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The Daily Illini

Friday April 6, 2012

High: 61˚ Low: 36˚

www.DailyIllini.com

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

Vol. 141 Issue 127

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Provost candidates address UI community BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

MELANIE CHALLBERG THE DAILY ILLINI

U.S. Rep. Tim Johnson, R-15, smiles while addressing his decision to not run for reelection. Johnson was at Urbana City Hall on Thursday to explain his retirement after over 40 years of service. He stated he could not adequately serve the 15th district, continue campaigning and care for his family. “It would be a disservice to us all,” he said.

Johnson drops re-election bid Personal obligations cited as reason not to run 7th time BY MATT RICE STAFF WRITER

At a press conference in Urbana on Thursday, six-term U.S. Rep. Tim Johnson, R-15, announced his decision to drop his re-election bid, saying he no longer wishes to make the personal sacrifices that come along with the office. “Aside from the missed birthdays, births and weddings, there are some specific critical family issues that require my ongoing attention,” he said. “Taken together, I cannot adequately serve the 15th District, campaign in the new 13th District, be in Washington, D.C. and fulfill my obligation to my family. It would be a disservice to us all to attempt that.” The Republican has served in public office for 44 years, having joined the

Illinois General Assembly in 1976 and the U.S. House of Representatives in 2000. He has often split from his party to stick to his principles, including his harsh criticisms of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He said he is proud of being extraordinarily connected to his constituents. “The single proudest thing I can look back on is the legacy of the fact that there is a real face associated with real public service,” he said, in reference to his relationship with his constituency. His decision not to run leaves his ticket on the 2012 ballot for the 13th District vacant. Many names have been put forth as possible replacements, but so far any talk of a replacement is only speculatory. Johnson stated that he has a particular person in

mind to fill his spot but would not offer a name. “I know them all (the potential candidates), and I like and respect them all,” he said. Johnson said his decision to drop out of the race was unrelated to the possibility of losing his seat. “If I felt we were not going to win the election, it would cause me a lot more angst about my decision,” he said. Jon Schroeder, a local farmer and supporter of Johnson’s, was present at the announcement. He said he understands the politician’s decision. “Speaking as a farmer, I appreciate his years of service for agriculture,” he said. “He will be missed, but there is an ebb and flow to politics.” The 66-year-old Congressman said “three more years could be 50 percent of the rest of my life” and added that he was concerned by his colleague Mark Kirk’s recent stroke. Johnson has made it clear that he does not intend to fade out of the public eye. His potential future endeavors include returning to practicing law

and perhaps even teaching. However, Johnson declared that he would never become a Washington lobbyist. He said he worked well with people of differing beliefs throughout his career. “I appreciate my friends, I appreciate people who have been my adversaries because quite frankly that’s the way the system works,” he said. Johnson intends to resign at the end of his current term. At the announcement, he was surrounded by his tearful family members. Johnson’s family supports his decision, said Buzz Johnson, the representative’s son. “Today, our family emotions are excitement and happiness for our dad, and we support him 100 percent,” he said. Johnson stated that his successor should be nominated by Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady some time after April 20. His successor will then have to face David Gill, a Democrat whom Johnson has defeated in three past races.

The fi nal three candidates for the provost position came to speak with the University community in a series of public forums. The forums were vice president and chancellor Phyllis Wise’s idea and are a fi rst for the campus. Each candidate had 30 minutes to discuss their strategies for bringing change to the University as well as previous experiences that they believe will help them in the position. After the presentation, a Q-and-A was held for audience members. Last week, Adam Gamoran, professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin and director of the Wisconsin Center for Education WATKINS Research, held his forum at the Knight Auditorium in the Spurlock Museum. He said he was glad to have a public forum and meet with faculty members. “The position of provost is one that reaches all the different parts of the Uni- ADESIDA versity, and so it’s important that people have a chance to meet the provost candidates,” Gamoran said. He added that his background from the positions he held at Wisconsin has helped him understand more about the University of Illinois. “I served a very wide GAMORAN range of campus roles, so I think my experience in working at the campus level with lots of different schools and colleges would be an asset,” he said. “I have experience with fi nding creative solutions to the challenges that all major research universities are facing.” The remaining two public forums were held this week on Tuesday and Thursday at 1:30 p.m. Ruth Watkins, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, mentioned her achievements, which include providing more scholarships to students, increasing transfer students and creating more online courses for students. Watkins emphasized the importance of collaboration while talking about her main philosophy. “I try to put the focus on: how do I help people be successful, how do I help them raise up their scholarship and their research to the area and level that they want to, (and) let

See PROVOST, Page 3A

Crime Alerts see substantial decline since last term STAFF WRITER

On Nov. 13, students, staff and faculty received an alert from the University Division of Public Safety regarding a shooting near campus that morning. Fast-forward to April, and no other Crime Alert has been issued since. University Police have confirmed that since the November incident, the campus has not seen any crime warranting the mass distribution and activation of the University’s Crime Alert system. According to the University Police Department’s archives, there have been no police reports in 2012, compared to 34 alerts issued in 2010 and 15 in 2011. Capt. Skip Frost of the University Police said only “crimes of a certain magnitude” are published and released, such as armed robbery, sexual assault and aggravated battery. “It doesn’t mean crimes aren’t occurring,” Frost said. “We do not report minor crimes to everyone.” Lt. Tony Brown of the University Police said the department’s decision not to disclose these other minor crimes falls in line with the 1990 Clery Act. The Clery Act is a federal statute that requires all financial aid-providing universities and colleges to gather and disclose information regarding crime and safety on or near the school’s campus. However, Brown added that minor crimes are not required to

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be reported in these alerts. For those crimes, Brown said that it is up to a lieutenant or higher ranking department official to decide what gets distributed to Crime Alert subscribers. It all depends on crime patterns, the risks associated with not releasing information, whether or not the crime was an isolated case and how severe the crime was. “We go more on a case-by-case basis,” Brown said. “We look and see if there is a pattern. Assaults, for one, happen very frequently on campus. But if it is an isolated incident, maybe just one person hitting another, if it appears it is just people getting into a fight, then we probably won’t report it.” Drug crime arrests and theft cases are not reported with Crime Alerts, for example. In 2011, there were 247 drug crime arrests and 371 cases of reported theft. According to the department’s security report and other departmental data, there was a decrease in almost every type of offense in 2011 compared to years past. Burglary has declined every year since 2009, when 103 incidents were reported. In 2011, that number decreased to 35. Statistics for 2011 will be officially confirmed later this year. However, he added, that does not mean crime now is nonexistent on campus.

See CRIME ALERTS, Page 3A

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Crime Alerts lower now than in previous years With the exception of motor vehicle theft, the number of criminal offenses reported by University police has decreased over the past few years. In addition, no Crime Alerts have been issued this year. Note: 2011 statistics are not official. University police will unveil official data in the 2011 security report later this year. 120

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Star of the NBC show “Parks and Recreations” and University alumnus Nick Offerman pauses during a meet-and-greet after performing to a sold-out crowd at the Illini Union on Thursday.

100

‘Parks and Recreations’ star performs to sold-out crowd

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Number of offenses

BY RAFAEL GUERRERO

2008 2009 60

2010 2011

BY ELIOT SILL STAFF WRITER

40

The Illini Union Board welcomed University alumnus Nick Offerman to provide some of the “Parks and Recreation” star’s comedic stylings. Offerman, most famous for his television role as Pawnee Parks Director Ron Swanson in the NBC series, offered fans of his television role access to the actor behind Swanson’s trademark mustache as well as his own advice for students.

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Sex offenses

Robbery

Aggravated assault

Burglary

BRYAN LORENZ design editor

Source: 2010 Security Report, University Police Department

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“I thought, ‘If I’m gonna talk to young people, I’m gonna give them the best version that I can of my tips for how to have a prosperous life,’” Offerman said. “There will not be a quiz handed out by me, but life will be giving you a pop quiz.” Offerman, who appeared sans mustache, had not been back to campus since graduating with a fi ne arts degree in 1993.

See OFFERMAN, Page 3A

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, April 6, 2012

The Daily Illini

POLICE

Champaign

512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300

! A residential burglary occurred in the 600 block of Fox Sedge Court around 10 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the victim reported an unknown subject burglarized her residence. Items stolen include a computer, two DVD players, two televisions and a computer accessory. ! A 27-year-old Champaign male and a 33 year-old homeless male were arrested on the charges of possession of alcohol in a parking lot and public urination in the 300 block of West Church Street around 6 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the subjects were seen drinking and urinating in a park. ! A residential burglary was reported in the 00 block of East John Street around 3 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown subject entered the apartment without authorization and fled when confronted by the resident. ! Motor vehicle theft occurred in the 400 block of Taylor Thomas Lane around 8 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the victim reported an unknown suspect stole her vehicle from her driveway. The vehicle in question is a silver, 2005 Chevrolet Malibu. ! A 22-year-old Champaign male was arrested on the charge of aggravated assault

Copyright © 2012 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Marty Malone )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Asst. online editor Hannah Meisel News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte

Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Video editor Krizia Vance )(.›**.$/*++ video@DailyIllini.com Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editor Bryan Lorenz )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Assistant design editor Eunie Kim Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM at the Omega Delta fraternity house, 1106 S. Third St., around 7 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, victims reported being threatened by a subject who displayed a handgun. ! Battery was reported in the 1500 block of Kiler Drive around 8 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, three female subjects, possibly in their late teens, knocked on the victim’s door. When the victim opened the door, the suspects pulled the victim outside and battered her. The suspects were not located.

Urbana ! A 19-year-old Urbana male was arrested on the charges of battery and residential trespassing in the 2000 block of Vawter Street at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the offender entered victim’s occupied residence without permission and remained in the residence after being asked to leave. The offender battered the victim. He was later taken to jail. ! A 30-year-old Urbana male and a 31-year-old Champaign male were arrested on various charges in the 1300 block of West Ellis Drive around 3 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the 31-year-old offender was arrested on a Champaign County arrest warrant. The second offender gave a false name

to police in order to avoid arrest for three valid Champaign County arrest warrants. A third offender’s vehicle was searched and a rolled up dollar bill with cocaine residue was found. Police also located a pair of brass knuckles inside the vehicle.

Illinois Student Senate teams up with class to help clean up campus

» » » » » » » » University ! Two U. of I. students reported the theft of their unsecured backpacks, which were left on a gymnasium bench inside the Activities and Recreation Center, 201 E. Peabody Dr., at 10 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the backpacks contained electronics and other items valued at $1,700. At 8:30 p.m., a student also had reported the theft of a book bag and book from a bench in the ARC men’s locker room. Estimated value of the items was $60. ! University police assisted the Champaign Police Department 7 p.m. Wednesday in the apprehension of three men, who, according to the report, a witness reported that the one of the suspects pointed a gun and threatened him while he was walking near Gregory Drive and Third Street in Champaign. Police found the men walking near Gregory Drive and First Street, confiscated a BB gun from one of them and issued all three a U. of I. letter of no trespass.

» » » » »

It’s not enough to say that we need to clean up our environment — we need to act. The Illinois Student Senate is committed to making our campus a better environment for students. Find out how you can help at DailyIllini.com

Keep up with this weekend’s updates on Illini sports

» »

For the latest results from this weekend’s competitions, including women’s gymnastics first-ever hosting of NCAA regionals, follow The Daily Illini Sports section at @DI_Sports

Compiled by Rafael Guerrero DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

THE217.COM CALENDAR PICKS

Today ART & OTHER EXHIBITS

EXHIBIT: ¡CARNAVAL! Spurlock Museum at 9 a.m. Fifty Years: Contemporary American Glass from Illinois Collections

Krannert Art Museum at 9 a.m.

Bringing Faith & Art to Life: Works of Shari LeMonnier

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Nathaniel Lash Photo night editor: Joshua Beckman Copy editors: Kaitlin Penn, Matt Petruszak, Lindsey Rolf, Ben Mueller, Christine Bednarz, Meghan Gallagher Designers: Colby Roate, Rochelle Chen, Lucy Brace, Scott Durand Illustrators: Veronica Pham, James Kim Web posters: Steven Vazquez, Torrence Sorrell,

Unitarian Universalist Movement of Urbana-Champaign at 8 a.m. After Abstract Expressionism

Krannert Art Museum at 9 a.m. Jerusalem Saved! Inness and the Spiritual Landscape

Krannert Art Museum at 9 a.m.

Karen Chen, Sony Kassam

“Wise Animals: Aesop and His Followers” Exhibition

Page transmission:Natalie Zhang

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday in the summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

U of I Main Library at 8:30 a.m. Shozo Sato’s Work Celebrated at Krannert Center and Japan House in Spring Semester

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts at 12 p.m.

“Where the Wild Things Glow” Paintings by Hua Nian

Amara Yoga & Arts at 9 a.m.

The Brothers Size at the Armory Free Theatre

Armory Free Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

CLASSES, LECTURES, & WORKSHOPS IPRH Symposium: Empire from Below

I-Hotel & Conference Center at 9 a.m.

Friday Forum Presents “The Making of a Successful Multilateral Environmental Agreement: Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and its Montreal Protocol”

University YMCA at 12 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

William Tyler ft. Nick Rudd Indi Go Artist Co-op at 8 p.m. Late Night with DJ Belly

Radio Maria at 10 p.m. Impalas at Huber’s!

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Huber’s at 8 p.m. The Dirty Feathers

Cowboy Monkey at 10 p.m.

Illinois’ Sarah Fiedler, competing on the beam above, and the rest of the women’s gymnastics team will host the NCAA regional competition in Huff Hall this Saturday.

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Power Flow Yoga with Corrie Proksa

CORRECTIONS

Cowboy Monkey at 6:30 p.m. Highdive at 10 p.m. Karaoke with DJ Hanna

Phoenix at 9 p.m.

» » » » » » » » Parrish Brothers

Rosebowl Tavern at 9 p.m. 1st Friday Blues

Memphis on Main at 8:30 p.m. Yoga Classes Krannert Art Museum at 12 p.m. Amara Yoga & Arts at 12 p.m.

Vinyasa Krama Yoga with Don Briskin

Amara Yoga & Arts at 4:15 p.m.

Happy Hour Hot Flow Yoga with Luna Pierson

» » » » » Amara Yoga & Arts at 5:30 p.m.

When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

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HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. ! Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or email diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. ! Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or email diadsales@illinimedia.com. Employment: If you are interested in working for the Advertising Department, please call (217) 3378382 and ask to speak to Molly Lannon, advertising sales manager.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, April 6, 2012

3A

‘Dare to Dream’ event addresses proposed building BY THOMAS THOREN STAFF WRITER

An ongoing discussion regarding the feasibility of giving some cultural centers and gender and ethnic studies programs their own facility continued Thursday night. Nearly 50 students and faculty members attended the “Dare to Dream” event. The talk began by dispelling several commonly held myths about the status of the project. Isabel Molina-Guzmán, associate professor of Latina and Latino studies, said the proposed facility would not be a “multicultural center” in the sense that

it would lump all of the cultural centers into a single, merged unit. Instead, she said it would be a facility that allows the various centers and programs to remain distinct units with their own staff. The building would have the added benefit of physical proximity that “would allow for more opportunities for collaboration” between the cultural centers, and gender and ethnic studies programs. Anna Gonzalez, associate vice chancellor for student affairs, said past concerns about this facility isolating and segregating the cultural centers are

mostly gone as the facility is now viewed as a good thing by most. She said this is in large part because of the quality and planned centralized location of the facility — the northwest corner of Sixth Street and Chalmers Street. She said the “world-class” building and easily accessible location would not make it “far away and hidden” from campus. Even though everyone involved with the feasibility study agrees on the planned location of the facility, it could still change if a donor were to give funds for another building

in the same location, Gonzalez said. However there are still some who remain opposed to the proposed collective cultural center. La Casa Cultural Latina withdrew from the study in a December 14 letter to the University. Later in the evening, MolinaGuzmán corrected other myths, such as the project already having money and plans to begin construction as early as May. She said there are not any funds for the building thus far. At this point, architecture fi rm Moody Nolan, Inc. is only looking into the feasibility of

the project, not a fi nal design of the building, said Tony Battaglia, architect for Facilities and Services. This is more of a programming role than a design role for the fi rm he said. “Programming is taking all the requisite spaces, functions, desires that all the stakeholders have and trying to compile them into a working diagram,” Battaglia said. Molina-Guzmán said the architects and consultants are trying to help determine if it is possible to include all academic units and cultural centers in one space.

Next Thursday, April 12, the fi rm will present their preliminary ideas for the facility in the form of “thumbnail sketches,” said Ross Wantland, assistant director of the Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations. These will be based on the Thursday discussion along with other talking points from feasibility study meetings held this past December. Wantland said the April 12 meeting will be a “much more advanced” version of the meeting on April 5. It will run from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in the Colonial Room of the Illini Union.

Student group works to end sex trafficking BY JENNA HOUCHINS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

After the second part of a campaign supporting human rights, the registered student organization International Justice Mission, or IJM, raised a total of $350 to help aid the cause. The IJM sponsored fundraiser, Loose Change to Loosen Chains, ended Thursday after raising slightly more than $50 in spare change this week. On each day of the event, IJM members gave out free ice pops and iced tea on the Quad to those who donated spare change to help spread awareness about global slavery and sex trafficking. “People are really generous,” said Steffi Chang, IJM member and junior in LAS. “I’m so blessed when people give us even a penny because I really believe any type of donation can really go a long way to help the cause.” Donna Yeung, co-president of the Illinois chapter of International Justice Mission and senior in ACES, said she enjoyed spreading awareness through the fundraiser. “The coolest thing is having people stop by and ask us what IJM is about,” she said. Advocates for the RSO were prepared to inform students on the issues addressed by IJM. “We tell them what the money is for and if they’re interested, we’ll talk even more about sex trafficking and how it is a really fast growing criminal industry going on,” Chang said. While some students only stopped by to donate, other students, like Seema Dave , sophomore in LAS, stayed to talk with IJM members about the issues and what the RSO is about. “At fi rst I just stopped by to donate my extra change from lunch but ended up learning a lot about the issues,” Dave said. In addition to collecting spare change, the fundraiser also attracted some new members to add to the RSO’s 20 active members and the 100 members on the official list, Yeung said. She said they are not only hoping to support the cause, but grow as an organization as well. “People really do want to help out after fi nding out about what IJM does,” she said. IJM will continue their fundraising efforts with other events this semester by partnering with other RSOs such as Liberty in North Korea, or LiNK, and the Human Wrong Initiative, as well as holding its annual benefit dinner on April 15th. “We should be fighting for those who can’t fight for themselves,” Chang said. “IJM really believes in this cause and I really believe through our efforts and prayer it can be stopped.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

This July 31, 2006, file photo shows Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, during a meeting near the Sudan border with a delegation of 160 officials and lawmakers from northern Uganda and representatives of nongovernmental organizations in Congo. On Thursday, San Diego-based Invisible Children, the California group that produced the wildly popular video that turned Kony into a household name, posted a sequel on the Internet, Kony2012 Part II.

Invisible Children posts sequel to Kony 2012 video BY JULIE WATSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — A wildly popular Internet video turned African warlord Joseph Kony into a household name and boosted the international hunt for the brutal rebel leader. Can a sequel do more? That’s the burning question for the small California advocacy group Invisible Children and its follow-up effort, “Kony 2012 Part II.” The Associated Press was given a copy of the sequel before its Thursday release. Part II repeats some of the same slick, inspiring shots as the

OFFERMAN FROM PAGE 1A Patricia Lusk , IUB director and head of the special event committee, said Offerman came to campus as part of his college tour. “As an alum, we defi nitely wanted him to come to campus,” Lusk said. “So we reached out to him, and he was very interested and excited in coming, so we’ve been negotiating with him ever since.” She said promotion for the event did not begin until earlier this week, when his appearance became official. Offerman performed to a crowd of about a thousand at the Illini Union, interspersing his comedy with original songs, which performed while he played acoustic guitar. “There are similarities, but it’s nice to see that he’s not Ron Swanson,” said Colleen Daniel , University alumna. “It was nice to see a different side of Nick Offerman.”

original of a young global community mobilizing into action. But noticeably missing is the voice of the organization’s co-founder, Jason Russell, who directed the first video. Russell was diagnosed with brief psychosis last month after witnesses saw him pacing naked on a sidewalk in a San Diego neighborhood, screaming incoherently and banging his fists on the pavement. His outburst happened shortly after Kony 2012 thrust the group into the global limelight. The sequel also lacks the kind of narrative that made the original unique. The fi rst Kony

Some of Offerman’s comedy toed the line between the religious and the risque. Tip No. 8 on Offerman’s list to achieve prosperity was to “follow Jesus Christ, if it gets you sex.” Gina Yoo, freshman in LAS, said it was interesting to see the dirtier side of the television star. “It just makes him seem a lot more worldly, a lot more experienced,” Yoo said. “It’s interesting to see what perspective he has and how he actually knows a lot about the Bible.” The comedian took time at the beginning of his performance to thank University professors Shozo S ato a nd Robi n McFarquhar, saying that he would not be where he is if not for their guidance. “He referenced a lot of the classes we took in theater,” Daniel said. “I probably thought it was a lot funnier than some other people think because they didn’t know what he was talking about.”

2012 presented the global issue through a child’s eyes, with a discussion between Russell, who directed the video, and his young son Gavin about stopping the bad guys. The latest video (http://apne. ws/HZvaiz) is a traditional — albeit hip — documentary that addresses criticisms fired at the San Diego-based nonprofit since its overnight launch to fame. Among the complaints were that Kony 2012 was too American-centric, that the group spends too little money directly on the people it intends to help, and that it oversimplified the

CRIME ALERTS FROM PAGE 1A There are many factors that go into this decrease in crime, officials said. Frost said the installment of more than 500 cameras by the start of the 2011 fall semester is one main factor. These cameras, installed all across campus, are being noticed by potential criminals, he added. “Most criminals, believe it or not, are shy in front of a camera,” Frost said. Change in weather can also be a factor in crime. Brown said winter tends to bring crime down as more people stay indoors, but with a milder 2012 so far, he added that he appreciates the stillness in campus crime. “Generally, spring semester tends to be quieter for crime,” Brown said. “Fall tends to be a bigger problem for us as the past few years were.” This comes as good news for students and others on campus. David Pileski, student body president, said the students he has

26-year-old confl ict involving Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army. The original video drew some 100 million hits on YouTube, and likely will go down in history as a case study on what can go viral, says pop culture expert Robert Thompson. But the Internet is fickle, he said. “The fact is, the story has developed in so many odd ways with all the controversy, and the sequel can’t really promise the bang of that first video — which is informing people of something they did not know before,” said Thompson, a Syracuse University professor. “Now we’re getting talked to are very happy with the current state of security at the University. One of his first initiatives as president of the Illinois Student Senate was to create a safety committee to plan events and raise awareness about how to stay safe. He said he considered it “a good policy move to start things off” during the first few weeks of his term. “We’ve seen that University Police has truly done its best to ensure safety on campus,” Pileski said. Sharon Lee, program advisor at the Illini Union Parent Programs, said she has not heard of any concerned parents who were put on the crime alerts Listserv. The lack of Crime Alerts has made many parents feel safe about what is going on at the campus, she added. “Usually when there is an increase in crime, parents will call with concern,” Lee said. “But the fact that there are no crimes to report must be a good thing for them. Haven’t had any calls wondering whether the system is down.”

into the details, which is never that thrilling.” But then again, Thompson added, what goes viral never ceases to surprise. Ben Keesey, Invisible Children’s CEO, said the sequel was made in two weeks. The thinking, he said, was the organization needed to answer to people wanting to know who was behind last month’s Internet success that prompted a bipartisan group of 40 U.S. senators to back a resolution condemning Kony and had children around the entire country asking their parents to do something.

PROVOST FROM PAGE 1A my partners in on that effort ... (and) help me when I need it down the road?” Watkins said. At Thursday’s public forum, Ilesanmi Adesida, dean of the College of Engineering, also talked about his accomplishments and spoke with the public about his vision for the position of provost. He said he was happy with how many people showed up to the public forum. “We’ve done a lot of things in Engineering, but I see some of the things that we have done that can be taken to the next level and used to solve some of the critical problems we have on the campus,” he said. “I want to see some of those things expand in other areas.” The public can submit their comments on each candidate through an anonymous webbased form, which can be found on the provost search website.

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Opinions

JURISDICTION

POLITICAL CARTOON

VERONICA PHAM THE DAILY ILLINI

Your support makes it possible to run Daily Illini To create dialogue, we need your voice RYAN WEBER Opinions editor

“N

ewspapers are a dying industry” is the banner that flies in the face of every media outlet that has the fighting spirit to run the presses despite the dismal drop in the readership of traditional broadsheet newspapers, giving way to an increased online audience. Just more than a month ago, news broke about The Daily Illini’s unfortunate financial state, which, to the delight of our staff, raised from the shadows support for the work we do here — alumni, faculty and even other universities voiced their concerns about our newspaper’s situation. Most importantly, we received, what I would call, overwhelming support from the students, concerned about the future of this publication. We wouldn’t be here producing content five days a week if it weren’t for the University’s students. Everything we do, from writing, researching and reporting to producing and distribut-

ing this paper, is for our readers — the students. Here, I speak for myself. Before arriving on campus, the utterance of “The Daily Illini” meant nothing to me. I once read that two years from now, you won’t recognize yourself. Well, two years after sitting in my first lecture in Foellinger Auditorium, I find myself as the opinions editor. Everyone says it, but it’s true: Never would I have seen myself here. Now that I am, I have a responsibility to you, our readers. In any newspaper, we columnists, bloggers and cartoonists have a special role of contextualizing news stories and coloring them a new shade. We take the news stories of the day a step further to argue their relevance and merit. Sometimes, a news story cannot speak for itself, so we give it a voice. What is most interesting about being able speak where news cannot is that we can also listen in a way that news cannot. We want to hear what you have to say. We want a dialogue — for you to join the conversation. As I move into the coming year as editor, I expect Opinions to continue to push what we have to say into the lecture halls, cafeterias and libraries in which you read us. Because even if newspapers are a dying industry, we, and what we have to say, are not going anywhere.

Ryan is a sophomore in LAS.

THOUGHTS ON THE SIDE

GUEST COLUMN

Health care another thing to worry about Time spent online can TOLU TAIWO Opinions columnist

I

n T-minus one year, one month and some odd days, I will be entering “the real world.” Many of you know about my obsession with my quarter-life crisis and the indecision of my future, so I’ll spare you those details. Yet, beyond the search for a perfect graduate school and housing, I worry about one other pivotal thing: health care. Yep, you heard right: I did say health care. I want to sleep at night knowing that if I break my arm fighting off a bear in the woods (yes, I do plan to be that awesome in my later years), I’ll be taken care of. And with all the debate around the Affordable Care Act lately, I’m not quite sure that will happen. For three days beginning March 26, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the constitutionality of the act. If found unconstitutional, several provisions, if not the entire law, will be cut. The Court will make a decision in late June, so I can already tell you which month will be a nail-biter for me. True, there are some things in the act that don’t really concern me yet. Point: my eyes glaze over when I read “Medicare.” But the most important provision for me — and for all

of us students — is the individual mandate that will require all to get health insurance. There’s debate over whether the mandate is “forcing” us against our free will. Now, let me be clear, I don’t like to be “told” to do anything. I cross the street when the stoplight tells me to wait, and I touch hot plates at restaurants when the waiters tell me to be careful. When I heard the government wanted to make me buy health care later down the road, my first thought was to barricade myself in my house and never pay taxes, Ron Swanson-style. However, this is something that needs to be mandated to college students. Realistically, I’m the weird exception to

the rule. Most people aren’t thinking about health care now, and chances are they won’t be thinking of it right after graduation. But later, we don’t want to regret not purchasing insurance. It may seem intrusive, but it’s for the sake of our health. Of course, there’s a reason the act doesn’t often cross our minds: We’re not “out in the real world” right now. We’re in the world of our parents’ health insurance and McKinley. Plus, the Act is long and, again, a lot of the provisions, while wonderful for us, may not kick in at this point in our lives. But if by some reason, the whole law was shot down, one important provision — that we’ll stay on our parent’s health care about five years after col-

lege — will disappear. You think it’s daunting to start paying at 26? Can you imagine doing so the second you graduate, without time to ease into it? I can. It’s my version of personal hell. Maybe I’m just being paranoid. After all, Obama is apparently confident that the Supreme Court will back him up. Still, the individual mandate works. It may be a pain, but it’s going to force us to think into the future and protect ourselves from any mishaps. We should be able to enter the real world somewhat confident in ourselves and our health: birth control, runny noses broken bones and all.

Tolu is a junior in Media.

help fight world hunger T he United Nations has set eight Millenium Development Goals for 2015, and I took a class where we spent some time focusing on each of these goals. The first of them is to end poverty and world hunger. The United Nations’ goal to halve the proportion of people living in hunger is that which I am focusing. Over the past month or so, I have tried to raise awareness of world hunger. I have talked to people by word of mouth, and I have created a twitter account, @ fiteworldhunger, The World Food Program sponsors Free Rice, a website that makes it so easy to make a difference internationally. On this site, you can answer very simple questions, including English vocabulary questions such as “teacher means: instructor,” in which you donate ten grains of rice for every correct answer, via the United Nations World Food Program. How many study breaks go by watching the same Youtube videos or by clicking on the same Facebook tab over and over? This is an opportunity to actually send food to those who need it and at no cost to you besides a couple clicks. Certainly chronic hunger

is not as severe an issue in Champaign and Urbana as it is for those starving in developing nations across the globe, but there are local resources such as food pantries. I know that visiting a food pantry and donating food isn’t the simplest thing to do, especially with our busy schedules, but what is easy is staring you right in the face — the internet is such a simple way to make a difference. The point is this: One in every four children under five is underweight in developing regions. The problem is worse in South Asia, where half of these children live impoverished. To think that you can make a difference while sitting at a computer, answering easy questions, is truly incredible. I didn’t realize these resources existed before, but it appears that the United Nations found a way to reach a generation addicted to Facebook and the Internet. Even though 925 million people are projected to suffer chronic hunger this year, you can help make a difference and prevent it.

One in every four children under five is underweight in developing regions. The problem is worse in South Asia, where half of these children live impoverished.

ALEX RUBY, junior in LAS

THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID

You’re already beautiful; now show the world your ‘naked face’ MELANIE STONE Opinions columnist

I

t’s no secret what’s in my bathroom drawer: makeup, a hair straightener, perfume, nail polish, lotions, a curling iron and much more. I call these things my beauty essentials — tools of the trade that are important to girls everywhere. Admittedly, I rely on these products, and I know I’m not the only one. Appearances matter, especially for women. We work tirelessly to smooth our frizzy hair, achieve flaw-

less skin and seek perfection to no avail. Two women, Molly Barker and Caitlin Boyle, are quite familiar with this primping cycle. The duo started “The Naked Face Project” a few months ago as a way to figure out the intention behind their beauty habits. Barker and Boyle are no strangers to encouraging and empowering women. Girls on the Run, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping preteens gain self-respect through running, is Barker’s movement. Boyle’s revolution is called Operation Beautiful, in which people post anonymous notes in public places in an attempt

to end negative self-talk. “We said to ourselves, let’s Over the years, they kept just eliminate all of our primpgetting the same question: ing habits,” said Barker. “Let’s “Why wear go to the beauty makeup or coldesert, so we or your hair if can figure out we are beautiwhy we’re doing ful the way we these things.” are?” The two womNeither women have learned an had a solid so much. For answer. And Barker, it’s so “The Naked been a fascinatFace Project” ing journey so was born. far. The idea “I discov“The Naked Face Project” behind it is ered how my simple: no feelings about makeup, no myself had gotnail polish, no ten tangled up hair products, nothing for 60 with my appearance,” she said, days. exhaling as she told me about

“Why wear makeup or color your hair if we are beautiful the way we are?”

her experience. “I love the things I’ve done with my life, yet I still have issues with my beauty and body and everything. It’s been an enlightening process.” I couldn’t help but wonder what would happen if the ladies of Chambana embarked on such a journey. Here, and on every other college campus, there is an obsession with physicality. We pile on mascara and curl our hair, and for what? To attract members of the opposite sex? To feel better about ourselves? Perhaps Barker and Boyle are truly on to something. If we attempted “The Naked Face Project: University of Illinois,” we could come one

step closer to understanding ourselves and our reasons behind all of these beauty habits. Getting our eyes off ourselves is by no means an easy task, but this project might go a long way when it comes to eliminating selfishness, vanity and narcissism. “Just try it for two weeks and see what happens,” said Barker eagerly, excited to see her project reach a new audience. “For us, we began to feel free at that two-week point. If you can get through two weeks, you’ll really reap the benefits.” Two weeks. Au natural. Girls, can we do it?

Melanie is a freshman in Media.

Reader’s opinions: The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. Mail: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.”


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Friday, April 6, 2012

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BY ALISON MUTLER operate unless they’re 30 bribed. bribes.60 SoBeloved he fl ies sick 45 Chihuahua 13 Do some recharging 37 It has a sticking point DOWN for a THE ASSOCIATED PRESS one’s sights AP photographs of Andrei inSoho his babies to western Europe on bud- 47 Adjustgroundskeeper 25 Things worked 52 Can shade 37Center It hasfor a sticking “Immortal 14 39 Sandy ! 1 “Take cover!” under in a BUCHAREST, Romania — incubator generated sympathy get flights so theyBeloved” can get treatpoint piece 49 Lays atop 31 See 32-Across cat-tails? 42 Pre-stunt 54 Exeter provoca!2 Security requests 9 Grade sch. garage Baby Andrei has confounded doc- around the world. ment from doctors who won’t 51 Asset exclamation 39Highly Sandy shade tion 15 decorated !3 Star in Cetus subject tors just by being alive: The tiny “Offers of help have come in, expect 27 “Sax All Night” ANSWER TO kickbacks. PREVIOUS PUZZLE 53 King, in Cape Verde Bradley 46 Thing worked Abbr. on in a 42 Pre-stunt 57 Cut takers: ! 4 What an express of10 Round-trip New Ager boy with twig-thin limbs was giv- particularly from abroad, from a Andrei, who still weighs less 55 Handy-andy’s letters provocation garage 22 Prefix with many fruit ten whizzes by: Abbr. 59 Some kind of A F F than I X an average A H E newborn, A D D S Box-office flight? en just days to live when he was non-governmental organization,” hasH 56 take 29 Mtge. broker’s city in 46names Thing worked on 48 Second-largest ! 5 Hägar’s wife ___ S T O just R K10 centimeters B A S I (4 E inches) E E 58 L SALT born with almost no intestines — Cirstoveanu said. come-on 11 ITackles and II, e.g.a tough in a garage Finland 24 Georgetown athlete ! 6 Polynesian farewell eight months ago. The cost of the surgery 60 6 letters P goes R O of V intestine, E R B compared I A G E to about T R 60 E Beloved task “Immortal Be31song “SCTV” lineup 25 worked under 50 Matched up, after “in” 48Things Second-largest Now there’s a glimmer of hope into the hundreds of thousands meters H I T three S O A F (yards) PforEother R O N loved” piece 61 Fan setting 12 W. Coast clock in a garage 52 Can 33 Hmong city in Finland ! 7 “Beau Geste” headfor another miracle. of dollars, way out of the reach hasI 63 puzzle’s black A L ofI babies D his I Sage. A Like S Tthem, E Rhe O D How this setting homeland 27 “Sax All Night” New 54 Exeter exclamation 62 Apollo’s chariot gear 50 Matched up, People in Europe and the Unit- Andrei’s Gypsy parents, who liveN started are arranged L E T I Lteething. M O R A I N E squares 13 Do some Ager 57 Cut takers: Abbr. 35 It is in Spain after “in” “passenger” ! 8 Responsibility for a ed States have started offering in a poor part of eastern RomaHe has captured the hearts of 64 They may have you in T Y G E R W O O F S T E R recharging 29 Mtge. broker’s come59 Some kind of ___ groundskeeper funds to help Andrei get a com- nia. Romania’s average monthly his nurses, some of whom played stitches, in brief For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; with a credit R E P Ato try S T U R the E monon 60 6 or, letters 14 Center for cat! 9 Grade sch. subject plicated intestine transplant in salary is $460, or 350 euro. the lottery to raise card, 1-800-814-5554. 31 “SCTV” lineup 65 Gunsmith with Smith 61 Fan setting A C H S R I S E U R G E S tails? 10 Round-trip flight? the United States, the Romanian The bribery culture in Roma- ey needed for surgery in the U.S., 66 One may say “I’m with Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday 33 Hmong homeland 62 Apollo’s chariot “pasP H O which E B ECirstoveanu S A hopes B S E Tackles a tough pediatrician in charge of the nian hospitals is so ingrained theN T 15 Highly decorated 11 crosswords fromtask the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. stupid” senger” 35 It is in Spain E toR infant S I S E get R L 12 W. Coast clock setting baby’s care said Thursday. that nurses expect bribesPjust willTnow forYfree. R D A AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit Bradley The offers came after an Asso- change sheets. Surgeons can parents, who live E DgetI T Andrei’s S S O P O hunM N !I 22 Prefix with many nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. The crossword solutionToday’s is in the puzzle Classified section. Online subscriptions: and more than 2,000 past ciated Press story last week hundreds of euros (dollars) andZ dreds A D C of O kilometers N Q U E(miles) S Taway, I O N fruit names puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). MARCO AND MARTY BILLY FORE chronicled how Dr. Catalin Cir- upward for an operation,Swhile Nurses take A O rarely A Lvisit. E U T A Rturns E T E 24 Georgetown Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. stoveanu, head of the neonatal anesthetists get roughly a third cuddling the bony baby, who E R N Y A T E S G O R E D Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. athlete unit at Bucharest’s Marie Curie of that. loves human contact and screws children’s hospital, fl ies babies Cirstoveanu runs the cardio up his face and wails when put abroad for lifesaving surgery to unit at Marie Curie. But its state- back in his incubator. Andrei was born premature get around a culture of corrup- of-the-art machinery has lain idle tion in which many doctors won’t because he has banned staff from on July 27 in the town of Tecuci.

Aid sought for baby’s rare intestine transplant

Rebel insurgent group calls for cease-fire in north Mali

DOONESBURY

GARRY TRUDEAU

BY RUKMINI CALLIMACHI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAMAKO, Mali — The rebel group that recently seized control of Mali’s remote north in a maneuver that effectively partitioned the country in two announced a cease-fire Thursday, saying they had reached their military goal. Moussa Ag Assarid, a spokesman for the National Movement for the Liberation of the Azawad, said the group was declaring the cease-fi re to allow humanitarian aid to resume in the north, where shops were looted. In Ivory Coast, the military chiefs of the nations bordering Mali met Thursday to hash out their plan for a military intervention. Deputy Ivorian Defense Minister Paul Koffi Koffi said military action is being considered both to reverse the coup that deposed Mali’s president last month, as well as to preserve Mali’s territorial integrity after the rebel advance in the north. He instructed the army chiefs of the 15 nations in West Africa to draft a detailed plan, including how many troops each intends to send, how quickly they could ready them and what logistical means they plan to contribute. In Paris, Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said France is ready to help African forces on a logistical level. The chief of staff of the French army, Adm. Edouard Guillaud, traveled Thursday to Burkina Faso to discuss details with the president. The rebels launched their insurgency in January, saying they wanted to establish an independent Tuareg homeland in the north, known as the Azawad. They only succeeded in taking small towns until March 21, when disgruntled soldiers stormed the presidential palace in the distant capital of Bamako, overthrowing the president.

BEARDO

DAN DOUGHERTY

HAROUNA TRAORE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coup leader Capt. Amadou Haya Sanogo speaks to the press at junta headquarters in Kati, Mali, an outskirt of Bamako. The day after an embargo was placed on Mali, the soldier who led a recent coup said Tuesday that he agrees with restoring constitutional order.

Illinois gun laws fall short on promoting safety, audit says BY JOHN O’CONNOR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPRINGFIELD — State oversight of gun ownership in Illinois is “limited” in its ability to safeguard the public because of poor follow-through, inadequate collection of mental health records and tardy action on permit applications by “overwhelmed” Illinois State Police officials, an audit Thursday reported. The state police program for issuing and monitoring Firearm Owners Identification cards falls woefully short in gathering court records on potentially mentally ill gun owners, confi scates only 30 percent of the FOID cards that police revoke and doesn’t report critical information to federal authorities required by a criminal background database, the report found. Lawmakers ordered Audi-

tor General William Holland’s assessment last spring after the uproar caused by an Associated Press public-records request for names of the state’s FOID-card holders. State police denied the AP inquiry, but the attorney general said the records should be released, prompting a successful Illinois State Rifle Association lawsuit and pushing legislators to ban disclosure but calling for a study to ensure there is proper gun-permit supervision. “Our audit concluded that the effectiveness of the FOID card program is limited in promoting and protecting the safety of the public,” Holland wrote. Deficiencies in mental health reporting alone, he said, “seriously undermine the effectiveness of the FOID program.” The state police largely agreed with the fi ndings and

said it is making improvements. Spokeswoman Monique Bond pointed out FOID applications topped record levels during the period audited, 2008 to 2010 — about 300,000 a year. 138 PANTONE COOL GRAY 6 There are more 1.3PANTONE million Illinois FOID cards, necessary to buy guns or ammunition in the state. Cards are denied to those who are “intellectually disabled” or judged “mentally defective” as well as to felons, drug addicts, domestic violence offenders and others with various troubles. Auditors found that from 2008 to 2010, state police revoked PANTONE 138 PANTONE COOL GRAY 6 more than 20,000 FOID cards, but retrieved only about 30 percent of them. Some are surrendered to judges when a holdPANTONE 138 PANTONE COOL GRAY 6 er is convicted of a crime, and beginning this year, state law requires they be returned to state police, Bond said. PANTONE 138

PANTONE COOL GRAY 6


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Friday, April 6, 2012

Marine charged with engaging in political activities to fight case with 1st Amendment BY JULIE WATSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MICHAEL BOJDA THE DAILY ILLINI

Braden Boe, left, director of the film “A War for II,” watches as his film is played at the Art Theater in downtown Champaign. ”A War for II” was screened during a preview for the third annual New Art Film Festival on Thursday.

Preview of New Art Film Festival showcases local filmmaking talent Annual event’s 3rd outing to showcase more documentaries BY CHRISTINE BEDNARZ STAFF WRITER

The Art Theater and C-U Confidential hosted a preview event yesterday featuring local film artists in preparation for the third annual New Art Film Festival, or NAFF. Jason Pankoke, programmer of the event, said the festival is intended to help local filmmakers showcase their work and boost their careers. However, he said this year’s festival will be different from previous years.

“This year will be a lot more eccentric, partially because there will be more documentary pieces,” Pankoke said. Some of the films at the preview included a music video directed by Chris Eitel, of Urbana, called “Life Inside an Elephant”; a science fiction short directed by Chris Lukeman, of Champaign, called “Once Upon a Time in 1973”; a period short directed by Braden Boe, of Charleston, Ill., called “A War for II”; and a music documentary directed by David Gracon, of Champaign, called “Walls of Sound.” “Walls of Sound” was shown in its entirety at the event, while only portions of the other films were presented. The film features a record store in Eugene, Ore., that struggles to stay in operation amid the world of legal and illegal digital downloading, according to a press release. Pankoke offered his insight on the connection between “Walls of Sound” and the purpose of NAFF.

“In the age of rapid downloading, people can definitely empathize with the plight of being an independent business person, which is also exactly why we do this festival, to help promote struggling local film makers,” he said. The event also made it possible for Thomas Cord, a local film director and New York photographer, to debut his film “Riding Virginia.” The film includes a Champaign-based cast and crew selected by Brett Hays from Shatterglass Studios. Pankoke said he along with the filmmakers have done their best to compile the best show for 2012. “Several pieces are collaborations across campus,” he said. “The films take a lot of people pulled together to make ... the miracle of just getting it done and creating something worth showing.” The NAFF will take place April 20 from 5 p.m. to midnight as a featured event of the 10th annual Boneyard Arts Festival. The complete list of featured films will be released Monday.

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. — A Marine is facing dismissal from the military for posting Facebook images of President Barack Obama’s face superimposed on a donkey and for selling “Nobama” bumper stickers online, a prosecutor said Thursday. Sgt. Gary Stein, 26, acted irresponsibly and disregarded repeated warnings that his anti-administration postings violated Pentagon policy involving members of the military, Marine Corps Capt. John Torresala said during a hearing at Camp Pendleton. Comments that were prejudicial to good order and discipline were posted on the Facebook page used by military meteorologists and could have influenced junior Marines, the prosecutor said. Stein’s security clearance was taken away and he has no future in the Marine Corps because he can’t do his job, Torresala said. Backed by a team of lawyers and congressmen, Stein is fighting to stay in the military and test its longtime policy of limiting the free speech of members. His lawyers and the American Civil Liberties Union contend his views are protected by the First Amendment. Stein has rallied support since he was notified last month that the military was moving to discharge him after determining he was in violation of the Pentagon policy barring service members from engaging in political activities. “The military may be different from the civilian world, but it’s not exempt from the First Amendment,” said David Loy, legal director for the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial counties. “Sgt. Stein didn’t say anything for which the Marine Corps has any right to punish him.” The Marine Corps has said it decided to take administrative action after Stein declared on Facebook that he would not follow unlawful orders from Obama. In addition to being discharged, Stein said, he would have his rank reduced to lance corporal if he is proven to be in violation. He said he was removed from his job at the Marine Corps Recruiting Depot in San Diego on Wednesday and given a desk job with no access to computers. Loy said Stein did not threaten order or discipline or take positions that anyone would attribute to the Corps. Instead, the Corps is threatening loyalty and morale in its ranks by persecuting a Marine for exercising his free speech rights, Loy said. Stein, a nine-year member of the Marine Corps, has said he started a Facebook page called Armed Forces Tea Party to encourage fellow service members to exercise their rights. Defense lawyers began the hearing Thursday by asking board members about their understanding of military policy limiting members from engaging in political activities and the guidelines on expressing their personal opinions.

Police say Oakland shooter may have had multiple targets Hundreds gather Tuesday to mourn loss of 7 victims BY TERRY COLLINS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEN MARGOT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mourners attend a memorial service at the Allen Temple Baptist Church. Several hundred people gathered Tuesday night for a prayer vigil for the victims of Monday's shooting at Oikos University, a small Christian school in Oakland.

OAKLAND, Calif. — Police said Thursday they were investigating the possibility that a gunman who killed seven people at a tiny private Christian college was seeking multiple intended targets in his rampage. A day earlier, police said the apparent target had been the director of the nursing program at Oikos University. However, Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan said late Wednesday the gunman had been seeking another female administrator, not the director of the nursing program. Officer Johnna Watson, a police spokeswoman, would not identify the other administrator but said she no longer works at the school. She did not clarify whether the nursing director could be among the group.

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“We’re still looking at if there were any other intended victims as well. That’s part of our ongoing investigation,” Watson said Thursday. “We’re keeping the investigation open for the possibility if the suspect was intending to harm any other administrators.” Suspect One Goh, 43, has been charged with seven counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder, plus a special circumstance allegation of committing multiple murders that could make him eligible for the death penalty. He did not enter a plea or make a statement during his first court appearance Wednesday. Police said Goh acknowledged forcing a woman from her office at gunpoint into a classroom, where he fatally shot several people before fleeing in one victim’s car, according to a police affidavit. Nursing student Ahmad Sayeed said a gunman burst through the back entrance of the lecture hall holding a terrified school receptionist hostage and began randomly firing. The receptionist, Katleen Ping, 24, was among the slain. Police arrested Goh about an hour after the shooting spree at

a supermarket a few miles from campus. In a Wednesday interview with The Associated Press, Oikos nursing director Ellen Cervellon said her conversations with several students and faculty members led her to believe the gunman was looking for her. She said Goh had dropped out of the nursing program at the tiny private school around November and became angry when she told him the school could not refund all his tuition money. Cervellon wasn’t on campus Monday when the rampage occurred. She did not return calls Thursday seeking further comment. Investigators have said Goh was angry about being teased for his poor English at the school, which is focused on serving Korean immigrants but is attended by students from around the world. Victims of Monday’s shootings came from a number of countries, including Korea, Nepal, Nigeria and the Philippines. Goh was born in South Korea but became a U.S. citizen, police said.

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1B Friday April 6, 2012 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports Newly released Williams’ tape reveals more skeletons in Saints’ closet KEVIN THORNTON Sports columnist

I

of splitting time. “We’re good friends, so it’s really easy to cheer him on when he does well and I think vice versa for him.” O’Toole threw for 270 yards, one touchdown and four inceptions while completing 40 of his 67 pass attempts as a true freshman. He said although his playing time was limited last season, the experience has proved valuable this spring.

don’t know if New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton has any hobbies outside of football, but now would probably be a good time to pick one up. On a day where Payton, general manager Mickey Loomis and assistant coach Joe Vitt were set to appeal their suspensions stemming from the bounty scandal, disturbing new audio of former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams surfaced. While working on a documentary about former Saints special teams player Steve Gleason (suffering from ALS, otherwise known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), filmmaker Sean Pamphilon was able to record a “please tell me you’re not recording this” type of speech given by Williams. It was delivered the night before the Saints divisional playoff game against the 49ers this January — which the Saints lost anyway, go figure. Loaded with words you can’t say on television, Williams’ speech was probably a lot like many pregame pep talks, but way more incriminating. Referring to 49ers running back Frank Gore, Williams said, “We’ve got to do everything in the world to make sure we kill Frank Gore’s head. We want him running sideways. We want his head sideways.” When talking about backup running back Kendall Hunter, Williams continued, “Little 32, we’re going to knock the f*** out of him.” Despite sounding violent in nature, these comments and Williams’ use of the phrase “kill the head, and the body will die” wouldn’t shock many who’ve been in a football locker room before. His speech takes a more serious tone, however, when talking about wide receiver Kyle Williams — who was then recovering from recent concussions: “That little wide receiver, No. 10 ... We need to f----- put a lick on him now.” These words could be the figurative nails that shut the coffin on Williams’ NFL career, as Pamphilon told Yahoo Sports that he released the audio of the speech because of how uncomfortable Williams’ comments — specifically about Kyle Williams’ concussions — made him feel. In my opinion, the most alarming part of the audio is when Williams talks about receiver Michael Crabtree: “We need to decide whether Crabtree wants to be a fake-ass prima donna, or he wants to be a tough guy. We need to find out. He becomes human when we f------ take out that outside ACL.” It’s one thing to tell your players to play physical and hit hard, but it’s completely different to encourage them to target another player’s knee — especially one with a history of knee problems — potentially ending someone’s career and taking food off his family’s table. Technically it’s not against the rules to use a player’s injury history against them, but it’s definitely unethical. And although Williams never specifically mentions the bounty program, he repeats the phrase “I got the first one” while rubbing his fingers together, indicating cash payment, according to Pamphilon’s recording. Making the situation worse, this speech took place about a week after the NFL reopened its 2010 investigation into the Saints’ bounty program, after team officials denied such a system existed. It’s unclear if NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell had heard this audio before handing down his punishment, but this recent public revelation is going to make it very difficult for Payton

See FOOTBALL, Page 2B

See THORNTON, Page 2B

Gymnastics sets bar high for regional competition JOSHUA BECKMAN THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Sarah Fiedler, competing on the beam above, and the rest of the women’s gymnastics team will host the NCAA regional competition at the Assembly Hall this Saturday. The Illini enter the field in the fourth seed out of six but aim to win. BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

After a week off from competition, the No. 22 Illinois women’s gymnastics team will host the NCAA regional competition Saturday for the first time in program history. The Orange and Blue enter the competition as the fourth seed in a six-seed field; however, it does not falter their confidence. The Illini will welcome No. 2 Oklahoma, No. 11 Stanford, No. 14 Denver, No. 24 Kentucky and

Illinois-Chicago to the Assembly Hall. “We know that we need to concentrate on ourselves,” Illinois head coach Kim Landrus said. “We can’t worry about if we are first seed or sixth seed. We need to worry about one routine, one event, one skill at a time.” The solid performance at Big Ten Championships by the Illini has helped bring momentum into the gym during practice. Senior Kelsey Joannides said the energy has risen in the gym although

the season is coming to an end. “There’s days that we come in and we are tired; it’s been 13 or 14 weeks straight now, you’d think that we’d start to be a little more tired, but I think that we know this is the peak time,” Joannides said. “In your head, you don’t want to let yourself get down. You bring it every day knowing that this could be our last meet; this could be our last Monday practice or Tuesday practice. The energy is a lot better because we know what

we want to accomplish and we know what it’s going to take to get there.” Unlike its regular routine, Illinois has had two weeks to prepare for the Champaign regional. As a leader, Joannides has been trying to keep her teammates focused during practice. Illinois continues to build on what the team has been working on in practice all season long. “I always try to be a posi-

NCAA Champaign Regional Saturday, 4 p.m. The Assembly Hall The Illini host their first ever NCAA regional competition.

See WOMEN’S GYM, Page 2B

Men’s gymnastics gunning for 4th consecutive Big Ten title Illini reminisce on past Big Ten wins as they anticipate another title BY EMILY BAYCI SENIOR WRITER

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Paul Ruggeri and the rest of the seniors on the men’s gymnastics team will aim to claim their fourth Big Ten Chmapionship title this weekend in Iowa City, Iowa.

This year’s Illini seniors don’t know what it means to lose a Big Ten Gymnastics Championship. Every year of their college careers, Illinois has taken the conference title. This weekend at the Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City, Iowa, the Illini are hoping for a four-peat. “You really take ownership to know you have won four rings out of your four possibilities,” Illinois head coach Justin Spring said. “In essence, you can say that you’ve had a perfect Big Ten run.” The championships are a far cry from what Illinois entered three years ago, on April 3, 2009, in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Illini were the underdogs and hadn’t claimed a Big Ten title in five years. They were trailing the entire meet and came back in the last rotation to share the crown with Michigan. The Illini have progressed since then, building with solid recruiting classes and claiming two more

conference titles. They enter the careers. They accomplished othweekend as one of the favorites, er feats, including individual Big along with No. 1 Penn State, which Ten titles, national champions and defeated the Illini earlier this two more team conference titles, season. but “nothing compares to the first “Not to sound cocky, but I am one,” senior Kyle Moe said. completely confident in saying we “It was just surreal,” said senior can come in and Paul Ruggeri, win our fourth who was a sophin a row,” senior omore during Anthony Sacrathe first win. “I mento said. was still young. Now with some I didn’t realof the highest ly understand Big Ten start values in the the whole team Illinois Gymnastics nation and worldChampionships a t m o s p h e r e class gymnasts and how much Friday, 7 p.m. everyone really on the roster, a Saturday, 7 p.m. win seems more cared about winCarver-Hawkeye Arena plausible. But ning a champiIowa City, Iowa onship, winning looking back on something like their freshman The Illini look to claim their fourth that. I got to see year, the seniors remember to stay 23, 24-year-old consecutive Big Ten title.! humble. men cry, and it “It taught me was such a fulnot to take winning for grant- filling feeling to be a part of that ed,” senior Devin Regan said. “I and to contribute to that.” remember turning around and see“We built something,” he adding (then-senior) Ross Bradley’s ed. “A dynasty, a tradition of this face burst into tears. It was a big program.” Ruggeri doesn’t think he’ll be moment; it was life changing.” All five seniors named their first shedding any tears this weekend, Big Ten title as the most momentous moment of their college See MEN’S GYM, Page 2B

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Scheelhaase, O’Toole split 1st-team responsibilities in spring football practices O’Toole has an opportunity to push for more playing time this season. He and The Illinois football team has versatil- Scheelhaase have split reps with the first ity on offense with returning quarterbacks team in spring practices, but head coach Nathan Scheelhaase and Reilly O’Toole. Tim Beckman said the job is currently One gives the Illini a traditional pock- Scheelhaase’s to lose. et passer, while the other excels in the “Nathan deserves it because he’s been ground game as a rushing the starting quarterback for two years,” Beckman quarterback. “I mean, I’m more the said. “If we had to take a speed runner,” the 6-foot-4, snap today, he’d be the one 220-pound O’Toole joked. taking the first snap, but Reilly continues to progAs last season’s starter, Scheelhaase led the team ress and Nathan does, and in rushing with 624 yards Miles (Osei) does also.” on 191 carries for six touchScheelhaase passed downs, while O’Toole carfor 2,110 yards, scored ried the ball 13 times for 13 touchdowns and threw 47 yards in limited action. eight interceptions with a BILLY GONZALES, “I’m just kidding,” 63.2 completion percentco-offensive coordinator age in his second season O’Toole said. “Obviously as starter. when you watch us play, we’re completely different types. Nate runs “Nathan’s played a lot of football,” quararound and makes plays with his feet, and terbacks coach Chris Beatty said. “I told I like to think I can throw the ball. ... But those guys I remember watching them at the same time, Nate can throw and I can when it was 70-67, or whatever that Michmove a little bit.” igan score was (67-65 Wolverines win), a BY CHAD THORNBURG STAFF WRITER

“No matter what offense you’re running, you better have great leadership skills.”

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Reilly O’Toole (4) prepares to run during the game at Memorial Stadium. While fellow returning quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase (not pictured) brings pocket passing ability, O’Toole brings a speedy running game to this season, among many other skills. couple years ago and thinking, ‘Man, that guy’s just a freshman out there and he’s going with Denard Robinson score for score.’” Beckman said he hasn’t yet decided how he plans to utilize his quarterbacks during the season. He employed a two-quarterback system at Toledo and could do the same at Illinois. “I think it helps that me and Nate don’t have any tension or anything,” O’Toole said


2B

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Friday, April 6, 2012

Track heads South for Battle on the Bayou Women’s track to face top-ranked opposition in La. BY BOB MERLO STAFF WRITER

After taking home six event victories last weekend, the Illinois women’s track and field team will attempt to take its momentum south, competing against some of the nation’s top teams. The Illini will travel to Baton Rouge, La., for LSU’s Battle on the Bayou. They will face the likes of No. 2 LSU, No. 10 Texas Tech and Big Ten foe Penn State. With three competitive outdoor meets already under its belt, this weekend will provide the Orange and Blue with its best indicator of progress that the team has had all year. “This is going to be our biggest meet of the season. We’re really expecting to go in there and get some personal bests and run fast,” head coach Tonja BufordBailey said. “The weather is going to be nice, competition is going to be great — this is really going to be our indicator of where we are and what we need to do in training, getting ready for postseason.” All-American freshman Ashley Spencer looks to return to form this weekend after battling illness the past two weeks. She currently holds the nation’s fastest time in the 200 meters and will lead six other Illini competing this weekend. “She’s still a little down, not at 100 percent, so we’re still going to work her through it though because she’s been out for a few weeks,” Buford-Bailey said. “She’s going to run the 200 again and an open relay, so we’re hoping she’s going to be back to where she was a month ago.” Spencer took home the Big Ten indoor title in the 200 and was integral in Illinois’ title in the 4x400 meters as well. The Illini’s success in indoors has carried over to the outdoor season thus far, and hopes are that it will continue. “We came off of a pretty good indoor season, and everyone still has that momentum going, and we’re just ready to keep going and just get better and better,” sprinter Ashley Kelly said. At this point last season, the Illini were coming off a disappointing seventh-place finish at Big Tens, and they were still practicing indoors due to the weather. This year, their fourth-place finish indoors and warm temperatures have them better prepared for meets like this one. “I think the first two weekends were kind of like getting your feet back under you, getting used to outdoor track again, adjusting from indoors to outdoors,” Kelly said. “LSU is going to be more about just putting your race together, everything you’ve worked for in practice and really executing it against competition.”

FOOTBALL FROM PAGE 1B “As the season progressed last year, I got more and more comfortable,” O’Toole said. “Not only for me, but I feel like my teammates, they can see that I was somewhat successful in some games. Knowing that I can actually go out there and make plays, they can trust me.” Beatty said O’Toole has improved as a leader and that he brings a positive energy to the team. “He’s kind of infectious,” Beatty said. “Those guys, they like his personality. He gets excited. He hit a big ball yesterday and he was chest bumping everything.” In addition to competing for playing time, Scheelhaase and O’Toole, along with Osei who has also been playing running back, have had to learn a new offense. Co-offensive coordinators Billy Gonzales and Beatty have implemented their spread offense in spring practices, which Scheelhaase said is considerably different from what the Illini ran last season under former offensive coordinator Paul Petrino. Scheelhaase said the new offense emphasizes getting players the ball in space. “Obviously that is just a different feel for everybody,” he said. “I think guys have seen what it’s been able to do as far as get them chances to make bigger plays and things like that.” Scheelhaase said the Illini haven’t gotten too far into the intricacies of the system, as Beatty and Gonzales have opted to focus on the basics this spring. “We need to get a whole lot better,” he said. “We need to learn a whole lot more, just the smaller parts, the fine details of what makes the offense really work. But I think guys can see that, can see the development that we’ve all had as far as what this offense has done.” With the quarterbacks’ varying strengths and skills, Gonzales believes the Illini are very strong at the position. “What we’ve realized is, son of a gun, we’ve got three guys that can run the offense extremely well,” he said. “Bottom line is you better be a great leader to play that position, plain and simple. No matter what offense you’re running, you better have great leadership skills. “And all three guys have stepped up and done a fantastic job so far.”

JOSHUA BECKMAN THE DAILY ILLINI

Andrew Riley, front, crosses the finish line to win the 60-meter hurdles during the Illini Open at the Armory. Riley will make his debut in 110-meter hurdles at Saturday’s Battle at the Bayou.

Men’s track will contend against best teams in country at Saturday’s meet BY BOB MERLO STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s track and field team will get a chance to see how it stacks up against some of the best teams in the nation this weekend. In Baton Rouge, La., the Illini will compete in LSU’s Battle on the Bayou. Among others, the Illini will battle with the likes of No. 2 LSU, No. 7 Texas Tech, No. 9 Mississippi State and No. 20 Iowa. The meet will be the first of the outdoor season for All-American Andrew Riley, as well as for other top Illini athletes. “With the competition this weekend, we’re really looking forward to this meet,” head coach Mike Turk said. “Obviously, we’re going to have some top-level competition from across the country and it’s a great facility, the weather is going to be hot, and this is a great early season meet for us.” Riley, who sat out the first two meets

after a grueling indoor season, will meet of the outdoor season, so I’m just make his season debut in the 110-meter going out there to have some fun and get hurdles, an event that he narrowly lost back in the competitive spirit.” his national title to last Riley will also comseason against LSU’s pete in the 4x100 meter Barrett Nugent by relay alongside fellow All-American senior five-hundredths of a second. Stanley Azie, freshman “I expect to go out Brandon Stryganek there and have some LSU’s Battle at and senior Josh Zinzer. Illinois fun,” Riley said. “With It will be the first time the Bayou Nugent, the guy I’ve this season the Orange been battling over the and Blue will have its Saturday, all day years, it’s going to be a top relay squad out on Baton Rouge, La. good competition. It’s the track. good for him and it’s The men’s and women’s fields include “It’s going to start top-10 opponents No. 2 LSU and No. with seeing our pergood for me.” 7 Texas Tech. Riley isn’t getting formances, seeing our caught up in old rivaltime and our distancries, however. He plans to treat this meet es improve, and that’s the big thing,” just as it is: his first meet of the season. Turk said. “I think we’ll see quite a bit “I’m just looking to go out there to get of improvement.” the rust off,” Riley said. “It’s my first Freshman Joey McAsey and sopho-

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more Ryan Lynn will also open their competition in the 800 meters this weekend, an event that could prove pivotal in the team’s final standing on the leaderboard. “We’re going to be opening up with some of our guys that haven’t been on the track yet this outdoor spring, or guys that haven’t been running their main events,” Turk said. The meet should provide the Illini with the benchmark they have been looking for, as their top performers will have an opportunity to see how they stack up against top-notch competition and see what needs to be done to improve. “I’ll be looking back and comparing where they were at this time last year,” Turk said. “I know all indications have been that we’re a little ahead of where we were last year at this time, so I want to see that trend continue.”

Illinois women’s tennis eyes victory over Michigan, shot at Big Ten lead Illini hope to end Wolverines’ 3-year, 30-match winning streak in Big Ten play

BY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

A battle against a top-20 team for a share of the Big Ten lead is the challenge that faces the Illinois women’s tennis team. No. 19 Illinois (12-5, 4-1 Big Ten) hits the road this weekend to face conference-leader Michigan on Saturday and then Michigan State on Sunday. The Illini have won six in a row, four of them conference wins, a run that has propelled them to the national rankings. The No. 19 ranking is the fourth highest in school history — the highest was in 2004 when Illinois was ranked No. 16. “We’re not going to change one thing,” head coach Michelle Dasso said. “We’re trying to keep things as consistent as we’ve been over this last month or so.” The No. 15 Wolverines (12-5, 5-0) have also been hot, winning five straight matches. They have been a juggernaut in the Big Ten over the past three years, as they haven’t lost a conference match since March 29, 2009, where they dropped a 6-1 decision to Northwestern. The threeyear streak spans 30 matches, and their head coach Ronni Bernstein is 43-2 in her career in conference clashes. Both losses came against Northwestern. “I don’t think so,” said fresh-

WOMEN’S GYM FROM PAGE 1B tive, optimistic person in the gym and remind them to focus on the little details,” Joannides said. “I’ll be the first to admit, I get so frustrated when I mess up, so they are always there checking on me, saying ‘finish this skill’ and ‘point your toes’

MEN’S GYM FROM PAGE 1B win or lose. “That can wait for NCAAs,” he said. If the Illini win the NCAA title match, they will have won the first national championship for the program in 23 years and the first for Illini athletics in nine years. That goal was not quite conceivable three years ago. If the Illini accomplish it, Spring said more intense emotions can be expected. “There’s a lot of teams I was on where winning a championship, getting a ring is just an endless pursuit that never happens,” Spring said. “Having the opportunity to win four Big Tens in a row and a national title, it’s pretty unreal.”

THORNTON FROM PAGE 1B

CHONG JIANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Melissa Kopinski eyes the ball during her doubles match against Iowa. The freshman Kopinski is undefeated in her last seven singles matches, as the Illini take to the road to face Michigan and Michigan State this weekend. man Melissa Kopinski when mark in dual matches this year. asked if there was any added She is currently No. 125 in the pressure playsingles rankings. Also, reding a team like Michigan. shirt senior “We’ve had a Marisa Lamgreat run in bropoulos has the Big Ten won six sinthis year. We’ll gles matches No. 19 Illinois No. 15 Michigan treat it like any (12-5, 4-1 Big Ten) in a row for the (12-5, 5-0) other match Illini. and go execute Michigan Saturday, 11 p.m. our game plan has a superb Ann Arbor, Mich. and see how freshman of Illinois aims to claim a share of the its own in Emithat goes.” conference lead. Kopinski is na Bektas. She is ranked No. 6-0 in her last 10 in singles seven singles matches — one of which was and holds a 13-3 record in dual unfinished — and has an 11-2 matches. She also has been

named Big Ten Athlete of the Week four times this year and has been ranked as high as seventh in the nation. Michigan State (8-8, 0-5) is in the conference cellar, having lost four in a row and seven of its past nine overall. However, it does boast an 8-4 record at home this year. “I don’t really care what’s going on with any other team in the Big Ten other than the University of Illinois,” Dasso said. If Illinois wins, there is the potential for a four-way tie at the top of the Big Ten standings, with Northwestern and Nebraska both holding 4-1 records in conference.

the regional. “Big Ten’s was awesome,” sophomore Sarah Fiedler said. “Just the energy from Big Ten’s, we have been transferring that this week and we’ll definitely bring that to regionals also. We did really well at Big Ten’s, so it gets you excited for regionals also.” Being present for both Illinois appearances at the NCAA Cham-

pionships, Landrus holds high expectations for her team going into this weekend and hopes to take her team to nationals for the first time as head coach. “I want to go out there and hit 24 for 24,” Landrus said. “I want to leave Assembly Hall knowing that we have done everything that we can. And of course our goal is always to finish in the top two.”

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and ‘that was really good, but it could have been better.’ I think I just try and keep up the energy and help everyone make the best out of every day, even if it’s not perfect.” Though the Illini placed fifth at the Big Ten Championships, they recorded their secondhighest score this season with a 195.850. The Orange and Blue plan to carry the momentum into

(suspended one year), Loomis (eight games) and Vitt (six games) to win their appeals. Not only did they deny the program’s existence but continued its practice after multiple warnings by the league to stop. In addition to the suspensions, the Saints were forced to forfeit their next two second-round picks and fined $500,000. Williams became a member of the St. Louis Rams’ staff before the penalties were announced. Goodell has since suspended him indefinitely from the league, and there’s no indication he plans to appeal it. Despite telling his players, “We don’t f****** apologize for how we’re going to play,” Williams has publicly apologized twice since the scandal went public. Now I’m not friends with Goodell or anything (yet), but I’ve got a good feeling Pete Rose will get into the Baseball Hall of Fame before Williams is allowed to coach another NFL team. As far as Payton’s concerned, he should hope Bill Parcells wants to coach the Saints next year and find a good book to read — as it looks like he’s going to have a lot of free time on his hands for the next 12 months.

Kevin is a sophomore in Media. He can be reached at thornt10@illinimedia.com. Follow him @kevinthorn10.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

3B

Friday, April 6, 2012

FOR RENT

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310 315 320 330 335 340 345

Apartments Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

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HELP WANTED

employment

HELP WANTED

!"###$%&##'()*+,-+)-./012-*23-45/630+,-5.67-33378.95/:5;74)(-

020

Part time

030

Full/Part time

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FOR RENT

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Furnished/Unfurnished

410

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410 APARTMENTS Furnished

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APARTMENTS Furnished

420 APARTMENTS

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420 #

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1 Bedroom 901 W. Springfield, U $ 520-570 911 W. Springfield, U $ 525-595 1004 W. Springfield, U $ 495-529

G"=$@&$*'/-H$ *B/CD/(1) 4#'()*++,# -.//#012/.1/2# # 3!456#$$57889!# :::;,<,=*+=(*>?(@;A+,# 7777777777#

2 Bedroom 111 S. Lincoln, U

!"#$"%&'(%)*'%+**,%#%-*./01*%2/3*(% 8,0#*!/-!(9("5(/5-!#1,-!,1%&"&'#!/0*!&1*!-9-%6!4(6:

Corner of Lincoln and Green $780

<!!$@&$*9?2I$ *B/CD/(1)

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1010 W. Springfield, U $1080 - $1140

4 Bedroom/Two Bath See the winners of

FOR SOMETHING WITH WHEELS THAT MOVES?

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LOOKING

1010 W. Springfield, U $1440 - $1680

#"=$%&$%(JFB$ *B/CD/(1)

For Info: (217) 344-3008 911 W. Springfield, Urbana www.BaileyApartments.com

BCD2#&#'/E.FFG# H$KK#D=(A?IJ# '0L#2M#%#NCOPQQ0# -.//#012/.1/2# # 3!456#$$57889!# :::;,<,=*+=(*>?(@;A+,# 7777777777#

THE217.COM

TUTORING

150

Need an ESL English Tutor? !"#$%&'()*+,%(++-)+ !"-).('+/0$-),1'/20$2( !3-4,$)0('.$(5,1'(1/'/0$-) !6'$0$)7,/)&,%$+0()$)7

!89:;<,0(+0,1'(1 !=1(/>,8(+0,1'(1 !?(7$))(',@/+0,1'-7'(++,%(++-)+ !:&$0$)7,1/1('+,-',/11%$2/0$-)+

I offer tutoring for adults and children at any level. CONTACT PAUL (American with 20 yrs. exp.) AT: 217-637-5923 or englishtutor4u@yahoo.com

ACTION

ADS! !"#$ %$ &'$ ()$ *'$ +(),$ %,$ -#$ ./0$10)2-3045$60)3/%#,-40$()$ 7)%#48().%.-(#$3%.09()-04$:()$ !"#$"%&'())) ;#,$ <0$ 0=-9-<=0$ :()$ (")$ 4803-%=$;3.-(#$;,$8)-30>?

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2 FREE PARKING SPACE special offer

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1 FREE PARKING SPACE special offer

THIS WEEK ONLY! 808 W. Illinois, U. 1BR/1BA $775. W/D, D/W, C/A !!!"##$%&'(")*$+ ,-./0+12.3.455

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Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

420 APARTMENTS

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Looking to

SUBLET your

APARTMENT?

!!!"#$"%&'() ! "#$%&'(!)*(!+,(!*-./01/! 2'%!34#56!7#!589:-;(!! %'.<'%%&<'.(!;5<%'5%;! *"%(+,--. =#>'?#-;%!@1AB0! /"%(+,--. C#D7!=#>'?#-;%!@EF0! /"%(+,--. =#>'?#-;%!@1100! >>>G4<'5#4';?<&%:&#:G5#9! /1HIAJEI1JJE!

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217­337­8337

502 E Springfield, C. 3 BR from $1,275 2 BR from $1,095

1 Bedrooms: 38"9$:(7*/6)-;0$<

2 Bedrooms:

208 N Harvey, U 604 1/2 W Elm, U 704 W Western, U 705 W Elm, U 712 W Green, U !"#$%$&'()*+,-./0$1

10 month lease options and prices at select locations 502springfield.com 217-351-1800

3 Bedrooms: 208 N Harvey, U 610 W Elm, U 711 W Elm, U

4 Bedrooms: 610 W Elm, U 711 W Elm, U 234$%$5-67/70$1 2"2$%$&'()*+,-./0$1

5 Bedrooms:

337­1565 hunsingerapts@gmail.com www.hunsingerapts.com

Take a virtual tour at www.bankierapts.com Call 217.328.3770 to set up an appointment

NO FoOLING AROUND

Furnished

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420 APARTMENTS

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HUMONGOUS 1BR !"#$%$&'(()*$+ ,-.$/'01$2#3# !"#$%&'$()*+,-

Units Completed by June 1st!

!!!"##$%&'(")*$+ ,-./0+12.3.455

34567$-8-%649!63 !"#$%&'()'*$+",$-.*./($0120 !"#$%&'$"(!) ***+,-./01213/-45/,$67+682 Bedroom 58 E. Armory, C. 201 E. Armory, C. 604 W. Stoughton,C. 1004 S. Locust, C. 511 W. Church, C. (unfurnished) 1009 W. Clark, U. 1010 W. Clark, U.

$870 $930 $1000+ $640-$850 $730 $670 $755 $845

Parking & laundry available Apartments Furnished

WIN $1000! Sign by April 15th and get a 32â&#x20AC;? TV installed in your bedroom or get $300 off a year

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Amenities at 51 E. John St., Champaign

$20 10 Words, 5 Days $10 20 Words, 5 Days

*Cash-in-advance only. No refunds, but you may cancel your ad.

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101 E Green St.

1

F !""!" !"""""

701 W. Washington St.

1

F !""!" !""!""217-337-8850. $370/mo.3 blocks from campus.Some utilities.

309 E. Green Street

4

F !" !" !" !" 847-209-6189. Seeking female sublet. All utilities. Rent $790

217-714-3016. $475+utilities. Free parking. Avail Immediately

1011 S. Wright St.

1

F !""!" !" """

310 E. Springfield Ave.

1

B !""!" !"!""847-219-7682. $650 + Sec. deposit. Nice view. Many amenities.

847-363-9610: $375/mo+utilities. Furnished. Close to quad.


4B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, April 6, 2012

Baseball prepares for 1st home conference series Pitcher Kevin Johnson, Illini hope to repeat last year’s sweep of Indiana it didn’t really feel like a conference game,” he said. “It was a fun While the Illinois baseball team game to pitch in. They had 5,000was off Wednesday, its next oppo- plus fans there, but this first connent, Indiana, was amid a mara- ference home series is defi nitely thon game against in-state rival a big one.” Ball State that went 15 innings Johnson has won his previous and lasted four-and-a-half hours. five starts, his most recent win Indiana prevailed over the Cardi- being a performance in which nals 6-5 in walk-off he allowed just fashion. two earned runs The Illini were in seven innings not triumphant against Mississippi Valley in their lone midweek game, losing State. Indiana to Bradley 6-3. “The compeIllinois Illinois (15-11, (13-16, 4-2 Big tition’s going to (15-11, 1-2) Ten) 1-2 Big Ten) welbe a little better, Friday, 6:05 p.m. comes Indiana (13obviously,” JohnSaturday, 3:05 p.m. 16, 4-2) this weekson said. “But Sunday, 1:05 p.m. end with hopes of Big Ten games, Illinois Field turning both teams’ you know, I get weeks around. up for those a Junior right-hand- The Illini take on their rivals in the little more just er Kevin Johnson first home conference game of the because it’s the season. (5-1, 2.86 ERA) will Big Ten and we take the mound for wanna make a Illinois, while left-hander Joey good showing.” DeNato (4-1, 2.51 ERA) will start Though Indiana should provide Friday’s game for the Hoosiers. more of a challenge for Illinois’ With Illinois’ only previous con- second home series, head coach ference games coming against Dan Hartleb doesn’t foresee a newcomer Nebraska, Johnson change in the team’s approach. said this weekend almost feels “We’re not gonna change anylike the first Big Ten series of the thing that we do because of a parseason. ticular team,” he said. “We just “That Nebraska series, it need to go out and throw quality was cool, but it was weird that pitches.” they’re in our conference now, so Redshirt freshman catcher BY ELIOT SILL STAFF WRITER

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Kelly Norris-Jones has worked in tandem with Johnson throughout the ace’s dominant stretch. “We have a great chemistry,” Norris-Jones said. “We talk in between innings, see where we’re at and pretty much what he does is just attack the batters. He jumps up and gets his fastball ahead early for strikes, and that’s when he can throw his change-up for strikes and also his curveball.” Offensively, Illinois was held to three runs by Bradley in Tuesday’s contest but wasn’t discouraged by the lack of production. “I thought we hit balls hard on Tuesday; I didn’t think we swung the bat terrible, but that’s just the game of baseball — sometimes it doesn’t happen,” leadoff man Thomas Lindauer said. Illinois swept Indiana last year in its fi nal conference series of the regular season. The series included a performance from Johnson that the junior remembers quite vividly. “I pitched the first game against them, I did 8 2/3,” Johnson said. “I remember that game specifically because Luke Joyce came in after me, threw two pitches and got my win.” A walk-off home run from thensenior Casey McMurray gave Illinois the 4-3 win in that game. Lindauer said that while hav-

CHONG JIANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois' Kevin Johnson throws a pitch as a Michigan State player leads off first during the first game of a doubleheader at Illinois Field. Johnson will start in the game against Indiana on Friday. ing swept Indiana last year is great, both sides are presenting different teams this year, and Illinois’ main focus is defend-

wanna do; if we can get two out of the three, we’re fi ne with that as well, but there’s no way we can drop a series at home.”

ing its home field. “We’re always looking to win three games,” Lindauer said. “That’s our goal, that’s what we

Illinois softball encounters Nebraska for 1st time since 20-1 loss in 2006 at Iowa last weekend and falling changed, Nebraska’s offense still 1-0 to Illinois State on Wednesday. has the potential to score 20-plus Nebraska (21runs. The 14, 4-2) enters C or n hu skers boast a lineup the game havthat leads the ing won eight of its last 10. Big Ten in both “The name hits and runs. Six hitters in on the other side, in the Big the Nebraska Ten, doesn’t lineup are batting over .300 mean a lot,” on the season, Sullivan said. compared to “Stats are one just two for the part of the Illini. analysis, but “I don’t know actually playmuch about ing the game them,” Illinois and being the ALEX BOOKER, pitcher Pepper better team Illinois outfielder Gay said. “I’ve that day, that never thrown inning, is what’s really important.” against them before. But I’m just Although the players have going to go out there and throw

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The Illini face the Cornhuskers for the first time since a 21-1 loss in 2006.

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Friday, 3 p.m. Friday, 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 p.m. Lincoln, Neb.

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Nebraska

(21-14, 4-2)

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“We’re looking to come out just as hard as we did in our first Big Ten outing with Minnesota. We want to take it to them on their home field, especially with their rowdy fans.”

their rowdy fans.” The Illini offense has struggled as of late. They have scored just two runs during the four-game losing streak. Booker has led the team with five hits in that stretch, including one of only two the lineup mustered against Illinois State. From the circle, Gay has thrown well in her last two outings, pitching 16 1/3 innings and surrendering just two runs but picking up two 1-0 losses. Her 1.74 ERA is good for third in the Big Ten. Even though it is the fi rst meeting between these teams that any of the current players will remember, the Illini see it as just another '()&*+,&'--.&&&&&&&&&&/+01&2&&&&&&& Big Ten series. “We’re looking to welcome them into the Big Ten by showing them how the Big Ten plays,” Booker said. “And hopefully we’ll get a 6 8 couple wins on the weekend.”

4

Illinois

(16-15, 2-4 Big Ten)

In its 12-year history, the Illinois softball team has met Nebraska only once — in 2006 at a tournament in Columbus, Ga. — and the Illini were hammered 21-1. Illinois head coach Terri Sullivan said that until she was reminded this week, she hadn’t remembered. “It was years ago,” she said. “I think it was the only game we played at a tournament that was rained out. I don’t remember much about it except that we were bad and they were good. It’s a whole different ball game now.” The Illini will meet Nebraska for the fi rst time since the 2006 defeat in a three-game series this weekend in Lincoln, Neb. Illinois (16-15, 2-4 Big Ten) comes in on a four-game losing streak after Iowa being swept in three games

strikes and not put them on with walks. Hopefully we’ll get a positive outcome.” The Nebraska pitching staff has not been as solid as its lineup. The team’s 3.33 ERA ranks near the middle of the Big Ten. Senior Ashley Hagemann has logged most of the innings for the Huskers, entering the weekend with a 14-11 record and a 3.02 ERA. Nebraska’s Bowlin Stadium is known for being a tough environment for road teams to play in. The Huskers are 7-0 at home this season, and 3-0 at home in Big Ten play after sweeping Northwestern two weeks ago. “We’re looking to come out just as hard as we did in our fi rst Big Ten outing with Minnesota,” Illinois outfielder Alex Booker said. “We want to take it to them on 7 their home field, especially with

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STAFF WRITER

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BY SEAN HAMMOND

The Daily Illini: Volume 141 Issue 127  

Friday, Apr. 6, 2012

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