drink. And though the fine folks at Discovery tell us beer drinking is just as American as baseball and bipartisan filibusters, the truth of the matter is that very few domestics are truly made in the USA. Budweiser originated in America but is owned by Anheuser-Busch InBev, which is headquartered in Belgium and has factories all over

the world. Molson Coors Brewing Company, the world’s fifth largest brewing company and proud producer of this University’s covetedly-cheap Keystone Light, is headquartered in Colorado, but is actually Canadian. What’s more, Coors Brewing Co. (the regional division of Molson Coors and the third largest brewer of beer in the US) is in a joint venture with SAB Miller (makers of Miller Lite), which is headquarted in London, England and bases many of its facilities in South Africa, Asia and Bavaria. And you thought outsourcing stopped at car manufacturers and telecommunication hotlines. Now there is nothing wrong with a little globalization for the greater good of a better beer. But if your goal is to show some national pride as you raise your glass (or for most reading this, your red Solo cup), be wary that not all “Proudly American” beers are purebred domestic. Hipsters rejoice; Pabst Blue Ribbon is based in L.A. and the company has no plans to move outside the country any time soon. But while PBR breweries are located within the U.S., Miller Brewing Co. owns them all. This leaves us with local brewing companies. Those familyrun, passion-driven and obscurely named brands that show up on the “Make Your Own 6-Pack” rack in the liquor section of select grocery stores. If you’re intimidated by the vast and random selection of local micro-brews (or are not of age) but still want to support local beer, you do have other options. Central Illinois houses what could have been downtown Champaign’s best-kept secret if I didn’t tell so many people about the mind-blowing beer-battered asparagus appetizer. Destihl is a Brewery and a restaurant — excuse me, ���Gastro Brewpub,”

which basically means they put the beer they make into the food they serve. But if you’re a traditionalist and prefer to stick with drinking your beer instead of eating it, there is a niche market for your kind as well. The Blind Pig Brewery is an old mainstay for townies, grad students and the occasional undergraduate whose tastes grew too refined for Firehaus fishbowls. Not to be confused with The Blind Pig Company, the Brewery is, as the name suggests, where the patrons have the physical machinery to brew hard ciders and a rotating variety of hops-based beers. The Blind Pig’s namesake is based on its history; it’s the first all-grain brewery in Champaign since those folks in Washington quit kidding themselves and repealed prohibition. Even the term “blind pig,” synonymous with the more popular “speakeasy,” is infused with Americana. So why should those of us who do partake in this nation’s imbibe-able pastime buy local? Think of it as your civic duty. Thomas Jefferson reportedly wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence in a local tavern. Some scholars credit George Washington’s presidency in part to the fact he bought a round for the 69 electors (because nothing coerces an unanimous vote like a man who distills his own whisky up on Mt. Vernon). And then there’s the often-quoted yet inaccurate quip associated with Ben Franklin: “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” If our founding fathers endorsed the beverage, well, what’s more ‘Merican than that? Cheers.

Renée is a senior in Media. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Religious right wrong on civil liberties BRIAN SIEGEL Opinions columnist

E

arlier in his campaign Mitt Romney was posed with a tough question from a much different demographic — a gay Vietnam veteran. Gov. Romney sat down at the table with one of America’s finest heroes, an old Vietnam veteran. Romney was unaware that the vet was gay and when he asked Romney about marriage law, the governor defended his position in support of the Defense of Marriage Act. The veteran wanted his husband to receive the full benefits that a veteran’s wife would receive upon his death. All of his hard work fighting for the lives and freedom of the American people and yet he cannot give any of those benefits to his significant other of many years, though legally married in the state of New Hampshire, he is still unmarried in the eyes of federal law. Protecting the sanctity of marriage has become a hot button issue for conservatives, namely Republicans, since their friend across the aisle, President Bill Clinton, signed the Defense of Marriage Act into law in 1996. Restricting marriage rights of same-sex couples should not be a conservative value. In fact it flies in the face of everything that conservatism stands for. Conservatism is about restricting the scope of government, or at least it used to be. Republicans have stayed strong to their fiscally conservative values, maintaining each person’s right to the property they earn, they stayed behind their

pro-life stance, but they fall short when it comes to marriage. In this instance, the conservative party is hindering both the religious aspect in some states and the legal aspect. There are more states than not where same-sex couples cannot get married and are stuck with labels like “domestic partnerships.” According to the Human Rights Campaign there are 1,138 benefits, rights and protections provided for marital status in federal law. However, because same-sex couples when married are not considered spouses under federal law, they do not receive those benefits. For example, if a partner in a samesex marriage passes away, his or her family would not receive full social security benefits. Furthermore if that same partner or his or her family gets sick, federal law does not provide for the other to take medical leave to care for their partner or family. It is each person’s right to believe and practice whatever religion his or her heart desires. It could be Christianity or that a flying spaghetti monster created the universe. That is your right as an American citizen. However, it is not your right to impose that religious belief on federal law and that is what the religious right has been doing for too long. The Defense of Marriage Act is a disgusting piece of legislature that imposes the will of the beliefs on a portion of the United States and that is completely unconstitutional. Marriage is a religious ceremony and the federal government should be a separate entity from religion. It is our constitutional right to practice whatever religion we choose. At the time the


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Over-borrowing biggest mistake in student loans HANNAH BOLLMAN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The freedom of college often comes with students’ first exposure into the world of independent finance, such as student loans, bills and credit. One common financial situation college students deal with is student loans. According to Andrea Pellegrini, the assistant director of the Office of Business and Financial Services, many students feel conflicted about loans. “Student loans are a doubleedged sword, in that higher education is almost always needed to make money, but money is needed to obtain a degree. Students question if the debt will be worth the cost of the education in the long run,” she said. College students often wonder if they will be able to make enough to pay off their loans when considering borrowing money, Pellegrini said. She cites “over-borrowing” as a source of many students’ loan problems and has contributed to an all-time high of $1 trillion in student debt. She advises students to only take out money they absolutely need and to

5A

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

have realistic expectations of their spending. To put the student debt increase into perspective, UIUC finance professor Kevin Waspi compared it to LeBron James’ salary. “Let’s say LeBron James makes $40 million per season. He would have to play 25,000 seasons at that salary to pay off the one trillion dollar student debt,” he said. “Student loans have become a necessary evil. If I were a student today, you better believe I would study my a** off to make the best of those student loans and not go into debt for years.” When asked how students can get the best financial value out of their education, Waspi said that since the cost of education is so high everything should be prioritized so money isn’t wasted. “If a Ford employee works a 40-hour week, in theory, a full-time student should study 40 hours per week,” he said. “That is where the true value of investment in education lies.” The high costs of college are inevitable for most students, but as Pellegrini points

out, this campus offers many options that students often do not take advantage of. Beside scholarships and part-time employment, there are various programs that cater to college students. The ARC’s financial wellness program located in the Wellness Center, for example, offers a number of services, presentations and one-on-one counseling to students in an attempt to educate them about fiscal responsibilities. The University’s TCF Bank center, housed in the Illini Union Bookstore, also offers several incentives, such as free checking accounts and withdrawal services to students who open up independent accounts, according to a TCF representative. “Because of the future’s unknowns, habits of thrift and saving set a good foundation for the rest of your life,” Waspi added. “Don’t get into investing this early, just concentrate on your studies and saving as much money as you can.”

Hannah can reached features@ dailyillini.com.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

ACROSS

  1 Admin. aide   5 Spook 10 Wise guys? 14 Off one’s rocker 15 Does some computer programming 16 Midmonth day 17 Red-skinned food 18 Island dances 19 Reference 20 Articles in Dracula’s wardrobe 22 Actress Hayworth 23 Raise, as young 24 Lebanese water passage? 27 Veer back in the other direction 28 Start of a long-distance call 29 Nord’s opposite 30 Ike’s command in W.W. II 31 Fawning females 34 Book after Daniel 38 Sudanese junkyard? 42 Perfume compound 43 Officer on the bridge with Spock and Uhura 44 Penpoint 45 Family member, informally 47 Magazine staff, for short 49 Mississippi-to-Michigan dir. 50 Big shoe specification in Libya? 56 U2 frontman 57 Buck tail? 58 Alternative to Travelers 60 Kitchen fixture 61 Poetry 63 Trader ___ 64 Unlikely prom king 65 Greenland native 66 Book before Daniel: Abbr. 67 Ballpark figs. 68 Perfume 69 Minus

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21 24

22

39

33

34

43

51

36

37

41

42

50

32

40

45

35

29 31

38

13

26

28

30

12

23

25

27

11

44

46

52

47 53

48

54

49 55

56

57

58

60

61

64

65

66

67

68

69

62

59 63

PUZZLE BY KENNETH LEESER

DOWN

13

  1 Writer Waugh   2 Soothing soaks   3 One getting the blame   4 “My Cousin Vinny” co-star   5 Where to study chem. or hist.   6 Mannerly   7 Extemporize   8 Rope, for Ricardo   9 Op-ed pieces 10 Pinhead-size spy photo 11 Word on taking one’s leave 12 Imply

21 25 26 27

32 33 35 36 37 39

Val d’___ (Alpine skiing destination) Fleabag hotel, for short Helpful computer command European coal center Farmworker who became the Cowardly Lion in Dorothy’s dream Ostrich’s cousin Medical hardening Write Shakespearean poetry Popes and the like Head of a French monastery Answers

40 41 46 48 50 51 52 53 54 55 59 62

Charlie’s Angels, e.g. Quattro manufacturer From Serbia or Croatia Elite retreat Hearty steak Gallivants Unable to move Memorable 2011 hurricane Springsteen’s “Born ___” Tier Questions French 101 word with two accents

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

DOONESBURY

BILLY FORE

GARRY TRUDEAU

DARRYL BUSH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alvin Roth, 60, a Harvard professor and visiting professor at Stanford, smiles at a press conference announcing his award of a shared Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences at Stanford, Calif., on Monday.

Two Americans matched with Nobel Prize Economists use math to match husbands with wives, organs with donors BY KARL RITTER AND PAUL WISEMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STOCKHOLM — Two American scholars won the Nobel economics prize Monday for work on match-making — how to pair doctors with hospitals, students with schools, kidneys with transplant recipients and even men with women in marriage. Lloyd Shapley of UCLA and Alvin Roth, a Harvard University professor currently visiting at Stanford University, found ways to make markets work when traditional economic tools fail. Shapley, 89, came up with the formulas to match supply and demand in markets where prices don’t do the job; the 60-year-old Roth put Shapley’s math to work in the real world. Unlike some recent Nobel priz-

EL CHARRO FROM PAGE 6A area each vary in the number of people they can seat. Dan Roiter, sophomore in LAS, discovered El Charro when he was walking back from the CVS down the street. Roiter has stopped in on a Wednesday before to take advantage of the deal. “It can get really crowded, but you never know. There are always different amounts of people,” Roiter said.

FACEBOOK FROM PAGE 6A right after you die, which the law says they can inherit, how they get their hands on the actual embodiment of the work.” So even though a person can have copyright of certain material, they most likely won’t be able to actually acquire it themselves. Facebook collects this content and tucks it away in storage, in case it could ever come in handy in the future. Since the information is all digital, the issue becomes hazy. There is not a tangible object that can simply be handed over to an heir. “If you think about the way that we deal with people’s (physical) assets after they die, we have centuries of precedent of worked out rules for this,” said

es — such as the Peace Prize that went to the embattled European Union last week — this year’s economics award did not seem to send a political message. “It’s all about down-to-earth, highly useful stuff,” said Robert Aumann, a professor at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University who won the 2005 economics Nobel. “We’re talking about the nittygritty of health care and education — which medical students are assigned to which hospitals. We’re talking about how to arrange donors of kidneys.” Shapley made early theoretical inroads into the subject, using game theory to analyze different matching methods in the 1950s and ’60s. In a groundbreaking 1962 paper, Shapley and the late David Gale looked at how to match 10 men and 10 women in perfectly stable marriages. They created a model in which no two people liked anyone else better than each other.

While that may have had little impact on marriages and divorces, the elegant algorithm they developed has been used to better understand many different markets. Building on Shapley’s work, Roth applied it decades later to the market for allocating doctors, creating an algorithm that led to the redesign of the National Resident Matching Program that pairs fourth-year medical students with hospitals. “Before Roth, it was not unusual to not get any of your first three or four choices,” said David Warsh, who follows university economists in his Economic Principals blog. “After Roth hooked up this new algorithm, almost everyone got what they wanted.” The algorithm has also been used to match kidneys with patients who need transplants. Before Roth, “there were no economists in that business at all,” Warsh says. “He’s really changed it and saved a lot of lives.”

If customers want to eat at El Charro on a Wednesday that’s not as busy, Perez noted that student breaks are normally slower. However, Perez said business in the summer usually stays consistent because the restaurant has a loyal customer base. El Charro’s menu also includes vegetarian options, a perk for those who have restrictions in their diet. El Charro also has a large selection of beverages, such as Jarritos soda, which is a popular soft drink brand in Mexico. Brenda Sanchez has been a

resident of Champaign for about 15 years and is a new employee at El Charro, but she has been a customer for about a year. Sanchez said her favorite part of El Charro is how authentic the food tastes. She recommended trying El Charro’s tacos because they are delicious and easy to customize, she said. When you’re craving tacos that won’t break the bank, El Charro offers a solution with its authentic tacos at $1 each.

Derek Bambauer, associate professor of law at the University of Arizona. “We have rules about what happens if you have a will or if you don’t have a will, what happens if you have a family or if you don’t have a family, and so forth ... we haven’t done any of that work for the Internet yet.” Since there is no such historical model for posthumous social media regulation, it will take time for laws to be put in place. “There are states (that have) passed a law on this that ensures a right of access,” he said, those being Oklahoma and Idaho so far. “Well, (Mazzone) points out that having 50 different states try to address this problem might not be a good approach.” Instead, Mazzone proposes that there be an all-encompassing federal law that sets a baseline for what should be done with a social networking profile

after someone dies. Enacting such a law, however, could take years or even decades. Until then, Brophy recommended taking the issue into your own hands. He suggested leaving the “permission and means of access” to social media and networking sites to those you trust. This way, if something happens to you, you’ll have someone who can access your accounts in order to retrieve certain content, information and postings that you added during your lifetime. While there is no major federal law in place that addresses the issue of “Facebook Afterlives,” the subject matter will surely gain traction as more people continue to utilize social networks.

BEARDO

DAN DOUGHERTY

THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE

FREE

FREE COPIES DAILY

Kayla can be reached at features@ dailyillini.com.

Reema can be reached at abiakar2@ illinimedia.com.

A 30, 60 OR 90 MINUTE MASSAGE

RSO of the

Week !"#$ !"#$%&'% !"#$%!&'()*+(*()

Every Thursday in the Daily Illini and at dailyillini.com


Business Technology

Financial future While college offers the freedom and independence that students crave, it also comes with a slew of financial responsibilities, such as dealing with student loans. Turn to Page 5A to learn more about your fiscal responsibilities in college.

6A | Tuesday, October 16, 2012 | www.DailyIllini.com DISH OF THE WEEK

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Tacos

Talk About

BY KAYLA BURNS

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

L

ocated on Green Street between Locust and First streets, you will fi nd a Mexican grocery store and restaurant that goes by the name of El Charro. To most who pass by, it appears to be just another place to grab a bite to eat or pick up supplies for an authentic Mexican meal, but really, it is much more. When entering the small, red brick building at 55 E. Green St., the Mexican decorations, such as the blankets and pictures on the walls, makes visitors feel as though they just stepped into a traditional shop somewhere far from Champaign. El Charro is small but packs a punch. It opened in 1996 as a grocery store and added the restaurant about seven years ago. Their menu, written in Spanish, includes a wide variety of classic Mexican cuisine, and most of it is made to order. They have many choices to offer, including Mexican sandwiches, huaraches, gorditas and burritos. Most fi nd one aspect of El Charro hard to resist: the Wednesday special of one taco with the customer’s choice of meat for $1.

Alejandro Perez has worked at El Charro for about five years. He said the $1 tacos special began about two years ago and has drawn crowds ever since. “You never know how crowded it will be on a Wednesday, but it’s usually constantly busy from about lunch to close,” Perez said. The special runs from open to close every Wednesday. El Charro’s hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays. The Wednesday $1 tacos include any ingredients the customer requests, with the exceptions of three toppings that include an extra fee. Adding avocado, sour cream or cheese costs 20 cents per taco. At El Charro, customers have the option to eat in or order their food to go. If interested in dine-in, there is a seating section with bright walls painted half red and half yellow, divided by a horizontal white chair rail. Customers can watch a TV mounted on the wall in this section. The eight tables in this

See EL CHARRO, Page 5A

The ghost of your life still resides on Facebook after death BY REEMA ABI-AKAR STAFF WRITER

Facebook is an extensive, seemingly bottomless anthology of inside jokes, cherished memories and life events. But what happens to your Facebook account when you die? “There is little to no regulation that exists in this department,” said Jason Mazzone, law professor at the University. He is the author of “Facebook’s Afterlife,” a paper examining

the control of social media sites over the pages of their deceased users, and proposing a federal law that standardizes a set plan of action for this situation. “We’re in a period where technology has really gotten ahead of the laws that are in place,” Mazzone said. “I mean, 15 or 20 years ago, nobody had any reason to think about this issue.” Today, over one billion people around the world use social networking websites, accord-

ing to Comscore.com. Of these accounts, more than 30 million of them on Facebook are attributed to people who have died, also known as decedents, as stated in a Technorati.com article. The current way that Facebook deals with accounts belonging to dead people is by “memorializing” the page, as Mazzone stated in his paper. This involves disabling much of the late user’s past posted

Trust is the Key TO OUR RELATIONSHIP

content, but leaving the page open for friends to comment postmortem. “When you’ve got something like (Facebook) that is intangible and really is not ... any value other than sentimental value, the courts and legislatures don’t have a good way of resolving those kinds of issues,” said Alfred Brophy, law professor at the University of North Carolina. The main questions that arise

get

are: Who has the ownership or copyright to the decedent’s page and information? What happens to the photos, links, posts and other content within the account? Where, if at all, does the law come in? “A copyright exists at the moment of creation,” Mazzone said. “So as soon as you write something, put something on a page, or post something online ... the federal law says you obtain a copyright immediately.”

buzzed ::

A copyright lasts throughout someone’s lifetime and 70 years afterward. Copyright can be bestowed upon someone else as granted in a will or within an estate, just like regular property or monetary inheritance. “Facebook doesn’t purport to interfere with the actual copyright,” Mazzone added. “The problem, though, is how the person who inherits the copy-

See FACEBOOK, Page 5A

every thursday :: readbuzz.com

Take A Shot w/ Illio

Introducing The Daily Illini’s Fact Check The Daily Illini’s reporters and editors do strive for accuracy when researching and reporting campus and local news. But when we get a fact wrong, The Daily Illini really does want to know. We’re counting on you to help us keep the record straight.

At the end of October, we’ll randomly draw the names of two reader fact checkers to win a gift certificate to Noodles & Co.

Must be 18 or older to win. Illini Media employees excluded.

S

If you notice a mistake, an omission, a misinterpretation or an out-and-out goof, please email us at: factcheck@illinimedia.com

TAKE A PHOTO AT OUR PROP PHOTO BOOTH  And Win a page in the yearbook for your RSO or Greek Organization Wednesday, Oct 17 at the YMCA 10am ‐ 2pm


Sports

1B Tuesday October 16, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Volleyball’s Viliunas set to start Wednesday Setter earns Big Ten honors for debut BY ELIOT SILL STAFF WRITER

When Spike Squad and the rest of the Illinois volleyball faithful file into the Huff Hall bleachers Wednesday, there will be a glaring difference at what is debatably volleyball’s most critical position. True freshman setter Alexis Viliunas made her debut Saturday against Michigan State, and after dropping the first two sets, Illinois righted the ship for a crucial conference road victory. Head coach Kevin Hambly’s decision to play Viliunas over senior Annie Luhrsen was successful — for the time being. Viliunas will now have a chance to prove herself in front of the orange-clad crazies in Huff Hall, as she is slated to start Wednesday’s in-state showdown with conference foe Northwestern. Viliunas earned Big Ten Freshman of the Week honors for her performance, earning the next available start in the process. “She was poised. I thought she wasn’t connecting as well as we needed her to early, but then she settled in and really did a nice job,” Hambly said. “Mostly, she was just poised and played well and made plays.” Viliunas said playing with former high school teammate Jocelynn Birks helped her remain calm. “(Birks) helped me a lot last night because by her playing really well, it helped me to stay calm and not worry about the little things,” Viliunas said. “Like, my sets didn’t have to be perfect because I knew that she’d put the ball down anyway.”

McMahon on fire Birks led the team in kills Saturday, and has done so in nearly all of Illinois’ games this year. Across from Birks, though, Liz McMahon has shown fairly steady improve-

See VOLLEYBALL, Page 2B

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Supo Sanni (7) tackles Michigan’s Denard Robinson during the game at Michigan Stadium on Saturday. Sanni and the Illini defense allowed Michigan 45 points in the loss.

Defense uses bye week to regroup Highly touted unit doesn’t understand poor performance BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

Jonathan Brown has no words for why the Illinois defense is performing so poorly. When asked if he was surprised that the once proud defense has struggled so mightily this season, he paused and just shook his head in agreement, puzzled, to say the least, how a team that was seventh in the NCAA last season in total defense had 45 points effortlessly scored against them. Now, as Illinois enters its bye week, Brown said it’s time to hit the restart button. The first seven games of the season

can’t just be wiped away as if they never existed, but the scarred memories and psyches of the Illini must be cleared from what has been a dismal seven weeks of this season. Head coach Tim Beckman said his team is entering a crossroads. He wouldn’t say if this was the perfect time for a bye week, but a week off from game action couldn’t have come any sooner for Illinois. The Illini are looking to regroup physically and, maybe more importantly, mentally after a fourth straight shellacking and ninth consecutive conference loss dating back to last year. “What would you expect the locker room to be like after a game like this?” Brown said after Saturday’s 45-0 loss at Michigan. “Eighty guys come into the locker room, embarrassed. You can just imagine what that’s like.” Illinois is giving up the second-most points in the conference after allowing 45 to Arizona State, 52 to Louisiana Tech, 35 to

Penn State, 31 to Wisconsin and 45 against Michigan. The offense isn’t any better — dead last in scoring in the Big Ten. To say the Illini struggled Saturday is an understatement for a team that managed 134 yards of total offense and a meager 29 passing yards. Justin DuVernois’ punting was better last week, as he avoided shanking any punts. But the Illini’s special teams added another missed field goal attempt, and it’s 2.1 yards per punt return rank 117th out of 120 FBS teams. Nothing is going right for the Illini on all three sides of the ball. Even a players-only meeting before last week’s game against Wisconsin wasn’t enough to turn the Illini around. The bye week is a chance to stop the snowball effect from continuing to turn this current four-game losing streak into more, much like last season. “I challenged them in the locker room,” Beckman said. “I just said again, ‘Guys,

There’s a fine line between stunts and athletic feats Bizarre feats still test courage, athleticism

BY GINA MUELLER

Fighting adversity

The outcome of the MinneThe Illinois women’s soccer sota match seemed to have an team was on a roller coaster impact on the Illini as they preride this weekend. pared for the Big Ten matchup Remaining positive was against the Badgers. Illinois hard for the Illini after Fri- showed a bright light during day night’s 3-0 loss against the stormy afternoon late in Minnesota. Juniors Kassidy the first half by earning the Brown and Vanessa DiBernar- first goal of the match. It was do came out against the Gold- the first time since Illinois’ en Gophers with determina- matchup against Ohio State tion, recording shots on goal in on Sept. 21 that it was first on the seventh and 14th minutes, the board. The goal tallied by senior but were unable to put either of those attempts in the back Marissa Holden looked as if it would have sealed the fifth of the net. Minnesota star forward Tay- conference victory of the sealor Uhl earned her 14th goal of son for Illinois, but a missed the season in the 27th minute, touch by an Illini defender making the Goldlate in the en Gophers the second half first on the scoreended up board. Illinois costing it has made a habit the win. of coming from “Anytime behind in games, there is a but have proved to little bit of be fortunate with adversithe outc omes. ty, we can’t They weren’t as sustain our successful against confidence the G olden and our colGophers, though, lective will,” and only tallied Illinois head coach Janet eight shots, none Rayfield of which were said. “For 85 goals. Illinois’s NIKI READ, minutes, we confidence needsenior forward ed a boost before did a pretty heading into Sunday’s 2-1 good job and then we make a double-overtime loss against mistake and now it’s a battle. Wisconsin. ...This team has to show a lit“We went into the game tle more mental toughness in knowing every game no matter those moments.” what the record or the season The match was an even draw is looking like, we are going to at the end of the first overtime fight,” senior Niki Read said. period, resulting in 10 more “I think one of the main things minutes of play for one of the we were trying to do was to teams to seal a victory. The battle and prove to anyone and Illini were unable to rally back ourselves that we can stay in this time, as Wisconsin wore any game no matter what our down Illinois’ defensive line, roster is currently looking like.” See SOCCER, Page 2B STAFF WRITER

EMILY BAYCI Sports columnist

A

See FOOTBALL, Page 2B

Illinois soccer optimistic for senior weekend

OUT OF BOUNDS

man plummeted 24 miles from a balloon Sunday afternoon and lived to tell the tale. Felix Baumgartner, a 43-year-old Australian skydiver, leapt 128,100 feet from the sky at 833.9 mph, where he set five world records: the first person to break the sound barrier, the highest freefall parachute jump, the highest vertical speed in freefall, the greatest freefall distance and the most concurrent views of a live stream on YouTube, with more than eight million people tuning in. This all happened in under 10 minutes. Now that’s impressive. Some people call this a publicity stunt (the jump was sponsored by Red Bull) and others call it an awe-inspiring tale. Me, I call it an athletic accomplishment, something that took bravery and talent. It took around 5 years to organize this jump, and Baumgartner had been training since 2009. “It was really brutal at times,” Baumgartner said in a press release after the jump. “I thought for a few seconds that I’d lose consciousness. I didn’t feel a sonic boom because I was so busy just trying to stabilize myself.” The competition was Baumgartner against the world, meaning the weather, the skies and atmospheric pressure. Most people wouldn’t call this an example of sport. I know for a fact my dad is going to give me a

there’s five opportunities left for us to get better, we have to do one at a time.’ Indiana happens to be the next one. We’ve got to step forward in this program, and we’ve got to try to make our football team better.” The bye week can also aid the Illini by giving their injured players a chance to heal. The Illini’s injury report reads like a who’s who in Illinois football. Quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase left Saturday’s game with a concussion, and starting cornerback Terry Hawthorne missed that game after suffering a head injury against Wisconsin. Linebacker Houston Bates has seen limited action since he was injured at Arizona State and is playing on “darn near one leg,” according to defensive coordinator Tim Banks. Other starters, including Graham Pocic, Supo Sanni, Steve Hull and Darius Millines, have also missed action during the season.

BALAZS GARDI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pilot Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., on Sunday. hard time for writing about this, but you can’t deny that this took athletic greatness. The groundbreaking event got me thinking about other obscure athletic accomplishments. I perused the Guinness World Records and picked out some of the most impressive and eccentric athletic endeavors.

Longest distance swam underwater in one breath Who doesn’t have these competitions in their youth? I’m pretty sure I’ve only been able to make it one-half of the pool’s length, but I’m not that talented. The record of two hundred meters set by Tom Sietas of Germany doesn’t seem all that impressive to me, and probably not McKayla Maroney either.

Fastest mile Hicham El Guerrouj, a Moroccan middle-distance runner, is the world record holder for the mile, with a time of 3 minutes, 43.13 seconds. Guinness keeps records for every type of mile imaginable, including the fastest fireman’s carry mile (15:11:87), fastest mile on a pogo stick while juggling three balls

(23:28), fastest one-mile sack race (16:41), fastest one-mile piggy back race (12:47) and the fastest mile hopping on one leg and jumping rope (34:01). I’m in shock that people kept going at those attempts for an entire mile.

Most star jumps in one minute Give me a minute before you think I’m completely making something up by talking about star jumps. It’s like a jumping jack instead you start crouched on the ground and extend your entire body in a star position. So now that we know what a star jump is, we can puzzle over how somebody was physically able to do 61 in one minute. That’s more than a full jumping jack every single second.

Most squats in one hour My first question is why would anyone do squats in the first place, let alone for an entire hour? Paddy Doyle from the United Kingdom did 4,708 squats in 60 minutes in 2007. I bet after that squatting marathon, he never squat again.

Longest distance walking over hot plates Now this is probably the biggest stretch for an athletic accomplishment, but the fact that somebody subjected themselves to the torture of walking over hot plates for 22.9 meters deserves a shout-out. I watched the video, though, and it didn’t seem nearly as intimidating as I imagined. He was barefoot, which must have been rough. That led me to realize how the majority of these stunts are built for publicity and not worthy of that much attention. There’s a fine line between real athletic competition and doing something simply for bragging rights. These seemingly athletic records test mental toughness more than anything else. I’m still giving Baumgartner props. I mean, he broke the sound barrier. That’s something I’m not sure any sky diver will have the nerve (or ability, or guts, or whatever you want to call it) to try.

Emily is a graduate student. She can be reached at bayci1@dailyillini.com. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyBayci.

“I think one of the main things we were trying to do was to battle and prove to anyone and ourselves that we can stay in any game no matter what our roster is currently looking like.”


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Men’s tennis uses individual play to prepare for season BY STEVEN VAZQUEZ STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s tennis team entered the fall season coming off of a Big Ten championship and a Sweet 16 departure in last season’s NCAA tournament. With the nation’s No. 6 recruiting class bringing in four freshmen, the Illini are looking to continue their winning ways this season. The Illini were busy last month, as they kicked off their fall season at the Olympia Fields DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI Country Club Fighting Illini InviAlexis Viliunas smiles as she speaks on Illini Drive on Monday. Viliunas was named the Big Ten Freshman of the Week yesterday. tational on Sept. 17-19. They also competed in the University of Virginia Ranked +1 Invitational in Charlottesville, Va., as well as the Audi Napa Valley Tennis Classic in St. Helena, Calif., the following weekend. More online: Listen to them to. So because they weren’t believed in Annie, we were Head coach Brad Dancer said the whole interview with responding and she’s making all committed in Annie, we were although the fall season is all Illinois volleyball coach those changes, we decided we gonna move in that direction. individual results with no team Kevin Hambly and freshman Alexis matches, it is still significant for had to make a change and see if I wanted her to play with freeEditor’s note: The following is a parwe got a better response to the dom and not worry about risks. Viliunas online at DailyIllini.com. the players. group. “It’s just guys playing for She did everything we asked tial transcript from an Illini Drive inthemselves and for the prestige but that’s the last piece you and it wasn’t working. terview with Illinois volleyball coach ID: Is this the first time you’ve had of the program, if you will,” move. ... It didn’t change that Kevin Hambly and freshman Alexis ID: For someone who didn’t know Dancer said. “At this stage right much really how much Lex to pull the redshirt midseason? Viliunas. now, each guy is trying to get as would’ve played, except her KH: Yeah, it’s the fi rst time I’ve that her redshirt could be pulled changed a setter midseason. It’s midseason, what’s your reaction good as they can be. That’s really mindset that she was competall they’re trying to do.” ing for the job. Illini Drive: On Thursday, you made the fi rst time for a lot of things. when you finally get the call? I still think it was the right Viliunas: It was awesome. I’m Dancer said while the team the decision to switch to Lex at decision. not going to lie. I was really ID: For you as a player, is it good to may not be seeing the outcomes setter. You said that was a tough it wants this autumn, he is still shocked because obviously, I have that confidence? decision for you to make. impressed with his young roster. wasn’t expecting Kevin to call. AV: I mean, going out there Hambly: That was the hardest ID: (Viliunas) said she didn’t decision I’ve had to make. Not know that was a possibility for her He just called me after I got and knowing that (Hambly) “Result-wise, we have high because of Lex because I have redshirt to be pulled. expectations for our program, has faith in me and is not out of class. But I’m happy. I’m a lot faith in Lex. Because I like KH: And Annie didn’t know going to pull me out after each so maybe not as good as we like,” doing whatever is the best for Annie (Luhrsen) and I care about that was a possibility either. Dancer said of his team’s play mistake I make really helps the team and if that’s what’s Annie. Annie was doing what we The important thing for Annie thus far. “But I’m really pleased when you’re out there. And I best, then (I’ll do it.) were asking her to do and was especially was it had to be her KH: If she wasn’t redshirtwith the overall spirit and the just play free and do whatevtrying to make a lot of chang- job until it wasn’t. I wanted focus our guys have.” ing all year, she wouldn’t er I can. es and was really having a hard her to have complete confi Sophomore Farris Gosea was have played much at all. She time because the team was not dence in the job. I wanted her Illini Drive can be reached at illinidrive@ the sole Illini representative at would’ve played one match. responding the way she wanted to believe, and she did. We the ITA All-American ChampionNot because she’s not capable, dailyillini.com and @IlliniDrive.

Viliunas replaces Luhrsen as setter for Illini

Former redshirt gets unexpected call to play

»

» » » » » »

» » » » »

» »

ships in Tulsa, Okla., earlier this month. Gosea said the team has not been living up to its expectations so far. “Team-wise, I feel like it’s been a bit below-par from what we were expecting,” Gosea said. “I feel like a lot of our guys can perform better and get better results. Obviously, we’ve got a young team, so I feel like we all need to grow up pretty fast.” Associate head coach Marcos Asse said he is excited with the work ethic that the freshmen have been displaying. The upperclassmen have also taken notice of their effort, he added, which has given them confidence in their younger teammates. Dancer said he is impressed with the amount of matches his guys have been getting in. He’s also been pleased with his doubles teams. “Our intensity and energy in our doubles has been better this fall than it was last spring, or for that regard, over the past few years,” Dancer said. “We’ve got to figure out how to solve problems and fi nd solutions when we’re out on the court,” he added. The Illini were not in competition last week, as they were preparing to head to East Lansing, Mich., this weekend for the USTA/ITA Midwest Regionals. “I’m 100 percent confident that this group of guys can do things that may surprise a lot of people if they continue with the daily routines they’ve put into place,” Asse said.

Steven can be reached at vazquez5@ dailyillini.com.

Bears offense working to hold NFC North division lead THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — While the Chicago Bears appreciate their place atop the NFC North standings, they know it’s not a view they’ll enjoy for long unless some big changes occur on offense. The Bears (4-1) had a bye over the weekend and took over the division lead because of Minnesota’s 38-26 loss to the Washington Redskins. “It’s not bad — without playing, that’s not bad,” tight end Kellen Davis said Monday. “You can’t beat that really.” Still, Detroit (2-3) and Green Bay (3-3) both won Sunday, keeping the Bears from getting too excited about their half-game lead over the Vikings (4-2) as they began preparations for next Monday night’s game against the Lions. The Bears play only their second divisional game of the season against the Lions, so the race obviously has a long way to go. “Our division took a step up,” coach Lovie Smith said. “But as I told the team today, none of that really matters for us. We like the position we’re in. Any week you have to be ready to go to play your best football. That’s what I saw from this weekend. Teams that played 60 minutes or

more end up winning the football game. Detroit, this week ... I’m sure they’ve been waiting for this game for a long time.” To stay where they are, the Bears offense has to come around both in the running game and passing game to complement a defense that has been dominant to date. The passing attack took a hit with the loss of wide receiver Alshon Jeffery, reportedly to a fractured hand. The rookie has 14 catches, but the Bears will get wide receiver Earl Bennett back from a two-game absence due to a hand injury. “Those guys (teammates) are out there making plays, just having fun,” Bennett said. “We’re winning and it’s tough to sit back and just watch and not be a part of the fun.” Even with Jeffery making 14 catches and wide receiver Brandon Marshall tied for ninth in the league with Detroit’s Calvin Johnson at 35 catches, the Bears passing game ranks only 23rd (222.6 yards per game). The running game had struggled until the Week 5 blowout win over Jacksonville, when running back Matt Forte went over the 100yard mark for the first time since Nov. 7, 2011.

STEPHEN MORTON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears cornerback Charles Tillman, center, celebrates with teammates defensive tackle Henry Melton (69) and strong safety Major Wright (21) after intercepting a pass and scoring a 36-yard touchdown against the Jacksonville Jaguars on Oct. 7, in Jacksonville, Fla. The Bears are 4-1.

Yankees’ manager attends father’s funeral in Ill. BY DAVID MERCER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pallbearers carry the casket of Jerry Girardi, the father of New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church on Monday in Peoria, Ill. Giradi died Oct. 6 at 81 after years of struggle with Alzheimer's.

PEORIA, Ill. — Jerry Girardi was memorialized Monday as a dedicated laborer who built the ranch-style Illinois home where he raised five highly successful children — two doctors, a math professor, an accountant and New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi. The Yankees manager, who attended the funeral service during an off day in the American League Championship Series, sat quietly alongside his family. None of the Girardis spoke, and they left the church quickly to attend the burial in Tampico, the tiny north-central Illinois town known as the birthplace of Ronald Reagan. Father Larry Zurek told the roughly 100 mourners at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in downtown Peoria that Jerry Girardi’s contribution went far beyond

FOOTBALL

VOLLEYBALL

SETH PERLMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FROM PAGE 1B Beckman said he’s never been around a team with so many injuries. But Sanni wasn’t making any excuses. “We have to be able to deal with negativity and the injuries,” Sanni said. Senior leaders like Sanni, Hawthorne and defensive end Michael Buchanan have the challenge of keeping their teammates buying into the thought

that Illinois could turn things around. “I think just stressing that we’re still playing for something,” Buchanan said. “We could win five games and still go to a nice bowl. “This is a huge time for us. We have a week off, so I think it’s really time to find ourselves and figure out what’s wrong with this team and figure out why we’re not playing with heart out there and try to get this thing fixed.”

Jamal can be reached at collie10 @dailyillini.com and @jamalcollier.

FROM PAGE 1B ment from the beginning of the season, getting more comfortable with her role as a kill producer. McMahon averaged just 1.95 kills per set last season, her freshman year. Excluding Illinois’ 3-0 defeat against Michigan, McMahon has produced 75 kills in the past 20 sets, good for a 3.75 kps. Including that stretch, her season average this year is 2.77 kps. “I think it just took me a while to kind of be comfortable with

his occupations as a bricklayer, restaurant owner and salesman. Foremost, he cherished family, Zurek said. “Jerry built walls, but he built so much more,” the priest said. Jerry Girardi died Oct. 6 at a residential treatment center in nearby Metamora, Ill., at age 81. He had suffered from Alzheimer’s for years. The funeral came the day after Joe Girardi was ejected for arguing a controversial call during a loss to the Detroit Tigers that left the Yankees down 2-0 in the series. But, a lot like the images baseball fans are accustomed to seeing from the Yankee dugout, Girardi showed little emotion Monday. A few times, he dabbed at tears with a handkerchief. Joe Girardi, whose mother, Angela, died in 1984, managed his team through much of last week without telling players or the public that his father had died. this year and kinda get me going offensively,” McMahon said. “I’ve just been working on my confidence, just always being aggressive no matter what because when I do get more hesitant that’s when I start making errors.” McMahon has shown an aptitude for timely hitting as well, as in Saturday’s match, when a thirdset kill by McMahon ended a 6-0 Michigan State run and allowed Illinois to regain its footing, or in the fifth set of that same game, when McMahon had three kills in a five-point sequence to stretch the Illinois lead and put it within

SOCCER FROM PAGE 1B scoring only 44 seconds into the second overtime period . “There is some youth to this team,” Rayfield said. “I don’t think this senior class has really dealt with the adversity that they are dealing with this year, and they are learning how to do that. We better learn how to do that really quickly because we certainly have a situation where we’ve got to play the way that we are capable of playing and getting the results that we are capable of getting.”

Quick turn around for senior weekend Illinois will only have a few days to recover after a weekend on the road before facing Northwestern at home Thursday night and Nebraska on Sunday for the team’s senior night. The Illini will have to balance making improvements physically on the fi eld with restrange of victory.

Illini cling to ranked status At 9-9 overall, Illinois has two more losses than any other top25 team. Additionally, Illinois lost to a nonranked opponent for the first time last week in Ann Arbor, Mich., when the Wolverines shut the Illini down 3-0. Illinois’ comeback on Saturday allowed them to stay in the rankings, however, as the No. 25 team in the nation. Despite being 10th in the conference in overall record and tied for seventh in conference record

ing their bodies and building a strong mentality to prepare for the upcoming schedule. For some Illini, it will be more than just another conference win to fight for. “This weekend is a little special, so we should have a little extra energy anyway,” Holden said. “A lot of the girls parents will be in town because it is senior weekend, so there will be a little extra energy on the field.” With the two conference losses over the weekend, Illinois barely sits at the top of the Big Ten bracket in fi fth . Though Northwestern and Nebraska are toward the bottom of the rankings, it is vital that the Illini clinch these victories. “Everyone should come out and watch,” Read said. “Illinois is going to have to fight to stay on top of the bracket and sometimes it’s a good thing to have something to fight for.”

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30. at 3-5, Illinois is the Big Ten’s fifthranked team. Ranked ahead of the Illini are No. 20 Ohio State, No. 17 Purdue, No. 10 Minnesota, No. 4 Nebraska and No. 1 Penn State. While the Buckeyes, Boilermakers, Golden Gophers and Nittany Lions have all beaten Illinois this season, the Cornhuskers come to Champaign on Sunday at 2 p.m. Illinois helped knock the Spartans, who also lost to Northwestern over the weekend, out of the rankings.

Eliot can be reached at sil2@dailyillini. com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Bankier Apartments

MISC.

www.bankierapts.com

217-328-3770

# BDROOMS

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN IT PA RK IN G UT ON ILI S TIE S I ITE NC L.

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y I C NU NI PA T RK IN GO UT NS ILI TIE I S I TE NC L.

# BDROOMS

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

MISC.

MHM Properties

www.mhmproperties.com 2,3

217-337-8852

202 E. Green, C.

1,4

F !" !" !" """

Balcony, elevator, jacuzzi tubs

606 E. White, C.

1107 S. Second, C.

1,4

F !" !" !" """

Balconies off every bedroom

Professional Property Management

508 E. Clark, C

1,2,3,4

B "" !" !" """

Laundry on site

502 E. Springfield, C.

3

F !" !" !" """

2 BA, W/D, D/W. Newer, balcony/patio

408 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F !" !" !" """

Intercom entry, remodeled bathrooms

503 E. Springfield, C.

1,2

F !" !" !" """

Newer, W/D, D/W, 9 foot ceilings

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F !" !" !" """

Patio/Balcony

301 S. Fourth, C

2

F !" !" !" """

Newer 2 BA, W/D, D/W, 9 foot ceilings

55 E. Healey, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

Parking & internet included

505 E. Stoughton, C.

3

F !" !" !" """

Newer, balcony/patio, 2 BA, W/D, D/W

303 W. Green, C.

1,2,3

F !" !" !" """

Guest parking lots, balconies off bedrooms

808 W. Illinois, U.

1,2,3

F !" !" !" """

Newer, W/D, D/W

505 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

F "" !" !" """

Laundry on site, Balconies

802 W. Ohio/1009 Busey, U

2

B !" !" !" """

Duplex with Hardwood Floors, W/D, parking included

1106 W. Stoughton, U.

1,2

F !" !" !" """

Hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances

610 W. Oregon, U.

2

B !" "" !" """

Spacious, W/D, off street parking

805 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

F "" !" !" """

Laundry on site

205 E. Green , C.

1

F "" !" !" !""Large, Great Location, Security Doors

911 S. Locust, C.

1

F "" !" !" """

Laundry on site

108 E. John, C.

1

B "" "" !" !""Huge, Hardwood Floors, Security Doors

56 1/2 E. Green, C.

1

F "" !" !" """

Dishwashers

1003 W. Stoughton, U.

2

F "" !" !" """

Engineering campus, some remodeled, C/A

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F !" !" !" """

Lots of updates, must-see units!

305/307/311 W. Birch, C.

1

B "" !" !" """

Close to campus, 1 parking space included

621 E. Green, C.

4

F !" !" "" """

Skylights, jacuzzi tubs, balcony off every bedroom

308 E. Iowa, U.

2

B "" !" !" """

Close to campus, 3 Level floorplan

1109 W. Stoughton, U

4

F "" !" !" """

Patio/Balcony, Skylights

906 S. Vine, U.

1,2

B "" !" !" """

Close to campus, remodeled, on-site laundry

619 S. Wright

2,3

F !" !" "" """

You can\’t get closer to the quad!

Castle on Locust 1007 S. Locust, C.

www.cu-apartments.com 1,2,3,4

Country Fair Apartments 2106 W. White St., C.

Johnson Rentals

1,2

217-840-1070

F !" !" !" """

Cable & internet included

myapartmenthome.com

217-359-3713

B "" !" !" !""FREE Heat, Digital Cable & High Speed Internet

www.johnsonrentals.com

217-351-1767

Shlens Apartment

F !" !" !" """

New! With private baths

www.ppmrent.com

www.shlensapts.com

217-351-1800

217-344-2901

904 W. Stoughton

2,3

F !" !" !" """

42in. flat screen in some units, desk+chair, covered parking

1102 W. Stoughton

2,3

F "" !" !" """

42 inch flat screen in some units, computer desk and chair

1004 W. Stoughton

4

F "" !" !" """

42 inch flat screen in some units, computer desk and chair

1009 W. Main

1,2

F "" !" !" """

42 inch flat screen in some units, computer desk and chair

Smith Apartment Rentals

www.smithapartments-cu.com

217-384-1925

103 E. Healey St., C.

1

F "" !" !" !""Parking Included

58 E. Armory, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

$890, includes one parking

104 E. John St., C.

1,2,3

F "" !" !" !""Parking Included

1004 S. Locust, C.

1

F !" !" !" """

$540 & $655, parking $40

105 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

B !" !" !" """

1 Parking Space Included

1009 W. Clark, U.

2

F !" !" !" """

$775, includes one parking

108 W. Charles, C.

1

B !" !" !" """

Loft, Secured Building

1010 W. Clark, U.

2

F !" !" !" """

$865, includes one parking

210 E. White, C.

2,3,4

F !" !" !" """

Secured Building

1012 W. Clark, U.

2

F !" !" !" """

$775, includes one parking

208 E. White, C.

2,3,4

F !" !" !" """

Remodeled units available

610 W. Stoughton, U.

1

F !" !" !" """

$510, includes water & one parking

310 E. Clark, C.

1

B !" !" !" """

Loft, Secured Building

201 E. Armory, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

$950, parking $60

312 E. White, C.

Ef.,2,3

F !" !" !" """

1 Parking Space Included. Water Included.

201 E. Armory, C.

Ef.

F !" !" !" !""$410, includes water & electric, parking $60

308 E. Armory, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

Secured Building

507 W. Church, C.

Ef.

F !" !" !" """

$365, includes water and one parking

508 S. First, C.

1

B "" !" !" """

Secured Building

511 W. Church, C.

2

B !" !" !" """

$685-$745, includes water and one parking

807 S. Locust, C.

3,4

F !" !" !" """

Remodeled units available

201 E. Armory, C.

3

F !" !" !" """

$1305, parking $60

1103 S. Euclid, C.

Ef.,2,3,4,5+

F !" !" !" """

Near 4th and Armory

1106 S. Second, C.

1

F !" !" !" """

$515, includes water, parking $50 -$70

11 E. Logan, C.

2

U "" !" !" """

Close to Downtown

507 W. Church, C.

1

B !" !" !" """

$490- $525, includes water and one parking

314 E. White, C.

5+

F !" "" !" """

Group House

1004 S. Locust, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

$660-$870, parking $40

106 1/2 E. Armory, C.

5+

F "" "" !" """

Group House

511 W. Church, C.

1

B !" !" !" """

$520-565, includes water and one parking

306 E. Armory, C.

3,5+

F !" !" !" """

Near 4th and Armory

58 E. Armory, C.

1

F !" !" !" """

$620, includes one parking

53 E. Chalmers, C.

1

F !" !" !" """

$700, parking $40

53 E. Chalmers, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

$1100, parking $40

MHM Properties

www.mhmproperties.com

217-337-8852

205 S. Sixth, C.

3,4

F !" !" !" """

Jacuzzi, big TV, free internet

805 S. Locust, C.

2,4

F "" !" !" """

Bi-level, balconies

101 S. Busey, U.

1

F "" !" !" !""Paid utilities, large kitchens

101 E. Daniel, C.

1,2,4

F !" !" !" """

Bi-level lofts, balconies, free internet

808 S. Oak, C.

2,3,4

F "" !" !" """

Balconies, lofts, free internet

605 E. Clark, C.

1

F !" !" !" """

Balconies, free internet

102 S. Lincoln, U.

2,3,4

F "" !" !" """

Balconies, skylights, cathedral ceilings, free internet

906 S. Locust, C.

Ef.,1,4

F "" !" !" """

203 S. Fourth, C.

1,2,3,4

F !" !" !" """

Bi-level, balconies, free internet

908 S. Locust, C.

1

F "" !" !" !""$580-$605

311 E. Clark, C.

2

F !" !" !" """

Balconies, free internet

705 S. First, C.

3

F "" !" !" """

$1045

705 S. First, C.

4

F "" !" !" """

$1415-$1515

OUR MUSIC LIBRARY IS 12,000 SONGS.

THIS EQUALS 15,038 TACOS FROM TACO BELL.

THEY WOULD COST $11,800 ON ITUNES.

Tenant Union

www.tenantunion.illinois.edu

U of I Tenant Union

U "" "" "" """

The Tower at Third

www.tower3rd.com

302 E. John St., Champaign 2

Tri County Management Group

217-333-0112 Free! Check Landlord Complaint Records & Lease Review!

217-367-0720

F "" !" !" !""1 block from Green. Individual leases. No cap on utilities. www.tricountymg.com

217-367-2009

Parking $40/mo.

LISTEN TO THE FACTS.

3B


4B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

FOR RENT

Services

Employment

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

110 120 130 140 150 160

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

Rentals

Apartments 410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

Announcements

710 720 750

Campus Events Community Events

Classes

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830 Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one day’s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

6

T e n a n t U n i o n . i l l i n o i s . e d.u

Sudoku '-

7

)

6

"

4

!

)

6

5

3

8

4

!

5

3

7

"

8

8

4

7

6

!

3

)

5

3

"

4

8

6

)

"

7

5

!

8

5

"

3

!

8

!

)

4

5

3

6

)

4

"

"

!

!

8

5

7

6

8

6

)

7

4

4

3

3

6

!4 )

3 7 ) 8

)

7

3

4

!

8

5

6

"

6

"

8

7

)

5

!

3

4

7 6 ) 8

"

!

4

5

3

!

5

"

6

3

4

)

8

7

3)

5 ) 5 ! 6 7 4 8 3

5

3

6

!

)

"

"

8

7

"

3

8

4

)

5

7

" ! 6 3 4 )

8

6

7

"

5

!

8

!

4

" 7 5

6

3

8 ) !

"

!

3

3

4

8

7

5

3

!

"

)

6

)

6

5

6

4 8 7

3

"

"

!

7 5 8

6

7

)

! 3 4

! 4 8 5 ) 6 "

8

)

5

!

7

"

3

4

6

4

4

8

3

"

7 5 8 6 "

!

)

6 5

3 ) 5 4 7 !

3

6

! ) 7

" 8

6

7

5

6

4

!

3

8 "

7 )

4 5 3

"

7 ) "

8

)

!

8

!

!

"

3 ) 6 5

4

7

5 3 6

8 4

)

4 6 ! 3 " 8 7 5

5

3 8 7 ) 6 " 4 !

"

! 7 5 4 8 3 6 )

!(

!

"

)

7

8

3

5

4

3

6

7

4

8

5

3

4

!

)

7

7

4

!

5

3

)

4

7

8

6

37

3

6

!

"

!

6

)

8

6

3

"

5

6

7

"

)

8

4

5

!

)

8

5

"

!

7

8

"

5

!

4

7

6

)

3

7

4

8

!

6

!

"

"

5

!

3

)

4

7

6

8

3

"

5

5

)

"

6

8

7

5

3

6

4

8

)

4

3

)

4

!

7

3"

'

4

!

$$$$$$$$$*&+,$-$$$$$$$./0112$

5

7

'

6 4 ) ) !

4

6

4

6

A S K S

7

"

B B E

"

!

)A

E M I N E N C E S

!

I S E R E

3

4

'

S O N N E T I Z E

G E T A T

5

4

A D I E U

5

E M S I S C A R Y R O S U D H O A R T U D S I P L A E E V T E E L

8

4

!5 E S M C U L E T R O O R S U I N S

5

"

6

7

4

8

3

!

)

7

8

6

8

4

! 7 3

"

5

)

) 6 5

)

!

3

4

4

3

5

"

6

)

7

!

8

5

"

"

7

4

6

3

4

!

8

5

6

)

! 8 7 " 3

) 5

4

4

R E A T A

8

810 Words, 5 Days ' 6 $10 7 'call 217­337­8337! 7

5

"

3

4

!

6

7

!

5

20 Words, 5 Days $20

4

8

6

7

7

Visit the217.com calendar for a full list of things to do this weekend!

)

I R E N E

A D L I B

7 7

)

7

6

"

!

5

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or call 217.328.3770 to set up an appointment

!

8 !

6

8

6

4

Now Leasing!

5

7

8

6 9

I N E R T

!OB

9

C O U R T E O U S

7#,$80$09-:-890$;()$(")$4<03-%9$ 73.-(#$7,$<)-30=>

!

7

)

"

)

3

)

9

3

5

8

5

"

9

T R O V N E E S

Z E K E

T S O C M H E S I R U O N D R T O E R S I S P O L O A N V D I S C

) !

3

8

5

7

7

'

!"#$$%&'($)(#%"*%""%+%)!,7 )

5

S C A P E G O A T

8 ' 5 !"#$%$&'$()$*'$+(),$%,$-#$./0$ 10)2-3045$60)3/%#,-40$()$ 5 6 !"#$%&'"(#()'$*+#(,-'"),%*.'"*/*0,*1#2%333

) '

7

5

4

"

)

"

"

8

!

4

S O D A B A T H S

ACTION ADS! 6

)

7

)

8

4

6

9

4

! 6

)

6

9

6

RIGHT APARTMENT!

Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

8

8

'

A L E C

6

6

QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY

6

4

217-344-3008

(217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com

)

8

RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT 9 LOCATION! RIGHT APARTMENT! RIGHT PRICE! RIGHT LOCATION!RIGHT RIGHT PRICE! PRICE! RIGHT APARTMENT!RIGHT LOCATION! RIGHT PRICE! 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com RIGHT LOCATION! (217)(217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com RIGHT PRICE! QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY (217)RIGHT 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com QUALITY HOUSING TOTHE THECHAMPAIGN-URBANA CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY QUALITY HOUSING TO UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY PRICE! RIGHTAND APARTMENT! (217) 352-3182 www.UGroupCU.com QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY RIGHT LOCATION! (217) 352-3182QUALITY www.UGroupCU.com HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY RIGHT PRICE! QUALITY HOUSING TO THE CHAMPAIGN-URBANA AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY 7

8

)

9

4

NINQSPQFSUJFTDPN 

4

!

Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

www.mhmproperties.com

3

7

8

www.BaileyApartments.com *Available

!

6

)

Close In Urbana Locations

)

5

5

'

3

)

8

Digital Comp. Lab, Grainger, Siebel 2 1/2 Blocks

8

!

(217)337­8852

6

4

4

!

GUARANTEED COMPLETION!

(

!"#$%&#'$&"()*$%+&,-.&/"&#'$&*01"2&+314$+&+5&#'1#& $14'&%567&450()"&1"8&9:9&+;(1%$&45"#1/"+&5"0<&5"$& 5=&$14'&"()*$%>&?'$%$&/+&5"0<&5"$&+50(#/5">&@+50(#/5"&/"&A01++/=/$8+&1"8&5"0/"$&1#&666>81/0</00/"/>45)B>&

!!"#$%&#'(()##########*+,-#.#######/01223#

7

9

)

Do You Want Close? !"#$%&'()%% ! *+*),-.#, Leasing for Fall 2013 Engineering Campus /",0%,0.%% $*"1&%"11"#" 1,2,3&4 BEDROOMS *+*),-.#, 2.*)30 Illini Union 3 1/2 Blocks Mech. Eng. 3 Blocks

6

5

7 3

Video Intercom In Unit Washer/Dryer Granite and Tile Satellite TV*

8

(White near Wright, Across from future ECE Building!!)

;

8

!"#$%&$'()*+%,$(%,-$(,*!%.($(/%%%%%%%%%%%-'0(%#+%")%&,1(2""0/

!

606 E White, Champaign Flat Screen TV Cathedral Ceilings Balconies Free High Speed Internet

!"#$$%&'()$*)#%"+%""%,%*!-.

5

?;76@=

)

Luxury 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Loft Apartments with Private Baths

'

.

9 4

6

78769:;19

"

'

9

(

!

:

.

9

;

9

5

'

;

)

(

8

6

9

(

7

Coming in August, 2013

.

<09='9=;' 6

;

8

6

270>3 !""!#!

:

!

; 78769:;19 9

7

4

6

'

/012' 3456'

7

8

4

7

.

7

'

"

'

;

3

8

(

6

7

(

.

!

8

7

!"#$$%&

8

.

8

$1,305

Most apt. furnished, parking available, laundry available

:

A program of the Office of the Dean of Students

8

201 E. Armory, C.

7 LE 9A S E R E V I E W S 6 9 '

TENANT UNION

' .

8

LANDLORD COMPLAINT RECORDS

5

3 Bedroom Apartments

.

8

8

6

)

K_\9\jkf]:L fek_\)(.%Zfd ZXe_\cg pflĂ&#x201D;e[ k_\Y\jk Zf]]\\%

' 7 HUNTING . APARTMENT ??? :

6. ices Grim? o h C nt

1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments priced for every budget. Come in today!

7

G E9 T T H E FA CTS (

9

;

(

!

LgcXk\ jkl[p`e^6

tme r a p

!

6

;

3

Roland Realty  217­351­8900

7

8

'

$1,100 $890 $950 $685-745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775

!-$.&$'(/012*3,$'&$4.%5 58 E. Armory, C. 201 E. Armory, C. !77$%&$'()*+(,$'& 8"?$%&$9:;)<(:;=,$>& 7""?$9&$@;+)3:,$'& 7""B$%&$'0/*C,$>& 7"7"$%&$'0/*C,$>& 7"7D$%&$'0/*C,$>&

7

:

2 Bedroom

9

:

.

7

6

A

'

.

7

8

4

House Leasing is  Underway! Stop  !"#$%&#$'()*#+,# 901 S. First St. for more details.

Wine Cooler In-Unit Wi-Fi Mirror Closet Doors Covered Parking*

$700 $620 $490-540 $510 $540, $660 $515, $565

!-$.&$'(/012*3,$'&$4.%5 58 E. Armory, C. !"#$6$!77$%&$'()*+(,$'& 87"$%&$9:;)<(:;=,$>& 7""?$9&$@;+)3:,$'& 77"8$9&$92+;=A,$'&

:

:

430

Unfurnished

1 Bedroom

ROLAND  REALTY

:

'

9

K_\9\jkf]:Lfe k_\)(.%Zfd]\Xkli\jk_\ Y\jki\jkXliXekj`ek_\Xi\X%

APARTMENTS

8

9

9

!"#$%&'()&'*"#+, -&'./, "#, 012&%3 %&++*#$,/"(%+0)4,2/,'&)5*#$,'",&,$%"(6, "4, $(/+, 7*'., &, .($0, 6*080, "4, )0''(80, +'(85, *#, /"(%, 6"+'3.*$., +8.""), 2%&83 0+9,:2%(+./"(%'00'.&4'0%8.*6"')0,

3

Furnished

6

?le^ip]fi jfd\k_`e^e\n6

$410 $365

201 E. Armory, C. !"#$%&$'()*+(,$'&

(

9

5

Efficiency

420

7

7

www.smithapartmentsâ&#x20AC;?cu.com

6

!"#$%#&'()#*+,-.#/"00%#1"0#$-2345# 1+4#"1#%"+6#

!

Smith Apartments 217â&#x20AC;?384â&#x20AC;?1925

8

830

"

APARTMENTS

NOW RENTING FOR 2013­2014 SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING NOW!

MISCELLANEOUS 69

67

!"##$%&'())'(*))'$+,$-(."/#$$ !"#$%&&"'(!&)"$$"*"+(!"%,#-+./-.. &01+"/.2-03.-4*.5677.&8-0/-0/9.

6

!"#$%&'()*+&(*,*&%-.$%/ !"#"$"%&'())*+",-(./"-.,-(.+"0122" 2345.'&'"678"9:5..&;<"95=;&">?+" 0122"@AB:"C4&&'"D.E&(.&E+"0122" F5E&(+"@&5E"5.'"E(5<:"(&*)G5;H""I,,J <E(&&E"45(KA.B+"A.'))(";5-.'(L+"4));+" E&..A<"M)-(EH"I."N"O>P"=-<"()-E&<H"" C*5;;"4&E"IQH"OJ0"RJSTU7+"C5E"!7JSH" $!7V"FH"F:AE&"CE(&&E"" !"#$%&'(%)"*+#,-&./#0& $!WJUSRJUW!U" " XXXH*L545(E*&.E:)*&HM)*"

!"#$%&'()&'(*&+,$#-''%&.,/#0

announcements

"#$%&'$!(!)*++$! ! ,-.!(!/.#-+! '()&*+,&'--.&&&&&&&&&&/+01&2&&&&&&&!3455%& ! 01-!(!23$#+'! ! 435!(!6&.$! ! !"#$%&'%()%*+,$-((#. 7-.!(!8'3*5! !"#$%&&'(#&)*+",-.,--,/,0 ! *(//(0%&'%()%10"22$3. 90:;<<:;==,9! 12,11$3(#&)*14$+",-.,--,/,0 ! *")4%&'%()%1&5-/3. >>>?@.@A*&A+*-#+1?%&@! +",-.,--,/,(15)%-3(#&)0

8

410

503 E. Springfield, C. Newer building, C/A, D/W Washer/Dryer, $795 www.ppmrent.com 351-1800

! "#$$!%&'( ! "#$!%&'()*(! ! +,-!#!+,"!.!/01'2! ! "34!#!"35!.!6789&! ! +3+!:!;8<97! ! =0)>2!<')?!/)@*9A!B1'2&9C! ! )))*+,+-./-0.1203*4/+ ++4#DDE-!

7

Furnished/Unfurnished

1 BR-CAMPUS-JAN 2013

!"#$%&' !

4

APARTMENTS

!!!"##$%&'(")*$+++ +,-."/0-"-122

!"#$!"%&'(&)*+,-./&0( !"#$%&'((('"))*+,-.'*)/#,*-#01'2'3'4' 5*6+""7'898+&7*-&%')"+':;2<=' >"7*'$-,&%'9*&')+,*-6?0='>#@*6$?*'8-' 899",-&7*-&'&"680A' :2BC<DBC:;;E'FFF=&+,#"$-&07.=#"7'

!"##$%&'()$*(#)+ !"#$%&'(#))'*+,'-#)."/$0'#11'+*')"2' $2/0"3+,"++4'52)&6'7+8'#1-#9&' :#%2')"2:'*221',/0")'#)'"+:2';'$+)' +$')++')/0")'+*'#'12#&"6'<+0&='.#)&=' !"#$%&'(%)*+,%-./%0*..%1-22%.*3,%4*5,% +*')"2:'*+,'9+86'!"2'$2>)')/:2'9+8' #,2'1++%/$0'*+,'&+:2+$2')+'0/?2'9+8,' 52)'&+:2'1+?2'-"/12'9+8'#,2'#-#9=' 6-7,%0*..%*%4*22/%

!"#!$"#%&'()#*"'$+## ,--#./&#0(1#2(3#"02#0)2(4#5()#(3## !"#!$"#$/&627## 899:#%;#<)"'$37## :=>9?@=>9## ABCBDDB<+#

PARKING / STORAGE 570

900

"

rentals

'&%!)*!+,-./$-0!1*! ! '&'!)*!234560!1*!! ! '&'!7!8#-,5$0!9*! ! :&:!)*!;#<0!9*! ! :&=!)*!+/.34>0!9*! ! %&(!)*!"/3?>@0!9*! ! (''!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! %&=!)*!),A>@0!9*! ! B&=!7*!9$#?<0!9*! ! -./0!B&B!7*!C@,>50!9* ! 1112343*56*75+87,2963& ! %'DE((DE::=%!

710 SHOUT OUTS

Events & Meetings

)

FOR RENT

1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms on campus

!"#"$"%&'(&)*+, !

!"#$%&'()*+*,$)*-*.()#//0*'/"&(&* /$*1,02"&*$(,#*34/"5'4/$*,$)* 3%64'*,$)*7'%/*,$)*8%$1/9$:* !,99*;<=>?;<=+* @,99*>-A?=+<B*

CAMPUS

3

!"#$%&'&(#)*+,-# !"#$%&'()*(+,("-(./..0,1.'(( "23(%&.(/45%6(7).+(8/("-29:6(( ;,<*=/+/(5,<*)+/&284./>(+/.+.6(( ?1>/&@,(7AB(.541.6(( C<40=(5,@+&401=48D@<40=65,<6(

!"#$%&'())&"*%&"#& )+,-(./&0"#*),)&1"2& /,.)(#3&#"45

! "#$$!%&'(! !

!"#$"%&'(&")&*"$+', !"#$%"&'()*+,-,'./%0,1/"*/,&",2$&).,, !%34"4,4%)45,6%)),74%8&"9,, :&.1()",477;&4"1)',&"1;$*)*5,, <=>,(//8$75,-,14%,94%49)5,?@AB5,, C4;;,-DE5@A-5ADFG,

announcements

things to do

5

!"#"$#%&'()*$+,,'-,'.-$-&/'01$'2%33' 4-,-5' 6667,"#"$#%&+)*$+,,7819:;1#,'

!"#$%&'(##)$*+,,-$*+(./01&'$$ 232(4)&.40$*#($,&20&$/.$56789567:$ 0;1##,$-&2(<$"""<&204=/&"9234<;#)$

!"#$%"&"'(%)**+",*-.(."" *$"/#+0-.1"2-334"5-)$6.,(%1"" 23#7"./)(($"89.1"" :;<=:>;=?;&<" ./,$(6%()=0)*0()76(.1/*+"

!"#$%&$'()*+$%+&,$!"#"$"%&'())*"+,(-./0&'"121(3*&-3/" +)("456!7"8)"2&3/7"9:0&',;&"3)"/&&" 30&*"%&+)(&"30&<=(&">)-&?"" 46@A!B@A455C"DDD73(.:),-3<*>7:)*"

!"#$%&'(%&)*'$+ !"#"$%& '()"*(&+&,(-.//0&1&,2%34&5& ,(-.//0&6&,2%3& !"#$%"&'()&*+$)&",'-../'0..&1,'0#$' $7.((84&$%298)($$&$%(()&:9%73(8;&<./0 &=1>?@A(.$/8;&B(-&CD(DD(.&>EEF?6GH&

510 CONDOS/DUPLEXES 620

"

!"#$%&'()*+%,"-*(.%/**$*$%#/%0(1"2 /"3% 4556% 7899% :;% <;#/3% =>#?-% ;/% &'()*+.3%

420 HOUSES FOR RENT

Furnished

!

!"#$%&"'()*#"!+,*-

!"#$%$&'()*+,("-.$/0 !"#$%&'()*+$,"-$,'%%$./012$3&%45&$ 6-'*7$*&#$,4%%8$,4-*)(9&7$.$:;$$ '<'-=>&*=(?$(=')*%&(($'<<%)'*@&(?$$ 7)(9#'(9&-?$#'(9&-A7-8&-2$B)()=$$ ###2!&'-!"-=9CD2@">?$"-$@'%%$ .0EFGHIF/EG0$,"-$7&=')%(2$

420 APARTMENTS

7

020

Part time

Furnished

Furnished

6

HELP WANTED

420 APARTMENTS

APARTMENTS

'$23)#43'(5 ,0%2&%&'%<'/;%-;2",0.4 %#2,*%&'%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'( %&7"(%&+23"%),0%?2@"%',"%&'%',"%'-%<'/;%-;2",0.4 &")(()&".%)8'/&%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(4 45

employment

'

4


The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 37