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Monday, July 30 - Sunday, August 5, 2012 Vol. 141 Issue 162›FREE

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Alma on her way to makeover PAGE 5 SPORTS

Big Ten coaches talk Penn State PAGE 9 OPINIONS

Columnist: My food should not be a political statement

PAGE 8

INSIDE

We a t h e r Pa g e 2 | Po l i ce Pa g e 2 | O p i n i o n s Pa g e 8 | S p o r t s Pa g e 9 | Cl a s s i f i e d s Pa g e s 1 5 -1 6 | S u d o ku Pa g e 1 6 | Co m i c s 1 4


July 30-August 5, 2012

2

FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TUESDAY

Isolated storms with a high of 93 and a low of 69.

Sunny with a high of 95 and a low of 65.

POLICE WEDNESDAY

Mostly sunny with a high of 92 and a low of 67.

The Daily Illini

FRIDAY

Mostly sunny with a high of 89 and a low of 71.

Partly cloudy with a high of 92 and a low of 74.

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CORRECTIONS

Champaign

When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives ! A 18-year-old male was arrested on for accuracy, so if you see a mistake in the pamultiple charges of possession of canna- per, please contact Editor in Chief Samantha bis and operating an uninsured vehicle in Kiesel at 337-8365. the intersection of North State Street and Hill Street around 11:20 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the subject, of Champaign, was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of cannabis. ! A 36-year-old male was arrested on the charge of transporting liquor in a vehicle in the 1100 block of North Prospect Avenue around 8 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the suspect, of Urbana, was sleeping in his vehicle with an open liquor container. ! A burglary was reported in the 200 block of West Springfield Avenue around 11 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect entered the building, a business named Mark of Cain Tattoos, through a window and exited through the back door with two cameras, a knife and three power tools. ! A 24-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges of possession of cannabis, operating an uninsured vehicle and driving with a suspended license in the 1200 block of West Bradley Avenue around 7:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect, of Champaign, was terry stopped under suspicion that he was driving with a suspended license. Suspect was then arrested after search of car revealed possession of cannabis.

Urbana ! Criminal damage to property and an aggravated assault was reported in the 1300 block of Silver Street around 11:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, the offender confronted the victim during which the victim alleged that the offender kicked in his door and attempted to cut him with a knife. The offender was located and denied all accusations. ! A 21-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges of unlawful possession and use of a weapon, aggravated battery and possession of stolen property in the 1200 block of West Hill Street around 2:30 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the victim and offender are related and live together. They got into an argument and the offender, of Urbana, returned a few minutes later with a handgun. Victim stated the offender threatened to shoot him and then hit him in the head with the gun. Offender was found walking nearby and taken to jail. It was later learned that the gun from this incident was stolen from Rolla, Missouri.

ON THE COVER Melissa McCabe The Daily Illini

The Alma Mater, one of the icons of the University of Illinois, will be taken down on Aug. 6, beginning a 10 month restoration project. The statue is scheduled to be finished for the May graduation date of the Class of 2013.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast.

University ! A 23-year-old male was arrested on the charge of burglary from a motor vehicle outside of the Agriculture Engineering Science Building, 1304 West Pennsylvania Avenue in Urbana, around 1 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the suspect, of Savoy, was witnessed by a building employee entering another employee’s vehicle. Police found the suspect in the vicinity of the vehicle in possession of the victim’s

wallet. ! A 22-year-old male was arrested on the charge of cannabis possession in the in the 700 block of South First Street around 5 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, an officer was aware that the suspect, of Champaign, had a warrant and stopped him. He was found to have cannabis.

Compiled by Steven Vazquez.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

July 30-August 5, 2012

3

URBANA HOUSE CATCHES FIRE BY JEFF KIRSHMAN AND CHAD THORNBURG COPY CHIEF AND STAFF WRITER

An Urbana house located on the 400 block of Oregon Street caught fire in the late afternoon Sunday. The owners of the house, Leon and Judith McCulloh, were not home when the incident occurred. The first call was reported by a neighbor to the fire department at 3:47 p.m. Emergency responders arrived on the scene within four minutes, Urbana Fire Marshal Phil Edwards said. No civilians or firefighters were injured. The blue house is still standing, and the original location and cause of the fire are still unknown. Firefighters were still in the process of putting out the fire as of 5 p.m. Sunday, at which time Edwards classified the fire as Second Alarm. Edwards estimated 20-25 firefighters were on the scene. “With the size of the house, the size of the fire when we got here, we immediately went to a second alarm,” Edwards said. “The First Alarm, you would get three engines, then a truck. When you go to a Second Alarm, then you get additional engines, you get an additional command officer and you get all these extra resources that come in. That’s the difference between the first and the second alarm, how big the fire is, how big the building is.” Edwards said a proper estimation of the damage wouldn’t be known until the investigation was complete. “When you think about fire damage, it’s not just what burned, but also what’s damaged by the smoke.” Jeanne Gravy, 66, was watching TV and working on her computer when she saw the entire side of her next-door neighbors’ house engulfed in flames. “I never use this term, and this time it was of prayer: ‘Oh, my God,’” Gravy said. “I’ve never seen a house like that before. ... I called my daughter. She said pack a bag, get the cats in the crate and get ready to vacate.” Another one of the McCulloh’s neighbors, Anne Casey, said the house, which was known around the neighborhood for its aesthetics, had been recently remodeled. “I know them because they have the most beautiful garden in the neighborhood,” said Casey, 57. “Everybody goes over there all the time and tells them how beautiful it is.” A shed located behind a residence across the street from the fire also caught fire, but it was extinguished earlier in the afternoon. “The houses are pretty close here, so there’s a little bit of a challenge there. As far as what’s happening inside, I don’t know what challenge they have inside the house.” Leon McCulloh is a retired math professor from the University.

Alma Mater scheduled to be removed for reconstruction in August BY KYLE MILNAMOW SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

The statue that represents the long-standing tradition of the University will be taking a vacation until next May. The Alma Mater, located on Wright Street next to the Union, will be going under preservation for the next 10 months to fix cracks and also to bring back its original color through the help of lasers. The idea to conserve the statute came about two years ago when the Preservation Working Group, or PWG, conducted a campuswide survey on what needed to be fixed. Around 25 students responded and with the help of the PWG, there was a push to get some work done on the statue. “The Preservation Working Group did a campuswide survey of heritage collections on campus, and we’re looking at outdoor art,” conservation librarian and PWG chair Jennifer Hain Teper said. “Because we were looking and, we have a critical eye, we noticed some signs of deterioration on the Alma Mater that concerned us. Basically when you start seeing visual signs of deterioration, that’s usually a good sign that it’s time to have some professional look at

it before the damage becomes permanent.” Teper, Christa Deacy-Quinn and Melvyn Skvarla, members of the PWG were part of a committee that helped choose a conservator for the Alma Mater. Deacy-Quinn, collections manager at the Spurlock Museum and PWG member, described the process like going to the doctor. The Alma Mater had to be diagnosed and then the process of fixing it could begin. The statue will be taken down on Aug. 6 and then worked on by Conservation of Sculpture and Objects Studio. Though the statue was supposed to be taken down earlier in the summer, the studio that was awarded the job of restoration picked the date that would work best for them based on availability. “We had to select a firm conservation company that could actually take care (of the Alma Mater) and do the proper thing, so we had to evaluate that,” Deacy-Quinn said. This isn’t the first time the Alma Mater has been worked on since it was erected 90 years ago. In 1981, the statute underwent small repairs. Caulk was used to fi ll in some of the cracks, and that was the fi rst time caulk was used on the statue. This time the Alma

Mater will be undergoing full restoration. The conservation fi rm is going to go through and try to fi nd the original color of the Alma Mater. “Lorado Taft, the sculptor for the Alma Mater, he had a particular color in mind,” Deacy-Quinn said. “What happens is, as it has been outside, the piece has been oxidizing. So that’s why the color has been turning. That may not have been the original color that the artist intended, but everybody is used to seeing the sculpture this color.” The project has gotten some of its funding from donations. According to Teper, that isn’t the only place money is coming from. “The Chancellor’s fund was used to pay for this,” Teper said. “They’ve been very supportive of bringing in a conservator to be able to do the work and to fund that through campus funds.” According to Andrew Blacker, who spoke for campus historical preservation officer Skvarla while he is on medical leave, the project will cost approximately $100,000. A big part of the project being delayed was the worry that the Alma Mater would not be up in time for the 2013 graduating class to take pictures in front of. However, in the con-

tract for the preservation, the deadline for the work was scheduled to be done by May. Though it is a later start than some people imagined, that deadline is still on pace to be met. As Deacy-Quinn put it, “what would a graduation be like without the Alma Mater?” To make sure everyone knows what is going on in the project, there will be three seminars hosted through the year to track the progress of the statue. The fi rst will be on Sept. 28 at the Spurlock Museum. The meetings will be opened to not just students and faculty, but anyone who wishes to attend. “The main thing is the preservation working group also is all about educating people about preservation,” Deacy-Quinn said. “What we wanted to do is, the Alma Mater is a beloved piece on campus, and we wanted to keep people updated on that and also get them interested in the preservation process.” As Deacy-Quinn said, fi nding out more about the project may ease the pain that some people may have when the statue is gone. “Everyone is really interested in the Alma Mater, and if she is gone, we need to be talking about it,” Deacy-Quinn said.


July 30-August 5, 2012

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New location, but same White Horse Inn Bar will look to reach new customers with location on campus, serve food BY JEFF KIRSHMAN COPY CHIEF

The White Horse Inn is prepped and ready. The Champaign health department, not so much. White Horse had intentions of reopening at its new location at 510 E. John St., the former location of the bar Fire Station, on Aug. 1, but will have to wait at least two weeks for the health department to review the location. “We put in our paperwork with the health department, but apparently there’s a queue that you have to wait for,” part-owner Daina Mattis said. “We thought we’d be able to get everything done. We’re quite ready — just waiting on them.” Mattis said she anticipates the bar will open before the beginning of the fall semester, but that she would prefer there be a couple of weeks to iron out kinks and prepare the staff. The White Horse had been located at 112 E. Green St., since 1973, but briefly closed under previous ownership in November 2007. Mattis and her husband, Aidas, partowner of the bar and a medical and doctoral student at the University, joined in 2008 and reopened the bar. White Horse closed its kitchen within months of reopening because of its inconvenient location and shut down completely again in February 2010 with intentions of finding a new location. “The food was struggling because we were so far away, so we decided to close down the kitchen and open the bar from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. The model was working for us, actually.” White Horse had its heart set on the central location of 510 E. John

St., but the ownership of Fire Station secured the spot mere weeks ahead of them. After looking at a few more locations, including one near Busey Bank, ownership decided to return to its old location in January 2011 before it could lose its liquor license. Its kitchen doors remained shut. “It was definitely frustrating, but we left the building in great shape so we basically just put those old shoes back on,” Mattis said. Fire Station closed after two years of questionable management. The establishment was legally a restaurant but often promoted itself more like a bar. “They just called one day and said we’re not opening,” said Madeleine Ogrinc, senior in material sciences and engineering and a former Fire Station employee. “Bad management. ... We were one bar that got badly in trouble.” At the end of the year, Mattis said, an establishment needs to present certain business percentages based on its licenses. As a restaurant, Fire Station needed at least 60 MELISSA MCCABE THE DAILY ILLINI percent of its profits to come from food and only a maximum of 40 White Horse Inn has moved to a new location at 510 E. John St. The property was formerly the home of Fire Station, which percent of its business could come closed earlier this summer. The current White Horse location on Green Street closed on July 25, the new bar will not open from alcohol sales. Mattis said she until sometime in August. doesn’t anticipate similar problems at White Horse. burgers everywhere. These sau- pustown people thought we were a Greek presence, while the bars While White Horse isn’t interest- sages are different than anything Townie bar, so we were alienating Murhpy’s and Legends cater to a ed in focusing as much of its atten- else.” both,” Mattis said. “In the heyday, different crowd. tion on its food menu, it is hoping to Mattis said one of the most before downtown Champaign was “What I’ve noticed is that even attract customers with a unique del- appealing aspects of moving White built up, White Horse was the place in places like Clybourne’s and icacy: White Horse will import 12 Horse to its location was that the to go. But once downtown got built Firehaus, during the day they get different kinds of German sausag- bar is how University students will up, people started going downtown. a bunch of graduate students and construction workers and so forth,” es from Continental Gourmet Sau- associate the bar with other bars in We got stuck in no-man’s land.” the “hub of everything.” Still, establishing a demographic Mattis said. “And we’re happy to hit sages, located in Glendale, Calif. “It’s just something different “‘Townies,’ as they call them- of customers doesn’t happen over- that market. ... You want to reach that you can’t really get in Cham- selves, thought that our bar was night. Many bars, such as KAM’S, out to everybody and have somepaign,” Mattis said. “You can get a Campustown bar, and the Cam- Joe’s and Red Lion, have a strong thing to appeal to everybody.”

American Bar Association fines UI law school BY HANNAH MEISEL STAFF WRITER

The University’s College of Law has been fined $250,000 by the American Bar Association, or ABA, as the organization wrapped up its investigation into the college Tuesday. In November 2011, the University and its hired investigative team found that former assistant dean of admissions and financial aid Paul Pless had manipulated student data for eight years in order to make the college appear more selective. In the fall, the ABA launched a concurrent investigation into the situation, the findings of which were not released until Tuesday. Pless is not mentioned by name in the ABA’s full report — only by title. The college as a whole will pay the consequences, including the fine. The college must also hire and pay a compliance monitor for the next two academic years in order to independently keep an eye on student data entry.

Additionally, the ABA has effectively ended the Illinois Law Early Action Program, or iLEAP, which allowed University juniors to apply to the college without having to take the LSAT. Permission for this program was granted by the ABA in June 2009 as a “variance” of Standard 503 in the ABA’s accreditation rules. Standard 503 requires that students seeking entrance to accredited law schools must take the appropriate test, in this case, the LSAT, according to americanbar.org. “The Assistant Dean for Admissions was instrumental in the development and implementation of this plan, and noted that a key objective was to secure the enrollment of students with high undergraduate GPAs, without having to count their LSAT scores, with the resulting benefit from a law school ranking perspective,” the report reads. “The variance was not granted by the Council for this purpose and, had the Council been aware of how it would be used, the variance request would have been denied.”

Forensic analysis of Pless’ computer in the fall revealed emails to colleagues in which he admitted his interest in instituting iLEAP. A now infamous quote stated his main concern lay in the iLEAP students’ high academic performance in undergraduate studies. “I am a maverick and a reformer, so I started a new program for U of I undergrads to apply in their junior year and we don’t require the LSAT,” Pless wrote in an email to a colleague on Oct. 28, 2008. “We have additional essays and an interview instead. That way, I can trap about 20 of the little bastards with high GPAs that count and no LSAT score to count against my median.” In a move similar to the ABA’s censure of Villanova University’s law school last summer, the organization charged the College of Law with both coming up with a report to be distributed to all accredited law schools and publicly displaying the findings of the investigation for at least two years.


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5

July 30-August 5, 2012

Midwest drought propels biofuel research BY NORA IBRAHIM DESIGN EDITOR

Fires, drought and more than 4,000 broken temperature records have made the summer of 2012 particularly noteworthy. But the unshakeable heat has provided the impetus to push research in alternative fuel sources and bioenergy in a different direction. The Department of Energy awarded a $12.1 million grant toward research into drought-tolerant grasses as a sustainable bioenergy source. The five-year project will be headed by the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis in collaboration with the University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, the University of Minnesota and Washington State University. Andrew Leakey, whose lab will be receiving a portion of the funding here at the University, said work has already begun to get the project rolling and its timing was perfect. “There are two real purposes for approving the grant. The fi rst is that the drought is the No. 1 thing globally affecting crops. It’s going to be a real challenge to agriculture for a long time,” Leakey said. “The other element is that in order to provide enough food and fuel for ourselves, we need to make as much use of the land as possible.” The lab will be using a panel of 200 hundred genome types of Setaria viridis, a plant closely related to already prominent bioenergy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and even corn. These grasses are then exposed to wet and dry conditions, and they are assessed for the greatest fertility. Those grass types that are most successful under droughtlike conditions are then screened for the genetic sequences responsible for their tolerance of drought. “If we can identify the genes that make (Setaria) drought tolerant, we can develop other drought tolerant crops (because) those genes are probably present in those other

closely related types of grasses,” Leakey said. The initiation of the project is opening many doors of opportunity for undergraduates interested in research, Leakey added. Stephanie Klein, senior in LAS , is one of Leakey’s undergraduate research assistants who has been heavily involved in the preliminary work that has been done so far, such as laying out the plots for the panels of Setaria and sampling the genetic material. “I think it’ll be interesting to see how different environments change how genes express themselves,” Klein said. “Bioenergy resources are a big talking point in today’s economy and politiTIM VIZER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS cal discourse. So I think my U.S. Congressman John Shimkus, left, speaks on Friday with Luke Timmermann in one of involvement in this project is Timmermann's remaining corn fields at his St. Rose, Illinois dairy farm. He raises the corn as feed for very worthwhile because it’s his dairy operation, and has had to harvest much of it and place it in long-term storage as silage for a part of something so ground the livestock due to the drought. The corn is stunted in size and development due to the drought and, breaking.” despite Timmermann's efforts, to increase size and yield. Undergraduates aspiring to “It’s a two-way street: We have the resources and peowork in the industry or pursue graduate work have been critical resources for carrying out the project, Leakey ple to carry out this research, and the students have this said, and was the reason why the University is one of the wonderful opportunity to be a part of something exciting,” Leakey said. collaborators.

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July 30-August 5, 2012

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Video-gambling ordinance divides council BY JORDAN HUGHES CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Urbana City Council will vote this week on a controversial video-gambling ordinance. The ordinance will decide whether the city of Urbana will allow video-gambling machines in bars and restaurants. On Monday, council members will finally decide where the city stands on this issue. At last week’s meeting, several stipulations of the ordinance were revised. As it currently stands, the ordinance states that businesses that want to have video-gambling machines must pay a $200 licensing fee. These businesses do not have to limit their entry to 21 year olds. The initial proposal was revised so that now 12 licenses will be available to Urbana businesses versus the original six licenses. The state law on this issue is generally regarded as less restrictive than the Urbana law. Last month, the Champaign City Council decided it would not ban video gambling. Staying competitive within the area for Urbana might mean needing to approve this ordinance. But many in the community have a problem with allowing gambling machines in local businesses. The Urbana City Council has taken all of this information into consideration and believes the ordinance is reasonable as it stands. “I support the ordinance as it’s revised because I think it strikes a middle ground between the points of view that we should ban it or it should be restricted,” Alderman Diane Marlin, Ward 7, said. Alderman Charlie Smyth, Ward 1, agreed that the law has

been revised to try to please both proponents and opponents. “I have no problem with the ordinance as it’s revised,” Smyth said. “It’s a more reasonable licensing price from a city point of view.” Smyth and the other aldermen will have the ability to revise the ordinance later in the year should they see fit. “We’re protecting ourselves in a way by limiting the number of licenses that will be granted,” Smyth explained. “But there is the ability to add more licenses.” Not everyone sees the ordinance as being the best solution to the problem. Alderman Robert Lewis, Ward 3, wants people to know the law may have more of an effect on our community than they think. “Some will tell you the statistical impact of video-gambling machines is minimal,” Lewis said. “But I think economic times mean people are more inclined to take a chance and gamble.” Besides being morally against gambling, Lewis thinks the ordinance might have unforeseen consequences. “This might put additional stress on local law enforcement,” Lewis explained. “University students would have more access to gambling, and students shouldn’t be squandering their funds.” Not passing this ordinance, however, might do more harm than help for the city of Urbana. “We’re taking a practical position at this point,” Smyth said. “People will always find a way to gamble if they want to, and it allows Urbana businesses to be on equal footing.” The issue has been compared to that of alcohol prohibi-

tion, namely people will gamble regardless of whether it is a societal cost. The Urbana City Council says that they regard liquor licenses in the same way. “If our business community needs this to be competitive, and it has no real impact on the city. I don’t see any reason why we should stand in the way,” Smyth said. In 2009, the state approved its Video Gaming Act. The act imposed a tax on the net income of each machine and directs a percentage of those revenues to state projects. Some of the aldermen believe the state needs to come up with better ways to raise funds. “Making money off of gambling is a lousy way to fund government,” Smyth said. “In many cases, gambling takes advantage of those with lower incomes.” Smyth explained how those in poverty may be more likely to seek out gambling as a means of desperately trying to find a way out. “We may end up taxing people who may not be in a position to pay,” Smyth said. “Ironically, most of the time it ends up being the lower income people who can’t afford it.” “I think that when this law was signed to raise revenues, it was misguided,” Lewis said. “I think it impacts more people than one could anticipate.” This is a multifaceted issue that will undoubtedly remain controversial. The Urbana City Council will do their best to come up with a solution that keeps everyone’s interests in mind. “We tried to find a balance, something we can live with,” Marlin said. “It won’t make everyone happy, but it strikes middle ground.”

Greeks to showcase new additions next year BY MAGGIE O’CONNOR STAFF WRITER

It may not seem logical to hang the number four on a door in a three-bedroom apartment, but John Lock, 2011 University alumnus and Nabor house fraternity board member, plans to proudly display this remnant of his Nabor house bedroom in his new place. The small keepsake will remind him of the time he spent in the old white home that was demolished earlier this summer. According to Lock, the agricultural fraternity house on Lincoln Avenue held around 30-40 members each year, and the wear and tear on the house was evident. On the second floor, he said, there was even a hallway with curved flooring. “You couldn’t roll a ball down the hallway without it hitting into the wall,” he laughed. For the past seven or eight years, the fraternity board has been working to get plans approved, but the funds for $2 million construction costs were raised in less than a year by an alumni base of about 500. “The fact that we could do that was ... I couldn’t believe it,” Lock said. “Our alumni were really generous.” Part of the fundraising effort was an initiative called “Building with Bushels,” said Jeff Ray, vice president of the Nabor house fraternity board. Keeping with their agricultural tradition, Nabor house accepted livestock or grain donations and sold them, putting the profits toward the new house. Ray said that a significant amount of money was raised through this effort, the brainchild of Bob Stewart, Nabor house fraternity president. The demolition began May 17, according

to the project website, “BuildNaborHouse. com.” The building company, Homeway Homes, constructed the house off-site in 19 pieces and the project is scheduled to be completed by Sept. 15, Lock said. Until the house is ready for members to move in, the plan is in motion for members to live in Illini Towers. Though nothing has been signed yet, Lock said that the fraternity will pay to house as many of the 36 members as it can afford in IT. Figuring out where to house members until the project’s completion is only one of the many details that had to be worked out in the expensive project. The board members are volunteers but have been putting in countless hours to make sure everything runs smoothly. “That’s one of the founding spirits of Nabor House: to work, work hard and work together and so we’ve definitely been doing that through this project,” Ray said. Lock said that members and alumni look forward to having a spacious new facility where members can live comfortably, alumni can attend annual meetings and potential high school recruits can visit. They anticipate that the new house will be helpful in this fall’s recruitment. Nabor House is not the only fraternity undergoing changes this summer. Ashley Dye, director of fraternity and sorority affairs, said that Acacia will be making renovations to the former Phi Mu sorority house before calling it their home in the fall. Their crest and fraternity name are already boldly on display against the white brick exterior of the house.

MELISSA MCCABE THE DAILY ILLINI

The new Nabor fraternity house, on the corner of Lincoln Avenue and Iowa Street, is not scheduled to be completed until Sept. 17. The $2 million project started on May 17, according to the project website, BuildNaborHouse.com. Sigma Kappa sorority also will have a new a ramp on the west side of their house when members return in the fall. Funded by Sigma Kappa’s finance corporation funds, the ramp is part of a Sigma Kappa initiative to ensure that they include everyone, including a current member who uses a wheelchair, said Doris Liestman, Sigma Kappa’s property manager.

“We felt like we wanted our house to be accessible to everyone — both members and grandparents and family that come to our house in wheelchairs,” she said. “And we want everybody to be able to enter and partake.” The project began July 18 and is scheduled to be complete in early August, Liestman said.


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July 30-August 5, 2012

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Campustown businesses await students return Drought, heat present additional challenges during summer months during the school year. Many bars have taken to closing In a summer characterized down early on weeknights. by a drought, it comes as no surAs the amount of drinking on prise that Campustown businesses campus goes down, so does the haven’t exactly been making it rain. amount of late night food cravings. With many businesses trying to Many school-year mainstays, such conserve resources and funds in a as Fat Sandwich, have reduced busitime when two-thirds of the student ness during the summer. population has vacated campus, One late night food stop, Silver there are plenty of white sheets of Mine Subs, has faithfully endured paper taped on doors the tepid busiannouncing summer ness climate, hours or impending remaining renovations. open until 3 “It’s just a mata.m. ever y ter of when peonight — even on nights when ple come out,” said John Acord, a manits neighboring ager at Murphy’s bar and stronPub. “I mean during gest producthat heat spell, a lot er of customers, KAM’S, is of people were stayclosed. Silver ing inside.” Mine, locatAcord said he had no specific knowled on Daniel edge of the pub’s Street, shares the street with financial numbers, Subway, which but said the bar experienced a fairhas closed for PATRICK GRADY, ly slow summer, the summer, a manager for Silver Mine Subs relative to the eight vacant building years he’s worked that formerly there. Acord said the housed the bar bar was inhibited by the lack of suc- C.O. Daniels, Home of Gourmet Chicess from Chicago sports teams. nese Restaurant, which was closed “Last summer it was better into July for renovations, KAM’S, because the Bulls made a deeper the Illinois Union Bookstore and run in the playoffs, and that always Espresso Royale, which truncated helps our business,” he said. “The its hours this year. Bulls obviously had a problem in Why stay open in such an unideal the first round , so that kinda hurts context? Advertising, said manager because obviously there are plenty Patrick Grady. of Bulls fans around here.” “Basically, we’re open 7 (a.m.) till He added that the lack of success 3 (a.m.), I mean why not do that? It by the Blackhawks and the Cubs doesn’t make any sense to change were detrimental to business. He hours,” Grady said. “If people are said it has been reaching capacity used to you being open till 3 a.m., about once a week, and that’s with and then you start closing early: keeping the east wing of the pub ‘Are they gonna be open?’ That’s closed, as compared with reaching gonna be their question.” capacity three or four nights a week During the summer, CampusBY ELIOT SILL

ASSIGNMENT EDITOR

It doesn’t make any sense to change hours. If people are used to you being open till 3 a.m., and then you start closing early: ‘Are they gonna be open?’ That’s gonna be their question.”

What is th

ere to do

MELISSA MCCABE THE DAILY ILLINI

Murphy’s Pub is one of many establishments suffering through the summer slowdown. The heat and drought have exacerbated an already bad business climate in Campustown during summer months. town businesses lose their employees in the same way they lose their patrons, so businesses can rehire a smaller staff to save money. Despite this, businesses know to brace for impact in the wake of losing so many consumers, relying on summer school students, University camp attendees and residents from other parts of the city to get by. An event that helped out Campustown business earlier in the summer was Streetfest, a one-day block party on Green Street that featured live music and various food specials and entertainment acts. Also, the weekly Thirteen Thursdays helps

bring Champaign residents to Campustown for discounts and deals during the summer. Both were championed by the Champaign Center Partnership, or CCP, which seeks to integrate patrons from the city’s different business districts. The CCP’s executive director, T.J. Blakeman , said his institution’s initiatives have proved beneficial to fighting Campustown’s summer slowdown. “I think (business) has been very similar to other years, although I’d like to think with some of the extra stuff we’ve been doing on campus, that that’s helped,” Blakeman said.

“Thirteen Thursdays, we did our summer concert down there, we’re hearing that those things are driving traffic.” The worst part of the summer is around the corner: the leasing gap. Summer school is over, the fall semester has yet to begin, and most of the relatively sparse regular business Campustown establishments have come to rely upon vanishes. Luckily for the Campustown economy, it’s just a few short weeks until the fall semester begins, bringing nearly 40,000 students with it.

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8 Monday July 30, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

EDITORIAL CARTOON

RICK MCKEE THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL

Olympics are more than just sports E

I take my food without politics JOSEPH VANDEHEY Opinions columnist

C

oming to Illinois from across the country, I have scoured the Champaign-Urbana area for unique cuisine and new eateries that are unavailable in my native Oregon. Papa Del’s, of course, is a favorite haunt of mine, and I try to make a trip out to Steak ’n Shake every month or so as well. However, despite its absence in my hometown, I have felt no strong impulse to give the local Chick-fil-A a try. The chicken-specializing fast-food chain hit the news recently after remarks by its COO Dan Cathy in defense of “the biblical definition of the family unit.” Chick-fil-A has earned fame for basing its business practices on biblical principles, most visibly closing Sundays, but these practices have led to some infamy as well: The company has donated millions of dollars over the years to what it calls pro-family groups — and what others call anti-gay groups. The COO’s remarks have thrown the company’s business practices back under the limelight. The Jim Henson Company severed its ties with Chick-fil-A, pulling Kermit and Miss Piggy from kid’s meals across the nation. Several mayors, including Rahm Emanuel of Chicago, have objected to the building of any more Chick-fil-A franchises in their cities (for which, in turn, the mayors have been scorned by the left and right). And there have been renewed calls for a general boycott. Odds are if you have hung around the Quad long enough, dear reader, you have met someone whose whole raison d’etre entails convincing you to join their boycott of choice. You try not to make eye contact. You run. You hide. But they find you all the same, shoving a pamphlet under your nose until you are forced, guiltily, to take it and slink off the Quad. Half the time, the reasons given for joining the boycott make me less interested in protesting, not more. I

do not need the concern of animal cruelty hanging over my head to make me forsake eating a steak in favor of a few more carrots; wanting to eat healthy does that job just fine. Reducing global bovine discomfiture is then a nice bonus, rather than a gnawing guilt. Likewise, I have no desire to transform into a seething ball of hate and bile toward Chick-fil-A; most would be turned away by my anger, and it would give the targets of said anger a martyr complex they do not need. Still, I do not want to go there. The way Chick-fil-A has politicized its food (and thereby, my purchase of its food) has pushed me away. In some sense, one cannot avoid politics in food. I am sure that I have, at some point, purchased an onion grown on the farm of a racist, misogynist twit who believes that Muslims and anyone of Mexican descent should be deported without due process. There is nothing I can really do about that. After all, grocers do not place stickers on each onion they sell warning potential buyers of the political inclinations of the grower. The good and bad are tossed in alike. There is no way to support any political view over another by picking a certain kind of onion — unless you pick up the organic one, but that is another issue entirely. However, Chick-fil-A’s statements and contributions might as well have slapped that sticker onto their meals: If you purchase this lunch, part of the proceeds will go to these causes. It would be one thing if Cathy himself, using the wealth he has accumulated from successfully managing his company, were to support these causes; at least then there would be a step removed and no direct connection to what my money would support. But here, the company itself is giving the money. Simply put, if my lunch has to be political, I at least want it to be political toward things I support. So, Chick-Fil-A, as cute as your cows are suggesting that I “Eat Mor Chikin,” if I feel the need for a fast-food lunch, I might skip your place and pick up a smoothie instead. Which, as a nice bonus, will probably make some animal cruelty crusader quite happy.

Joseph is a graduate student.

very four years The Daily Illini Editorial Board during the sumEditorials reflect the majority mer, the world opinion of the board, which surrounds around its comprises: televisions to watch Samantha Kiesel, editor-in-chief; Ryan the top athletes comWeber, managing editor; Eliot Sill, assignment editor; Steven Vazquez, pete for two weeks in assistant assignment editor; Melissa sports varying from McCabe, photo editor; Nora Ibrahim, swimming to equestri- design editor; Jeff Kirshman, copy an. chief; Karen Chen, web producer; Kyle Milnamow, social media director The Summer Olympics is an event unlike any other. The 2012 London Games has over 10,000 athletes representing 204 countries — 11 more countries than in the United Nations — and all have at least one woman on their team. It’s a time where we watch sports that otherwise go undetected for four years. When was the last time you watched swimming or gymnastics? But even though the baseline for the Olympics is all about sports, it is so much more than that. These two weeks are about friendship between other athletes, but even more friendship between other countries. It’s about achieving the ultimate sports dream. It’s about respect for other athletes, coaches and countries. It’s about achieving excellence and returning home a hero, even without a medal. It’s those three Olympic values — friendship, respect and excellence — that shape every Olympics. The Olympics represent what we should strive for this world to become: competitive, but respectful. There will always be rivalry in sports, even rivalry within the same team, and there will always be winners and losers in sports. But that is not what the Olympics are about. The Olympics are about everything the official website says, “To build a better world through sport.” So, while watching these Olympic Games, go ahead and cheer for the athletes of your country. But also cheer for the handshakes that conclude every competition.

Reader’s opinions: The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. Mail: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.”


Sports

9 Monday July 30, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Beckman addresses Penn State recruiting BY CHAD THORNBURG STAFF WRITER

CHICAGO — When Illinois head coach Tim Beckman took the podium Thursday at Big Ten Football Media Days, he didn’t waste any time before addressing Illinois’ alleged recruiting of Penn State’s players in State College, Pa. “I know it’s going to be asked, so I’m going to attack it because I’m a proactive guy,” Beckman said. “We were in State College, but we did not go onto their campus.” In wake of the sanctions imposed by the NCAA and the Big Ten, all Penn State players are able to change schools without penalty or limitations on transferring within the conference. “It’s like NFL free agency without the rules,” said Penn State head coach Bill O’Brien. “They can do what they want as long as they tell our compliance office that they’re contacting these kids, and it is what it is.” Reports surfaced Wednesday that a contingent of Illinois coaches was spotted leaving an airport on the way to meet with Penn State players. Beckman confirmed eight coaches went to State College but said they set up shop at nearby restaurants rather than on Penn State’s campus. “I did not want our coaching staff on their campus,” Beckman said. “I told the staff before, we’re going so that the players can come to us and not us go to them. I don’t know if that makes it right or not, but that’s what I said as a head football coach.” Beckman said the coaches were sent to Penn State in response to a player who reached out to them with interest in transferring to Illinois, and then the staff made themselves available to “a few” other players interested in making the move to Champaign. To comply with NCAA rules, Illinois sent Penn State a list of players the Illini are in discussions with, but Beckman declined to comment on which players or how many names are on the list. Illinois athletic director Mike Thomas said Illinois is operating within NCAA and Big Ten protocols and that

he’s comfortable with how the Illini coaches have handled the situation. “The focus is on us because it was recognized that we were there,” Thomas said. “But I can tell you we weren’t the only ones that were.” He added that he didn’t necessarily view the Illinois contingent in State College as recruiters. “When I think of that, it’s going in and doing a hard sell and being really aggressive,” Thomas said. “That wasn’t the case here.” Penn State’s players aren’t only on Beckman and the Illini’s radar. USC’s Lane M. SPENCER GREEN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Kiffin is reportedly Penn State football players Michael Mauti and John Urschel, right, sign autographs for fans as part of Big Ten close to luring away Media Days and Kickoff Luncheon, on Friday, in Chicago. Penn State’s star running back Silas Redd, and O’Brien told ESPN on Wednesday league and its players. Delany met with the conference that there were numerous coaches on Penn State’s campus coaches Thursday morning and laid out the ground rules recruiting his players. for the transfer protocols. “I have no idea what schools were on our campus, nor “We’ve tried to articulate how this could be damaging,” do I care,” O’Brien said. As of Thursday, O’Brien said he Delany said. “If a player is interested in talking to you or has an interest in your university, so be it ... But there doesn’t know if any players plan to transfer. Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said he is concerned comes a point of reasonableness, where if a person says, the situation could cause be damaging to the health of the ‘I’m not interested, I don’t want to talk to you,’ move on.”

NCAA sanctions to Penn State: fair or targeting the wrong people? BY JEFF KIRSHMAN COPY CHIEF

“No sanction, no politician is ever going to take away what we’ve got here,” Penn State linebacker Michael Mauti said outside the school’s football facility Wednesday. “We’re going to fight for Penn State, fight for each other. Because this is what Penn State’s about — fighting through adversity.” Mauti’s sentiments are noble, but they are also misplaced. Unprecedented crimes called for an unprecedented series of penalties. The sanctions against Penn State are not the result of a witch hunt by the NCAA. Nor is it the NCAA’s fault that Penn State is in trouble. Mauti, who appears to be speaking for many in Happy Valley, is pointing his arrows at the NCAA for taking away the bowl games and the scholarships and the money. But the NCAA didn’t do this. Penn State officials did. Mauti and head coach Bill O’Brien are treating the situation like it’s any other source of adversity. This is not something to use as a chip on your shoulder. This isn’t just football. It’s more, and it’s worse. I’m not going to pretend that restricting the football team from bowl games will

enhance the victims’ healing process. But where was the outcry when USC was punished in 2010 or any of the other acts deemed worthy of penalization by the NCAA? Matt Barkley shouldn’t have to answer for something Bush did. Yet that will always be the case. Punishment by the NCAA is always flawed to an extent because players who accept illicit benefits are often out of college by the time they surface. That’s life. The Penn State players can still keep their scholarships even if they elect to stop playing football. And if they want to transfer, they can do that too. In the shady underworld of college recruiting, all a player can do is hope their school stays clean. This is not a perfect solution. Actions by the NCAA either extend to students who weren’t involved, or it is going easy on an institution that can’t possibly suffer enough for its crimes. I’m OK with suffering at the expense of football games. As Yahoo columnist Dan Wetzel wrote: “Penn State and its fans always said the program was about more than winning. The next decade will offer them a chance to prove it.” Sometimes, the fight against adversity is one worth conceding.

BY ETHAN ASOFSKY STAFF WRITER

I’m not going to pretend to be an expert in punishing monsters, but in the wake of the unprecedented penalties against Penn State’s football program, it’s apparent the NCAA isn’t an expert on the subject either. These are uncharted waters. The world of college football is unfamiliar with the types of people who hid Jerry Sandusky’s atrocities that took place in Penn State locker rooms, elementary schools or in a questionably soundproofed basement. But those are criminal allegations. The NCAA, by namesake, is an athletic association. The monster it sought to punish earlier this week was the Penn State football program, and the overbearing culture that led to a “lack of institutional control” by the university. The 96 men on the Penn State roster are now essentially NFL free agents, minus a paycheck. In so many words, the NCAA’s mission is to turn the football program into a ghost town; its players best suited by transferring and leaving the program in the dust. The NCAA’s punishment ultimately misfired at the wrong perpetrator. It’s not the players. It’s the culture. Some things are just bigger

than football. That’s the NCAA’s message, and it’s an important one. However, the punishment that was imposed is lazy. It’s uncreative in a matter that deserves the utmost creativity. Former Daily Illini assistant editor Spencer Turkin and I were talking the night before the “unprecedented sanctions” were released. He came up with, what I believe, is a proper solution that delivers the correct message. Let nobody in. Allow Penn State football to continue as usual, bowl-game eligibility and all, but don’t let fans into the stadium for the next few years. Outlaw tailgating. Blackout the television feed in Pennsylvania. Mandate the formation of a victim charity fund. Don’t allow the university to take in football revenue, but make it dish out stipends to local businesses and workers that would lose money from the eliminated crowds on Saturdays. Send the culture surrounding the program back to the Stone Age. Punish the real monster. When Joe Paterno first took over, his football program put State College, Pa., on the map. The NCAA should entrust academics to keep it there. Make the university shift its focus from football and prove that “We are Penn State” means more than what happens from end line to end line.


July 30-August 5, 2012

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10

Beckman looking at Northwestern as rival BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

As soon as Illinois head coach Tim Beckman arrived at Illinois, he made no secrets about engaging in a rivalry with “the team up north.” In the Illini locker room and meeting room, a Northwestern sign has been crossed out — Beckman’s doing. He has no interest in denying or hiding it, either, “Starting in high school, remember the team you played down the road that was the team you had to beat” Beckman said. “This is our state school. I figured that would be the rivalry. “I respect Coach Fitzy (Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald) and his program. I’ve been up there quite a bit, I hope he wins every game but one.” Illinois, and more specifically Beckman, seem intent on pushing a rivalry between the two schools. The coaches both expressed a mutual respect for each other and have known each other long before their days in the Big Ten. But does Northwestern really consider it a rivalry? Fitzgerald has continually played down a possible rivalry between the two schools. “I don’t follow a lot of those things closely because I take the focus and the attention on to our program,” Fitzgerald said. “And we’re focused right now on our opener. But before that, we’re going to be focused on ourselves. We have to get a lot better than we were last year, and that’s the challenge as a coaching staff.” Maybe this rivalry could get heated one day, but for now it doesn’t seem so. Not to Northwestern linebacker David Nwabuisi, who acknowledged that maybe the rivalry is more fun for fans and alumni at the moment. “I’m sure fans get a kick out of it,” Nwabuisi said at Friday’s Big

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Jeff Allen (71) blocks Northwestern’s Vince Browne during the game. The game was held at Memorial Stadium on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011. New Illinois head coach Tim Beckman is playing up the rivalry between Illinois and Northwestern. Ten football media day. “Probably got Illinois guys working with Northwestern guys and they’re probably talking smack in the office before they play every year. For us it’s really another game on the calendar. The only difference is were playing for that Land of Lincoln trophy.”

Northwestern offensive lineman Brian Mulroe did go as far as to call the game a rivalry, but then downplayed it meaning more than any other Big Ten games. “Just any Big Ten opponent is going to be a crazy game,” he said. “Sure it’s a rivalry, but do we change our mindsets going into the

game, probably no.” Despite any Northwestern objections, Beckman is going to push the matchup with the Wildcats every year, especially if the game can continue to have special venues such as when the game was played at Wrigley Field in 2010. “I’ve been in those big rivalry

football games, and I think it’s something that you breed through your program,” Beckman said. “We call it the team upstate. And I’m not scared to say that. That’s the school we’re going to call it. We’re going to make it a rivalry and we’re going to make it a very, very important part of our football season.”

Wristbands feature football’s ‘one’ goal this season BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

CHICAGO — It’s an old sports cliché: taking it one game at a time, one play at a time. It’s also a goal and the mindset the Illinois football team has adopted this year — one that every player is reminded of every time they look down at their right wrist. The four Illinois representatives at Big Ten Football Media Day, head coach Tim Beckman, offensive lineman Graham Pocic, quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase and defensive lineman Michael Buchanan, each sported a fat, orange wristband with blue letters reading the word “one” written on it. Directly on the other side is a date, one that Beckman has mentioned several times during the two-day event in Chicago: 12-1-12. It’s the date of the Big Ten Championship game in Indianapolis.

The phrase “one” has a double meaning — an acronym for “operation new era” and to serve as a constant reminder to take everything one step at a time. “The fact that one play can change the game,” Scheelhaase said. “That one player. It’s important for all of us. It’s what we’re all about.” Former players were given the exact same wristband, but with the colors reversed, a blue band with orange writing. Offensive line coach Luke Butkus will be seen sporting both, since he’s a former player and a part of the current program. The idea for wristbands dates back to Beckman’s days at Oklahoma State, but he gave credit to his wife for the idea of the theme. “Because the ‘one’ is so important in everything you do,” Beckman said. “Have to take your first step, make

your first catch. In the weight room, you have to have your first rep. “All of the things important with the name one ... because this is new and the culture is different from what they have had in the past.” Beckman professed he’s a big believer in mottos and goals to keep his players motivated and that is the key for the constant reminders about the date. As he turned his wristband to the other side, he spoke about how he always wants the goal of the team to be a champion. He’s tried to instill the date in his players’ minds, reminding them of it in as many ways possible. “We never take these off,” Buchanan said. “It’s kind of like our calling card. Our image. It’s always on our mind, winning a Big Ten championship, and we want to change the program.”


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

July 30-August 5, 2012

11

Previewing the Big Ten’s contenders MAX TANE Staff writer

D

uring Big Ten football media days in Chicago, Max Tane spoke to the members of schools around the conference, previewing the upcoming 2012-13 season. The following is his take on some of the schools in Big Ten.

Nebraska

Michigan

Ohio State

The inaugural season in the Big Ten for the newcomers from Lincoln had its up and downs. They held their own at home, killed on the road, destroyed in the bowl game. Credit the rest of the conference for holding their own last season as many were expecting the Huskers to win the conference handily in their first season. Now that it has the lay of the land, Nebraska can get more familiar with its opponents. Senior running back Rex Burkhead was the ultimate workhorse last season, but expect other backs to get reps next season. However, Nebraska will be very reliant on the run if quarterback Taylor Martinez can’t correct his infamous throwing motion. Burkhead on his workload and the offense: “It depends how the games go. But we have a few new guys that had a good offseason. You’re going to see a lot more comfortable team. Guys know what they were doing now and aren’t running around like chickens with their heads cut off.”

The success of head coach Brady Hoke’s fi rst season warrants him a name on a sandwich at any Ann Arbor eating establishment. I love how Hoke is more personable on the sidelines, never putting on a headset. His coordinators did a masterful job of playing to the team’s strengths of offensive speed on the edges and interior strength on defense. We’re still waiting on Denard Robinson to become a better passer. Not many are expecting him to come out and carve up the Alabama secondary to open the season . Shoelace and the Wolverines will have to survive road tests at Nebraska and Ohio State to be in contention to make it back to Indy. Hoke on having the tag of the favorite: “Not much, to be honest. I think we were picked fi fth in our division a year ago. We don’t put much stock in that. It’s like anything in life: It’s not where we start but where we fi nish.”

Enter Urban Meyer to the Big Ten. After a year in the broadcast booth calling Big Ten games, Meyer brings his championship pedigree and SEC speed from Florida to a conference that has been slowly evolving from traditional stereotype of pro-style offenses and defenses. Meyer’s offense is very quarterback-centered (see Alex Smith, Chris Leak and some fellow named Tebow), so Braxton Miller comes into the spotlight after a freshman year in which Ohio State fans would cringe when he dropped back to pass. Despite a year where the postseason isn’t a option for the Scarlet and Grey, an easy nonconference schedule (not a surprise) and favorable Big Ten slate could have Ohio State sitting pretty for a high fi nish. One can only expect the Michigan game to be Ohio State’s bowl game. Meyer on the Big Ten competing with the SEC: “They have to win bowl games. The coaches in this conference would know much better than I would. I’ll know more obviously next year. But I know one thing: I’ve watched enough film this summer, there’s some very good teams in this conference. I anticipate winning is not that far off.”

Michigan State

Wisconsin

Illinois

Penn State

Running the football and good defense — basic, but its what made head coach Mark Dantonio successful in East Lansing. Last season reminded me of shades of Jeff Smoker, T.J. Duckett and Charles Rogers (back when Sparty wasn’t a choke artist). The offense loses a lot of fi re power, especially at wide receiver. DeAnthony Arnett arrives from Tennessee and should be the primary target. Defensive end William Gholston and defensive back Johnny Adams were two of the 10 that were named players to watch in the Big Ten . Dantonio on reaching the posteason: “It’s always been our conversation in our locker room, to get to the Rose Bowl, whether it was 2007 or what year it’s been. And that, to me, is our goal. I think you have to make your goals and you have to climb the ladder when you get to your goals, to get to those goals.”

For two straight years, Bret Bielema’s squad has fell short in the Rose Bowl. Still, you can’t take away from the program he has advanced in his six years at the helm. Wisconsin has seemed to master the transfer rules, luring their second straight “rental quarterback” to Madison. Last year it was Russell Wilson, and this year it’s Danny O’Brien this year. O’Brien will have two years of eligibility after graduating early from Maryland. Like Wilson, O’Brien enters the season as probably the best quarterback in the conference without even taking a snap in the Big Ten. It’s certainly a defi nite that senior running back Montee (now pronounced “Montay”) Ball is the best running back in the conference. He’ll be one of the Heisman frontrunners at the beginning of the season. Ball says the transitions from Scott Tolzien, to Wilson, to O’Brien behind center has given him different ways to attack defenses. Tolzien was a game-manager, Wilson was a risk taker and O’Brien should be a combination of both. Ball on what Heisman candidates he’s keeping an eye on: “Marcus Lattimore (South Carolina). I have much respect for him and how hard he works. To see the stats he puts up, I most defi nitely try to match him or beat him and I’m sure he does the same.”

Before it was reported that Illinois had coaches in State College, they were just another school coming to Chicago to talk to the media about the upcoming season. Instead, fi rst-year head coach Tim Beckman was bombarded with questions about his decision to look at Penn Sate players. Other coaches were quick to say they decided to not look into Penn State. Then again, can you blame Illinois at all for this? Penn Sate players can play right away, and Beckman is trying to put his mark on a program that has been marred by inconsistency during the Ron Zook era . As far as the season goes, Illinois will look to make the most of the absence of Ohio State and Penn State from reaching the Big Ten Championship game. Expect plenty of competition entering the start of Camp Rantoul. Beckman on the offseason mentality: “If you’ve read any of the Twitter stuff that I tweet about Illini Football (@ coachbeckman), you know that we build it through competition. I think we had 15 outstanding days of spring going over, competing and playing the fi rst play as if we played the last play and playing at a tempo that we believe is going to be the Illini tempo and being a fi nisher by competing.”

Originally, Penn State players were not going to attend to Big Ten media days. It wasn’t until a few moments before the event started that we found out they would be in attendance. It’s hard to view Joe Paterno in a different light after what has been uncovered through the Freeh Report, but try to bear with me on this. Paterno still was the person that brought players to Penn State that left the program as role models in society, and as genuine men. And that’s exactly what the three Penn State players showed with every question presented: class. Bill O’Brien does have a lot on his plate in his fi rst year, facing the uphill climb of the sanctions delivered by the NCAA. But based on the quality of players he was able to retain for the upcoming season, he can still sell the program’s quality and the NFL pedigree he hails from. Michael Mauti on the support from the Penn State community: “I’ve had plenty of students email, text me. We hang those emails on our wall for motivation. We’ve gotten support from entire Penn State family. I’ve heard from department heads, former players, former coaches. The whole community is backing us.”

More online: Thirsty for more?

To check out Max’s take on the rest of the teams at Big Ten Media Days and a look at each of the conference’s divisions, be sure to log on to DailyIllini.com.

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July 30-August 5, 2012

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Parr and Johnson to return next year BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

This year’s MLB First-Year Players draft was much easier for the Illinois baseball team to take than last year’s. The Illinois team that won the Big Ten Championship in 2011 saw nearly half its members leave for graduation or because of the draft. It forced the Illini to go into 2012 with 18 players who had never played an inning at Illinois. Four Illini were drafted in this year’s draft this past June, three of them underclassmen — Matt Milroy, Kevin Johnson and Jordan Parr — along with senior Willie Argo, who had no choice but to go to the next level. Milroy decided shortly after that he would sign with the Miami Marlins minor league system. That left Parr, the Illini’s leading hitter, and Johnson, Illinois’ Friday starter and ace of its staff, to decide just how high the Illini’s incoming expectations could be next year. Losing those players would’ve forced the Illini into a situation similar to last year’s, trying to replace so much production and find consistency in the team. Both Parr and Johnson are currently playing on the same team in Northwoods League during the summer and had a decision to make. They both expected to go somewhere in the top 15 rounds and neither did. Parr fell to the 26th round to the Los Angeles Dodgers and Johnson to the New York Yankees in the 31st. They both spoke to their families to decide what’s best for them, but also confided in the coaching staff. Parr spoke to bench coach Eric Snider and head coach Dan Hartleb separately three times, each over the phone, while Johnson spoke with pitching coach Drew Dickinson and coaching assistant

Jason Anderson, each of whom had a large impact on both players’ decisions to stay. “The cool thing about them is they never tried to tell me what I should or shouldn’t do,” Parr said. “They never tried to do it selfishly for the program, so they could get me back and they could have a good player on the team. “I think that it was one of the those experiences that was really cool of your coaches to help be your mentor too.” From speaking with his coaches before the draft, Johnson drew a line at the 15th round, although he admitted that he probably would have signed a contract if he got drafted in the top 20 rounds. Even then, seeing his name getting drafted, especially by an organization with the history and tradition of the Yankees, was enough to make Johnson think twice about his previous precedent. He spoke with Anderson, a former Yankees player, about how the team’s system worked; he ultimately decided that he should stay in school. Johnson said the opportunity he wanted would not likely be there in the Yankees system, adding that he wants to go into the big leagues as a starter and he was likely being drafted as a reliever. Hartleb praised the idea of consorting with his players, but said he really thought the two were intelligent enough to make their own decisions. “We didn’t try to sway them, but I think they needed to be educated and they needed to understand exactly what they’re dealing with,” the eight-year head coach said. “I think they both made good decisions.” Johnson and Parr are taking this experience as a motivational tool.

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Jordan Parr connects with the ball during a game against Indiana at Illinois Field on Apr. 8. Parr will be returning to Illinois in the fall despite being drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 26th round of the MLB First-Year Players draft. Pitcher Kevin Johnson will also return, turning down a draft offer from the New York Yankees. “I feel like there’s some things I can improve on and that there’s no reason I can’t get drafted again higher next year,” Johnson said. Both players mentioned how not getting drafted as high as they liked increased their desire and intensity training during the summer. “I feel like there’s some things I can improve on and that there’s no reason I can’t get drafted again higher next year,” Johnson said. “It is a little bit of a disappointment. It kind of makes me want to work a little harder than last year.” With Parr and Johnson a part of the Illini next season as well, Illi-

nois could be in position to make a run at the Big Ten Championship. Parr says he is excited about the prospects of next season, in what will be his second at Illinois. He wants to take on a leadership role, not necessarily by being the most outspoken, but with his play and leading by example. Johnson, who was on the 2011 Big Ten championship team, said he believed this team could be “the best team since I’ve been at Illinois.” However, Hartleb isn’t buy-

ing into the hype too much. He’s excited to not have had his roster depleted by the draft but he still knows nothing will be handed to the Illini. “We have to improve,” Hartleb said. “If we don’t improve, then we’re right back where you were a year ago. “I think we can be a very good team, but you can’t talk about being a good team you have go out and you have to prepare and then you have to go out and get your job done.”

Beckman creates ways to connect with students BY CHAD THORNBURG STAFF WRITER

CHICAGO — Since arriving in August, Illinois head football coach Tim Beckman has made an effort to generate excitement about his new program. On Aug. 26, the day before classes begin at Illinois, Beckman plans to get the fans involved in a big way — possibly in a record-setting manner. Beckman will welcome the student body to Memorial Stadium to watch the football team practice over a dinner of burgers and hot dogs. At the end of the practice, he plans to invite all of the fans to join the field goal unit on the field. “We’ll try to get as many people on that field as we can and take a picture from the press box and see if we can set a Guinness record,” he said. “I don’t know how many

people have ever been on a field while you’re kicking a field goal. I just thought it might be something neat for the student body to be there.” Cramming the field with fans isn’t the only plan Beckman has to reach out to the Illinois faithful. He hopes to invite a student organization to watch each home game from the balcony outside his office, calling it “Beck’s Balcony.” “Set up some tents, put bar stools up there, some food,” he said. “Let them be a part of (the game).” He also said he’s in discussions about developing a student body flag to be flown at Memorial Stadium and the students can vote to decide which player will carry it out to the field for each home game. “With Coach Beck, we’ve all been excited about what he brings to the table, and we’ve rallied behind that,” quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase said. “He brings excitement

to every day and to everything we’re doing. Whether it’s being out there on the practice field or whether it’s going to a meeting, he brings excitement to it one way or another.” Beckman has employed a proactive approach to getting Illini fans involved in a team that spoiled a 6-0 start with an 0-6 finish last season. “We need the 12th man,” Beckman said. “I’ve coached and played in stadiums that are nuts, and it’s definitely a factor in the football game.” Beckman’s energetic personality isn’t just directed toward the fans. Defensive end Michael Buchanan said Beckman’s liveliness rubs off on the Illini players. “He’s very high energy,” Buchanan said. “When he texts, he’s an all caps kind of guy ... That’s just his personality.”

Max Tane contributed to this report.


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MARCO AND MARTY

July 30-August 5, 2012

13 NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BY BILLY FORE

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HOROSCOPES Today’s Birthday (07/30/12). The year brings a boost in popularity early on, along with the urge to explore and discover new boundaries. Push your own envelope, and develop a challenging study plan. The world is your oyster. Balance it sustainably. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 8 -- Taking risks allows you to get farther now, even if you may find disappointment at times. Reinforcing the structure helps the commitment. Leave enough time for family. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 7 -- Listen as a loved one tries to explain, and consider the feelings underneath. Try not to take it personally. You can learn whatever you need to know.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- Today is a 8 -- It’s not all about you. Be aware of your surroundings and your partners. Measure your progress, but keep moving forward. Arrive early to see the tourist attractions before they get crowded. Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Today is a 9 -- A good attitude counts. Be creative when it comes to improving your home. Save more than you spend. Turn complaints into possibilities. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 7 -You’re lucky in love, but it will require listening and patience. Work within the system. And don’t make assumptions. Imagine the other side of the looking glass. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- Be a source of comfort and good sense. Friends love your positive outlook. Use

frugality to your advantage. Do it carefully so you won’t have to do it all over again. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Don’t get lost in the details, and keep moving forward. Family and/or friends give you a boost but not necessarily in romance. Be practical, and accept a compromise. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 9 -- Resist temptation and you’ll be surprised at how much you can save and increase your credit rating. A female directs the show from behind the scenes. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 9 -- You’re in charge and enjoying it. Consider all options, and break the pattern. Record the results. A female could use encouragement and support. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 6 -- Go along with rules your partner

sets to surmount a difficult situation. It all ends up working out for the best. A person who looks weak is really strong. Don’t take things at face value. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 7 -- Your time is best spent with friends. Listen and avoid conflict. Move romance to the top of your priority list. Set up a savings system that works. Consulting an expert helps. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- List what you need to learn, build a new framework and go for it. Don’t despair if a loved one doesn’t like what you like. Your enthusiasm could be quite attractive.

2010 Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by Knight Ridder-Tribune Information Services.

Check out the DI on

46 Chess piece: Abbr. ACROSS 47 “___ want to talk   1 Brewer Coors about it”   7 Add liberally to 13 & 14 With 64-Across, 49 Be behind 52 Relaxes familiar rule not 54 Fordham athletes always followed 15 5-Down and others 58 Studier of distant emissions 17 Da’s opposite 61 Major 18 Bygone record 62 Ones giving cash label for quarters 19 Melodramatic 63 Some Rijksmusesound um holdings 20 Adobes and 64 See 13- & 14-Across abodes 22 Touchdown stat 24 Twins sharing a DOWN star on the Holly  1 “It’s ___!” wood Walk of Fame   2 Take out 27 Push to the right,   3 Not paid for, as facsay tory work 30 Part of an extend-   4 One to build on ed family   5 Some charitable 31 Chem. assay sporting events 32 China problem   6 Part of un jour 35 Cap   7 How some argue 37 It’s good for your   8 One who’s split health   9 Pal 39 Automaker Ferrari 10 Authors 40 QB calls 11 Vision: Prefix 42 ___ Tales, maga12 Investigator of zine where many many accidents, for H. P. Lovecraft stoshort ries first appeared 13 Engine part: Abbr. 43 Ban on strip min14 Northern exing, e.g. tremes? 45 Western and for16 Mr. Mojo ___ eign, to moviego(anagrammatic ers nickname for Jim

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HELP WANTED Full time

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208 N Harvey, U 604 1/2 W Elm, U 704 W Western, U 705 W Elm, U 712 W Green, U

3 Bedrooms: 208 N Harvey, U 610 W Elm, U 711 W Elm, U

5 Bedrooms:

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337­1565 hunsingerapts@gmail.com www.hunsingerapts.com

Open House  Every Saturday!! 1­4 pm

(Bonus: Free Parking Space)

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217-351-8900

Two Bedroom Apartments at: 33 E. Chalmers St. 702-704 W. Elm St. 803 W. Green St. 903 W. Oregon St. 402 N. Prairie St. 404 S. Urbana St.

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Efficiencies 508 S. First

104 E. John 108 W. Charles 312 E. White 104 E. John 1103 S. Euclid

1 Bedrooms

2 Bedrooms 3 Bedrooms 41103 S. Euclid Bedrooms

2 104 E. John Bedrooms

104 E. John 308 E. Armory 208 E. White 807 S. Locust 105 S. Fourth S. Euclid 807 S. Locust 1103 208 E. White 208/210 E. White 807 S. Locust 1103 S. Euclid 306 E. Armory 308 E. Armory 208 / 210 E. White 312 E. White 306 E. Armory 4 Bedrooms 1103 S. Euclid 807 S. Locust

508 S. First 5 Bedrooms 108 W. Charles 208 E. White 3 Bedrooms 1103 S. Euclid 104 E. John 306 E. Armory 1103 S. Euclid 103 E. Healey Call for an appointment 105 S. Fourth 807 S. Locust 108 1/2 E. Daniel 208/ 210 E. White Houses 310 E. Clark 312 E. White 509 S. Elm, C. 106 E. Armory 314 E. White 104 E. John www.johnsonrentals.com 308 E. Armory 108 E. Daniel 306 E. Armory 312 E. White 106 E. Armory rentals@jrpm.comcastbiz.net 507 S. Elm, C. 106 ½ E. Armory

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15

Digital / Print Production Manager Illini Media, the parent company of The Daily Illini, WPGU, the Illio and buzz Magazine is seeking a Digital/Print Production Manager. You will be responsible for creating the digital architecture to bring a traditional media company up-to-date with a fast-evolving group of readers and listeners. Working with a student production and creative staff, you will evaluate our WordPress websites and content management systems to efficiently deliver news, advertising, social, and radio content to our campus community and beyond. Your team will create mobile apps for iOS and Android platforms in order to reach our mobile audience most effectively. In addition, you will lead a team of student designers in the production of all Illini Media printed products and marketing materials.

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Over 1,000 apartments to choose from

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510 HOUSES FOR RENT

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July 30-August 5, 2012

16

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com


The Daily Illini: Volume 141 Issue 162