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Romney tax returns: Cause for criticism or approval? OPINIONS, 4A

Black Dog serves it up True barbecue flavor makes restaurant a winner HEALTH & LIVING, 6A

Tuesday September 25, 2012

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Admissions focuses on next year’s enrollment BY LAUREN ROHR STAFF WRITER

Now that final enrollment numbers are in, the Office of Admissions is focusing on its goals for next year in the areas of improving recruitment, diversity and financial aid opportunities. “Certainly to recruit a bright, diverse class of students, it really takes a lot of effort throughout the campus,” said Stacey Kostell, director of undergraduate admissions.

The admissions office, the financial aid office and a marketing and communications unit for admissions create their own goals before coming together to collaborate on broad, campus-wide goals, Kostell said. An overview of these goals has been presented to the senate admissions committee and the Senate Executive Committee, or SEC, over the past few weeks. Michael Biehl is the senate admissions committee chair and said the committee acts as a liai-

son between University admissions officers and the Urbana-Champaign Senate. After reviewing the campus enrollment plan goals last week, he said they are “in the spirit of” the University-wide enrollment management plan created by former University president Michael Hogan last spring. “Speaking for the committee, these goals are very detailed, very challenging, and yet they are in line with the expressed

admissions and enrollment management goals that have been previously communicated by the University,” Biehl said. To achieve these objectives, he said administrators and faculty members need to have “appropriate dialogue and maintain ongoing communication efforts in this area.” Kostell said a main enrollment goal is to increase the campus’ outreach and recruitment. She said the admissions office works

to build relationships with Chicago public schools, but they also want to increase their “international presence” to ensure that students who attend the University represent a broad spectrum of nationalities. Although the University is wellknown by Illinois resident students, Kostell said it is important that high school students nationally and internationally are famil-

Outline of Enrollment Goals ! ! !

!

Freshman enrollment: 7,000 students Transfer student enrollment: 1,400 students Out-of-state enrollment including international enrollment: 25 percent Increase amount of application: 32,000 applications

SOURCE: STACEY KOSTELL, ASST. PROVOST FOR ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

See ENROLLMENT, Page 3A

Training classes under way at PTI From slated closure to classes

BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

After two years of contention surrounding the survival of the Police Training Institute, intructors and recruits are now halfway through their fi rst month. Basic training classes began Sept. 10 at the institute, and Michael Schlosser, interim director, said he is pleased to see the PTI open again. “I think everyone realized the importance of our historical academy,” he said. “That very fi rst week, I walk in the classroom and I see all these young, eager students ready to learn about police work — it was a very exciting time for me and a very exciting time for the Police Training Institute.” The institute underwent a few changes and has updated its classrooms’ technology this year. Changes to PTI include remodeled classrooms, access for each recruit to a laptop computer provided by the training board and a University e-mail address and new methods of writing reports and feedback through an online format. Officer Michael Unander of the University Police Department said his classes are better than he expected due to the technological improvements. “Nobody likes to sit through eight hours a day of any kind of classroom,” he said. “(We) have kind of gotten into a lot of interaction and interactive scenarios. It makes it a lot easier to take that information and learn how to put that into practice.” Schlosser said over the past few years, student attendance at the academy decreased, which decreased the PTI’s budget. “A lot of the money we rely on for the Police Training Institute comes from the police recruit tuition to attend our academy,” he said. “Years ago, we would have the class sizes the size of 60 to 90 students.” JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

Quincy Wood and Michael Unander practice handcuffing Basia Bardzinska at the Police Training Institute on Monday.

See PTI, Page 3A

November 17, 2010 Police Training Institute slated for closure

September 21, 2011 Western’s facility will not replace Illinois’ Police Training Institute, UI says

December 4, 2011 Police Training Institute urged to remain open after budget problems resolved

March 29, 2012 Training board votes to not recertify UI Police Institute

April 24, 2012 Champaign PTI no longer certified; WIU location takes precedence

May 28, 2012 PTI closure pushed back

July 15, 2012 Police Training Institute to continue operating under UI and Training Board

September 10, 2012 First day of classes for PTI

“I think everyone realized the importance of our historical academy.” MICHAEL SCHLOSSER, interim director

Chalmers apartment fire yields no injuries

Phyllis Wise joins Gov. Quinn for his trip to Brazil

Champaign Fire Department, owner of apartment cooperate in search for the cause

Gov. Pat Quinn began his sixday trip to promote Illinois business and tourism in Brazil on Sunday — but not without mention of the University. Vice President and Chancellor Phyllis Wise joined Quinn on the trip to recruit Brazilian students and represents the University as one of about 30 delegated officials from Illinois businesses, educational institutions and state and local governments. The group is scheduled to make stops in São Paulo, Brasília and Recife. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said Wise is accompanying Quinn on this trip because the University has many alumni in Brazil and has relationships with organizations in Brazil. Kaler said because of those

BY MATT RICE STAFF WRITER

Champaign Fire Department officials continue to investigate the cause of a fire that broke out in an apartment at 310 E. Chalmers St. in Champaign on Monday afternoon. Dena Schumacher, the department’s public information officer, said the apartment was empty when the fi re was ignited and no one was injured. Schumacher said a fire alarm was engaged at about 5 p.m. Schumacher said when firefighters arrived, it took them about seven minutes to

INSIDE

extinguish the flames. The authorities were alerted to the fire when a resident living close to the inflamed apartment noticed flames coming from the air-conditioning unit. Ritu Shah and Nikita Patel, residents of the building and seniors in LAS, said they were alerted to the fi re when they heard a loud shattering of glass and saw large plumes of smoke emanating from the air-conditioning unit of the apartment across the courtyard from them. Michael Gudino, property manager for Kennedy Wilson

BY HANNAH PROKOP DAYTIME ASSISTANT EDITOR

SARI LESK THE DAILY ILLINI

Michael Gudino, left, property manager at Kennedy Wilson Properties, talks to some of the firemen who responded to the fire in apartment 205 at 310 East Chalmers Street. Properties, the company that owns the apartment building, was on the scene Monday. “We are working with marshals to determine the cause of the incident,” Gudino said. “That’s all we have to say at the

moment.” Schumacher said investigators are still determining the extent of the damage caused by the fire.

Matt can be reached at news@daillyillini.com.

relationships, Wise will be able to help the state government meet and connect with people and organizations that might be able to partner with Illinois to help with the state’s economic development. Illinois is also making an effort to attract more Brazilian students to Illinois universities through the Brazilian government’s Scientific Mobility Program, according to a press release from Quinn’s office. The program provides scholarships for one year of study at universities in the U.S. Illinois companies have already donated to scholarship funds and provided internships to Brazilian students through the program.

Hannah can be reached at hprokup2@daillyillini.com.

Po l i ce 2 A | Co r re c t i o n s 2 A | C a l e n d a r 2 A | O p i n i o n s 4 A | C ro s swo rd 5 A | Co m i c s 5 A | H e a l t h & L i v i n g 6 A | S p o r t s 1 B | Cl a s s i f i e d s 3 B | S u d o ku 3 B


2A

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Tuesday, September 25, 2012

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Champaign Theft was reported in the 700 block of West Church Street at around 6 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the victim reported that an unknown offender stole his bicycle. ! Residential burglary was reported in the 00 block of Sherwood Court at around 3 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, an unknown offender broke into the victim’s residence and stole the following items: one computer, one television and cash. One telephone and one door/frame were reported damaged. ! Criminal damage to property was reported near West Bradley and McKinley Avenues at 10 p.m. Friday. According to the report, two offenders threw an object at a moving tow truck, causing damage to the truck. The offenders fled on foot and were not located. ! A 29-year-old male was arrested on the charge of reckless discharge of a firearm in the 2400 block of North Neil Street at around 1:30 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, the suspect fired rounds into the air in the apartment complex parking lot. ! A 23-year-old male was arrested on the charge of attempted burglary from motor vehicle at around 5:30 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the suspect burglarized the victim’s vehicle. The suspect was found in possession of burglary tools. ! A 63-year-old male was ar!

Copyright © 2012 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

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TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM rested on the charges of peeping tom and trespass to land/ real property in the 1200 block of Julie Drive at around 10 p.m. Friday. According to the report, the suspect was observed looking into the victim’s window and trespassing.

Urbana ! Domestic dispute was reported in the 2000 block of Vawter Street at around 4 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the victim reported that her biological sister attempted to batter her with a knife after an argument in the offender’s apartment. The victim was not injured. ! Two 21-year-old females were arrested on the charge of domestic battery in the 800 block of Division Avenue at around 5:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the victim and offender are or were in a same-sex relationship. The offender saw the victim with another woman and attacked her out of rage. Upon talking to both parties, they claimed the other person attacked them. ! Theft was reported in the 900 block of West Springfield Avenue at around 7 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the victim’s locked bicycle was stolen by an unknown offender. A bicycle and lock were both reported stolen.

University ! A 22-year-old male was arrested on the charge of aggravated battery in the 900 block of South First Street at around

3 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, witnesses said the suspect battered a University student during an altercation on the sidewalk. The victim refused medical treatment. ! Theft was reported at the Civil Engineering Building, 205 N. Mathews Ave., at around 6 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, a bicycle that was secured to a rack on the south side of the building was stolen. The bicycle is valued at $400. ! Theft was reported at Forbes Hall, 101 E. Gregory Dr., on Saturday. According to the report, a bicycle secured to the hall’s bicycle rack was stolen. The bicycle is valued at $100. ! A 19-year-old male was arrested on the charge of driving under the influence of drugs at the Arboretum parking lot, 1800 S. Lincoln Ave., at around 1 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, an officer patrolling the lot said he found the suspect in a vehicle smoking marijuana and learned that he had been smoking marijuana and driving the vehicle prior to police contact. Drug paraphernalia was also recovered. ! Theft was reported at the Illini Union, 1401 W. Green Street, at 4:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, a University student reported that someone stole his cell phone while he was studying at a table in the building. The student said he suspected a man who had bumped into the table earlier had taken the phone, which is valued at $650.

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In the September 21 edition of The Daily Illini, in the article “Pygmalion music festival at Canopy Club brings new, local bands to C-U indie scene,“ it was incorrectly stated that Andy Switzky is the lead guitarist and singer of HUM. Matt Talbott is the band’s current lead guitarist and singer. The Daily Illini regrets this error. When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

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ENROLLMENT FROM PAGE 1A iar with the University, so they are more likely to add it to their list of top schools. To do this, she said the admissions officers will pay attention to the outlets where students get their information about their prospective schools, such as College Confidential and College Prowler. Calvin Lear, SEC member and graduate student, said there was some concern among the SEC regarding the term “diversity” as it pertains to international enrollment on campus. “The SEC, as always, is concerned about striking a balance between various groups represented in the enrollment (numbers),” Lear said. “Some concerns were put forward that the University may underrepresent

PTI FROM PAGE 1A As a graduated student of the institute, Sgt. Ken Palmer of the Livingston County Sheriff Department is a part-time instructor at the academy. He said he is glad to have the opportunity to teach students at the PTI. “It makes me feel real good knowing that there still is a calling for law enforcement officers, and younger people in the community want to get out to serve and protect,” Palmer said. “It gives me great joy graduating

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

domestic students from in-state in favor of other groups.” However, Lear said overall, the SEC thought the report on enrollment goals would benefit the campus, allowing for a stronger pool of incoming students. Despite the University’s limited state funds, Kostell said admissions offi cers are also looking for ways to reduce costs for students. She said although there are no fi nalized plans, they are looking to create a scholarship website, which will make it easier for students to fi nd scholarships that fit their qualifications. “I think affordability is always a goal,” Kostell said. “We’re really looking at how we can best utilize our limited resources to maximize affordability.”

3A

Endeavour embarks on its final journey

Lauren Rohr can be reached at rohr2 @dailyillini.com. from PTI, and getting hired on as a part-time instructor was like a crowning jewel in my career.” The two-year struggle to fi nd funding ended July 9, when the Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board and the University came to an agreement to establish the PTI as a training and research institute. The University had stated two years earlier that it could no longer afford to subsidize the PTI since it did not connect with the University’s educational mission.

Carina can be reached at lee713@ dailyillini.com and on Twitter @ clee0118.

New York City restricts unhealthy foods BY MEGHAN BARR AND VERENA DOBNIK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — People nervously waiting around in New York City hospitals for loved ones to come out of surgery can’t smoke. In a few months from now, they can’t have a supersized fast-food soda. And soon, they won’t even be able to get a candy bar out of the vending machine or a piece of fried chicken from the cafeteria. In one of his latest health campaigns, Mayor Michael Bloomberg is aiming to banish sugary and fatty foods from both public and private hospitals. In recent years, the city’s 15 public hospitals have cut calories in patients’ meals and restricted the sale of sugary drinks and unhealthy snacks at vending machines. But now the city is tackling hospital cafeteria food, too. And the Healthy Hospital Food Initiative is expanding its reach: In the past year, 16 private hospitals have signed on. Earlier this month, the city moved to ban the sale of big sodas and other sugary drinks at fast-food restaurants and theaters, beginning in March. Critics say the hospital initiative is yet another sign that Bloomberg is running a “nanny state,” even though the guidelines are voluntary and other cities — including Boston — have undertaken similar efforts. Hospitals say it would be hypocritical of them to serve unhealthy food to patients who are often suffering from obesity and other health problems. “If there’s any place that should not allow smoking or try to make you eat healthy, you would think it’d be the hospitals,” Bloomberg said Monday. “We’re doing what we should do and you’ll see, I think, most of the private hospitals go along with it.” The cafeteria crackdown will ban deep fryers, make leafy green salads a mandatory option and allow only healthy snacks to be stocked near the cafeteria entrance and at cash registers. At least half of all sandwiches and salads must be made or served with whole grains. Halfsize sandwich portions must be

available for sale. “People sometimes right now don’t have healthy options,” said Christine Curtis, the city Health Department’s director of nutrition strategy. “So you are there at 2 in the morning and maybe your only choice is soda and chips.” Marcelle Scott brought her own chips and soda into the lobby of Manhattan’s privately operated St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital — there was no vending machine in sight — as she waited for her daughter to give birth Monday. It wasn’t the fi rst time the unemployed security guard from the Bronx got the “munchies” for junk food to keep calm while awaiting the outcome of a loved one’s medical procedure. “I like my Snickers and my Mars Bars — especially if I’m nervous for somebody who’s inside,” she said. Most hospitals have already overhauled their vending machines by allowing only two types of 12-ounce high-calorie beverages at each vending machine — and they must be featured on the lowest rack. Hospital vending machines have also swapped out most baked goods for snacks like granola bars and nuts. At privately run Montefiore Medical Center, which operates several hospitals in the Bronx, changes have been under way for a couple of years. “We took ice cream out of the cafeterias and began serving more whole grains,” said Dr. Andrew Racine, chief medical officer. “We changed white rice to brown rice.” Herbert Padilla, a retired Manhattan hairdresser, was sitting a few feet from a giant coke machine Monday in an outpatient waiting area at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt, where he was undergoing treatment for a nerve disorder. He said that in general, he supports efforts to keep people from overdosing on junk food, but “we shouldn’t be forced into this by a hospital.” “The mayor is going too far with this. It’s ridiculous,” he said. “We’re being told what to eat and what to drink. We’re not living in a free country anymore.”

ALBERTO MARTINEZ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Space Shuttle Endeavour is ferried by NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) over downtown Austin, Texas, early Thursday. Endeavour is making a final trek across the country to the California Science Center in Los Angeles, where it will be permanently displayed.

Activists demonstrate on Quad, compare abortion to Holocaust BY ILYA GUREVIC CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Pro-life activists used large posters with detailed images to share their message with the University community Monday on the quad. Dan and Donna Holman of Keokuk, Iowa joined David Griffi n of Mattoon, Ill. to express their views on the issue. Holman also voiced his opposition to abortion rights by speaking to all passers-by in aggregate and individually to those who chose to stop and converse with him. Dan Holman, a former electronics technician in Rockford, Ill., said he and his wife spend approximately 10 weeks of the year on the road protesting abortion by visiting schools across the Midwest and South. The Holmans both consider themselves “missionaries for the pre-born.” After the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision

in 1973, Holman said he viewed footage of two abortions. “(I) was moved to do something for the pre-born ... The word ‘fetus’ is used as a pejorative to dehumanize unborn children and more easily kill them,” One of the signs the group displayed paralleled an image of corpses in Hitler’s death camps with a photo of body parts of a fetus. Another displayed a photograph of a bloody fetus with a caption above it that read “Nobamacares,” and a caption below that read “Abortion.” Several Jewish students also reacted to the Holocaust reference. “I don’t know how you can even compare abortion to the Holocaust,” said Mimi Stender, junior in Education who identifi es as Jewish. “It just isn’t right.” Griffi n is hosting the Holman’s at his home for this event

and their upcoming trip to Eastern Illinois University. This was Griffi n’s fi rst time participating in a pro-life protest. After coming across YouTube clips about the Holmans, Griffi n wrote to them and asked if he could come along for Monday’s protest. Griffi n, a former real estate broker, said he has supported the cause for years and has worn a button that says “abortion,” with a swastika inside the “O.”’ Regarding the graphic nature of his poster, Griffi n said, “If I had a prettier picture of abortion, I’d have put it up.” Several students approached the activists, making comments about the posters and the abortion issue overall. Warren Souza, freshman in LAS who identifies as Roman Catholic, said he opposes abortion but decried Holman’s harsh words. “We are not preaching the same gospel,” he said. “We can

share the message in a more loving way, like telling a pregnant woman her options. Condemnation can come from God only.” John O’Connor, graduate student in LAS, thanked the demonstrators for “ensuring a continuing Democratic majority with their reactionary views” and added that their viewpoints and strategy show “a total lack of nuanced understanding” of individual circumstances that could lead to women turning to abortion, such as “health issues with the child or mother.” Holman said he “represents God” but cannot understand why “God should bless America, a wicked nation that allows baby-killing.” He said he did not sense apathy on the campus. “People just don’t care,” Holman said.

Ilya can be reached at news@ dailyillini.com.

Nye warns against creationism in online video BY DYLAN LOVAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The man known to a generation of Americans as “The Science Guy” is condemning efforts by some Christian groups to cast doubts on evolution and lawmakers who want to bring the Bible into science classrooms. Bill Nye, a mechanical engineer and star of the popular 1990s TV show “Bill Nye The Science Guy,” has waded into the evolution debate with an online video that urges parents not to pass their religious-based doubts about evolution on to their children. Christians who view the stories of the Old Testament as historical fact have come to be known as creationists, and many argue that the world was created by God just a few thousand years ago. “The Earth is not 6,000 or 10,000

years old,” Nye said in an interview with The Associated Press. “It’s not. And if that conflicts with your beliefs, I strongly feel you should question your beliefs.” Millions of Americans do hold those beliefs, according to a June Gallup poll that found 46 percent of Americans believe God created humans in their present form about 10,000 years ago. Nye, 56, also decried efforts in recent years by lawmakers and school boards in some states to present Bible stories as an alternative to evolution in public schools. Tennessee passed a law earlier this year that protects teachers who let students criticize evolution and other scientific theories. That echoes a Louisiana law passed in 2008 that allows teachers to introduce supplemental teaching materials in science classes.

“If we raise a generation of students who don’t believe in the process of science, who think everything that we’ve come to know about nature and the universe can be dismissed by a few sentences translated into English from some ancient text, you’re not going to continue to innovate,” Nye said in a wide-ranging telephone interview. The brief online video was not Nye’s first foray into the combustible debate, but “it’s the first time it’s gotten to be such a big deal.” “I can see where one gets so caught up in this (debate) that you say something that will galvanize people in a bad way, that will make them hate you forever,” he said. “But I emphasize that I’m not questioning someone’s religion — much of that is how you were brought up.” In the video he tells adults they

can dismiss evolution, “but don’t make your kids do it. Because we need them.” Posted by Big Think, an online knowledge forum, the clip went viral and has 4.6 million views on YouTube. It has garnered 189,000 comments from critics and supporters. It drew the ire of the creationism group Answers in Genesis, which built a biblically based Creation Museum in Kentucky that teaches the stories of the Old Testament and has attracted headlines for its assertion that dinosaurs roamed alongside Adam and Eve. The group produced a response video featuring two scientists who say the Bible has the true account of Earth’s origins, and that “children should be exposed to both ideas concerning our past.”

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bill Nye, host of television’s “Bill Nye the Science Guy,” arrives as President Barack Obama hosts a White House science fair in Washington on Oct. 18, 2010. Nye recently waded into the evolution debate with an online video urging parents not to pass their creationist ideas on to their children.


4A Tuesday September 25, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

POLITICAL CARTOON

Editorial

Meaning lost in Gangnam Style craze

DANE GEORGES THE DAILY ILLINI

Focus should be on election’s real issues, not tax returns or birth certificates

RENÉE WUNDERLICH

I

t’s time to stop asking for Mitt Romney’s tax returns. The dogged, single-minded pursuit of Romney’s tax history by individuals demanding the returns, like Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, has contributed to the drowning out of this election’s real issues and is reminiscent of the clamor for Barack Obama’s birth certificate. As of Friday, Romney has released two years of his tax returns, while Obama has released the last 12 years. The IRS cannot legally release any information regarding a taxpayer’s returns, but since the ‘70s, beginning with Nixon and Carter, presidents have released their own returns. Releasing traditionally private information like tax returns — or even a birth certificate — has simply become a part of becoming a public official. The problem with controversies such as these is that they are never truly resolved; rather, they amplify the predetermined assumptions of the most negative and extreme factions of our political system. Romney’s taxes have become a lure that has trapped Romney and the public alike from more important issues and has made an already-negative election even worse. For example, the interest in Obama’s nationality was, at one time, a defensible investigation into the legality of his candidacy and presidency. But the unceasing requests for his birth certificate became a rallying cry for those were already invested in portraying the president as radical, socialist and essentially un-American. In the case of Romney’s tax history, the details within those returns could arguably shed light on the financial dealings of a candidate who has long used his business experience as a selling point. However, his privileged upbringing and personal wealth have fueled the opposition narrative that Romney is an elitist who thinks of himself high above regular citizens. Romney is in a double bind: Releasing more tax forms would only draw more attention to his personal finances; if he doesn’t, his lack of transparency instead would seemingly justify the suspicions of those, like Reid, who think that Romney has somehow evaded his fair share of the tax burden. When faced with a similar bind, Obama delayed distributing his birth certificate. It was a last resort, a realization that the noise generated by birthers was more damaging than the image of the president caving to such pressure. But with the release of his last two years of returns, we must now investigate the motives for demanding more. Even if we had these returns, would they show anything more than a businessman who, along with numerous others, benefitted from the U.S.’s investor-friendly tax code? Can an honest argument be made that Romney is hiding something more than financial documentation of his family’s wealthy lifestyle? Romney is a wealthy man who makes his money from sources mostly unobtainable to the average American. To no one’s surprise, that is what his tax forms show. Beyond financial matters, Romney has done little to endear himself to those in the middle and working class, and the release of a secretly-taped fundraising speech, along with past gaffes, have not eased Romney’s struggle to “reintroduce” himself to the voters. In the end, we should keep in mind that the birther movement levied a much more serious charge against Obama than the one Romney now faces from those interested in his tax history. However, the effects of these political manhunts are same: Narratives and ideology become the central actors of the election instead of the issues. It turns the election from one between two candidates into outlandish combat between a collection of assumptions, character flaws, inferences and stereotypes. As for Romney, whether he releases the rest of his taxes or keeps them to himself, his next move should be to present us with a more detailed economic plan backed up by data, health care reform policies and other planned legislation.

Opinions columnist

T

of it to the church, but only claimed a deduction for $2.25 million from donations, according to the campaign. That means the Romney family voluntarily paid a higher tax rate than they were legally required, which the campaign said they did to stay consistent with Romney’s pledge to never pay less than a 13 percent tax rate. No matter what he does he just cannot win. He gives millions of dollars back to the church. If it was anyone but Romney, they would be getting Good Samaritan articles in the paper, not criticism. So let’s say hypothetically Romney paid a 26 percent tax rate. Wouldn’t you be wondering why he paid almost double what he had to? It would be considered a scummy campaign move, an attempt to buy the voters. People are never quite satisfied. Considering his large contribution to charity I would hardily call him greedy when his donations double that of President Obama’s donations. According to the Washington Times, the Romney family gave almost 14 percent of their adjusted gross income to charity while the Obama family only gave 7 percent. Sure Mitt got himself in a bind when saying he would not pay more than he had too and simultaneously pledging to never pay less than a 13 percent effective tax rate. But if you’re mad that he paid more than he had to in taxes and kept his pledge to the people, then you’re probably just grasping at straws. I’d love for the political conversation to get into bigger issues, but it looks like tax returns take the cake in the news world this week.

he chorus played for under a minute at this weekend’s football game against Louisiana Tech, but it got more crowd feedback than the Illini’s few meager touchdowns. And unless you’ve been on a social media cleanse for the past three months, you’ve probably seen the viral YouTube video. But is our American take on an international craze at the expense of a cultural image? Maybe I’m a little late to the party when it comes to the 34-year-old rap artist PSY’s Gangnam Style, but it was the first thing I saw when I opened my laptop after nearly two months of being out of the country with limited Internet access. Nothing says welcome back to America like an adorable Korean man in a baby blue tuxedo jacket gyrating around every form of public transportation. Seriously — he’s on a boat, in a subway, in a basement garage ... the dude is everywhere for no apparent reason at all. (Sorry, I almost forgot the stables, the sauna, a crosswalk and a playground.) My first reaction was probably not unlike many who sat through the four minutes and 13 seconds of “Oppa Gangnam Style.” What the heck did I just watch? I’m curious, what is it about K-pop now that everyone loves? I also wondered just how many calories I could burn doing that sideways double-step. I seriously think it’s the first dance in a while to catch on in America that requires more than acting like a semi-animated Jell-O mold; I never did catch on to the Bernie, the Wobble or even the coveted Dougie. Now we have a dance named not after a guy or teetering motion, but an actual “culture.” Gangnam is a very wealthy territory in Seoul, South Korea, kind of like the Beverly Hills of the country, known for its conspicuous consumption of most recently, coffee. In the English translation of PSY’s “Gangnam Style,” the lyrics, “A guy who one-shots his coffee before it even cools down” reportedly refers to how coffee shops are the place to see and be seen in Gangnam. The song is indeed a parody of material wealth, ultra-delicate women and the social status associated with those two. That’s pretty deep for a neon-coated pop song that animates the global masses. It turns out that there is already a fair amount written on what it means to have “Gangnam Style.” American journalists pounced on the “real meaning of Gangnam Style,” explaining the satire and symbolism of the horse-riding elite and fitness-crazed females. But no one wonders why Americans are so entranced by it. That’s because, as a nation of immigrants, we like foreign things. Hotdogs are the food of our country’s pastime, and those originate from Germany. Neckties, associated with Western wear as an essential part of the white collar uniform, are originally from Croatia. The Portuguese song Nossa Nossa topped the charts this summer, though not quite beating out “Call Me Maybe,” which is the work of a Canadian. But I digress. Break down the English translation of PSY’s “Oppa Gangnam Style” lyrics, and you get the insight of a man who is not of Gangnam. He sings about being “A guy who has bulging ideas rather than muscles” who searches for “A girl who covers herself but is more sexy than a girl who bares it all — a sensible girl like that.” What a nice message for humanity. Too bad it’s lost not in translation, but in the visual overload of punky camera angles and sidestepping choreography. We don’t like the song because of what it stands for. We like it because it’s simple, “exotic,” and downright catchy. We don’t know what we’re lipsynching, and we’re O.K. with it. The only English words in the whole song are “Hey, sexy lady,” and that phrase is pretty well recognized globally at this point. On an interview on The Ellen DeGeneres Show where PSY instructed Ellen DeGeneres and Britney Spears on the ways of Gangnam Style, he said, “(the) mindset of this dance is dress classy and dance cheesy.” My god, this man speaks to our generation! Isn’t that what we all want? To dress to the nines and party like idiots? Walk down Green Street after 10 p.m., and you’ll have your answer — you may already be there, riding your very own invisible horse, on your way to pay cover. So will I go to the Gangnam Style bar crawl? Maybe. Does Gangnam Style objectify an aspect of South Korean culture? Absolutely — PSY intended it to. Did I master the dance? You bet your sequin-studded booty shorts I did.

Brian is a junior in Media. He can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Renée is a senior in Media. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Wealth inequality hurts US as a whole SARAH FISCHER Opinions columnist

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t’s finally happened. Mitt Romney released another round of tax returns. Now the partisan pouting can begin all over again. Mitt Romney’s released tax returns from 2011 inform the American people of what he made, how he made it and how much of it he paid back to the United States. They tell us that he made upwards of $13 million and paid roughly 14 percent. They tell us that he donated $4 million to charity and claimed $2.25 million in deductions. And that’s all fairly boring. We should not care about what Mitt Romney paid in taxes. We should care about what his taxes and his tax rate tell us about the situation in the United States. Let’s look at how taxes work currently. Federal income tax operates on a bracket system: the more you make, the more you are taxed on income that falls in that higher bracket. If, for example, you make $1.01 million dollars, you would pay a higher rate on that $0.01 million than on the million before it. Look at Romney’s most recent admission. The 2011 tax rate for wages ranges from 10 to 35 percent. Romney, who filed jointly with his wife, would, like all Americans, pay 10 percent on all wage income less than or equal to $16,700, and would pay 35 percent on all wage income over $372,950. Looking over the tax returns, the Romneys leave blank “Wages, salaries, tips, etc.” essentially

nullifying this marginal tax rate. Instead, the Romneys paid a rate of just below 15 percent. This is all perfectly legal because most of Romney’s income comes from investment profits, dividends and interest, rather than a salary. This income, “capital gains,” is taxed at a lower rate. And it’s this flat rate that contributes to the massive wealth inequality in the United States. Today, the richest 300,000 Americans make almost as much as the bottom 150 million Americans. In 2010, Professor Michael Norton of the Harvard Business School told NPR that the top 20 percent of the nation held roughly 85 percent of its wealth while the bottom 40 percent of Americans had virtually zero wealth. Contributing to that is the fact that from 1980 to 2008, incomes of the bottom 90 percent of American rose only 1 percent (an average of about $303) — whereas the top 0.01 percent of Americans saw an increase of $21.9 million dollars, a 403 percent increase. Wealth inequality in the United States is painfully obvious. When compared to nations like Denmark and Sweden, which have a more egalitarian wealth distribution, we are about 30 percent more unequal. Even if we compare current wealth inequality to historical wealth inequality in the United States, it’s not an attractive comparison. Before the sharp global economic downturn in 2008, inequality levels were close to what they were before the stock market crash of 1929. The one that led to The Great Depression. We talk about the “American Dream”, about the United States being the “Land of Opportunity” and about

how it’s possible for any kid to become the president or a CEO or whatever else their dreams may be. With wealth inequality the way it is now, that is not the case. We are relegating those with unfortunate situations to remain stuck in those situations because we do not provide them the means to get out — regardless of how smart they are or how hard they work. While there is no panacea for wealth inequality in the U.S. — it’s been building for years. It can’t be fixed in one law or motion from Congress — implementing a tax system that is actually progressive would make a good start. The marginal system in place now, although “progressive” in name, does not provide the benefits to the U.S. economy that a truly progressive tax would. Because the current system does not judge all forms of income uniformly, it makes a system that could help decrease the wealth gap to something essentially negligible. The argument that billionaires and millionaires work harder for their money is absurd. Mitt Romney’s money is making money while he releases his tax returns. Bill Gates’ money is making money while he sits on his couch. The idea that they should pay a lower tax rate than the majority of Americans is absurd. And more than that, it hurts the United States as a whole. It limits social mobility, stifles economic growth and only makes the problem worse — and more difficult to fix — the longer it is allowed to continue.

Sarah is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Romney unfairly chastised for tax returns BRIAN SIEGEL Opinions columnist

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ll of presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s critics have gotten what they wanted — his tax returns. Line up boys and girls. Here is your opportunity to paint him as a greedy elitist. But first let me tell you why you’re wrong. There are essentially two schools of thought in the criticism of Romney’s tax returns. The first is that his low effective tax rate is a demonstration of an unfair tax code. And the second is that he manipulated his most recent tax release as a political ploy in order to pay more than he had to into the federal government. This manipulation would raise his effective tax rate from roughly 10 percent to his current 14 percent. A 10 percent rate would turn even more voters off to the Romney 2012 Campaign. Romney paid $1.9 million in taxes on his almost $14 million in income in 2011. Most of his money is from investments that are taxed at a much lower capital gains tax. President Obama wants to raise taxes on wealthy Americans such as Romney with what he calls the “Buffet Rule,” named affectionately after Warren Buffet. This would create a higher tax on capital gains, which would likely curtail economic growth, not stimulate it. A study conducted by the CATO Institute shows that a high capital gains tax is economically inefficient because it cuts entrepreneurship and investment. With less disposable

income, people are likely to take fewer financial risks. This effects the entire country. Higher economic growth will cut poverty more than any government entitlement program. It may seem like an unfair tax code, but it is sound economic policy to limit the taxation on investments. It is not necessarily that the money directly goes into the pockets of middle class Americans, but the investments spur a stronger, healthier economy — and that is something from which everyone can reap the benefits. I find it strange that we would chastise someone for paying the legally required amount of taxes. Another opinion comes from Obama’s campaign manager David Axelrod, who put Romney on blast this Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” for not claiming all of his tax refund for his charitable contributions. “Two months ago, on your own air, he said that anybody who didn’t take the deductions they were owed wasn’t qualified to be president,” Axelrod said. “Well, I guess he’s not qualified, because that’s exactly what he did last week to try and get his number up from 9 or 10 percent to 14 percent.” You can’t have it both ways. Let me get this straight, we are supposed to be mad that he didn’t claim all of his refund for the charitable contributions he made? I almost feel bad for Romney. He’s damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t. God forbid he takes his full tax break and his effective tax rate dips below 10 percent — it would be political suicide. Romney had pledged earlier in his political career that he would never pay less than 13 percent. The Romney family donated around $4 million to charity, a good portion


Edited by Will Shortz

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

No. 0821 5A

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

NEW69 YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across 39 Zales or Ones before 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Tiffany’s? whom pearls are 1 Gossip ACROSS cast 43 Middling noble 5 David Bowie’s 14 15 16 1 Gossip rank 70 Hornets’ home rock genre,   5 David Bowie’s rock genre, informally 18 19 44 Early 71 Deep black gem 17 informally Westinghouse 9 Old Indian ruler   9 Old Indian ruler 20 21 22 23 collaborator 14 Fit Down 14 Fit 45 Silent ___ 15 Excellent, in modern 1 Applies with slang a 15 Excellent, in 24 25 26 27 28 (Coolidge 16 AfricanQ-Tip, virus say modern slang 17 Samuel Adams or Corona nickname) 29 30 31 2 “Yeah, sure …” 16 African virus for arithmetic 46a“That feels them on how to start a business child travels in rocket, sees 18 Magazine 3 Retirement attire 17 Samuel Adams lovers? goo-oo-ood!” from scratch,” Mathai said. the planets and moons and is 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 orinCorona 4 Usherinformally in with “Most of the students coming tested on their and 20 Momentum, 49 counting Oscar-winning 22 [as written] fanfare 18expeMagazine came in cold, without any arithmetic skills. director of “The 39 40 41 42 23 Want letters econ. for arithmetic rience. 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Lost Points offers social and entrepreneurial skills BY MOHAMED ELRAKHAWY STAFF WRITER

In this weak economy, job offers are hard to come by. Many students arrive senior year without knowing where to apply, whether they have the skills needed to enter the workforce right away or how to go through the job search. Fortunately, one local business made it its mission to help. Lost Points, a software development consulting business, helps students gain skills in the technology industry while giving back to the community. The company offers internships for students looking to gain social entrepreneurship skills and work on community focused projects. “We came up with this idea to help address a couple problems in our community,” said Kerris Lee, partner at the firm. “One being student retention: A lot of people come to U of I to be educated and they leave to work somewhere else (outside of Champaign-Urbana). In addition to that, we wanted to give students a chance to not only look for a job but to create one.” The project is aimed at teaching skills that the University doesn’t emphasize, like behavioral and social interaction in a business, according to Lee. He pointed out that it gives students an opportunity to learn from the best teachers and become great businessmen or computer scientists in a group-oriented setting. Shiren Mathai, another partner at the firm, emphasized training with a business mindset. “We were trying to educate

company, to work on the software. In the space scenario, the

Mohamed can be reached at elrakha1@dailyillini.com.

Country music a part of Chicago’s hidden night life

DOONESBURY

BEARDO

GARRY TRUDEAU

DAN DOUGHERTY

LINDSEY TANNER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Hoyle Brothers band performing during Honky Tonk Happy Hour at Chicago’s Empty Bottle tavern on August 28. The gig is part of the city’s hidden country music scene. BY LINDSEY TANNER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Open the scruffy front door of a drablooking corner tavern in Chicago on Friday evenings and suddenly you’re in Texas, greeted by the rowdy twang of a genuine honky tonk band. Cowboy-booted couples of all ages two-step around the dimly lit scuffed wooden dance floor to the likes of Willie Nelson, Hank Williams or one of the band’s own drinking songs. “If I’m Not Drunk, I’m Not Drinking Today”, a crowd favorite. In a city better known for the rarified sounds of a world-class symphony and legendary jazz and blues, there’s a lively but almost hidden country music scene in Chicago. This isn’t the Nashville top 40 or overproduced pablum that you hear on commercial radio, or pay top-dollar to see in cavernous arenas. It’s more old-timey country music, from honky-tonk to Rockabilly and Western Swing, and it’s being resurrected by talented local bands like the five-man Hoyle Brothers, in otherwise nondescript venues like the Empty Bottle on Chicago’s Western Avenue. The Hoyles, not really brothers, have been playing at the Empty Bottle for 10 years, the last five or so with Texas-

APTELLO FROM PAGE 6A dent at the University, Wilson said he appreciates this kind of atmosphere. The 2007 graduate of Eastern Illinois University was an education major, but found Aptello to be an ideal combination of his interest in business and his education background. “I’ve always loved business,

born lead singer, songwriter and acoustic guitarist Trevor McSpadden, a handsome young crooner whose deep mellow voice sounds made for the old tunes. “I was surprised people were into it up here,” McSpadden said before a recent gig. The band regularly attracts a good mix of tattooed hipsters, middle-aged professionals and gray-haired suburbanites, all drawn to the down-home sound. The Bottle, on the edge of an old Ukrainian neighborhood, is better known for avant-garde late night bands, but the stalwart honky-tonk crowd has become a Friday night staple — McSpadden calls it almost like a weekly family reunion. “Chicago is a host to a number of different types of music, and it’s there for the taking and it’s there if you look for it,” said the Empty Bottle’s selfdescribed “head cheese,” Bruce Finkelman. On a recent Friday, a visitor from Naperville, walked into the Bottle for the first time and commented, beaming, ‘Wow, you could walk right by this place and never know it existed.” Same goes for Simon’s, a divey tavern in trendy Andersonville five miles to the north, where you’ll find another band popular among Chicago’s country cognoscenti, the Western

Elstons. Every other Wednesday night, they play a brand of Western swing so smooth and catchy that dancers somehow find room to twirl in the bar’s narrow aisle. A few blocks to the south, on a more working-class stretch of Clark Street, you could easily miss 40-year-old Carol’s Pub, the granny of the city’s country music scene. A little worn at the edges, Carol’s still serves up pitchers of PBR and live country music four nights a week. The Hideout is another hidden music gem, tucked away on an almost abandoned-looking side street in an old factory neighborhood northwest of downtown. A homey tavern with a back-room hall that resembles a North Woods rec room, the Hideout features an eclectic blend of live bands several nights a week including local songwriter-guitarist Robbie Fulks, whose schticks include hillbilly country and bluegrass. Neko Case has played there; so have the Waco Brothers and local honky-tonk favorite, the Lawrence Peters Outfit. The California Clipper features music and dancing Friday and Saturday nights in a 1930s-cocktail-lounge setting; good bets are local rockabilly or honky-tonk acts including The Possum Hollow Boys, Cropduster and the Black Willoughbys.

but I also had the passion to educate people, to teach people and to lead people,” Wilson said. “And I think that’s why I’m a great fit in what I’m doing.” That’s why three years after Friedl called on Wilson for temporary help with the business elements of his company, Wilson is still on board and working full time to develop Aptello into Friedl’s and the rest of the team’s ultimate vision. “I see Aptello becoming a

platform for all different types of services,” he said. “We knew education, and that’s why we started with that, but we don’t necessarily want to be just education. If you need legal, medical or any kind of advice, and you need it right away or want to get consult from the comfort of the home, Aptello will be able to offer it to you.”

Maggie can be reached at oconno36@dailyillini.com.

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Business Technology

Prepping for the workplace Local software company Lost Points prepares students for the group-oriented tech industry through interactive projects and partnerships with C-U businesses. Find out more on page 5A.

6A | Tuesday, September 25, 2012 | www.DailyIllini.com

BOW WOW

PHOTOS BY EMILY OGDEN THE DAILY ILLINI

BBQ

Black Dog Smoke & Ale House combines BBQ & beer for welcoming atmosphere BY HALEY JONES STAFF WRITER

A

name that bites, barbecue sauce that kicks, and meat that is smoked: Black Dog Smoke & Ale House is a little rough around the edges and a well-known restaurant in the ChampaignUrbana area. The smokehouse opened in February of 2009 and has increased its clientele as the months continue to roll by. Mike Cochran and Pedro Heller co-own the restaurant, which received its name from Cochran’s dogs. “My wife and I have two black dogs, Oscar and Lola, and we were taking them to a dog trainer and they began to call us Team Black,” Cochran said. “One day she told us how medium-sized black dogs, like ours, were the last ones to be adopted from The Humane Society. We liked the idea of our restaurant being named Black Dog and it also sounded like a pub name.”

Around town this Black Dog seems to be anything but the last one picked. The smoke house is located off campus on North Broadway Avenue in Urbana. You may miss the restaurant as you drive by, but you will not miss the line to get in from the time it opens. “We open the doors at 11 (a.m.) and fill the room and the restaurant stays that way pretty much until we close,” Cochran said. With the heavy traffic of people, Black Dog goes through a lot of food. One of the most popular items ordered is the beef brisket. Before the brisket is put out on the table, it has quite a long journey. The kitchen starts the night before at 8 p.m. by cooking the brisket in a smoker, which can hold up to 600 pounds of meat. The beef is left for 12 hours to ensure it is slow cooked and has a very smoky flavor. After it is removed, it needs some barbecue

sauce to accompany it. The restaurant’s seven different kinds of barbecue sauces are made completely from scratch. The most popular are the Georgia Peach, which is sweet and mild, and the Carolina Red, which is medium heat with black pepper and vinegar spices. After the barbecue sauce is added, it is time for the sandwich to come together. “We serve our sandwich, what we call Carolina style, with the barbecue sauce and coleslaw right on top,” Cochran said. Popular cohorts of the beef brisket are sweet potato fries and a cold brew to wash it down. Black Dog makes sure to represent the Midwest in their restaurant as well. They get most of their beer from breweries in Illinois and some from Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. The bar actually takes up half of the restauran,t so it is a large part of the atmosphere.

The other half is filled with booths that are more group-oriented. These elements make the atmosphere a mix between a barbecue restaurant and a neighborhood bar. A diverse group of customers matches the restaurant’s diverse setup. “We get everybody, literally we see everybody: students, older people, people from the University, former governors come in,” Cochran said. “We see people who drive a lot farther than I ever thought people would to come here. We just get a great bunch of people.” Whether it is the atmosphere, the beef brisket, or just the smoky smells that hit you as you cross the threshold, the C-U community has spoken: Whatever Black Dog Smoke & Ale House is doing, they are doing it right.

Haley can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.

Online business offers expert guidance to students BY MAGGIE O’CONNOR STAFF WRITER

Andrew Friedl, 2009 alumnus in Engineering, was buried in textbooks and difficult material when he realized that he had a problem even Google couldn’t fi x: there was no trusted, central location for him to fi nd help. For someone whose mind had been geared toward innovation and entrepreneurship since the age of 5, the lack of resources proved to be a moment of clarity. Friedl has spent the past three years developing Aptello, the Web-based business that he calls the “eBay for services.” With the help of the Illinois Launch program, which provides

consulting and a variety of other resources for student entrepreneurs, the business has grown and continues to receive help from EnterpriseWorks. Located in Research Park, the business incubator provides a home base for technology-based start-ups and limits the financial burdens of renting office space and other business costs that would otherwise inhibit the companies’ growth. Focused on tutorials and other educational resources, Aptello gives users a place to buy and sell expert guidance through topics like resumé critiques, paper editing, mock interviews, calculus tutoring, and more — all from the comfort of home.

Hanna Zhong, co-founder of Aptello, said that the site’s chief feature is its video conference tool. People can meet in this online conference room, where a whiteboard, documentupload capabilities and live chat allow people to interact and communicate effectively while still maintaining security and convenience. Zhong said that with many other companies that sell services, buyers must negotiate a meeting place, consider the safety of meeting a stranger and discuss prices. Aptello is intended to eliminate these concerns because it allows users to seek services as they need

them instead of having to schedule far in advance. Currently, a .edu email address and payment using a token system are required to participate online. A user will purchase a minimum of $10 worth of tokens through Aptello, and as they use services, charges will be deducted from their tokens. Aptello profits with a 10 percent service fee from the sellers, who can then also use their profits to buy services from other sellers, Friedl said. Students can access around 400 services posted from sellers at Loyola University, the University of Illinois-Chicago and Urbana-Champaign, North-

western University, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis University and the University of Chicago. Greg Wilson , business development lead and Friedl’s cousin, said the online conference rooms have attracted various student organizations that signed up to use Aptello instead of in-person meetings. It limits the difficulty of fi nding a mutually convenient meeting time and allows for the same kind of information exchange, he said. In recent months, Aptello has experienced increased traction, in large part due to two newlyhired M.B.A students who focus on the development of market-

ing and promoting among faculty and students, Friedl said. The company is separated into business and technology departments, but the unifi ed feel of the company has been essential to its success so far, Wilson said. Any time interviews are conducted, the 14 people currently on the staff are encouraged to participate in the decision process because the close-knit nature of the company requires that everyone works well together, he said. As the only member of the team who has never been a stu-

See APTELLO, Page 5A


1B Tuesday September 25, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

SCHEELHAASE STILL STARTING “I think both quarterbacks are capable, but Nathan Scheelhaase is our starting quarterback.” TIM BECKMAN,

Head coach

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Nathan Scheelhaase prepares to pass against Louisiana Tech at Memorial Stadium on Saturday. Scheelhaase was taken out in the first quarter after looking rusty, but head coach Tim Beckman reaffirmed his place as a starter Monday.

Beckman careful not to cause injury, will watch starter play during practice BY JAMAL COLLIER

I

STAFF WRITER

llinois head coach Tim Beckman ended any speculation of a starting quarterback controversy or ideas about a two-quarterback system with the simple statement, “Nathan Scheelhaase is our starting quarterback.” He said it not once but twice during his weekly press conference Monday, the second time more emphatically. Beckman said Scheelhaase suffered a big hit during the first offensive play of Saturday’s 52-24 loss against Louisiana Tech. Beckman worried about his quarterback after two defenders hit Scheelhaase — one high and the other low. Scheelhaase stayed in

the game, but after the fumble, Beckman made the decision to pull him. “I was a little concerned, being a coach and being a guy that I hope is like a father,” Beckman said. “I want to make sure that everybody’s 100 percent.” Assuming Scheelhaase is healthy and practices Tuesday and Wednesday, he is set to start against Penn State. The statement comes as no surprise for Scheelhaase, who said he and Beckman have talked about it. “I think Coach Beckman made the decision erring on the side on caution,” Scheelhaase said. “And it’s something you deal with as a player and move forward. “There’s been a dramatic difference every week-

end. Honestly, when we had our lift and run (Sunday), it’s felt as good as it’s felt.” But because of the unpredictable nature of ankle sprains, Beckman wants to remain careful. He dismissed that Scheelhaase was hesitant to run during the first quarter because of his ankle. The Illini wanted to establish the passing attack first with their running backs and try and get the ball to wide receiver Ryan Lankford before allowing Scheelhaase to run later in the game. “I want to see what happens Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday,” he said. “As I mentioned, I think both quarterbacks are capable, but Nathan Scheelhaase is our starting quarterback.”

Bulletin board material Penn State hasn’t forgotten about the Illinois head coaches that traveled to State College, Pa., to meet with Penn State players about transferring, whether the coaches were on campus. Beckman didn’t back down or express any regrets about his actions this

summer, and he reiterated that Illinois was contacted first. “This game was developed for opportunity,” he said. “If (Penn State players) come to us and say they would like that opportunity to speak to us, I think that’s what college football’s about. I regret that it ended up being this much and it’s still talked about, but it did give a young man his opportunity.” Offensive lineman Ryan Nowicki transferred to Illinois after the NCAA levied sanctions against the Nittany Lions. Penn State head coach Bill O’Brien said at Big Ten Media Days in July that he was not contacted by anyone from Illinois about meeting with his players. Beckman said he talked to O’Brien in Chicago about the issue but didn’t give a further explanation. He only said he hoped things had been worked out between them. “This game’s about the players and playing it out on the field, and I know they’ll be prepared,” Beck-

See FOOTBALL, Page 4B

OUT OF BOUNDS

Sports reporters root for the good story, not a specific team EMILY BAYCI Sports columnist

It

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois head coach Kevin Hambly speaks to the team during the match against Minnesota at Huff Hall on Friday.

Volleyball comes out of weekend No. 21 Illini struggle against Gophers, defeat Badgers for 1st conference victory BY ELIOT SILL STAFF WRITER

Minnesota came to Huff Hall and swept the Illini volleyball team in three sets on Friday. This experience was not totally new for the returning players. Illinois (7-5, 1-1 Big Ten) suffered a 3-0 home loss to Minnesota last year that served as its worst performance of the season. This year, though the result was the same, the effect was not a low point as much as it was a message to a young team of what Big Ten play is like. “They are the quintessential Big Ten team,” middle blocker Anna Dorn said of Minnesota. “They’re big and physi-

cal, they’re gonna do a lot of things that we haven’t necessarily seen because they’re so big. They can hit over us and around us and all that stuff. ... I think it was a good way for us to start out (the conference season) just because it would be a good test for us.” Illinois head coach Kevin Hambly said he thought the team came out and played passively until late in the third set, during which time Illinois made a 7-3 run before losing the match. “We were just very tense, very tight (in the first set) and our attacks, we were just hitting these roll shots and not attacking Minnesota at all,” Hambly said Friday. “We had 10 errors, we

Big Ten Standings No. 1 Penn State 2-0 (12-1 overall) No. 10 Minnesota 2-0 (11-2) No. 13 Purdue 2-0 (11-2)* No. 6 Nebraska 1-1 (9-2) No. 21 Illinois 1-1 (7-5) No. 22 Ohio State 1-1 (10-4) No. 24 Michigan State 1-1 (13-1) Wisconsin 1-1 (13-2) Northwestern 0-2 (11-2) Indiana 0-2 (8-6)* Iowa 0-2 (8-7) *- Illinois’ opponents this weekend gave them a lot of points on very, very passive errors. You expect to come out and fight and attack a team ... and we didn’t start really attacking them until that third set.”

See VOLLEYBALL, Page 4B

was a tumultuous weekend for Illini sports, with the lows outweighing the highs. I was “fortunate” enough to be present for two of the lowest lows: when volleyball was swept by Minnesota on Friday night and the embarrassment of a football game the next night. I wrote Illinois off as losing halfway through each event. Most everybody with a brain probably did that, but it was uncharacteristic for me. I’m usually what my friends call “unrealistically optimistic,” and I constantly recite the cliche, “It’s not over until it’s over.” Losing faith last weekend made me come to an upsetting personal realization. I am no longer a sports fan. Thanks to my five or so years of sports reporting, the fan has been completely sucked from of my soul. The days of having my face painted bright blue, holding a giant foam finger and screaming obnoxiously are long behind me. I still care about sports more than the average person, I still follow my favorite teams with a religious devotion and my moods still revolve around how said team performed, but I can never call myself a typical sports fan. No honest sports reporter can truly do that. It starts with all the time spent in the press box. You’re not allowed to cheer there. But this rule apparently only exists in the United States. If you cheer in the press box here, I’m pretty sure you’ll get kicked out, or

at least receive the death stare from about 30 people, which I’ve gotten repeatedly, just for talking too loud in the press box. The years of conditioning myself not to clap, to grit my teeth instead of smiling and to nudge whoever is sitting next to me instead of jumping up for joy have turned me into a silent machine when attending an event as a fan. I always second-guess myself before wearing orange to an event. As an objective student reporter, it’s against the rules to wear school colors while covering events. I kept wondering why people looked at me funny when I was tailgating Saturday with my purple shirt on. Then I realized, oh yeah, I was the elephant in the room. It’s even worse when I’m in the student section. I feel like I’m wearing a giant sticker that screams, “SHE’S NOT SUPPOSED TO BE HERE.” In all reality, no one has any idea that I’m out of place because I look completely normal. But I feel like an alien sitting there because I don’t know any of the cheers and have no desire to be standing for the entire game. I’m also analyzing every play more than I should and questioning why decisions were made instead of sitting back and enjoying the game. When people ask their friends something, I want to answer because I have the inside scoop. Then I remember how I’m here as a fan so I attempt to chill out, typically failing miserably. My non-reporter friends don’t understand my inner struggles. I went to a volleyball game with my friend Sheila a few weeks ago. She thought it was OK to arrive to the game 15 minutes late. Doesn’t she

See BAYCI, Page 4B


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Bears’ receiver gets defensive at former NFL star’s remark Marshall fires back at Sapp in online videos THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JOHN BAZEMORE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Luke Donald, of England, tees off in the Tour Championship golf tournament in Atlanta, Sunday. Donald, who lives in Chicago, will play for Europe in the Ryder Cup.

Ryder Cup to come to Chicago Luke Donald, a Northwestern graduate who lives on the North Side of Chicago, will play for Europe in Ryder Cup BY DOUG FERGUSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEDINAH, Ill. — The Ryder Cup comes to Chicago for the first time, and it’s only fitting that the Windy City can claim one of the players as its own. Luke Donald spent four years at Northwestern, winning an NCAA title and graduating with a degree in art. He married a local girl and never found reason to settle anywhere else. He lives on the North Side and suffers annually with Cubs fans. After the Ryder Cup, he and his wife will pick apples in the country for her birthday. There’s only one catch — Donald is English. The only “hometown” player in this Ryder Cup will be playing for the visiting team. “Unique, isn’t it?” Donald said. This is not the first time for a Ryder Cup held in the United States to include European players who make their primary home in America — Graeme McDowell, Ian Poulter and Justin Rose (Orlando, Fla.), Paul Casey (Scottsdale, Ariz.) and Jesper Parnevik (Jupiter, Fla.) to name a few. But those are seen

as golf communities. Chicago is among the world’s great sports cities, and it’s one of the best golf markets in America. It is expected to be loud at Medinah when the matches begin Friday, and there is little doubt that will give the Americans a big edge in crowd support. So where does that leave Donald? “The way I look at it is the home team has the biggest advantage,” he said. “Just taking away 1 percent of the crowd support, that’s a help to our team. And that’s the way I’m looking at it. But, yeah, it’s kind of odd. I don’t play Medinah that much. I’ve played it twice in the last five weeks or something like that. I don’t really go there that much. Staying in a hotel 20 miles away from where you live is kind of strange, but that’s the way it goes.” Donald will have support from more than just a few friends and family members. Europeans are coming across for the Ryder Cup, too, and you’ll be able to hear them singing around the first tee and belting out that “Ole, ole, ole ole” across the tree-lined

course. But it won’t quite be the same as what Kenny Perry and J.B. Holmes heard at Valhalla in their native Kentucky, the reception Padraig Harrington and the Irish boys received at The K Club, Jose Maria Olazabal at Valderrama or Lee Westwood at The Belfry. Donald is very much English. He just happens to love Chicago, which is why he never left. He first saw the city during a brief recruiting trip in April. Donald got off the plane and saw snow covering the ground. “I was wondering how I was going to play golf in college when it was still a little chilly out,” he said. “That was my first impression. And then my coach took me around to all the courses, just amazing golf courses. I had never seen anything like that coming from England. Also just amazed at college sports in general, just how big everything was. Our stadium was 55,000, and that was considered small in college sports. That’s a big Premier League football stadium in England.” It was at Northwestern that he

met his wife, Diane. They started getting serious right before he turned pro, while she was still a sophomore at Northwestern. That was enough reason to stay, though not the only reason. Most players turn pro and move to Florida, Texas or Arizona. Donald used to stay with friends when he went to Florida in the winter to keep his golf game sharp. Now he has a house in Jupiter and plays out of The Bear’s Club when it turns cold up north. But his main home is Chicago. It’s been that way for years, and probably will be for some time. “I think you become familiar with a place,” Donald said. “I had a lot of friends. My coach, Pat, was probably a big reason, too. I started dating Diane a couple months before I got my tour card, but we met when I was in college. I didn’t really have any reason to go anywhere else, other than the weather. But you always stay where you feel comfortable. And I felt very comfortable in Chicago.” This isn’t the first time Donald is playing a Ryder Cup on American soil. He made his debut at Oakland Hills outside Detroit in 2004 as a captain’s pick, though not many paid attention. He had only one PGA Tour win at

the time — the Southern Farm Bureau Classic — and three wins worldwide. Donald only recently relinquished the No. 1 ranking to Rory McIlroy. Until then, he had been at No. 1 for a total of 56 weeks. Tiger Woods, Greg Norman, Nick Faldo and Seve Ballesteros are the only other players who had been No. 1 longer since the ranking began in 1986. Even now, Donald has an unassuming manner that doesn’t draw much attention. Heads don’t turn when he walks into a restaurant or shows up at an event. Donald remains active with Northwestern, particularly the golf team. He is involved with The First Tee in Chicago, along with the Ronald McDonald house. He and his wife have two young daughters, but still take time to go to restaurants, sports events, arts shows and museums. “We like blending in,” Diane Donald said. “Everything is so easy to get to in Chicago, and it has everything. It’s kind of funny because I felt like I waited my entire life to leave Chicago, and now we have a home in Florida that’s empty half the year. Luke loves being here.” Only at Medinah, he won’t feel entirely at home.

L A K E FOR EST, Ill. — Chicago Bears receiver Brandon Marshall criticized former NFL star Warren Sapp for calling him a “retard” in a radio interview. That struck a chord with Marshall, who has acknowledged receivi ng tre atment for borderline personality disorder and anger management, and he fired back Monday in an online video. “I got a really disturbing heads-up on something Warren Sapp said, called me retarded. That’s really disappointing to hear that from an NFL legend, but I’m going to take this as a lesson, and I think we all can learn from this,” Marshall said in the video posted online. “Be very careful who you take advice from. You want to surround yourself with good people, godly people. When I look at Warren Sapp, I can’t go to him and talk about finances because he filed for bankruptcy. I can’t go to him and talk about my marriage because he filed for divorce. I can’t go to him and talk about being a father because one day I’m going to have children, because he’s not active in his children’s life.” Marshall later posted on Twitter that he received an e-mail from Sapp asking “where and when” and that he assumed he was being challenged to a fight. All that stemmed from an interview with the outspoken Sapp, an NFL Network analyst, on the syndicated “ The Dan Patrick Show.” He was criticizing today’s players in general, saying they have “no relevance for the past, have no conscious of what it is” when he blasted Marshall. “I mean Brandon Marshall talking about Shannon Sharpe ... ‘Who is he to talk?’” Sapp said. “He’s the first 100-catch receiver (tight end) back to back, retard. What you just did in Denver for three years. You don’t know this? Of course he doesn’t.

NAM Y. HUH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall takes a break during NFL football training camp at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Ill.

Jennings, Bears defense proving themselves on field BY ANDREW SELIGMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — If opposing quarterbacks want to challenge him, that’s just fine with Chicago Bears cornerback Tim Jennings. He just hopes they don’t stop. “I want to continue to try to make some plays and make some plays on the ball,” he said Monday. “The most opportunities I can get, hopefully the number can increase.” Jennings was leading the league with four interceptions through Sunday and was one of the bright spots on a defense that’s been sending out reminders lately that it is an effective unit. That group came up big in a 23-6 win over St. Louis, with the line again applying the pressure and the secondary doing its job, while the offense struggled for the second straight week. The Bears were leading the league through Sunday with 14 sacks after taking down Sam Bradford six times, and the defensive backs were making big plays, too. “It’s been a huge impact, as you can see,” Jennings said. “Any time we can create a whole bunch of sacks and get the quarterback a little jittery back there, us in the back end, we’re just able to react quick. It’s not going to be a whole lot of pump fakes, not going to be a whole lot looking around, so as soon as we see the quarterback looking and getting ready to throw it we’re getting ready to break.” The Bears are already nearly halfway toward their sack total from last season, when they tied

for 19th with 33 and ranked 28th overall against the pass. It helped that St. Louis’ offensive line had already been hit hard by injuries, but Chicago also made plays against Andrew Luck and Aaron Rodgers in the first two games against Indianapolis and Green Bay. The Bears’ defensive line has been getting contributions from just about everyone — not only Julius Peppers — with Israel Idonije delivering 2 ½ sacks on Sunday. And in the secondary, safety Major Wright came through with the biggest play when he returned an interception 45 yards for a touchdown to make it a 14-point game in the fourth quarter. It happened when Jennings deflected a short slant intended for Danny Amendola. “They’re consistently getting better,” quarterback Jay Cutler said. “It’s hard because they’re at such a good level. To see them get out there and dominate like that — they’re in complete control of their offense and exactly what was going on. It’s a tough group to go against.” Besides the deflection on Wright’s touchdown, Jennings also had an interception, giving him at least one in all three games. Considering he had just seven interceptions in his first six years and never more than two in a season, that’s a huge improvement. He had trouble hanging onto the ball, and coach Lovie Smith made it clear at the end of the season he needed to work on that. So that’s exactly what Jen-

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears cornerback Tim Jennings (26) reacts after breaking up a pass against the St. Louis Rams in Chicago on Sunday. The Bears won 23-6. nings did, catching about 100 balls a day from the Jugs machine during offseason workouts and training camp. He said it didn’t help, either, that he was dealing with a finger problem last season, and the missed

opportunities added up to a confidence issue, too. “I kind of understood where (Smith) was coming from,” said Jennings, who re-signed with the Bears for two years in March. “I thought I was playing

good football, but I knew I was missing a whole lot of opportunities. I knew if I had another opportunity to get another shot at this in Chicago — which is (where) I really wanted to be, I thought it was a good fit for

me — I just wanted to make the best of it. I made a conscious effort to kind of go back to what I used to do. I really did think I had great hands. Confidence got kind of low. I wanted to get back to the basics.”


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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

FOOTBALL

ing and getting on the field and getting things done.”

FROM PAGE 1B man said. “I know coach O’Brien has done a great job of getting his players prepared and ready.” David Jones of The Patriot-News, located in Harrisburg, Pa., called into Monday’s press conference and said Penn State fans are still “hot about this issue,” and it could possibly be bulletin-board material for Penn State as it prepares for Illinois. Beckman says he’s never been huge on bulletin board material and thinks his team will be ready to match Penn State’s intensity because it’s the start of Big Ten season. “I doubt we’ll be on the field and be talking crap about what went on in July,” Scheelhaase said. “I’m pretty sure they’ll be concerned about what’s going on, on the field and so will we. It’s about prepar-

BAYCI FROM PAGE 1B realize we have to get there 30 minutes early, make sure we’re settled and check that our computers are working? Wait, I guess she’s right. Those important details don’t matter to fans. This lack of time as a spectator results in a bitter hatred toward fans and the actions they engage in, which is really just jealously because I can’t take part in those activities myself. The fans are standing during games, excited to see that last point and you’re not supposed to stand — though sitting throughout a game is undeniably a perk. The fans ruin your perfect view. Then the fans do the wave, and the reporter is not a part of it. And if you’re a sports reporter that likes the wave, that’s just wrong. Next, the fans jump around and do crazy cheers and chants, which ruin your focus and makes it harder for you to hear what is happening in the

FROM PAGE 1B

Stripe the Stadium Fans attending Saturday’s game against Penn State are being asked to “Stripe the Stadium” in orange and blue depending on where their seat is located. Students sitting in the north end zone have it easy: They should all wear orange, as usual. But anyone sitting in an even-numbered sections should wear blue, while anyone in odd-numbered sections should wear orange. It’s the second year the team has had the promotion. However, the Illini will be looking for a different result, as last year’s “Stripe the Stadium” was spoiled when Illinois recorded its first loss of the season against Ohio State.

Jamal can be reached at collie10@dailyillini.com and @JamalCollier.

game. Then there’s the most depressing moment, which I experienced last Saturday: having to drink water while tailgating because you can’t interview athletes with beer on your breath. I love getting to know athletes, but being around the team so much as a reporter ruins your image of it. You learn that athletes you once idolized lack a personality or aren’t the nicest people or don’t deserve to be where they are. You realize that coaches are glorified robots who spout the same PR replies and dodge the truth. And most upsettingly, you uncover the dirty skeletons behind teams and have to report on the heartbreaking drama. Sports reporters are trained to root for the story, not a specific team. Really, you want what is going to be the most fun to write about. That would make for the most interesting dialogue after the game. In all reality, it’s probably more interesting that Illini quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase was benched for his poor perfor-

VOLLEYBALL Illini making it easy for opposing teams

Illinois allowed opponents Minnesota and Wisconsin to hit .375 and .262, respectively over the weekend — both above the Illinois opponents’ season average of .238. After the first week of conference play, Illinois is last in the Big Ten in opponent hitting percentage. “We’ve been like top three (in opponent hitting percentage) the last several years, and ... something we’ve hung our hat on is being a very good defensive team,” Hambly said. “It’s frustrating for us because we have our system, and we’re not executing it. Things are falling apart.” Hambly compared the system to

mance Saturday and Illinois got creamed than if he had played normally and Illinois won another boring football game. Rooting for the story really hit home for me this summer when I wished former Illinois gymnast Paul Ruggeri didn’t make the U.S. Olympic team, after chronicling his story for an entire year. My mom told me to never tell that to anybody. Sorry, mom. I’m writing this for the entire world to read. I’m a human, I wanted the best for Ruggeri, but there were a million stories about athletes accomplishing their Olympic dreams. I wanted to write about someone doing everything he could and then falling short. Even though his tale turned out sad and depressing, it was the better story. I’m sorry. I’m a reporter. It’s not about winning or losing, it’s about a good story.

Emily is a graduate student. She can be reached at bayci1@dailyillini.com. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyBayci.

Syracuse men’s basketball coach Jim Boeheim’s trademark 2-3 zone defense, where the system works unless the people operating it are younger and inexperienced. “Actually, when I watch Boeheim’s zone, it’s kinda how we wanna block, it’s read and react,” Hambly said. “You’ve gotta understand situations, and we give them lots of freedom to make decisions and the decisions they’re making aren’t always on. ... We need to continue to get better.” Illinois also ranks last in the Big Ten in opponent service aces allowed per set and kills allowed per set.

Illini hanging on to Top 25 status Despite losing in three sets to Minnesota, the Illini’s bounce-back win against Wisconsin allowed them to stay

in the Top 25, as they slid just one spot to No. 21 in the American Volleyball Coaches Association poll. Around the Big Ten, Penn State vaulted from No. 4 to No. 1 in the country after toppling No. 3 Nebraska and seeing then-No. 2 USC beat then-No. 1 UCLA and then promptly lose to current No. 2 Oregon in three sets. Nebraska fell from No. 3 to No. 6. Minnesota’s victory over Illinois helped the Golden Gophers rise from No. 12 to No. 10. Purdue’s wins over Michigan and Michigan State helped the Boilermakers rise from No. 17 to No. 13. Ohio State and Michigan State moved up one spot each to Nos. 22 and 24, respectively. Michigan’s loss to Purdue sent them out of the top 25.

Eliot can be reached at sill2@dailyillini.com and @EliotTweet.

ILLINI DRIVE

Volleyball coach, player recap Friday Editor’s note: The following is a partial transcript from an Illini Drive interview with Illinois volleyball assistant coach Dan Conners and senior middle blocker Erin Johnson.

We were saying the same stuff the entire match:“Let’s be aggressive. Let’s attack them.” It was kind of time to put our words in action.

Illini Drive: (Friday’s match was) not the way you guys wanted to see (the Big Ten) start. What are your takeaways from that match?

ID: Coach, Annie (Luhrsen) had a season high in assists. She had 60 on Sunday. Is that kind of a sign that the offense is starting to click and at the same time, the hitting is distributed?

Erin Johnson: I mean, I think we saw that we have to be a lot more aggressive. Big Ten is always. It’s a tough conference. It’s one of the toughest in the country, I think, and every night you have be ready to bring it. And I think we played really passively and I think we have to know that we have to come out more aggressively and attack our opponents.

»

DC: I think the balance in the attack was really nice Sunday. And I think we’re trying to push the tempo a little bit , and I think that’s helping. We’re going a bit faster, getting some people some better situations to attack from. And Annie definitely did a nice job putting the ball in a good position for those hitters.

the rest of this interview and the entire episode of the Illini Drive visit www. DailyIllini.com.

» » » » »

that has kind of turned around in the last four to six years since Coach Hambly has been here. ...And I just like his philosophy and the team culture he has here.

ID: Alright E.J., we had you on last year and you said you weren’t a fan of the E.J. Stomp. ... You can tell Spike Squad what you want when you serve or when you score. The floor is yours.

» » » » »

ID: Now you come in here. This is ID: What sparked the run to start your first year as an assistant coach that fifth set (of Sunday’s win against here. What interested you in this job Wisconsin)? when this came open? EJ: I don’t know if there is anyDC: One, it was an up-and-comthing you could pinpoint it on.

More online: To listen to

ing program. It was a program

EJ: I don’t know what I want. I just want them to pick something cooler. Like in E.J. Stomp, where does the stomp come from? ... I appreciate them cheering for me.

Contact Illini Drive at illinidrive@gmail. com and @IlliniDrive.

Illini work to put slow starts behind them BY CHARLIE MANIATES STAFF WRITER

nois in last year’s Big Ten championship game.

It took only 46 seconds for the Illinois soccer team to fall behind First home loss of season No. 11 Penn State. The Illini are hoping to correct Sunday was the Illini’s first their slow start against the Nitta- home loss of the season, dropny Lions on Sunday — when they ping their home record to 4-1-0. allowed three goals in the first This came on the same day as the 18 minutes — before Illinois hits seventh annual Illinois Soccerthe road this weekend to take on Fest, which provided free food Indiana and Purdue in its first two and inflatable attractions for all Big Ten road who attended, games. including soc“ We had cer alumnae. “It hurts, and 19 shots, we we had a lot of (have to) create something (alumnae) out out of that,” here, so it kind of stings a lithead coach Janet Rayfield tle bit because said after the you always loss to Penn want to make State. “Certhem proud,” tainly, I think, senior forward Niki Read said. if you take the NIKI READ, fi rst 20 min“But one part senior forward utes away, the about the Illistats look pretnois program ty even.” is they know how much work we That was the theme of the ear- do put into it, and they understand ly first half Sunday. The Illini felt that sometimes you can’t come they came out flat with not enough away with the result.” energy compared to the Nittany Read said that true fans underLions, who came out looking to stand that losses happen, and the avenge their overtime loss to Illi- team is going to work hard in

“It hurts, and we had a lot of (alumnae) out here, so it kind of stings a little bit because you always want to make them proud.”

practice this week to overcome the loss to Penn State and bring back more wins.

Injuries The weekend did not come and go without a couple of scares. At one point in the second half, junior midfielder Vanessa DiBernardo went down with a leg injury for a few minutes before walking off the field under her own power. After 11 minutes, she returned to the field and played the rest of the match. Freshman midfielder Taylore Peterson, who scored the team’s lone goal of the weekend Friday against Ohio State, sustained a leg injury Sunday to her ankle. Unlike DiBernardo, Peterson did not return to action. Her status is uncertain. “(Peterson) got stuck in an awkward tackle and did something with her ankle,” Rayfield said. “They’ll evaluate and see, and we’ll see how she is (this week).” Senior defender Kristen Gierman went in for Peterson and finished the final 22 minutes of the match.

Charlie can be reached at maniate2@ dailyillini.com.

JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Vanessa DiBernardo tries to beat Penn State’s Kori Chapic during the game at Illinois Soccer Stadium on Sunday. The Nittany Lions’ 4-0 victory caused the Illini to lose at home for the first time this year.

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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 22  

Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2012

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