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Forty years ago, Title IX reshaped education and athletics

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June 25-July 1, 2012

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In the June 11, 2012, edition of The Daily Illini, the editorial, “University should opt for dis! A 53-year-old male was arrested for cussion over surveys,� stated that 10.5 percent trespassing in the 1700 block of John Street of students, faculty and staff participated in the climate survey. The article should have stated around 10:45 p.m. on Thursday. According to the report, the offender that 16.2 percent participated. The Daily Illini regrets the error. entered a store he was banned from and When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we was recognized by employees. ! A commercial theft occurred in the will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives 700 block of Town Center Boulevard on for accuracy, so if you see a mistake in the paper, please contact Editor in Chief Samantha Wednesday. According to the report, the unknown Kiesel at 337-8365. offender entered an abandoned business and stole several items. ! A 44-year-old male was arrested for theft in the 1000 block of West Bloomington Road around 12:55 a.m. on Friday. According to the report, the offender asked the victim for the change and then grabbed the money from the victim and fled the scene. ! A diagnostic computer was stolen by an unknown offender from Crawford Transmission Repair, located in the 1500 block of Willis Avenue, around 4 p.m. last Monday.

Urbana A 23-year-old male was arrested for a noise violation in the 1500 block of East Washington Street around 8:30 p.m. on Friday. ! A hit-and-run was reported in the 3000 block of Beringer Circle around 7:20 a.m. on Saturday. According to the report, the offender, a 63-year-old man, was driving on a public highway before going out of his lane and on the left curb when he hit the victim’s mailbox. The offender then fled the scene. The offender was subsequently arrested in a separate automobile accident on a public highway, operating a different vehicle. ! A 24-year-old female, of Gambier, Ohio, was caught dumping garbage in a Dumpster in the 400 block of Lake Street on Saturday. According to the report, the victim had rented the Dumpster and had not authorized the offender to use it. ! A 50-year-old male reportedly stole money and a car in the 1100 block of Austin Drive around 7 p.m. on Friday. According to the report, the offender stole his mother’s bank card and used it to withdraw money from her account. The card has been stopped, but the offender stole all of the money fi rst. The offender then left in !

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ON THE COVER Melissa McCabe The Daily Illini Isabel Sikora, 8, rides a bucking bronco ride at the 42nd Annual Taste of ChampaignUrbana at West Side Park on Saturday. The event featured a variety of activites, including live music, food vendors from both local and chain restaurants, and booths featuring artists’ works.

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University ! A 48-year-old male was arrested for theft of services at Willard Airport, 11 Airport Road , Savoy around 5:45 p.m. on Wednesday. According to the report, a taxi driver told police that in lieu of cash, the offender had offered to send the driver a check for the ride to the airport.

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June 25-July 1, 2012

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Title IX represents more than sports Gender-equity law has opened opportunities for past 40 years BY EMILY BAYCI STAFF WRITER

Alina Weinstein cannot imagine college without gymnastics. The senior Illinois gymnast is grateful for her scholarship opportunities and knows she has Title IX to thank for that. She doesn’t know Ann Penstone, who was a collegiate athlete at Illinois in the early 1970s, who spent her college career fighting for athletes like Weinstein to have opportunities in sports. Penstone is fine with the lack of recognition, it’s actually what she wants. Saturday marked the 40th anniversary of President Nixon’s signing of Title IX. The 37-word law calls for schools to provide equal participation opportunities for men and women in any governmentally funded activities. “Basically our goal was

Title IX

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

for people of the next generation to never know there has been a problem,” Penstone said. “And that has proven true for the most part.” Title IX is often regarded as a law about sports, although there is no mention of women or athletics in the wording which states: “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” The creation of athletic teams for females was one of the most significant by-products. However, athletics wasn’t even thought of when the bill was originally presented said Dr. Bernice Sandler, a Title IX pioneer. When Sandler was in elementary school, she wasn’t allowed to run the slide projector or be a school crossing guard. She said what set her off was when she wasn’t hired for a tenure job at the University of Maryland because she “came on too strong for a woman.” Sandler did research and discovered that there were no laws that prohibited sexual discrimination. She decided to take an active role in creating one. “I testified, and I played a role in Title IX becoming a law,” Sandler said. “I was there the entire time, and I have been involved with Title IX ever since, which is longer than anyone else.” Before the law’s passing, the majority of women would get rejected from law schools or medical schools, simply because of gender. It wasn’t until the law almost passed that it was realized athletics would be affected under the broad language of Title IX, Sandler said.

“Even then I didn’t realize the magnitude of it and how women in athletics were being discriminated,” Sandler said. “I thought maybe women could have more athletic activities on field day.” Title IX significantly pushed athletics and education forward at Illinois, according to Kaamilyah Abdullah-Span, associate director for equal opportunities and access at Illinois. She said the focus has been mainly on athletics, although it is important to make sure an equal amount of women and men are admitted to college and that improvements are made to colleges that are historically male or female, like engineering or nursing. “People used to have the mindset that women were only around for teaching, nursing and being moms,” AbdullahSpan said. “Some people still have that mindset. There is still growth required.” Athletics, which were most notably affected by Title IX, went through drastic changes during Penstone’s time at Illinois in 1970-1974. Softball, women’s gymnastics and field hockey were dropped at Illinois in the early 1970s. Penstone said there were attempts to drop all other varsity sports, but during her senior year in 1974, herself and several other athletes fought to keep them. “If there wasn’t such a fight, the University probably would have gotten rid of everything,” Penstone said. Dr. Karol Kahrs was hired as an assistant athletic director at Illinois in June of 1974. She was responsible for implementing women’s sports. Basketball, volleyball, track, golf, swimming and gymnastics were brought in as part of Illi-

See TITLE IX, Page 6

New bugs begin eating away at trees in Champaign BY NATHANIEL LASH STAFF WRITER

“The green menace” has found its way into Champaign, city officials announced last week. The emerald ash borer, a small, metallic beetle that infests ash trees, was found along North Market Street in Champaign, on the property of Human Kinetics. Sandy Mason, the University Extension horticulture specialist for the region, said Illinois has native borers that are also deadly to ash, but these species cull trees that are already sickly, whereas the emerald ash borer is a less discerning pest. “It will go into healthy trees,” she said. “It knows no difference.” This first finding of the invasive species in the Champaign city limits, which appeared in the Detroit area in 2002 — presumably from shipping containers originating in Asia — adds to concerns about the future of ash trees in the Midwest. Borer larvae kill ash trees slowly by feeding on the inner layer of bark, which prevents the tree from transporting water and nutrients to the upper branches, with the tree dying from the top down once the borer takes up residence. The infestation has led to a quarantine of all ash products, which as of November includes the northeast portion of Illinois. “We’re worried about it because it creates hazards,” said John Karduck, lead arborist for the city of Champaign. “(Infected tree) limbs are more likely to fall off as they die.” Karduck said the tree at Human Kinetics, situated along the street above a bus stop, may have been infested for as many as seven years before it began showing symptoms that prompted arborists to take a closer look at it.

“This is a tree that’s been infected for quite a while,” he said. There are more than 2,000 ash trees on city property, making up less than 10 percent of the city’s tree population. Rather than deal with the recurring costs of protecting these trees from the pest with insecticides, Champaign is in the process of removing ash trees from city property that are showing symptoms of infestation. “We know it’s here now, we’re going to be looking for signs of decline in the trees,” Karduck said. “What we do know is that the beetle can fly a half mile in a season, so we start looking at the ash trees locally around here and monitor them for the ash borer.” Bob Price, maintenance director for Human Kinetics, said the company worked with Champaign to develop a public education program hosted on its grounds last Thursday. He said Human Kinetics has a number of ash trees on its property that have seen better days. “We’d noticed some dieback starting about two years ago, and we’d never really thought about the emerald ash borer,” Price said. “But once confirmation was made, we worked with the city of Champaign in developing the educational program today,” Price said the tree, with the level of dieback it has suffered, will have to be removed. Infestation can be indicated by tree shoots emerging lower on the tree, a symptom of nutrients not being able to reach higher parts of the tree. Adult emerald ash borers also leave 1/8 inch D-shaped holes in the tree. Owners of ash trees who believe they may be seeing symptoms of the infestation are encouraged to contact the University of Illinois Extension at (217) 333-7672.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COLLEGE OF ACES

An adult emerald ash borer beetle emerges from its bore on the surface of an ash tree.


June 25-July 1, 2012

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Food, bands bring together community Taste of C-U attracts all towns from Illinois BY KAREN CHEN WEB PRODUCER

West Side Park held the 42nd Taste of C-U over the weekend. This three-day event has been one of the biggest summer events in the Champaign-Urbana community. Sponsored by American Family Insurance, 10 bands were invited to play throughout the event, like Huckleberry Fate, Tons O’Fun Band, Blue Bus, and the Decadents. The diverse lineup attracted different audiences to the tent throughout the event, and the music could be heard from every corner of the park. Local restaurants from Champaign, Urbana and Savoy, Ill. presented the opportunity to try different foods. “There are 25 restaurants this year,” said Laura Auteberry, director of marketing and development for the Champaign Park District (CPD). “It’s about the same from last year.” Some restaurants used the festival as an opportunity to gain new business from the Champaign-Urbana community. “We are a new restaurant, only one and a half years old,” Angela Lee, cashier for the Spoon House Korean Kitchen tent said. “It’s an opportunity for us to share our traditional Korean food with the community.” For the community, it was an opportunity to explore the local fair in an efficient manner. “It’s been the third year of coming here,” said Pam Whitfield, of Champaign. Whitfield said her husband uses Taste of C-U to try the community’s different foods. Thirty-four arts-and-crafts booths covered the southeast corner of the park. Nine demonstrated artists, specializing in anything from personalized custom jewelry to face painting to ceramics and hand-thrown pottery. Robin Willey, who owns Wiley Pottery in Effingham, Ill. has participated in Taste of C-U for the past 10 years. Besides bowls and pots, she also makes oil lamps and hand-crafted vases. “Traveling 70 miles to Champaign isn’t far. I’ve gone further to Indianapolis for shows.” Willey said. “This is like home to me. It’s like my backyard.” The Taste of C-U is not only a stage for people to show their talents, but also a place to discover other interests as well, according to Rachel Hess, president of the Champaiagn Urbana Potters’ Club, which demonstrated the art of making clay pottery on Saturday.

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MELISSA MCCABE THE DAILY ILLINII

Ella Becker, 6, helps color a mural at the 42nd Annual Taste of Champaign-Urbana. The event featured a variety of activities, including live music, food vendors from both local and chain restaurants, and booths featuring artists’ works. Amy Doll used to work for CPD and moved to Freeport, Ill., several years ago. Last year, she returned for Taste of C-U and decided she would volunteer for this event this year. Doll said she missed the community and it’s fun to watch the people. Taste of C-U is a top fundraiser for youth. According to the CPD’s website, the proceeds of the event will also contribute to its Youth Scholarship Fund. Auteberry said the event raises $10,000-$15,000 for the cause. “The Youth Scholarship Fund provides opportunities to kids

to participate in recreational programs throughout the year,” Auteberry said. The CPD also cooperates with Champaign County Bikes, the Bike Project, Prairie Cycle Club and Wild Card Racing to “promote a healthy environment for all guests and our planet,” according to the CPD website. A bike corral is located in the southeast corner. As reward for riding bikes to the Taste of C-U, a ticket for a free beverage is given at the Pepsi drink tents in the park.

Right now, cramming is a part of life. But it doesn’t have to be a part of your mouth’s. When wisdom teeth come in, the result is often painful due to overcrowding and can cause damage to other teeth. This time of year, it is not unusual for students to have trouble with their wisdom teeth. Stress and lack of proper rest and diet seem to act as a catalyst for wisdom tooth flare-up. At Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, the removal of wisdom teeth is done as an outpatient surgery and is often covered by student insurance.

Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 3112 Village Office Place Champaign, IL 61822 (217)351-7111

Theron C. Waisath, D.M.D. www.illinoisjawdocs.com


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Taste of C-U offers thrill of adventure From Poland to Illinois, festival offers new opportunities BY KAREN CHEN WEB PRODUCER

Iwona Narolewska left Poland at the age of 19 and wanted to study languages. For seven years she lived in London, where she started creating her own jewelry. In her years in London, she also traveled around Europe by train. She moved to Chicago in 2005 and now travels around for art shows, mainly to promote her own jewelry collections. Before she settled in Chicago, she also lived in Japan for four months. She has a small studio in her home. “I made all this jewelry by myself. It’s hard sometimes because I also need to take care of my children,” Narolewska said. Narolewska has a 6-year-old son, who will start going to school in the fall, and a 4-year-old daughter. Being a single parent is difficult, she said. Because her mom retired a few years ago, she asked her mom to move to Chicago to help her take care of her children. Narolewska established Atira Jewelry six years ago, and it has since become her full-time job. She also works with three other designers from other places. Narolewska originally made jewelry with amber. Now she uses silver and bronze more as media. Not only does she work at her home studio, but she also works with other people, too. She attends the street art center to take jewelry classes. She’s been taking different classes in jewelry design and learning different techniques. “I love trying new things, too. Learning more different skills and techniques diversifies my works,” she said. “One time I

June 25-July 1, 2012

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was playing with other chemical mediums, I got a brown spot in my forehead. It took weeks to disappear.” Narolewska is also interested in studying psychology, especially in human services. Coming to Champaign for events like art shows and the Taste of C-U has become a regular route for her. This is the second time she has come to Taste of C-U. “I love traveling. The different culture and places inspire me,” she said. She pointed to a ring and bangle made with stiff metal wire and topped with white beads of different shapes. “These two pieces always remind me of my days in Japan. The beads represent the cherry blossoms. The trees were beautiful.” Joanne Keeney, a retired art teacher from Chicago, came to Champaign for a wedding this weekend and bought a pair of the sliver earrings of leaf shapes. It’s Keeney’s first time coming to Taste of C-U and it’s been a joy for her to discover different art. “I love stuff you can’t find anywhere else,” Keeney said. “(Narolewska is) a pleasure to find. Her jewelry is fabulous. Also coming from Chicago, this is local to me.” In the display, she puts her silver jewelry on wood plates to stress the metal property of the products. Gosia Konwerska, a friend of Narolweska, helped sell her products Sunday. “I met her last year in August’s Art Festival in Champaign,” Konwerska said. “I was her customer. But we became friends because we are both from Poland.” Konwerska also said she tried to convince Narolewska to move to Champaign. “I would love to move here,” Narolewska said. “Chicago sometimes is a little too much for me. Champaign is a peaceful town, and the people are very nice.”

Showing off C-U talent 1. A woman, who goes by the stage name of Noor Azhaar, performs a veil dance during the Classy Combinations belly dance troupe performance at the 42nd Annual Taste of Champaign-Urbana on Saturday. 2. Dominic Mortenson, 4, chases bubbles during the 42nd Annual Taste of Champaign-Urbana on Saturday. The event featured a variety of activities, including live music and food vendors from both local and chain restaurants, and booths featuring artists’ works. 3. Jason Kollum, of Park Ridge, performs during the 42nd Annual Taste of Champaign-Urbana on Saturday. Kollum says he has been a “full-time juggler, stilt-walker and balloon artist” for about 17 years. PHOTOS BY MELISSA MCCABE THE DAILY ILLINI

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June 25-July 1, 2012

TITLE IX FROM PAGE 3 nois varsity athletic program for the 19741975 season. The total budget for women’s athletics for the 1974-75 school year was $82,535, of which $33,570 was for salaries and $2,500 was for equipment. “Illinois decided to follow the rules,” Penstone said. “They did it big and they did it right.” The University continued working to stay in compliance with Title IX which proved to be a struggle throughout the years, said Kent Brown, assistant athletic director and head of media relations at Illinois. In order to abide by Title IX laws, men’s swimming and diving and fencing were cut from Illinois athletics in 1993. Members of the men’s swimming team sued the University for being denied equal opportunity after their sport was cut. The lawsuit was denied under the U.S. Court of Appeals, which sent a precedent that men could not use Title IX to claim sex discrimination after sports were dropped due to budget. “Some sacrifices must be made for equity because of budgets,” Brown said. Title IX requires equity, not equality. Equity is fair and sensible treatment and equality is identical treatment, which can often be implausible, said Ellyn Bartges, the Equity and Affirmative Action Officer, Chief Diversity Officer, Title IX and ADA Compliance Officer at St. Cloud State, which has done extensive research on Title IX. Women’s soccer was added at Illinois in 1993 and softball followed in 2000. “Change is slow,” Bartges said. “Espe-

cially when you are instituting not just in compliance with all the Title IX rules, a structural change, but a philosophical although it is a struggle to keep up. He does not see any additional sports comchange.” Brown said it was important for the ing anytime soon. University to honor those athletes who “For as long as I can remember, Illiwere not recognized by Title IX. In nois has been in compliance with Title IX standards,” Brown November 20 03, Illinois recognized said. women athletes Universities must pass two areas of a who participated in sports at Illinois three-prong test to before 1994 through be in compliance a program called with Title IX. One Illinois 3D. It stood is proportional comfor dreams, desire pliance, where the and dedication. percentage of male “ We dreamed and female athletes this would be done. must be proportionWe dedicated ourally similar to the number of male and selves to make it female undergradhappen, and our uate students. The desire was pretty clear. It was for love University can also of the sport,” said demonstrate a hisKAAMILYAH ABDULLAH-SPAN, Penstone, who was tory and a continuAssociate Director for equal one of more than ing practice of proopportunities and access 100 athletes who gram expansion for returned to be recognized and awarded the underrepresented gender or it must a varsity letter they had never previous- fully and effectively accommodate the interests and abilities of the underreply received. “I can’t tell you the number of people resented gender. The standards can be vague and often who were so touched and the number of people who were so happy to be honored confusing when enforcing Title IX laws. Illinois is currently working to make as athletes,” Penstone said. Brown said an issue is finding a wom- clear definitions of the rules to stop any en’s sport that can fill up as many roster uncertainty, Abdullah-Span said. “There is always room for improvespots as football, which will never leave the University. A popular sport to add at ment on all levels,” Abdullah-Span said. colleges is rowing because those teams “The law has done great things for educan have around 80 athletes on a roster. cation and sport, but it must always be But with little water around the area, it monitored to make sure the restrictions are being followed in an ever-changing would not be the best decision. Brown added that for now, Illinois is environment.”

“The law has done great things for education and sport, but it must always be monitored to make sure the restrictions are being followed in an everchanging environment.”

Champaign City Council split on vacant district seat BY GEORGE COVENTRY STAFF WRITER

The Champaign City Council was unable to reach a decision during Tuesday’s meeting as to who should fill the vacant District 3 seat. The vacancy appeared when Kyle Harrison’s resignation took effect on June 15. The four candidates — Vic McIntosh, Lynn Anderson, Barbara Kenny-Langendorf and Tony Pomonis — had all delivered statements during the council’s previous study session in a final effort to promote their bids. In order to be elected, a candidate had to receive five votes. Each council member was given the opportunity to officially nominate a candidate or pass. All of the candidates, except for KennyLangendorf, received a nomination during the first round of voting. A voice vote was then taken for each candidate in the order they were nominated. No candidate received five votes in the first or second round of voting.

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6

During the third round, the vote was split 4-4 between Pomonis and McIntosh. The council was still unable to decide on a candidate by the end of the fourth round, so a motion was passed to postpone the issue until July 10 council meeting. Deputy mayor and council member Thomas Bruno said the council will make its final decision on July 10 due to the previous cancellation of the July 3 meeting. Bruno believes the voting deadlock will end at the next meeting. “I think this will get resolved on July 10,” he said. “I have no idea how it will get resolved. But I think somebody will change their vote, and that’s what’s always historically happened.” According to Bruno, every candidate still has a shot at winning the vacant seat. “The third and the fourth candidates are not out of the run here,” Bruno said. July 10 will mark 26 days since the people of District 3 had a city council representative.

History of Title IX and Illinois athletics June 23, 1972: President Nixon signs Title IX of the Education Amendments Act into law, which prohibits sexual discrimination for educational activities receiving government funding. June 1974: Dr. Karol Kahrs was hired at Illinois as an

assistant athletic director. Kahrs was responsible for implementing women’s sports at Illinois.

1974: Seven women’s sports — basketball, volleyball,

track, golf, swimming, gymnastics and tennis — are implemented at Illinois as part of the varsity athletic program.

1979: The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare establishes a “three-prong test” for the application of the Title IX law. The three prongs are equal participation opportunities, equal treatment in program areas and equal access to financial assistance. 1993: Men’s swimming and diving and fencing are

cut from Illinois.

Sept. 1994: Members of the Illinois men’s swimming

program lose a lawsuit against the University of Illinois. The men sued on the grounds that they were denied equal opportunity.

1996: Women’s soccer is added as a Division I varsity sport at Illinois. 2000: Softball is added as a Division I varsity sport

at Illinois.

Nov. 2003: Illinois recognizes women athletes who

participated in sports at the University before 1974 through the Illinois 3D program — dreams, desire and dedication.

New kind of flight in antiquated airplane

NATHANIEL LASH THE DAILY ILLINI

The Experimental Aircraft Association’s Ford Tri-Motor plane flies over Champaign County farmland on Thursday. The restored 1929 aircraft, which once flew the Dominican Repulic’s president and appeared in “Public Enemies,” is on tour and took aviation enthusiasts on rides over the weekend out of Frasca Field in Urbana.


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June 25-July 1, 2012

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Jupiter String Quartet chosen for UI

Boston-based quartet to replace Pacifica Quartet, perform at Krannert

BY JEFF KIRSHMAN COPY CHIEF

The University was taken by surprise in March when the Pacifica Quartet, Grammy Award winners and the school’s quartet-inresidence, informed Illinois of its plans to fill the same role at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music next fall. Pacifica’s decision resulted in a last-minute replacement search by the University that ended with the selection of the Jupiter String Quartet in April. The Bostonbased string ensemble, consisting of violinists Nelson Lee and Megan Freivogel, violist Liz Freivogel and cellist Daniel McDonough, will call Champaign-Urbana home as the University’s new quartetin-residence, effective Aug. 16. They will perform at the Allerton Music Barn Festival on Aug. 30 in its debut as University faculty members. Multiple universities employ quartets-in-residence to perform and teach chamber music while also serving as ambassadors for the school at large. Illinois’ first quartet in residence was the Walden String Quartet, which established its residency at the University in 1947. Because of the combination of the Pacifica Quartet’s and Indiana’s high stature, interim director of the school of music Edward Rath said a number of students have transferred from Champaign-Urbana to Bloomington, Ind. “In music, recruiting is kind of like basketball or football,” Rath said. “Somebody wants somebody, and they’re able to make that move. ... I don’t think it’s an unfair thing.” “Indiana has a national reputation,” said Aaron Kaplan, graduate student in the music school. “They

have a lot of world-class faculty and alumni. And if I were in (the Pacifica’s) shoes, I don’t know what I would’ve done. Indiana’s music school is revered sort of like our engineering school is here. It’s the best of the best, the cream of the crop. It’s a great career move for them; it’s a great honor to be on their faculty.” Tammey Kickta, assistant director for artistic services at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, said the Jupiters, who are younger than the Pacificas, are on a similar career trajectory and could eventually reach a status similar to that of the Pacificas. “I think the Jupiters are going to step beautifully into that same type of relationship with the community,” she said. “Yes, it will take a little while for it to grow, but I think that’s because the Pacifica already established a certain kind of presence. If the Pacifica came in here and took us up to here, the Jupiters will be able to take us even higher. They have great shoulders to stand on, that’s the real beauty of it all.” The Jasper String Quartet and Parker String Quartet were also in contention for the position the Jupiters ultimately filled. After making the University’s short list, the three groups were invited to audition on campus, where they each presented a program at Foellinger Auditorium and taught group and individual classes. Rath, who sat in on the auditions and was part of the decision-making process to choose the Jupiters, said parameters that went into the decision included the quartet’s ability to publicly perform string quartet literature, teach private lessons and represent the University and community.

PORTRAIT OF THE PACIFICA QUARTET COURTESY OF KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS.

“We thought there was more of a sense of ensemble with the Jupiters,” Rath said. “They had eye contact, there was a greater freedom in the playing. All very subjective things. You have four or five different people, and you have four or five different things to say. There’s no way that you can say, ‘This is why we did this,’ but the overall consensus was that, all things considered, this was the group that we thought we should

have.” McDonough said becoming a quartet-in-residence had always been a goal of the Jupiters and the opportunity “came up on our radar screen” after touring exclusively for nearly 10 years and wanting to seek more stability as they start their families. “It’s a wonderful balance,” the Jupiters’ cellist said. “The University respects our desire to continue to perform, and it also allows

us to do a bit of teaching and to get to know a community that’s all ready shown a commitment to this art form.” McDonough also expressed excitement toward performing regularly at Krannert Center. “It’s a gem in the middle of Illinois,” he said. “It draws not only major cultural acts from all over, but it’s nice to have it as a type of home stadium for the string quartet.”

Plan the perfect date. Check out the calendar each week to find out what’s going on in town. Every Thursday in Buzz Online at the217.com

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8 Monday June 25, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL CARTOON

CHRISTOPHER WEYANT, THE HILL

Public focus not on Romney or Obama P

reparing for the neighborhood barbecue on Independence Day, scraping up the money for summer day camps or finding employment seem to take more precedence over Americans’ attention than anything that President Barack Obama or Gov. Mitt Romney have to say regarding their campaigns. Yet these two continue to shell out millions on rallies, political advertisements and travel expenses from their tours to capture the attention of a public that generally isn’t watching. We know this because that’s the majority of what the media covers. Too often, a story on Obama or Romney focuses on super PACs or finances and much less on policy stances. Traditionally, the American public elects their president based on proposed policy, but that information is lost among the media cacophony of campaign financials rather than useful policy matters. This extreme coverage could be a reflection of the amount of time Romney or Obama spends on their respective campaigns. If that’s true, the president is clocking in an uncomfortably low number of hours doing his job and serving the country. Equally likely, coverage starts entirely too early. Twenty-four hour news coverage keeps the world informed at every minute, but that means news must be produced that often, even when nothing is happening. Because of the current news cycle, we see senseless over-analysis that permeates news sites worldwide. Like a flower, media needs to give attention to campaigns every day, but too much will flood the American public and kill their interest.

Summer survival guide: A map to C-U’s hidden gems

The Daily Illini Editorial Board

JUDD VAN ANTERWERP

Editorials reflect the majority opinion of the board, which comprises: Samantha Kiesel, editor-in-chief; Ryan Weber, managing editor; Eliot Sill, assignment editor; Steven Vazquez, assistant assignment editor; Melissa McCabe, photo editor; Nora Ibrahim, design editor; Jeff Kirshman, copy chief; Karen Chen, web producer; Kyle Milnamow, social media director

LETTER

Climate survey did provide useful data, information The June 10 Daily Illini editorial (“University should opt for discussion over surveys”) incorrectly states that self-selection resulted in “a statistical inaccuracy.” Any survey that is voluntary is based on self-selection, which is also true of focus groups. As reported by Nathaniel Lash in the same issue of The Daily Illini, after analysis of the data, Tim Johnson of the Survey Research Laboratory concluded that the results obtained can be expected to be reasonably representative of the University community. The editorial suggested that the survey “accomplished almost nothing.” I disagree. The goal of any survey is to obtain useful data, and the climate survey did just that. The Daily Illini editorial dismisses the opinions of more than 17,000 University community members. Their responses are valid and will be the basis for further analysis and recommendations. I agree with the editorial board’s assertion that discussions are necessary to initiate the changes that will improve the climate at the University. I hope that making the results available will increase interest and participation in these issues among students, staff and faculty. CHRISTOPHER PIERRE, Vice President for Academic Affairs

Opinions columnist

W

hile all your friends have gone home to reunite with their old high school friends, spend time with family, or gain experience in that “awesome” internship that you have heard way too much about, you are stuck in the C-U for the summer. Though this may seem like a death sentence to many suburban kids, aching to go explore the wonders of the windy city; never fear because your favorite townie is here to tell you some tips, benefits and activities to surviving your summer in the C-U. 1. Two-dollar Long Islands and The Piano Man at Canopy Club. Believe it or not, there is more than meets the eye here. Of course, the question arises: Can you really beat a $2 Long Island? Yes. In the C-U, we don’t pay expensive prices for simply-made drinks like in large cities such as Chicago. In the Windy City, expect to pay close to ten dollars for ONE long island. After a few of those, your wallet can be feeling pretty thin. Plus, because the entrance age at Canopy is only 18-years-old, people watching can be a thrill when you are watching newly graduated

high-schoolers attempt to explore the world of drunken debauchery, some for the first time. What’s more, The Piano Man is pretty sick too. 2. Champaign and Urbana Park Districts. I can say with confidence that both Champaign and Urbana have some of the best parks around central Illinois. Sure, they are no Millennium Park with a giant metallic bean for people to stand in front of to take completely touristy pictures; however, they are a way to get out and enjoy a beautiful, relaxing day in the C-U, while steering away from traditional lounging locations like the Quad. 3. Experience what downtown Champaign has to offer. WHAT? Champaign has a downtown? Yes, my fellow classmates, townies need to have a place to get their drink on too. The positives of downtown include great people watching (who doesn’t love to observe and study the every move of a townie in the flesh?), clean floors, better drink selections, better dining options and a change of behavior. Let’s just say, you will not see people getting the typical “white-girl-wasted” that you will see on campus. Give it a try. At least by graduation, you can say that you experienced it.

Editor’s note: This is an abridged version of Judd’s column. To read the rest, go online to DailyIllini.com. Judd is a senior in Media.

Letters to the Editor: The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. Email: opinions@dailyillini.com.


Sports TITLE

IX

40 YEARS OF THE RIGHT TO PLAY

PERDITA FELICIEN

VI

we had a great coach. We had a great system at Illinois that there were always resources to help ith two Olympics all ready keep you focuses, help keep you on track.” Her former mentor saw improvements through under her belt and a chance to make a third, Perdita Fel- the years and kept watching the progress of the icien has come a long way since track star that would compete with her at the snacking on candy and people- 2000 Olympics. watching on the Quad. One of the biggest improvements she saw FelFelicien, a Canadian resident, attended Illinois icien make was the cutting out of a sugary snack. from 2000-03. Though this was right after the time “Perdita used to eat a lot of candy all the time. that former Illinois runner and current women’s Candy, candy, candy. She had it stored everyhead track coach Tonja Buford-Bailey spattered where,” Buford-Bailey said. “So she really starther name throughout the record books, Felicien ed backing off that, monitoring that. So it’s just that little life talking; it’s what you have to do to made her own impact right away. In just her freshman year, Felicien not only took be great.” home Big Ten Outdoor and Indoor Freshmen of Felcien admitted that some of the best times at the Year, but also became an All-American after Illinois were sitting on the Quad in between classplacing sixth in the Outdoor National Champion- es and practice and watching people walk by. But the reason she chose Illinois wasn’t just the area, ships in the 100-meter hurdles. Though Buford-Bailey had already graduated but who was running the program during her time. from Illinois, she was still in “I chose (Illinois) because Champaign training for future of (former head coach) Gary events. She didn’t just train Winckler,” Felicien said. to help herself, but to help the Felicien said Winckler incoming runners at Illinois coached “stellar” athletes, fi ll her spot. including Buford-Bailey. She said she also liked the academLucky enough for Felicien, ic side of Illinois. she was one of those runners. “I was in my post-collegiate Winckler noted that even TONJA BUFORD-BAILEY, career, so I was here training though Felicien had won seven women’s head track coach and tried to be a mentor for national titles while at Illinois, that group,” Buford-Bailey he thinks the best thing she did said. “Perdita was one that stood out pretty ear- was win world titles in 2003 and 2004. ly because she always knew that she wanted to “She was a good leader,” Winckler said. “She be elite. A lot of the teams I noticed early in my was someone who took control of the team. I think career, Perdita was kind of going down the same she probably did more by example in terms of her path. So that was just little tips I was giving her, performances on the field. She abided by all the how to be better, how to take care of yourself, why team rules. She contributed to the team conferthat’s so important. I remember one year to the ence meet by running multiple events. She was next seeing her and I thought, ‘Wow, she’s in the someone who just stepped up and got the job done.” Though Buford-Bailey is now the coach of the best shape of her life.’” Felicien said that one of the things she did when women’s track and field team, she credits Felicien she was at Illinois was read the media guide. Fel- as being the “backbone of new era that came in.” What has made her special is not only her skill, icien often saw the name of her mentor and knew but her attitude. she wanted to be at that level someday. After a successful fresh“It’s her ability to win, her mindset about winMore inside: man year, Felicien continued ning,” Buford-Bailey said. “She hates losing. Like, To check out to improve. She was named she really, really hates losing. It just never sits an All-American her sopho- well with her. Because she is so talented, the great No. 7 and more year in the 60-meter thing about it is sometimes she’ll kind of get in a No. 8 on The Daily hurdles and even won the cruise mode where it’s like, ‘Yeah, she’s just kind Illini’s Title IX list event at nationals, setting the of cruising through.’ Then that moment she gets of Illinois’ greatest NCAA record in the process. beat, next thing you know she’s on fi re.” female athletes in She credited this success When asked what her favorite moment in her school history, turn to a more structured pro- track career, Felicien took some time to respond to Page 10 and 12. gram at Illinois than in high and compared the question to ‘asking a mom about her favorite child.’” school. “In high school, I didn’t train very much; I didn’t She is currently in Canada getting ready for train very hard,” Felicien said. “When I came to the Olympic trials next week. Illinois, there was structure, there was rules. If she makes it, it will be her third Olympics, There was a great program. Obviously, fresh- making her just the second Illinois alumna to man year there are so many changes. Diet, food, qualify that many times. access to basically everything. So those can turn The fi rst? out to be distraction. But the good thing for me is Tonja Buford-Bailey.

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SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

“It’s her ability to win, her mindset about winning. She hates losing.”

»

» » » » » »

» » » » » PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS SPORTS INFORMATION

Monday June 25, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Editor’s note: June 23 marks the 40-year anniversary of the passing of Title IX, a resolution that all but mandated equality in women’s sports. In honor of the 40-year anniversary, The Daily Illini is recognizing the athletes that have forwarded female athletics in the wake of Title IX’s passing. The Daily Illini summer staff sat down and sifted through a list of more than 30 nominees to name and order the top 9 female athletes of the past 40 years in terms of cultivating excellence for women’s sports at Illinois. Check out next week’s issue for Nos. 3-1.

BY KYLE MILNAMOW

Four-time All-American Two-time world title champion Two-time NCAA champion Two-time Olympian

9

» »


June 25-July 1, 2012

TITLE

IX

40 YEARS OF THE RIGHT TO PLAY

RENEE HEIKEN SLONE

V

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

10

1993 NGCA, Golfweek National Player of the Year Three-time All-American Three-time NCAA tournament top-10 qualifier Tied LGPA tournament scoring record, 1995-97

PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS SPORTS INFORMATION

Renee Heiken Slone, who played at Illinois from 1990-93, where she was a three-time All-American. She is currently the Illinois women’s head golf coach.

BY EMILY BAYCI

L

STAFF WRITER

ike clockwork, Renee Heiken arrived at the golf course with about an hour and 20 minutes to prepare before every match. She would warm up on the range, first with the 7-iron, then the 5-iron, 3-iron, 3-wood, driver, pitching wedge and then back to the 7-iron to finish. Next it was on to the putting green, where she would chip and putt. Finally, she returned to the clubhouse where she would sit off to the side, taking a few moments of solitude to get physically and mentally prepared for the match at hand. “Discipline, structure and work-ethic, she had what it took to succeed,” John Heiken said of his daughter, who eventually married and took on Slone as her last name. The hard-working attitude was there from when her father taught her to golf at the age of seven as a family-friendly activity. It didn’t take him and his wife Ronda Heiken long to realize she was talented and they supported her. Ronda took her to tournaments and John golfed with her every day. It took Slone only five years of playing to make the decision for herself: She wanted to devote her life to golf. She cruised her way through the junior tournaments, and it wasn’t a question that she’d play in high school. There was no women’s team at Metamora High School in Metamora, Ill., so she played on the men’s team instead, in the No. 1 slot nearly every time. It was 1986, she was good enough and because of Title IX, there was no question of whether she could play with the men. Playing the longer yardage helped her short and long play. “It turned out being beneficial for me and for them,” Slone said. Four women went out for the team her senior year of high school. Enough for a women’s team, which helped her prepare for college, where she’d have to do it on a daily basis. The No. 3 junior golfer in the country, Slone had her pick of schools. She chose Illinois because it was close to home and she had the opportunity to make a difference there. “I guess I had a lot of luck on my side in her coming here,” said Paula Smith, Slone’s coach at Illinois. Slone lived up to her expectations in college thanks to her skills, but also largely because of her never-give-up attitude. No matter the time, the temperature or the winds, Slone kept going. During the Big Ten Championships in 1991, the winds were so strong she could barely walk, let alone golf, yet she kept steady and ended up with the individual title. “Everyone was in fear and awe of her. We knew her name and her achievements,” said Jennifer Mieras-Carfine, who golfed against Slone at Michigan State and with her on the professional level. “She was the one to beat. However, Renee never carried herself that way, she proved herself on the golf course.” Her consistency always showed, especially in her senior season of 1993, when she averaged a school record 74.33 strokes per round, had a school record eight medalist titles and

was named the National College Player of the Year by both the National Golf Coaches Association and Golfweek Magazine. “That was really important to me because it was based on performance throughout the year, not just one win,” Slone said. Slone never had quite what it took to win at the top level despite her consistency. She finished in the top six during all three of her NCAA appearances — she started college during the spring semester, so she used her four years of eligibility in three and a half — but she never claimed the individual NCAA title she was hoping for. The huge wins never came on the professional level either. She never won a major tournament, though in her first full year of the Futures Tour in 1998, she finished second on the money list. “That was what showed I did consistently well,” Slone said. She usually made par and rarely birdied, which Slone said is what it took to win the big tournaments. She had the moments of greatness, the ability to turn everything around. “I remember Renee had the best mental game I’ve ever seen,” said Valerie Zimmerman-Kantzler, Slone’s teammate at Illinois. “She would have bad holes and then slap herself in the leg, say some choice words and then go birdie, birdie, birdie.” Slone tied the LGPA tournament scoring record of 28 at the Jamie Farr Kroger Classic in Toledo during her 1995-97 stint on the LGPA tour. “I remember every shot from those nine holes,” Slone said. “I was completely engrossed in what I was doing and in the zone. When it was done, it was like I almost woke up from a dreamlike state.” Slone met her husband Rick in 1999 during her professional career, when he was the golf director at a futures tour event. They hit it off and were married in November of 2001. It was around then when she grew tired of packing and traveling all the time and switched over to coaching, taking an assistant coaching job at Bradley University in 2000. She went back to Illinois in 2001 and completed her last semester of education that held her back from a college degree in marketing. After some time serving as a golf professional, she took over for Smith as head coach at Illinois in 2006. “She found something that pacified her desire to compete,” Rick said. She doesn’t have the time to golf anymore, she can’t practice every morning, she is no longer devoted to being the best possible golfer. Her competitive spirit comes flaring back when she golfs and isn’t as good as the glory days. She tries not to think of how much lower the old scores are. Her records are in the past, though she still fills most of Illinois’ record book — she’s the career-stroke average leader and has the top two single-season stroke averages in school history — she’s waiting for that to fade away. “Records are meant to be broken,” Slone said. “The time will come and I’m looking forward to that, to coach that golfer.”


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

11

June 25-July 1, 2012

Uplifting Athletes event raises awareness Registered student organization helps promote cause against disease acoustic neuroma quickly turned to the Internet, searching for any information she could find on the disease. The stands in Memorial Stadium were Acoustic neuroma is a rare, slow-growing scarcely populated besides a few fans and tumor of the nerve that connects the ear to high school recruits arriving with their fami- the brain and can damage several important lies, most of whom were confused about what nerves as it grows. During her research, Mauwas going on. pin was pleased to come across this event It was early Saturday morning, and the being held in her hometown. RSO Uplifting Athletes and the Illini foot“It makes me love these guys out here ball team put on their first who are practicing and at the ever Lift for Life under same time, raising money the sweltering heat. The for this, something that is on entire roster split into my heart right now,” Maupin said. eight teams to compete in an eight-event strong“I said, ‘I’m going to get information and learn all man-like competition. Champaign-Urbana that I can about this rare area resident Rita Maupdisease.’” in sat in the stands, watchAnyone interested can ing as her eyes filled with still donate online, and the a cross between tears and event has raised nearly amazement. The event $3,000 so far. But no matRITA MAUPIN, was to raise money and, ter the monetary donations, Champaign resident perhaps more importantObi Egekeze, graduate stuly, awareness for acoustic neuroma. A week dent and treasurer for Uplifting Athletes, ago, Maupin had never heard of this rare dis- already feels complete with what he and the ease, but she had to make herself somewhat group wanted to accomplish. of an expert on it very quickly. “This is what it’s all about,” Egekeze said. Last Monday, her son Ben Crane, a U.S. “This event is a success because of her ... Army captain and University grad, was diag- because we were able to reach one person.” nosed with the acoustic neuroma after he Maupin not only had the chance to learn from started having some hearing loss. Maupin the booklets being handed out on Saturday, BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

“It makes me love these guys out here who are practicing and at the same time, raising money for this...”

but she was able to hear from someone who has the same disease: former Illini offensive lineman and now senior Andrew Carter. Acoustic neuroma ended Carter’s football career. When Carter was 19 years old, his hearing started going in and out after Illinois played in the 2010 Texas Bowl. “It sounded like the adults on Charlie Brown, and it was really affecting my football,” Carter said. He went to get it checked out by doctors, who discovered the tumor most patients don’t develop until they are into their 50s. Carter said his tumor grew faster than expected, and within six months, he became completely deaf in his right ear., Carter still believed he could play football, so he trained, and after spring break in 2011, tried to play on the team. Then he got hit. That was the last time Carter put on football pads. He had surgery on May 16, 2011, to remove the tumor. After his procedure, Carter thought he’d be able to make another comeback, but his doctors advised him against the risk of taking another hit to do further damage. “It took a long conversation with my parents after that, and I decided to just take my medicine and continue school,” Carter said. “The head injuries were way too bad, and I

was unfunctional for the rest of the day. It was quite difficult since I played (football) since I was 7 years old; I was ready to get my college career going, and when I had my surgery, I thought I’d come back and play, and then I can’t.” Carter has medication now, which he takes every morning when he wakes up to prevent day-long headaches and after he eats dinner at night. He’s still a part of the Illini football family, attending team workouts and learning the new playbook although he is limited physically. Defensive coordinator Luke Butkus brought Carter in almost immediately after he was hired and made it clear that he had a place as a part of this team, almost like a graduate assistant role for the senior. Carter gained a tremendous amount of respect for him because of it and holds the gesture dearly. His teammate and one of his best friends, Zak Peterson, and Egekeze started Uplifting Athletes at the University with Carter in mind. “I knew we had a really good cause here with Andrew,” Peterson said. “It was one of those things where not a lot of people really knew exactly what was going on. “So this was a good opportunity to not only help Andrew out, but give him the satisfaction of helping other people like him.” Just like Rita Maupin.


June 25-July 1, 2012

TITLE

IX

40 YEARS OF THE RIGHT TO PLAY

ANGELA BIZZARRI

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

12

BY JAMAL COLLIER

A

STAFF WRITER

Cross-country national champion National champion in the outdoor 5,000 meters National champion in the indoor 3,000 meters Set seven school records in four years as an Illini

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Angela Bizzarri competes in the women’s one mile run on Jan. 27, 2007. Bizzarri will compete in the Olympic trials on Monday.

ngela Bizzarri is the best female long-distance runner in Illinois history. That’s how both Jeremy Rasmussen and Tonja Buford-Bailey, Illinois’ women’s crosscountry head coach and track and field head coach, respectively, described her without any sign of hesitation. With the list of accolades Bizzarri accrued in four years at Illinois, including three national championships — crosscountry, outdoor 5,000 meters and indoor 3,000 meters — five Big Ten championships and seven school records, there may not even be a close second. It didn’t take long for Rasmussen to realize he had a special runner on his roster. During Bizzarri’s sophomore year in 2008, she ran in the 5,000 for the first time. She said she did it because she was just trying it out and wanted to run a longer race than the 1,500 she had competed in as a freshman. Bizzarri finished over a minute ahead of everyone else in the race with a time of 16 minutes, 16.43 seconds, the second fastest in Illinois history. “Watching her do it, it seemed really easy,” Rasmussen said. “To come close to breaking the school record without really knowing the event ... she’s the best athlete I’ve ever coached.” As Bizzarri entered the NCAA Championships in the 5,000 in 2008, even her best time was not close to the fastest times nationally. However, she would go on to finish second that year at the NCAA Championship, with a time more than 30 seconds better than her previous best. She still says that race is one of her best moments at Illinois because she knew she could compete on a national level. One year later, she returned to the NCAA Championship stage, where she would win the 5,000. As she recalled her fondest memories at Illinois during a phone interview from Eugene, Ore., she continually credited her coaches and teammates before she spoke about the national championships or the chance to compete in the Olympic trials in 2008 or any of her other accomplishments. Rasmussen still speaks highly of Bizzarri for many reasons, but saves his most important praises for the type of person she is. She’s extremely intelligent, having earned an undergraduate degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology and being a sixtime Academic All-Big Ten and a two-time Academic All-American. The soft-spoken girl from Mason, Ohio, became the leader of the Illini cross-country team as she became an upperclassman. “She was one of the most humble people you’ll meet and everyone really saw that,” Rasmussen said. “No one really saw this three-time national champion and this really great player. They saw another teammate and another individual on the team that was just trying to get better.”

Her coaches described her as one of the most competitive members of the team, a trait that drove her to work as hard, if not harder than her teammates. Bizzarri agreed, making it simple that she just hates losing. “She was a relentless competitor and she did not like to lose,” Rasmussen said. “She would do anything in her own power to make sure that didn’t happen. It was one of the reasons she had the success that she did. She was such a competitor and enjoyed competing and racing.” Buford-Bailey said during Bizzarri’s sophomore year is when she noticed just how competitive and intense she really could be and it came unexpected from such a quiet person. “It’s funny,” Buford-Bailey said. “When you’re around her you’d never know that she has a tiger inside her.” Bizzarri is currently in Oregon training for her Olympic trial on Monday with the hopes of advancing for the finals on Thursday. Even as she prepares for the big stage, Bizzarri is still training the same way she did in college or for any other race in her career. She only runs about 50 miles during a week of practice — pretty low for longdistance-runner standards — but focuses instead on form and perfecting every motion. She’s mixing in some light workouts to lifting some weights only to have the strength to maintain the running posture that has made her so successful. “She was very committed to doing what Coach Rasmussen asked her to do,” BufordBailey said. “A lot of people gave them a hard time for her not doing more mileage, but it was obvious that that didn’t make a difference because it kept her healthy.” She’s preparing for one of the biggest races of her life, but she’s not feeling any pressure. “(Every race) has its own significance,” Bizzarri said. “Obviously the Olympic stuff brings more attention, but for me it’s always the same. It just has more attention on it than maybe other things would.” Bizzarri still speaks with Rasmussen at least every month and still follows the Illini track and field and cross-country teams. She recently offered her congratulations to Andrew Riley and Ashley Spencer through Twitter and texted Buford-Bailey right after NCAAs. “It was a lot of fun to keep up with the athletes in how they are doing,” Bizzarri said. “It’s really exciting to see Illinois’ athletes do well on the NCAA scale and even do well in the Big Ten. It makes me proud to be an Illini and fun to follow the sport.” Buford-Bailey didn’t take the support lightly. She was amazed at how humble she has remained as Bizzarri still takes the time out of her training to want to stay involved with Illini sports. And as Rasmussen put it, “She’s an Illini forever.”


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

13

June 25-July 1, 2012

RUGGERI’S ROAD

Ruggeri’s journey to the Olympics nearing the end Editor’s note: This is the eighth part of a series highlighting Illinois gymnast Paul Ruggeri’s road to potentially qualifying for the 2012 London Olympic Games. BY EMILY BAYCI STAFF WRITER

Paul Ruggeri is trying not to think about the one thing that controls his every move: his dream of making the 2012 U.S. Olympic gymnastics team. Olympic Trials are June 28-July 1 in San Jose, Calif., where five of the 15 remaining gymnasts will be named to the final team. “Now is the time,” the recent Illinois graduate said. “It’s finally here.” He doesn’t know what else to think about. He’s worked toward this for his entire life. He’s pushed aside dreams of becoming a doctor, countless vacations and his social life. “If I think about it too much, I’ll go crazy,” Ruggeri said. “I really don’t want that to happen.” It’s back to the gym, back to the gym. It’s gotten harder in the past few weeks because everything else is over now. He helped lead Illinois to an NCAA title, he passed his finals, he earned a college degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology. “This is the next goal on my list,” Ruggeri said. “This is what matters now.” If he thinks about it too much, he starts plotting the different possibilities. He could make the team, he could not even come close

to a slot, he could get injured in competition, he could be a named an alternate. He knows what the best option is but is not so sure about the worst. “That’s why I try not to think about it too much.” Ruggeri said. It’s back to the gym, back to the gym. He bonds with his teammates because they’re going through the same thing. Ruggeri, Illinois volunteer assistant coach David Sender and sophomore C.J. Maestas comprise the largest university contingent of national team members training together for the trials. They spend most of their training time and free time together, going to baseball games, watching movies or cooking dinner. “It’s hard to understand just how important it is to have teammates at a time like this,” Sender said. “It’s something that can’t be taken for granted.” Ruggeri talks to Illinois head coach Justin Spring, who’s been through this same tale before — the anticipation, the drama and the buildup. He’s there to help Ruggeri perfect his routines. He’s there to give Ruggeri mental advice. He’s there to help him stop thinking about everything. “This is the toughest time in the whole period,” Spring said. “It’s where everything gets so tense and so complicated.” It’s back to the gym, back to the gym. Ruggeri is right on the cusp, he’s a bubble gymnast and knows it. His performance at Visa’s was sub-par during day one, with major

mistakes on vault and parallel bars. On day two, he was different and practically flawless. That’s what he knew he could do and what he knows he has to do two more times. “Paul had the best performance I’ve ever seen him have,” Spring said. “If he can do that again, well, anything is possible.” Everyone knows what his goals are. His friends, his family, people affiliated with the University — they are always asking if he’s nervous and wishing him good luck. He simply replies with a smile and a thank-you, seemingly calm, cool and collected. Then he continues on his way, leaving to work out again. It’s back to the gym, back to the gym. He’s not changing anything, not anymore. His start values are set in stone. But his execution values, he wants those to go up every possible tenth. That’s what it’s going to take to make it to London. Practices are twice a day now, so there’s time to work everything out. “I need to get myself to the point where I make no mistakes,” Ruggeri said. It’s back to the gym, back to the gym. His plans for the future, those can wait until after London. Everything is on hold until after London. It’s as though his life has frozen and every part of his body is working toward the ultimate goal of earning a spot on the team. “I’m at the point where I want to be,” Ruggeri said. “If I hold anything back, I’ll regret it forever.” It’s back to the gym, back to the gym.

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Paul Ruggeri competes on the parallel bars at the Huff Hall on March 2. Ruggeri will compete at the Olympic Trials this weekend.


June 25-July 1, 2012

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BY BILLY FORE

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BY GARRY TRUDEAU

HOROSCOPES Today’s Birthday (06/25/12). Focus on career, service and wellness this year. Relationships expand, and commitments deepen with care and nurturing. Strive for balance between work and play; prioritize wellness through diet and exercise. Notice what makes you happy, and schedule time for that. Your word is your greatest asset. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 9 -- There’s much to be done and no time to waste. Better to do a little bit at a time so that you don’t get overwhelmed. Your charm and wits help. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 7 -- You’re in for a fun time. It’s getting very romantic. The odds are in your favor,

so increase them by setting the scene: good food, music and company. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 6 -- Spend quiet time at home. Now is a good time to clean your abode and make it work for you. Simple is better. Take care of repairs, especially the plumbing. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Take a stroll outdoors and breathe in fresh air and new ideas. Some things you try won’t work. Get advice from a partner. Two heads are better than one. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Keep your money in a safe place. There’s more coming in (and going out). Think of ways to increase your savings. Avoid distractions. Shop for bargains. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- You’re in the spotlight, so give it every-

thing you’ve got. You may be questioning what you know, and that’s a good thing. Don’t brag about recent accomplishments. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- Spending some quiet time with yourself may be a good idea. Don’t take other people’s comments personally now. Listen for morale boosters. Take a comedy break. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- It’s time to hang with friends and party like there’s no tomorrow. Don’t take yourself or others too seriously now. Rest and relax. Share compassion. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- Look at yourself from an external perspective to see what you can learn. Your mind and self-esteem are growing. Give thanks for what you have (and for what you don’t have).

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is an 8 -- Travel far and wide, even if only by imagination. Don’t hide at home. Your interactions produce great ideas, and perhaps some even some intriguing conflicts. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 7 -- Don’t push yourself too hard, and take time for rest. Patience is a virtue that’s admired now. Discuss shared finances to get on the same page. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is an 8 -- Upgrade your boring old problems to new ones worthy of attention by committing to a new promise. Keep putting food on the table, and give thanks. Enjoy a quiet moment. 2010 Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by Knight Ridder-Tribune Information Services.

Check out the DI on

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that includes 24 “Knocked Up” ACROSS Death Valley director Apatow   1 Mix with a spoon 60 Sound heard in an 26 Sound heard in a   5 Not go empty hallway movie theater   9 Political science 61 “Never mind” 28 Loosen, as laces subj. 63 Secluded valley 29 Some whiskeys 13 Biblical water-to64 Like much diet 30 Flabbergasted wine locale food, informally state 14 Snapshot 65 1970 Kinks hit 31 Consumer 15 Flightless bird of 66 Indian woman’s 32 “You’ve gotta be South America attire joking!” 16 “Incidentally …” 67 Found’s opposite 34 Chemical in drain 18 Performs in a play 68 Rear end cleaners 19 Response of sym35 Have a meeting of pathy the minds 20 Suffix with ranch DOWN 38 Rowers 21 Cozy dining spot   1 Sir Walter who 39 Withdraw, with 22 Lone Star State wrote “Ivanhoe” “out” 23 Beef jerky brand 2 Western lake near   42 Packaged pasta 25 Egg-hatching spot Squaw Valley brand 27 Filmmaker with   3 E-mail folder 44 2011 Oscar-nomstyle and total   4 Some stylish suninated film about control glasses African-American 30 Pairs   5 Pronoun for a ship maids 33 ___ Hoop   6 Locker room hand- 46 Leisurely walk 36 1968 A.L. M.V.P. and out cleaner Cy Young winner   7 Big name in arcade 48 Drain target ___ McLain games heard be37 Cigarette’s end   8 Chinese-American 50 Sound fore “Gesundheit!” 38 “Holy cow!” virtuoso cellist 51 Large fishing hooks 40 Dedicated poem   9 Rock associated 53 Swamp critter 41 Striped equine with hardness 54 Walled city in Spain 43 Suspect, in cop 10 “Let’s be serious 55 Allow to attack lingo here …” 56 Pants fillers 44 Pairs 11 Presidential rejec57 The Bruins of the 45 Goofs tion N.C.A.A. 47 Carve into, as a 12 Chore 59 Muscular actor plaque 14 Deg. for a prof with a mohawk 49 Performing in a 17 Zap with a stun 62 Grain in play, say gun Cheerios 52 Following the law 23 A lumberjack 56 Skating jump might leave one 58 Sony rival behind 59 Southwest desert The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

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The Daily Illini: Volume 141 Issue 157