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Tuesday January 29, 2013

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Vol. 142 Issue 87

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Grants used for increased computer access BY EMMA WEISSMANN STAFF WRITER

Sonya Darter, executive director of the Orpheum Children’s Science Museum in Champaign, believes it is important for children to be exposed to technology early and often. She hopes her visitors will learn to view computers as more than just big “boxes.” “Once you start seeing the inside, the technology starts making sense instead of being invisible,” she said. With the grant of nearly $3,000

from the city of Champaign, the museum, along with five other non-profit organizations, will now have the funds necessary to help improve computer literacy in the community and bridge what they call the digital divide. Darter said the museum is currently purchasing materials to create a station that will feature two new desktop computers with large, child-friendly keyboards, a station where visitors can learn about computer hardware and a station where children can take apart and view the internal parts

of a computer. The stations are set to open in late February. Jeff Hamilton, Champaign telecommunications/AV technician, said a committee made up of community volunteers and digital divide experts chose to fund the museum because it was an opportunity “to reach an audience that changes every day.” “There’s a different school group or a different family that is going to bring their family in there, rather than ... the same group or same congregation using it over and over,” Hamil-

ton said. “So we thought that was a unique thing.” The other five recipients were the Tap in Leadership Academy, A&O Development Corporation, New Hope Academy, Center of Hope Church and St. Luke CME Church. Awards ranged from about $1,700 to $3,000. The city received the more than $16,000 for these grants from Comcast as a part of its cable franchise renewal in 2011. Hamilton said he thinks limited access to computer and internet access is a problem that is not

unique to Champaign but rather a deficit that affects many communities. According to 2010 census data, about a quarter of Illinois residents above age 3 live in a household without internet access. The data also shows 40.4 percent of those individuals depend on a computer outside the home for using the internet. Martin Wolske, senior research scientist with the Center for Digital Inclusion at the University,

“Giving individuals computer access is helpful, but it’s not the only way we use computers.” MARTIN WOLSKE, senior research scientist

See GRANTS, Page 3A

CUMTD premiers 4 new hybrids on route

Picture-perfect weather

BY CORINNE RUFF STAFF WRITER

Champaign-Urbana MTD will premier four more hybrid buses on its regular route this week, completing their newly-purchased fl eet of 10 . Last Tuesday, six of the new Flyer Xcelsior XDE40 buses began running for the fi rst time. “It’s got that new bus smell,” said Jan Kijowski , marketing director of CUMTD. More than half of CUMTD’s 102 buses are now hybrids, including other versions purchased in 2009 and 2011. The six hybrids that premiered last week bring the company’s total to 55 hybrid buses. Kijowski said the hybrids cost $600,000 each, about

See CUMTD, Page 3A DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Daniel Almquist, freshman in Engineering, composes a photograph of the Union on Monday’s foggy evening. “The fog is so surreal. I just love how cool this looks,” Almquist said. He said he usually doesn’t get to photograph in January because of the cold, and Monday evening’s temperature of 51 degrees allowed him to do some nature photography, which he likes to do.

URBANA CITY COUNCIL

Urbana debates residents’ payment process for sewer fix BY CORINNE RUFF STAFF WRITER

Urbana City Council members are finding that a sewage problem in a low-income neighborhood is less related to infrastructure and more related to a need for financial assistance for residents having difficulties paying for repairs.

BRIEFS University president discusses state’s financial situation with SEC BY LAUREN ROHR STAFF WRITER

Despite his satisfaction with the recent tuition increase, President Robert Easter is not as confident about state funding next year. University officials received word from the gov-

INSIDE

After city staff gave a presentation on the city’s sewer system at the meeting Monday, council members shifted conversation to fi nding ways to provide more fi nancial aid. Alderman Dennis Roberts, Ward 5, said the only difference he saw with the situation in Ellis

Subdivision seemed to be a difference in resident income levels. “This neighborhood is dealing with infrastructure aging, and we need to look for a program to give assistance,” he said. Many residents of the west Urbana neighborhood are retired senior citizens and have

expressed concerns about paying unexpected costs for road removal to access the sewer lines. Many also think the sewer lines are supposed to run down the middle of the street. But Brad Bennett, senior civil engineer of Urbana public works, who gave the presentation, said

ernor’s office last week that they could see a 4.6 percent reduction in aid from the state, Easter said at his meeting with the Senate Executive Committee on Monday. But he said he is concerned that the reduction may be even larger than predicted. Easter said the state has to come up with about $900 million to finance the pension plan for fiscal year 2013, which will

come from cuttings funds in other areas. “Our challenge is to make the case that higher ed should be a priority; we should not be so negatively impacted,” Easter said. In addition, sequestration is pending in the University’s future, Easter said. Within the next few months, the University could see an impact of than $60 million on its research enter-

prise and financial aid. Easter also told SEC members about the 1.7 percent tuition increase for the 2013-14 academic year, citing the lowest percentage increase in more than a decade. Despite the difficult state financial situation, he said the University is in a “good position.”

Lauren can be reached at rohr2@ dailyillini.com.

even new subdivisions have sewer lines on one side of the road. “They have just as many backups and root problems as areas built during the same time period,” Bennett said. “Everything has a finite life. It is no different

See UCC, Page 3A

Grainger Foundation donates $100 million to College of Engineering DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

The Grainger Foundation donated $100 million to the College of Engineering on Monday to support research in bioengineering and other areas as well as new chairs and professorships. The Grainger Engineering Breakthroughs Initiative is be-

“We use a lot of resources that have the potential to have a negative impact on the environment, but we are very careful to ensure they don’t.” JANE SULLIVAN, sustainability and transportation planner for CUMTD

ing established with this gift, according to a press release. Using $40 million of the donation, 26 new chairs and professor positions will be created with concentrations in bioengineering and what is referred to as “big data,” meaning the use of computers and supercomputers to obtain large amounts of information. Overall, 35 chairs and pro-

See ENGINEERING, Page 3A

Po l i c e 2 A | H o r o s c o p e s 2 A | O p i n i o n s 4 A | C r o s s w o r d 5 A | C o m i c s 5 A | B u s i n e s s & Te c h n o l o g y 6 A | S p o r t s 1 B | C l a s s i f i e d s 4 B | S u d o k u 4 B


2A

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

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Arson was reported at D R Diggers, 604 S. County Fair Dr., around 3:30 a.m. Sunday. ! Fights, riots and brawls Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. were reported at Radio MaThe Daily Illini is the independent student ria, 119 N. Walnut St., around 1 news agency at the University of Illinois a.m. Sunday. at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is According to the report, a published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole large fight ensued inside the or in part, the views of the University of bar. A bouncer received a miIllinois administration, faculty or students. nor cut from a knife. Also, All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property a female victim fell to the of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced ground and hit her head. or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper

!

University ! A 22-year-old and two 21-year-olds were arrested on the charges of possession of

drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance in the 300 block of East Green Street at 8:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the three University students were arrested after the University Police Department’s Narcotics United served a search warrant on their apartment. ! A 21-year-old was arrested on the charges of manufacturing and delivering cannabis near Sixth Street and Armory Avenue at 12:30 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, the suspect was a passenger in a vehicle that was stopped for not using a turn signal. An offi-

cer searched the vehicle after smelling cannabis inside and found several bags of marijuana in the suspect’s jacket and stuffed under his seat. ! Theft was reported at Everitt Laboratory, 1406 W. Green St., at 6:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, a student official for the International Honor Society for Electrical Engineers reported that an unknown offender had stolen an electronic cash drawer from an office at the location. The drawer was valued at $200 and contained an undetermined amount of cash.

DELEGATE A DIFFICULT JOB TO SOMEONE WITH EXPERIENCE. VISIT A GALLERY FOR INSPIRATION, BUT OTHERWISE STAY CLOSE TO HOME FOR COMFORT. AND DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW ABOUT YOURSELF.

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Today’s Birthday YOU CAN TRANSFORM OLD HABITS NOW. YOU’RE IN A SIX-MONTH CREATIVE PHASE. EXPLORE, INVENT, HAVE FUN AND GET INVOLVED WITH OTHER PARTNERS IN THE SAME GAME. HOME CHANGES MAY PROMPT A REMODEL OR MOVE. EXPECT A PROFITABLE RISE IN CAREER STATUS. TO GET THE ADVANTAGE, CHECK THE DAY’S RATING: 10 IS THE EASIEST DAY, 0 THE MOST CHALLENGING.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) TODAY IS A 7 — WHEN IT COMES TO PRODUCTIVITY, YOU’RE ON FIRE. BUT DON’T PUSH YOURSELF SO HARD THAT YOU GET ILL. REST IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT NOW. DON’T FORGET THAT A BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO WHO ARE NOT.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) TODAY IS A 9 — IF YOU DISCOVER YOU HAVE MORE THAN ENOUGH, LEAVE IT WHERE IT IS FOR NOW. FOLLOW THE RULES TO THE LETTER. A CONFLICT OF INTERESTS KNOCKS AT YOUR DOOR. DISCUSS POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS PRIVATELY.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) TODAY IS AN 8 — GET THAT GIFT FOR YOURSELF THAT YOU’VE BEEN THINKING ABOUT. SEE WHERE YOUR IDEAS TAKE YOU. SOMETHING DOESN’T ADD UP, THOUGH. TRUST YOUR INTUITION ON THIS ONE. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) TODAY IS A 7 — MAKE SURE YOU’RE ALIGNED. COMPROMISE MAY BE REQUIRED, AND YOU’RE GOOD AT IT NOW. WHEN YOU’RE AT A LOSS FOR WORDS, FIND A FRIEND TO SUPPORT YOU. IT HELPS TO PUT ALL YOUR IDEAS ON A LIST.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) TODAY IS A 9 — YOU’RE MORE CONNECTED TO YOUR COMMUNITY THAN YOU THINK. USE YOUR NEWLY GAINED POWER TO ADVANCE TOGETHER THROUGH THE CHALLENGES AND BE SURPRISED BY A BREAKTHROUGH.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) TODAY IS A 6 — EMBRACE YOUR MISTAKES. CREATIVITY GROWS FROM THE BROKEN PIECES. EXPECT TO BE PLEASANTLY SURPRISED. HAPPINESS SHOWS UP SOONER OR LATER. LOVE YOUR LOVER.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

TODAY IS A 9 — PRIORITIZE NOW.

TODAY IS AN 8 — THE MORE YOU WORK,

THE MORE YOU MAKE AND SAVE. JUST KEEP PLUGGING AWAY, EVEN IF YOU DON’T SEE IMMEDIATE RESULTS. RESIST IMPULSES, AND KEEP COSTS DOWN.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) TODAY IS AN 8 — EXPAND BOUNDARIES TO DISCOVER NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES. PLAY WITH FIRE AND LEARN ABOUT BURNS ... PUSH THE ENVELOPE CAUTIOUSLY. FRIENDS HELP YOU MAKE THE CONNECTION NEEDED.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) TODAY IS AN 8 — VENTURE FARTHER TODAY AND TOMORROW, WELL EQUIPPED AND IN THE RIGHT COMPANY. ADVANCE SLOWLY AND STEADILY. MAKE A BENEFICIAL DISCOVERY IN YOUR OWN GARAGE OR CLOSET.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) TODAY IS A 6 — PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO FINANCES AND REVISE YOUR BUDGET. ADD GLAMOUR TO YOUR EVENT WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK. FRIENDS OFFER VALUABLE, OBJECTIVE, INSIGHTS.

TODAY IS AN 8 — CONSIDER THAT YOU DON’T HAVE THE ANSWER, BUT RATHER PLENTY OF QUESTIONS, AND THAT’S THE FUN PART. OPEN YOUR MIND. ENHANCE YOUR COMMUNITY AND IMPROVE YOUR QUALITY OF LIFE. ROMANCE IS AVAILABLE.

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CORRECTIONS When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

3A

Boy Scouts considering lifting ban on gays BY DAVID CRARY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The Boys Scouts of America is considering a dramatic retreat from its controversial policy of excluding gays as leaders and youth members. Under the change now being discussed, the different religious and civic groups that sponsor Scout units would be able to decide for themselves how to address the issue — either maintaining an exclusion of gays or opening up their membership. Monday’s announcement of the possible change comes after years of protests over the policy — including petition campaigns that have prompted some corporations to suspend donations to the Boy Scouts. Under the proposed change, said BSA spokesman Deron Smith, “the Boy Scouts would not, under any circumstances, dictate a position to units, members, or parents.” The Boys Scouts, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2010, has long excluded both gays and atheists. Smith said a change in the policy toward atheists was not being considered, and that the BSA continued to view “Duty to God” as one of its basic principles. Protests over the no-gays policy gained momentum in 2000, when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the BSA’s right to exclude gays. Scout units lost sponsorships by public schools and other entities that adhered to nondiscrimination policies, and several local Scout councils made public

their displeasure with the policy. More recently, amid petition campaigns, shipping giant UPS Inc. and drug-manufacturer Merck announced that they were halting donations from their charitable foundations to the Boy Scouts as long as the no-gays policy was in force. Also, local Scout officials drew widespread criticism in recent months for ousting Jennifer Tyrrell, a lesbian mom, as a den leader of her son’s Cub Scout pack in Ohio and for refusing to approve an Eagle Scout application by Ryan Andresen, a California teen who came out as gay last fall. “An end to this ban will restore dignity to countless families across the country, my own included, who simply wanted to take part in all scouting has to offer,” Tyrrell said. “My family loved participating in scouting, and I look forward to the day when we might once again be able to take part.” Many of the protest campaigns, including one seeking Tyrrell’s reinstatement, had been waged with help from the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. “The Boy Scouts of America have heard from scouts, corporations and millions of Americans that discriminating against gay scouts and scout leaders is wrong,” said Herndon Graddick, GLAAD’s president. “Scouting is a valuable institution, and this change will only strengthen its core principles of fairness and respect.” The Scouts had reaffi rmed the no-gays policy as recent-

ly as last year, and appeared to have strong backing from conservative religious denominations — notably the Mormons, Roman Catholics and Southern Baptists — which sponsor large numbers of Scout units. Under the proposed change, they could continue excluding gays. Smith said the change could be announced as early as next week, after BSA’s national board concludes a regularly scheduled meeting on Feb. 6. The meeting will be closed to the public. Were the change adopted, Smith said, “there would no longer be any national policy regarding sexual orientation, and the chartered organizations that oversee and deliver Scouting would accept membership and select leaders consistent with each organization’s mission, principles, or religious beliefs. “BSA members and parents would be able to choose a local unit that best meets the needs of their families,” he said. “Under this proposed policy, the BSA would not require any chartered organization to act in ways inconsistent with that organization’s mission, principles, or religious beliefs.” The announcement came shortly after new data showed that membership in the Cub Scouts — the BSA’s biggest division — dropped sharply last year, and was down nearly 30 percent over the past 14 years. According to figures provided by the organization, Cub Scout ranks dwindled by 3.4 percent, from 1,583,166 in 2011 to 1,528,673 in 2012. That’s down

from 2.17 million in 1998. The Boy Scouts attribute the decline largely to broad social changes, including the allure of video games and the proliferation of youth sports leagues and other options for after-school activities. However, critics of the Scouts suggest that its recruitment efforts have been hampered by high-profi le controversies — notably the court-ordered release of fi les dealing with sex abuse allegations and persistent protests over the no-gays policy. The BSA’s overall “traditional youth membership” — Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Venturers — totaled 2,658,794 in 2012, compared to more than 4 million in peak years of the past. In addition to flak over the no-gays policy, the Scouts have been buffeted by multiple court cases related to past allegations of sexual abuse by Scout leaders, including those chronicled in long-confidential records that are widely known as the “perversion files.” Through various cases, the Scouts have been forced to reveal fi les dating from the 1960s to 1991. They detailed numerous cases where abuse claims were made and Boy Scout officials never alerted authorities and sometimes actively sought to protect the accused. The Scouts are now under a California court order, affirmed this month by the state Supreme Court, to turn over sex-abuse files from 1991 through 2011 to the lawyers for a former Scout who claims a leader molested him in 2007, when he was 13.

LM OTERO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jennifer Tyrrell hugs her son Cruz Burns, 7, outside Boy Scouts national offices in Irving, Texas, after a meeting with representatives of the 102-yearold organization. The Ohio woman was ousted as a den mother because she is a lesbian.

Champaign City Council to discuss debt policy, business diversity BY EMMA WEISSMANN STAFF WRITER

The Champaign City Council will discuss proposed additions to the city’s current debt policy and plans to develop a new program that would increase contracted work with minority and femaleowned businesses at Tuesday’s study session.

The additions to the debt policy aim to make the current policy more “comprehensive” and in line with “industry best practices,” according to the memorandum. One revision would expand the current policy’s process of selecting service providers to increase business with minority and female-owned fi rms.

Under the new policy, city-issued requests for business proposals would specifically state the desire to consider minority and femaleowned businesses. If these businesses have previously been identified that way, the requests would be sent directly to the business owners. “[We’re] trying to set up a pro-

cess where we can have more inclusion and diversity in contract selection,” said Council Member Will Kyles, District 1. “I think it will make the city of Champaign a leader in diversity — not just in talk, but in actual work.” The city is also developing plans to fi nalize a separate

“Minority and Women Business Development Plan,” which will be discussed at Tuesday’s study session. The program consists of three components: construction, small business and workforce development. “The Minority and Women’s program focuses on workforce development, as well as entrepre-

neurship and working with businesses and people who are starting a business,” Kyles said. “All of them are things that the community has advocated for, and all of them are for the good of progress in our city.”

Emma can be reached at wessmnn2@ dailyillini.com.

Senate OKs relief bill 3 months after Sandy BY ANDREW MIGA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Three months after Superstorm Sandy ravaged coastal areas in much of the Northeast, Congress on Monday sent a $50.5 billion emergency relief measure for storm victims to President Barack Obama for his signature. “I commend Congress for giving families and businesses the help they deserve, and I will sign this bill into law as soon as it hits my desk,” Obama said in a statement late Monday. Despite opposition from conservatives concerned about adding billions of dollars more to the nation’s debt, the Senate cleared the long-delayed bill, 62-36, after House Republicans had stripped it earlier this month of spending unrelated to disasters. All 36 votes against the bill were from Republican senators. “This is a huge relief,” said Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., noting the vote came 91 days after Sandy struck. The House passed the bill two weeks ago. Lawmakers say the money is urgently needed to start rebuilding homes, businesses, public transportation facilities and other infrastructure damaged by the Oct. 29 storm, one of the worst to strike the Northeast. Sandy roared up the East Coast and is blamed for more than 130 deaths and tens of billions of dol-

CUMTD FROM PAGE 3A $100,000 more than a diesel bus. However, the new model, which gets about 6 mpg, is 25 percent more fuel-efficient than other diesel buses in CUMTD’s fleet. It is lighter in weight than previous models, which helps reduce fuel consumption. “We expect we will get even lower usage of fuel,” she said. “(This new hybrid) is 2,600 pounds less in weight than the 2011 model.” They also feature a more ecofriendly design that lets natural light flood in from a back window and emergency hatchets. The company is also expecting to lower costs in maintenance with the new buses. Kijowski said effi ciency will increase because they will be powering the buses’ cooling

UCC FROM PAGE 3A from putting a roof on your house. At some point in the future, it will fail and will have to be replaced.”

lars in property damage, particularly in New York and New Jersey. The measure is aimed primarily at helping residents and businesses as well as state and local governments rebuild. The biggest chunk of money is $16 billion for Housing and Urban Development Department community development block grants. Of that, about $12.1 billion will be shared among Sandy victims as well as those from other federally declared disasters in 2011-13. The remaining $3.9 billion is solely for Sandy-related projects. More than $11 billion will go to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster relief aid fund for providing shelter, restoring power and other storm-interrupted utility services and meeting other immediate needs arising from Sandy and other disasters. Another $10 billion is devoted to repairing New York and New Jersey transit systems. Sen. Dan Coats, R-Ind., said Republicans weren’t seeking “to undermine” help for Sandy victims but instead were trying to make sure that the money was actually being spent on emergency needs. “We’re simply trying to say we need some standards,” Coats said. Earlier in January, Congress approved and Obama signed a $9.7 billion bill to replenish the National Flood Insurance Program, which has received well over 100,000

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Northeast lawmakers react after the Senate passed a $50.5 billion emergency relief measure for Sandy victims at the Capitol on Monday. From right to left are Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J.; Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J.; and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. flood insurance claims related to Sandy. Added to the new, $50.5 billion package, the total is roughly in line with the $60.4 billion that Obama requested in December. The aid package was greased for passage before the last Congress

adjourned and the new one came in on Jan. 3. But Speaker John Boehner refused to bring it to the floor after two-thirds of House Republicans voted against a “fiscal cliff” deficit-reduction deal raising taxes on couples making more than

$450,000 a year while deferring some $24 billion in spending cuts to defense and domestic programs. The ruckus after the Senate had passed an earlier $60.4 billion Sandy relief package by a nearly 2-to1 margin on Dec. 28 exposed deep

political divisions within Republican ranks. “There’s only one group to blame for the continued suffering of these innocent victims, the House majority and their speaker, John Boehner,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie fumed at the time.

fans with electricity rather than hydraulics, which use fuel. In addition to fuel efficiency, these new hybrids have several features that will make taking the bus more convenient for students and safer for cyclists. At night, LED lights attached to the front wheels coordinate with the bus’ turn signal to illuminate the road as the bus turns. Another feature allows the bus to lower itself closer to the ground than other buses, making it easier for riders with disabilities to board the bus. Jane Sullivan , sustainability and transportation planner for CUMTD, said hybrids are the most visible green initiative. However, there are a lot of other environmental efforts taken, beyond the buses, at the maintenance garage and in the office. “(At the maintenance garage,) they recycle our waste oil to heat the garage and reuse our

wash bay to wash the buses,” she said. “We use a lot of resources that have the potential to have a negative impact on the environment, but we are very careful to ensure they don’t.” Sullivan said CUMTD is only a few months away from receiving a certification from the Illinois Green Business Association . Mara Eisenstein , director of marketing and special projects for the Illinois Green Business Association, said CUMTD is a great example of a business that is looking at all angles of green initiatives. “They’re doing a really big effort to go green in the work place, too,” she said. “They are looking at their main offices, not only in their buses, but in their facilities.”

ENGINEERING

engineering scholarships and the renovation of Everitt Laboratory. “We are tremendously grateful for this extraordinary gift from The Grainger Foundation, which is an investment in the future of engineering, the future of our engineering faculty and students, and, indeed, an investment in the campus as a whole,” said

Chancellor Phyllis Wise in a press release. “This transformative gift will ensure a chain reaction of possibilities that will fortify the campus as a preeminent, globally-recognized institution.” The contribution is made in honor of William W. Grainger, a 1919 graduate in Electrical Engineering who established The Grainger Foundation in 1949. technology. “Once you start awarding organizations that serve families, you start reaching parents, and then that really helps to bridge the (generational) gap when parents are involved with their children,” she said. “We wanted to be part of the solution.”

Corinne can be reached at cruff2@ dailyillini.com.

served on the committee that reviewed applications for the grants. He said the term “digital divide” can be misleading, however, as the focus of the grants was not just to provide access to computers. He said the city also intends to change the way the community uses technologies

within certain “microcultures.” “Giving individuals computer access is helpful, but it’s not the only way we use computers,” Wolske said. “This isn’t about a digital divide as much as it is equipping the collaborations that are already often happening in these places.” For example, Darter said she hopes the museum’s grant money will encourage family interaction based on the use of new

Renee Renfro, resident of Tremont Street in Ellis Subdivision, said she was bothered by the assumption that residents should pay for their sewer repairs upfront, even though they will be reimbursed by the city after construction.

“I think there should be some work with the homeowner and the contractor so the money can be paid upon completion of the road,” Renfro said. “Not every resident has $3,500 in their pockets.”

City council members discussed the possibility of offering information to residents of sewer insurance programs, which would cost residents around $10 a month and would take care of repair fees.

Alderman Charlie Smyth, Ward 1, suggested either raising the cap amount of money the reimbursement program offers or having the city work directly with the contractor. The city council will contin-

ue to explore options for the situation, which will be discussed at the next council meeting on Feb. 4.

FROM PAGE 3A fessor positions will be created, which will double the amount of these endowed positions in the college. The gift will also fund research support for engineering collaborations, a $100-million fundraising campaign for

GRANTS FROM PAGE 3A

Emma can be reached at wessmnn2@illinimedia.com.

Corinne can be reached at cruff2@ dailyillini.com.


4A Tuesday January 29, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

America the exception, not exceptional

DANE GEORGES THE DAILY ILLINI

Small tuition increase still doesn’t make up for previous years’ high rates

SARAH FISCHER Opinions columnist

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Good thing money talks, especially since the animals can’t. Now Champaign County Animal Control is chiefly funded by the area’s dog registration fee. This is to say that funds vary depending on how many new dogs are registered by county households. Unless you buy a dog, you fund nothing. You do not pay any fee to animal control, or any facet by which the University or RSOs that directly or indirectly protect animals. The Champaign County Humane Society is a nonprofit, so you don’t need to worry about your money going there, either. Cases of animal abuse have indirect costs. Specifically, it costs the city time and resources to care for neglected animals and clear out what are often considered condemned living spaces. When police are the first responders on scene, they have to call animal control if they are unauthorized to handle the situation — that means two departments dealing with one incident. It also costs the state of Illinois money, as of legislation passed in 1999, for a maximum of five years in jail with allotted animal care counseling for the convicts afterward if the court sees fit. It costs the courts time, money and effort filing these animal cruelty cases. Animal cruelty reports diminish desirability in neighborhood properties for townies and students alike. Conditions that are undesirable to animals are usually past condemned standards by humans. And at the end of the day, there is the cost of the animal’s quality of life — or at least what’s left of it. Don’t waste your money. Don’t waste this community’s time and effort. Take care of the animals.

he Wall Street Journal created a graphic that maps the usage of a few key words in inaugural speeches since President Washington. It lists that President Obama mentioned “the people” almost three times as much as George Washington did. It’s where you can see that “God” is mentioned more in Obama’s two inaugural addresses than it was in either of the Bush’s. (Not quite up to Reagan’s levels though.) What becomes apparent in Obama’s speech through this graphic are the phrases he repeats, the ideas that continue to reappear. His focus is not on war or law or duty but on commitment to each other. He stated “preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action.” Though President Obama’s speech discussed a lot of those important freedoms, like gay rights and equal pay for women, and other issues such as global warming, it is his overarching theme that stands out. “What makes us exceptional — what makes us American — is our allegiance to an idea.” But the substance that follows doesn’t matter. What matters is that idea of American exceptionalism. The idea that we, as Americans, are exceptional because we are Americans. As President Obama begins his second term, his focus seems to be on this idea of “exceptionalism,” of America as a beacon to which all other nations can look toward as an example of a great nation. “America,” the president stated, “will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe ... (because) no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation.” American exceptionalism isn’t merely about setting the example, about being the infamous “city upon a hill.” It’s about action: “our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom.” It’s about creating a world that is in our image, that follows our lead. It’s the idea that to be an American is to be special, to be endowed beyond the citizens of other nations. “America’s possibilities are limitless,” Obama states, “for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands.” In a 2010 Gallup Poll, 80 percent of Americans stated that the United States was “the greatest country in the world.” American exceptionalism, writes Terrence McCoy in The Atlantic, “along with flag pins shining from one’s lapel, is one of the rare issues where Republicans and Democrats agree.” But they didn’t always. In fact, in the 1930s, Chicagoan S. Milgrom called exceptionalism “a chronic disease.” It was Joseph Stalin that actually coined the term American exceptionalism and his use was an insult, the “heresy of American exceptionalism.” Even President Obama, at a news conference in France in 2009, shared his doubts about the concept: “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism. ... (That) I think we’ve got a whole lot to offer the world does not lessen my interest in ... recognizing that we’re not always going to be right.” “How,” The Atlantic article asks, “did a phrase intended as derision become a rallying cry of American awesomeness?” How much of our national identity has been shaped in direct opposition to another country’s politics and policies. Look at the Pledge of Allegiance. “Under God” was added to the pledge in direct contrast to Communism during the ‘50s. The salute to the flag changed to placing one’s hand over the heart during World War II as it had previously resembled the Nazi salute. Even the pledge itself was written by a radical preacher a century after the nation was founded. America is a nation purposely set against other countries. It is a nation defined by difference. It is a nation that is, literally, the exception. We are the “Great Experiment” of democracy. We are a nation defined not by our race or our ethnicity but by our shared history and our shared ideas. But that does not make us exceptional. It does not allow us to define the rules by breaking them. It does not allow us to create countries in our own image merely because we think that image best. It certainly does not, automatically, by definition, place us above the rest of the world. In the HBO show “The Newsroom,” the nightly news anchor Will McAvoy is asked, “Why is America the greatest country in the world?” His response is a nearly five minute monologue, the crux of which is summarized by the sign in the audience that prompts his response: “It’s not. But it can be.”

Renée is a senior in Media. She can be reached at wunderl1@dailyillini.com.

Sarah is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at fische19@dailyillini.com.

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uition has gone up 1.7 percent for the Class of 2017, and it’s the smallest percent increase in 18 years. For the small increase, the University administrators deserve a pat on the back, but we say that with some reservation. While this is one of the smallest raises in nearly two decades, it is still an increase on one of the highest in-state tuitions of a public land grant university in the country. For those prior 18 years, the University had been raising money at a rate that far outpaced inflation. This year, if the board of trustees had exactly matched tuition to inflation, they should have increased tuition more. Tuition can only go up. At a minimum, it needs to keep pace with inflation. Over the last several years, our tuition has gone up faster than the incomes of aspiring students. The rising tuition just gleans a little bit more from the students who, being priced out of private institutions, have to go with a state school to mitigate the impending flow of student debt. Often, the University will blame the declining state support for the drastic increases in tuition. Since 2002, state support for the University has fallen $180 million dollars. In the ensuing years, tuition has increased 120 percent, from $5,302 to $11,636 in 2012. As such, the amount of additional revenue the University has pulled in over the last decade has more than made up the lack of money the state stopped providing. The need to bridge that gap is what has raised the tuition so drastically. So the University may blame the state for its tight budget, but it would seem it has more to deal with mismanaged money than anything. Still, the University has grown, and as such, there are going to be increased costs. Thankfully, the University tells us, President Bob Easter succeeded in cutting nearly $50 million out of the budget last year, which we congratulate. But, the savings probably won’t trickle down to those who need it the most: students. As we said last week, grant money is also decreasing, so we need to strive for even greater savings. Even if you were to see any returns on that $50 million savings, tuition will have inevitably increased, diminishing any money you might have seen. So yes, they did increase tuition at one of the lowest rates in recent history, but that doesn’t make up for the previous hikes, which keep the University out of reach of several Illinois residents who are otherwise qualified to be here. We say congratulate the University, but we do so with reservation.

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THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

Government money should go to students TOMMY HEISER Opinions columnist

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he United States is so divided culturally and politically that we are nearly two different Americas. Income disparity has skyrocketed since the Reagan presidency, and the wealthy are pressured to provide their fair share to the 99 percent. Adversely, if the government spends money to bridge this income gap, dependency on government-funded programs increases and incentives to work diminish. And there’s the rub. President Obama’s view on welfare is that government-funded programs — Medicare and Medicaid, for example, “free us to take the risks that make this country great.” But, more people rely on taxpayers’ money to provide for themselves and their families, sacrificing personal prosperity for a short-term guarantee. If anything, these safety nets increase one’s aversion to risk. The American Dream has agonizingly evaporated because it is unfeasible for pursuers at the bottom to transcend the income gap. Perhaps the president was speaking to immigrants who came here with nothing and took risks chasing a better life. But, I doubt the government’s safety net influenced decisions in their pursuit. Modern entitlement spending originated from Lyndon Johnson’s The Great Society agenda during the 1960s, which saw the birth of programs like Medicare and Medicaid. The Great Society was an extraordinarily ambitious program to end poverty and promote equality. By creating equal economic opportunity through unprecedented spending on education, Johnson sought to win the “War on Poverty” by alleviating the pains of those most impoverished.

The backbone of our modern welfare state is encapsulated by the idea of “means-tested” programs, such as Medicaid and food stamps, where eligibility is determined by your means to survive without help. In a recent Wall Street Journal column, political economist Nicholas Eberstadt, wrote that “about 35 percent of Americans (well over 100 million people) are accepting money, goods or services from ‘means-tested’ government programs. This percentage is twice as high as in the early 1980s.” With roughly 19 percent living below the poverty line in the 1960s, these programs targeted low-income families and poor students to make the American Dream more attainable. Fifty years later, recent data by the Census Bureau show rising poverty rates reaching levels over 16 percent. Since 1964, the government has spent nearly $15 trillion in total welfare spending, which has left the poverty rate inexplicably close to where it was when the War on Poverty began. The unfortunate dilemma with these programs is that we throw money at problems without regards to any substantial progress. America’s culture is deeply rooted in the paramount idea that through hard work and determination, a person can pull himself up by his bootstraps and climb the proverbial social ladder. Instead of being a bridge to mitigate tough times, welfare has indeed become a way of life, a new America. Most people will agree that the lack of economic opportunity at the bottom is a primary driver of income inequality, welfare dependency, poverty and access to education. It’s difficult to support an argument for spending almost $700 billion a year, which is only increasing, to fund these programs that have produced few, if any, results. The government should focus on funding for smarter life choices, small things like exercising or healthier

diets. This can help individuals focus on increasing their prosperity while having a safety net for things that promote health and happiness. So, what are ways to create economic opportunity? To reduce dependency? To empower a new America? Graduating from a four-year university is no longer working as a solution to bridging the income gap. Ask recent grads with a bachelor’s degree, or even a graduate degree, how easy it is to get a job. Any job. If we look at Americans under 30 who don’t have jobs or stopped looking altogether, the unemployment rate in September for those aged 18-29 rises to 16.6 percent. The unemployment rate without the labor force participation rate is at 12.1 percent, which is about 4.5 points higher than national rate at 7.8 percent back in September, where it still is today. By transforming community colleges into strong vocational programs, people will have a place to learn new skills, start a profession and earn a living. On top of that, employer-sponsored but government-funded training programs can accomplish better results than current federal training programs. In partnership with local businesses and national corporations, creating easy-toaccess programs can improve the quality of our labor force, reduce unemployment and wean ourselves off of inefficient spending. Student debt recently surpassed $1 trillion. The government provides money for students to earn a four-year degree, shifting some of this cash into more effective, private programs can better improve the economy. I would suspect people would support programs that incentivize people to work and assist with the means to obtain it. This type of spending avoids the unrestrained culture of entitlements and promotes equality.

Tommy is a senior in Business. He can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

Animal abuse costs both lives and money RENÉE WUNDERLICH Opinions columnist

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week ago today, an Urbana police officer found a dog in a crate. Or at least they found what was left of him. Police discovered a dog ravaging the carcass of the dead animal in the same area. The man who claimed ownership of the animals did not provide any reasons why the dog was dead or why it was being eaten by the other dog. Police noted that the deceased dog had wounds that were “consistent with being abused.” There was nothing else in the report about conditions of the live dog. Sir, you have no excuse. Given every opportunity to care for or relinquish your animals, you instead chose negligence. By choosing not to treat your dogs with basic decency or give them to others who could, you chose to let one die and the other to continue suffering. Pet owners and activists need little coercion when it comes to fighting for animal rights. But how many of us have changed the channel when “Angel” started to sound? Even the most devoted don’t want to watch Sarah McLachlan’s endorsement of the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals because who wants to look at starving puppies and kitties? It’s true, your personal life is probably unaffected by the thousands of documented cases of animal abuse that occur annually in the U.S. But when it comes to Champaign County, there may be good reason to get upset. Beyond companionship, animals provide invaluable services to our modern lives. You may be familiar with Illini

Service Dogs, where students train Labrador puppies to assist individuals in wheelchairs and power chairs. The University is currently leading the U.S. in college academics and sports programs for students with disabilities. The University boasts an accredited veterinary school of medicine — many students in the program volunteer at the Champaign County Humane Society. Don’t forget about therapy dogs at the UGL for study breaks during fall finals. There is a strong tradition of animal respect at this University. There also seems to be, at least on paper, invested effort toward proper treatment of livestock and other farm animals in Illinois. Those from farming communities can appreciate the value, at least monetarily, a healthy animal holds in comparison to a sick, poorly treated one. But there are still cases, all too often, of blatant neglect and vicious abuse toward sheep, goats, cattle and horses. Eleven horses were rescued by the Society for Hooved Animal Rescue and Emergency, just two weeks ago. Sadly, two of the horses died shortly after the transfer from the Vermilion County farm because severe health conditions caused by neglect. The farm was already on the black list for animal abuse, but after finding a dead horse on the property, SHARE showed up. So if you’re going to own an animal, you might as well ensure it survives if not for how expensive they are to purchase. The average horse can cost anywhere from $1,000 to $1,500, roughly the price of a 13-inch MacBook Pro. Turns out, animal abuse that results in death holds back the local economy. The American Pet Products Association estimates the average cost of basic care and training for a dog or cat is anywhere from $600 to $900 annually.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

DISH OF THE WEEK

Downtown lounge bar takes a spin on health BY ROHAINA HASSAN STAFF WRITER

While Boltini Lounge’s Fancy Mac ’n Cheese has long been a favorite, the quesadilla is now its most popular dish and is part of an effort to revamp the menu. The lounge, located at 211 N. Neil St. in downtown Champaign, is described as “the adult playground of downtown welcoming any and everybody from the downtown hipster to the professional enjoying a happy hour cocktail” on its website (www. boltinilounge.com/about/). Chris Brehmer, who recently moved here from Denver, was appointed as the new general manager. Because of this recent management turnover, the menu will also take a different direction. Justin Morrison, kitchen manager at Boltini, has a master’s degree in exercise physiology and hopes to integrate a nutrition aspect into the menu. He explained that they will remove anything short of healthy from the menu while also offering better-tasting food and healthconscious options. The quesadilla is a new dish and is different from a lot of the choices available on the menu. Customers can choose from beef, chicken or tuna varieties. While quesadillas are often viewed as a pretty simple dish, Morrison explained what sets theirs apart from the rest. “I have my own beef recipe that I specifically do here. I just came up with it on the spot right here,” Morrison said. He mixes in vegetables and makes sure the fat has been removed so it’s not greasy and heavy. Both Brehmer and Morrison said the chicken quesadilla was one of their favorites. Brehmer said that, for the rest of the menu, all of their produce is local and high-quality.

PIRATING FROM PAGE 6A The student is then required to meet with his or her resident director before the port is enabled again. While most cases are for first offenders, a second offense requires all residents to meet with the assistant director of residential life for community standards and safety programs. On the third offense, the room will no longer have Internet connectivity, Ruby said. Christine Svoboda, sophomore in LAS, and her roommate were confronted about illegal downloading last year while living in Hopkins Hall. “The Internet was supposed to only be shut off for a week due to the fact that it was our first transgression, but since it took so long to get a meeting with our RD, it took almost two weeks to get our Internet back,” Svoboda said. While the situation was resolved without any following offenses, Svoboda is still confused about what happened. “To be completely honest with you, I have absolutely no idea what I downloaded,” she said. “I have uTorrent on my computer but it was never active at school, and I didn’t use the school’s Internet to download anything like that because it was too slow.” Many file sharing programs, such as LimeWire or BitTorrent, automatically upload files through the program, Mertz said, so when students are notified of a copyright infringement, that can sometimes be the reason. While Housing doesn’t differentiate punishment between uploading and downloading files, according to Ruby, the content industry

5A

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

HASAN KHALID THE DAILY ILLINI

Boltini Lounge, located in downtown Champaign, serves up a delectable yet healthy chicken quesadilla. The quesadilla has become a popular staple amongst lounge goers as the kitchen manager changes up the menu. As for the restaurant and bar itself, Brehmer explained where the inspiration for Boltini Lounge’s name came from. “The name comes from an old circus family, an Italian circus family that moved to Holland,” he said. Circus-inspired clown and elephant posters scatter the walls of the dimly lit lounge. There are tables and bar seating for customers seeking a casual night, as well as a number of booths for more intimate seating. Open since 20 0 0, Boltini is known for being “pro-everybody.” They pride themselves on being very liberal and open to anyone, according to Brehmer.

“We just try to take care of everyone that comes through the door,” he said. The eatery is considered a lounge, which is illustrated by an extensive back bar. While Brehmer was taking inventory, he stated that there were 197 different bottles of liquor, clearing up any doubt on lack of choice. They offer small-batch bourbons, dry to sweet wines, at least 100 martinis and an obscure variety of beers. If that isn’t enough, the bartenders make sure they know how to make almost everything. In the odd case they do not, they make sure to look it up and serve it up right away.

sees them as vastly different offenses. “If you’re downloading, you’re participating in the problem, but you’re not seen as causing the problem,” Mertz said. But when you’re uploading, “you’re viewed as the source in that situation of the copyright violations.” Through personal ISPs, copyright infringements in terms of uploading can be a separate federal offense, especially when releasing copyright materials before they’re commercially available. Lawsuits can result in fines of hundreds of thousands of dollars. But through CITES, the content industry usually leaves it up to the University. “We’ll get some push from content holders to be more punitive, but for the most part they leave it up to us,” Mertz said. “They really expect that initial discipline can be handled by the school.” While a vast majority of the offenders are students, Mertz said, individual departments have had to deal with a faculty or staff member receiving a copyright complaint. Disciplinary action for first offenders are typically similar to that of a student’s: a warning and possibly some education. “We can’t get into specifics for HR reasons, but we had one faculty member who had repeat violations and they were actually asked to leave the University because it was such an ongoing problem,” Mertz said. Throughout last year, Mertz was able to track month to month what specific files CITES was receiving copyright complaints for, and he noticed some specific trends. “Very rarely is it something that was old. ... But when Kid Cudi

came to campus last year, that month — whether it’s students trying to get his music or whether it was the record label knowing that kids would be trying to download his stuff — we saw a spike in violations sent for his album,” Mertz said. “There’s certain shows, like ‘Parks and Rec’ or ‘Community,’ that’s a constant steady stream every month, but other things just come and go.” Mertz added that CITES “isn’t under the illusion” that these are the only violations taking place on campus. He suspects that the content industry isn’t filing complaints for all downloads, “so clearly there’s file sharing going on that the notices aren’t corresponding to.” Several factors go into the overall process. Some complaints that are received do not match up with the IP address’s activity for the timestamp given, Mertz said. Differences between torrent downloading and direct downloading might also make the copyright infringement harder to track and identify. However, the University still responds to the copyright complaints and does not tolerate the activity. Svodoba thinks the University has set up a good system to handle the situation and should continue to reprimand students who illegally download using the University Housing’s Internet. “Even though we find other security threats to be a bigger priority, this is something that we still have to do,” Mertz said. “If you’re constantly pressing you’re luck trying to get stuff for free, you still have the risk of getting caught.”

  1 Kinnear of “Little Miss Sunshine”   5 Turned red, say   9 Turned white 14 Streetside shout 15 Verne captain 16 “___ the other reindeer” (common mishearing of a Yuletide lyric) 17 Cookie baker 18 Eye carefully 19 Turn into mush 20 1966 Johnny Rivers hit 23 ___ Bator 24 Anthropologist Fossey 25 Create skid marks, perhaps 32 ___ crab 33 Malt-drying 17-Across 34 World workers’ assn. 35 Judith of “The Devil’s Advocate,” 1977 36 Early gig for Chase and Belushi, for short 37 Prison, informally 38 Prison, informally 39 Mentally together 41 “Stop right there!” 43 One with lots of experience 46 El Prado works 47 Lofty verses 48 Certain holiday mail … or what 20-, 25- and 43-Across have in common 54 “Me, too!” 55 Visionary sort 56 Untrusting 57 Dispute, as a point 58 Diva’s delivery 59 Falco of “Nurse Jackie” 60 Is introduced to 61 Shades at the beach 62 Beavers build them

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  1 Old muscle cars   2 Four-star piece, say   3 Corp. higher-up   4 Game with sets and runs   5 Like some coffee and potatoes   6 Take back, as testimony   7 ’Zine on the Net   8 Agreement that’s now sure to go forward   9 Kellogg’s snack since 1964 10 Bryn Mawr grad, e.g. 11 Old currency abbreviated “L.”

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The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

BILLY FORE

Rohaina can be reached at rhassa7@ dailyillini.com.

DOONESBURY

Sarah can be reached at soenke2@ dailyillini.com

PHOTOGRAPHY FROM PAGE 6A ers has been strong. “Both Andrey and Skye were very easygoing during my time with them,” said Emily Roth, a past client of Starostin Photography. “It came to my family’s attention that our dog was diagnosed with cancer, and Starostin signed on to take photos of him with us while he was still himself. The pictures turned out great, and Andrey and Skye were very considerate during our shoot.” Although the company takes its name from Andrey’s surname, both he and MacLean create a balanced work flow on a shoot. Starostin usually poses their clients and takes portrait-style photos, while MacLean wanders in the background, waiting for good candid moments to shoot. But they also remain ready to accommodate anything unexpected. MacLean also creates the promotional materials, and both spend time learning from online sources and experimenting with their own projects. The time necessary for running Starostin Photography can be busy outside of college, but the students are able to stay on top of both comfortably. According to them, their current situation as students has actually been helpful toward running their business. “What’s nice now is that we don’t have to worry about living off of our profit and instead focus on building the knowledge base and meeting clients,” MacLean said. “When we are done with school and this does become our livelihood, it’s going to be a smooth transition instead of starting up a business and scrambling to make ends meet. And it’s slightly relieving to not have a camera attached to your

1

ACROSS

BEARDO

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Look Your Best

FROM THE WAIST UP! Illio Senior Portraits Mon-Fri 9:30 - 5pm Sat. 10 - 2pm Now through February 2nd

PHOTO COURTESY OF STAROSTIN PHOTOGRAPHY

hand every second of the day.” At least not until the withdrawal kicks in, Starostin joked. Although their company has started off well, they are determined to keep improving their skills and building Starostin Photography. They agree that it is important for them to gain a wide range of experience so they can become wellrounded and have the comfort to work on their toes. “What it comes down to is that we have a passion for photography and we’re constantly trying to fulfill that passion in any way we can that makes us happy,” Starostin said. Since they started Starostin Photography, the students now have to add external hard drives to their equipment list in order to accommodate the large body of work they’ve accumulated. Plans for the future are solid and steady, including their first wedding set for May.

Adlai can be reached at aesteve2@dailyillini.com.

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6A | Tuesday, January 29, 2013 | www.DailyIllini.com

WHAT YOU

PAY WHEN YOU PIRATE CITES can and will crack down on your torrents BY SARAH SOENKE

In

STAFF WRITER

2008, the Recording Industry Association of America announced it would stop suing individuals for illegally downloading music after collecting more than 35,000 lawsuits since 2003. To replace its “subpoena, settle or sue” process, the RIAA instead contacts the music sharer’s Internet service provider to enforce disciplinary action. For CITES, the University’s technology services agency, this means receiving up to 100 copyright infringement complaints a month from content industry super houses, with 364 totaled from Aug. 1 to Dec. 31. The complaints encompass any music, television or film file downloads by students, faculty and staff, tracked by file name, size, timestamp and IP address. Brian Mertz, senior security outreach specialist for CITES, explained how the number of complaints from third parties is enough for CITES to actively engage copyright issues without having to do any tracking of illegal downloading of its own. “What CITES is basically doing when (the downloading) is in our area is gathering up the information, providing what evidence we can find of that activity and just passing that report on to dean of students — if it’s a student — or to the department if it’s a faculty or staff member,” Mertz said. Each department then handles the disciplinary action differently. For students living in University Housing, the Internet port in their dorm room is disabled and the student is notified via email, said Kirsten Ruby, assistant director of housing for marketing.

See PIRATING, Page 5A ILLUSTRATION BY BRYAN LORENZ THE DAILY ILLINI

Two UI students develop professional photography company BY ADLAI STEVENSON STAFF WRITER

College is viewed as a time for students to take charge of their futures. Some will decide to shoot for their dreams. Other students, who are no less determined, might take more pragmatic paths toward their success. And some even go outside the conventional path that many students take in their careers. Students Skye MacLean and Andrey Starostin are examples of University students who are excelling at what they love earlier than some. The students are the founders of Starostin Photography, a professional photography com-

pany they started independently in August and have steadily built since. Both MacLean and Starostin share a strong passion for the medium, but the idea to create the company in addition to Starostin’s exposure to photography are relatively new. “Earlier last summer I’d been given a small compact camera and realized that I really like taking photos and wanted a more high-end camera the more I used Skye’s or anyone else’s,” said Starostin, junior in LAS. “Then I ended up getting one and it just kind of snowballed from there.” MacLean caught on to photography much earlier in life, which almost appears to be a tradition,

judging from her family history. Her aunt is currently a successful food photographer in England and her great-great-grandfather shot and posed prominent figures, such as the Royal Family. But MacLean says she never previously pursued photography intensely. “It was never an activity that I thought, ‘Oh, this is going to turn into something,’” said MacLean, junior in LAS. “I always have enjoyed it, but when applying for college, I recognized other skills of mine were stronger and decided to focus on those.” Lucky for her, she was on the ideal path all along. MacLean and Starostin met during their soph-

omore year and became friends quickly after sharing a course in Russian — an easy A for Starostin, they both joke, because he speaks the language. After they set up several online pages and worked with friends and family, word of their talent traveled fast. “It helps that we have family in the northwest suburbs of Chicago and also around here,” Starostin said. “That’s given us at least a 160-mile range of people we can work with.” Both students also make Starostin Photography unique by tailoring the experience toward the customers. MacLean says they are com-

fortable with those who want a specific focus for their pictures, or are happy to be given total creative direction. After the photos are fi nalized, the students meet with their clients in person so both sides can benefit from the interaction. “We want to give clients a personable time, but for us, meeting with them helps gauge their reaction,” MacLean said. “There might be two photos we liked a lot, but they’ll be passed over. It’s like a learning process – we can develop our idea of what people want and expect.” And the response from custom-

“It was never an activity that I thought, ‘Oh, this is going to turn into something.’” SKYE MACLEAN, junior in LAS and co-founder of Starostin Photography

See PHOTOGRAPHY, Page 5A

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Sports

Illinois shows resilience at Minnesota BY MICHAEL WONSOVER STAFF WRITER

After scoring only 58 points in a four-point loss to Northwestern in its last outing, the Illini women’s basketball team recorded 52 points in the first half alone against Minnesota on Monday. Led by 21 points and 12 rebounds from senior forward Karisma Penn, the Illini knocked off Minnesota 91-86 in Minneapolis. The Illini are now 4-0 on the road in Big Ten games. “Really proud of our team,” Illini head coach Matt Bollant said. “Big win for our program to go on the road and win our first four says a lot about our resiliency. …. Our kids stepped up and made plays.” Minnesota (13-8, 2-5) missed multiple chances to tie or take the lead late in the last minute of the game, but the Illini (11-8, 4-3 Big Ten) held on, as sophomore guard Alexis Smith iced the game with two late free throws. The first half was tightly contested aside from a 5-0 Illinois

run to begin the game. With 13:44 left in the first half, the score was deadlocked at 11-11. Then Illinois found its offensive rhythm. The Illini went on a 20-10 run behind four 3-pointers, stretching the score to 31-19. Minnesota responded with a 15-6 run of its own, bringing the Golden Gophers within three points of Illinois, 37-34. Illinois went on a 10-0 run to end the half, including two more 3-pointers, entering halftime with a 52-41 lead. Illinois’ 52 points in the first half is its most points scored in any half this season. Illinois entered Monday’s game shooting only 28.9 percent from the 3-point line, but made seven first half three 3-pointers at a 41.2 percent clip, led by three from junior guard Amber Moore, whose second 3-pointer of the night moved her into third all-time in program history in 3-point field goals made. She made five 3-pointers in total to

spearhead a season-best shooting effort from the Illini, who drained 11 long balls, its largest total since the first game this season. Senior guard Adrienne GodBold led Illinois in the first half with 11 points and nine rebounds, including five offensive boards, helping Illinois outrebound Minnesota 24-23 in the first half. Penn and Moore contributed 10 points each to give Illinois three double-digit scorers by halftime. After withstanding a 15-6 run to begin the second half, the Illini stretched out its lead by going on a 19-7 run to extend its lead, 77-63, at the 10:11 mark in the second half. Minnesota didn’t give up, answering with a 19-4 run with 4:11 remaining in the game. Sophomore guard Rachel Banham’s and-one with 4:29 remaining gave GodBold her fifth foul of the game, disqualifying her on fouls for the seventh time on

See WOMEN’S BBALL, Page 2B

MARK VANCLEAVE THE MINNESOTA DAILY

Illinois’ Karisma Penn goes up for a lay up against Minnesota at Williams Arena in Minneapolis on Monday night. Penn led the Illini with 21 points and 12 rebounds. Illinois won 91-86.

Early injuries cause slow start to season

Orange Krush, fans leave impression with Illini recruits BY ETHAN ASOFSKY STAFF WRITER

BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

November is a month when training should be picking up and routines should be set but for this season it was a month of injuries for the Illinois men’s gymnastics team. Preseason training started with high energy and high goals. After winning the 2012 NCAA Championship, the Illini felt like there was nothing they couldn’t accomplish. Sophomore C.J. Maestas provided experience after competing in Olympic Trials during the summer, as was senior Yoshi Mori, who competed in the 2012 Visa Championships. Illinois seemed well on its way to defending its title. In early November, Maestas tore his right tricep while working at 85 percent on an air flare to incorporate into his floor routine. With no serious problems to his tricep before, the injury was unexpected. “Those injuries when you go down and you think, ‘Oh, I stubbed my toe or just hyperextended my knee,’ this wasn’t one of those,” Maestas said. “When I went down, I knew I was in trouble. At that moment, all I felt was pain.” Last season as a freshman, Maestas earned seven individual awards, including Big Ten Gymnast of the Year, Big Ten Freshman of the Year, Big Ten all-around champion, NCAA still rings champion and runnerup in the all-around. He was also voted as Illinois’ MVP by his teammates. Not being able to contribute during competitions this season, Maestas has taken on a new role. “I hope vocally my emotion is still in the gym,” he said. “Just because I’m in an ice bag or I’m not in there physically like I usually am, that shouldn’t change my personality within the team. It’s a different role that I’m not used to taking on, but it’s growing on me.” Things only turned worse when Vince Smurro suffered an injury while practicing his floor routine. Smurro was performing a tumbling pass, and in the process of landing, his knee hyperextended. He thought that he had torn his meniscus, but the news he received was even worse. “The doctor said it looks like someone

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois' C.J. Maestas competes on the rings during the Gym Jam at the Huff Hall on March 2. Maestas tore his tricep before the season began and cannot compete for six to eight months. just took a hammer to my bone,” Smurro said. “There was a huge crater in my tibia, which increased the instability in my knee.” The senior and captain learned he’d need to take a 10-week absence from competing. Smurro found himself in a similar position as Maestas, taking on a more vocal role as a captain. “I’ve never had a big injury like that,” Smurro said. “I’ve never had an injury last more than a week or two in my gymnastics career. ... I had a couple meetings with (head coach) Justin (Spring) and he helped me a lot in terms of what my mindset should

See MEN’S GYM, Page 2B

Injuries suffered by Illinois men’s gymnasts this season C.J. Maestas, Torn tricep 6-8 months Yoshi Mori, Strained Sternoclavicular join, back injury 1-2 weeks, TBD Cameron Rogers, Broken foot 8 weeks Vince Smurro, Indented tibia 10 weeks

For a second, the score didn’t matter. There was hope. In unison, the Orange Krush neglected the Illini’s 12-point deficit to then No. 2 Michigan with 11:44 remaining in the second half on Sunday, and started chanting. “We want Lyle!” CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, “We want Lyle!” JaQuan Lyle is a five-star recruit and currently ranked as the No. 15 basketball prospect in the nation for the Class of 2014 by ESPN. The junior has drawn interest from Kentucky and already has offers from Ohio State, Georgetown, Louisville, Texas and Indiana, among others. While Lyle’s mind is far from made up, he would be Illinois’ biggest recruiting get since Dee Brown in 2002. So if there’s a silver lining to the Illini’s 74-60 loss to the Wolverines, it was the Edwardsville, Ind., native’s presence. After the crowd finished the chorus of his name, Lyle tweeted from @JMamba5: “We want Lyle” chant #ICanDigIt. “It got real loud in here, and I had to tweet that,” Lyle said after the game. “To be the one they chanted, they had three commits here and lot of recruits, that was real special.” Lyle was referring to the Illini’s Class of 2013 commits Jaylon Tate, Kendrick Nunn and Malcolm Hill, as well as Class of 2014 commit Michael Finke, Class of 2014 No. 49 recruit Larry Austin and Class 2015 No. 23 recruit D.J. Williams. Lyle didn’t know the other recruits well, but he said he’s acquainted with Tate and has played against Nunn. Regardless, he was in Champaign to meet with Groce, which he did just before the game. “He really loves the game of basketball,” Lyle said. “He really looks forward to turning this school around. He just talked about me and how great I’d fit into the program. I really agree, but I just have to take

my time and see.” Austin, who plays at Lanphier High School in Springfield, Ill., also said he liked Groce’s system, but it was the first-year coach’s courtside demeanor that caught the junior point guard’s eye. “I like how he coaches his team,” Austin said. “He yells at them. He gets into them, but he gets the best out of his players.” Sunday was Austin’s second Illini game of the season. He was also in St. Louis for the Illini’s 82-73 loss to Missouri in the Braggin’ Rights Game on Dec. 22. While he hasn’t witnessed an Illini win this season, he’s noticed the fans, and their dedication to the team, even when times are tough. “The atmospheres are great,” Austin said. “The crowd gets into it each and every night. They don’t care who they’re playing. Even if they’re down, they’re still going to cheer for them. It’s pretty good here.” Austin keeps in touch with Illinois seniors D.J. Richardson and Brandon Paul, whom he met when he’d take trips down to Champaign when Bruce Weber was still coaching the Illini. Once Groce succeeded Weber, he met with Austin in his office and personally offered him a scholarship. Groce has a reputation of being a particularly strong recruiter. He was the lead recruiter when Ohio State signed Mike Conley Jr., Daequan Cook and Greg Oden when he worked under Thad Matta, and in the few months he had to recruit his class of 2013 he signed the nation’s 24th best class, according to ESPN. “Recruiting is always exciting,” Groce said. “I love meeting people and developing relationships. That part’s fine. I enjoy it.” The Orange Krush enjoys seeing top-50 recruits at games as well. They give the student section something to cheer about, even if the Illini are down 12.

Ethan can be reached at asofsky1@ dailyillini.com and on Twitter @AsOfTheSky.

Pre-Super Bowl week filled with asinine questions, bad sports journalism ELIOT SILL Sports columnist

T

his week brings about the most ridiculous spectacle in the sports media calendar: Super Bowl Media Day. If you don’t know what media day is, it’s the Tuesday before Super Bowl Sunday, wherein the Super Bowl’s host stadium turns into a beehive of meandering media types who may or may not know something about football. Last year, this media pageant — where, don’t get confused, no actual journalism takes place — began selling tickets so fans could lose money (about $25) to watch a bunch of sheep ask questions to players and coaches who view the affair as the silliest

component of the most serious week of their careers. On the one hand, more than 100 million people watch the Super Bowl, so it’s important, and it’s the most culturally unifying event crossing airwaves in the United States, as sadly as that may reflect on our culture. But does the Super Bowl warrant the glory of its media bonanza? The hype surrounding the Super Bowl is even more ridiculous when you consider how little anyone cares about the precursory rounds of the playoffs, comparatively speaking. Americans like it simple, so they only tune in when it’s two teams — it’s easier that way. That being said, 48.7 million people still watched the AFC championship game last Sunday, but a larger constituency who didn’t watch that game will watch the Super Bowl.

Clearly it’s not the football we care about here — it’s the pageantry, the party. Media day is a product of that pageantry. Something that fulfills a musing in the American public. People won’t remember all these players in five years, but we like to feel like we know them for those 3 ½ hours Feb. 3, when the lights shine brighter than ever and the flash bulbs make your eyes wince. Everyone feels like the Super Bowl is relevant to their life. I can very nearly promise you, The Daily Illini will produce Super Bowl content in its news, features and opinions sections in next Monday’s paper. Most newspapers in America will attack the game on all fronts. People feel tied to the Super Bowl, whether they should or not. Twitter will surely be on fire during the game, wheth-

er it be during gameplay, the commercials or the carrying out of such a tired concept as 10-minute halftime entertainment. All this attention being paid to a television program. There are serious arguments out there for making the day after the Super Bowl a holiday. It’s a big deal. The biggest. Does there need to be a day when we bug the players about football, their personal lives and generally random stuff? Some of the questions for media day sound like they’re coming from the 10-year-old girl from those Ray Lewis Visa commercials. Does Colin Kaepernick love puppies? Hype and spectacle are two very different things. The Super Bowl is deserving of all the hype it receives; being the conclusion of a 267-game campaign, it is the climax of America’s favorite season. But

PATRICK SEMANSKY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks at a Super Bowl news conference Monday. The Super Bowl will be the most-watched television program of the year, but does it warrant the relentless media coverage? to bring it to the level of deifying the players, following them around like apostles and boxing out the other bumble-

bees just to try and get your piece of larva so you can ask

See ELIOT, Page 2B


2B

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

As Wolverines ascend, future of Illini unsure DANIEL MILLERMCLEMORE Sports columnist

F

or a moment there, you could feel it. Illinois had sliced Michigan’s second-half lead to seven, and Assembly Hall was rocking — another sellout crowd desperately attempting to push its ever-mediocre Illini to the next level for the upset. Everyone in the building could feel the wheels start to churn — everyone except for Michigan. As they had been all game long, the Wolverines were utterly cold-blooded, stamping out any hopes the Illini had before they could get off the ground. A Mitch McGary tip-in off a Trey Burke miss ended the Illinois run, immediately followed by Burke picking the pocket of Brandon Paul at midcourt for a runaway dunk. Two minutes later, Michigan’s lead was 16 and the game was completely out of reach. It was an impressive performance made even more so by the fact that the Wolverines didn’t come close to playing their best game. Starting center Jordan Morgan sprained his ankle on Michigan’s second offensive possession and was unable to return. Burke, who entered shooting better than 50 percent from two and 38 percent from three on the season, made just 7-of-19 from the field and only one three. Despite not bringing their A-game, the Wolverines systematically suppressed any chance Illinois had at pulling the upset. Michigan led nearly the entire game and never once looked flustered, never reacting to the crowd or even appearing pleased with themselves when they eventually shut them up.

MEN’S GYM FROM PAGE 1B be and what my role as a leader should be.” After a short Thanksgiving break, the team slowly adjusted without Maestas. But the tightknit group would lose another member the first day back in the gym. Junior Cameron Rogers slightly hurt his knee before the break and was trying to take it easy while warming up his floor routine. Rogers went crooked in the air while practicing a floor exercise pass on the tumble track, which caused him to land on the edge, and his foot rolled off. He not only broke his foot in two places but tore open his toe and was forced to get stitches. “I was pretty frustrated because I’d been having a real-

ELIOT FROM PAGE 1B Jacoby Jones whether he could succeed with Tim Tebow as his quarterback. It’s not relevant. It’s not interesting. And it’s done just for the sake of doing it, just because it’s the Super Bowl

The Wolverines slowly stepped on the throat of the Illini, steadily increasing the pressure until there was no fight left. During the postgame press conference, John Beilein looked as relaxed as could be. As I wrote last week, a head coach’s job is significantly easier when paired with a great point guard, and Beilein has one of the best in the business in Burke. The Wolverines’ offense for the last four minutes of the game essentially consisted of Burke dribbling out the shot clock, then creating a shot for himself or his teammates. That said, the job Beilein has done this season is remarkable, no matter who’s running point. Michigan’s rotation Sunday night consisted of six freshmen, two sophomores and two juniors, including Morgan, who played just 1:30, and yet they have played like seasoned veterans in some of the toughest road environments in the Big Ten. This game wasn’t about Illinois. We know who the Illini are at this point in the season: an inconsistent team on both offense and defense that lacks size and rebounding. During hot shooting stretches, Illinois can keep pace with almost anyone in the country. During cold stretches, they don’t belong in the NCAA tournament. And the cold s tretches seem to come ever more frequently as conference play progresses. Case in point, Tyler Griffey is now 0 for his last 20 3-point attempts. The Illini must play exceptionalBRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI ly, give maximum effort and Michigan’s Trey Burke shoots over Illinois’ Brandon Paul during the Illini’s 74-60 loss to Michigan at Assembly Hall be mentally locked in for 40 minutes to beat a team like the on Sunday. Michigan is in good shape both this year and in the future, while Illinois’ future is uncertain. Wolverines, and they just don’t seem capable. since the Fab Five and pushranking after his team’s win March and in years to come No, this game was about ing it all the way to the No. 1 Sunday night. He’s right, it — a prospect that remains in Michigan and its ascent to the ranking for the first time since doesn’t matter at this point in doubt for the Illini. top of college basketball, about 1992. the season. Daniel is a senior in Media. He can Beilein finally turning around As he should, Beilein downBut these Wolverines are be reached at millerm1@dailyillini. a program mired in mediocrity played the importance of the built for the long haul, both in ly good preseason,” Rogers said. Problems slowly started to “Training was going really well, arise as the season quickly and we were six weeks out from approached, and the Illini tried our first meet. I was concerned to fill the position of those who about getting back and being were injured. ready for the first “We kind of meet or midseahad to frame the son or anything.” goal and misThese were sion we had as only three major a team to make injuries that sure that everyoccurred in addione understood tion to a few that we aren’t the smaller ones from same team, but major contribuwe have potentors, such as Mori, tial to do good VINCE SMURRO, who has strained things this year,” senior his SternoclavicuSpring said. “The lar joint and back work ethic needs so far this season. Mori is still suf- to step up and no one needs to fering pain in his back, which took try and replace C.J. by trying him out of the all-around competi- to be C.J. ... You have to be the tion last weekend at the Metroplex best you can be and that’s what Challenge, though he did compete we need.” on a few events. With a domino effect of inju-

ries, Illinois’ energy has sputtered from the start of training. Kenney Gym was not full of life and excitement over winter break like it usually was. “It was tough with so few guys doing routines because everyone wasn’t ready to do routines,” Spring said. “Typically, the energy over winter break is building and snowballing, just getting bigger and more exciting and we definitely lacked that.” Doctors this month cleared Rogers and Smurro, who both have competed in meets this season. But Maestas can still be found cheering from the sidelines. He is currently ahead of schedule with rehab, which he attributes to the way he approaches it. “I come into rehab and it’s not like, ‘OK, bored, moving my arm.’ I’m in there acting as if I’m doing

gymnastics,” Maestas said. “I attack rehab like I do everything else in life. If I have a busy rehab schedule, I treat it like I have a busy gymnastics schedule.” Maestas said he feels “phenomenal” and will be attending another doctor’s appointment in early February. He will get another checkup in hopes of proving that he can come back sooner than expected. Maestas is so confident that he was even testing out his skills in the gym last week. “I jumped up on the rings and everyone’s eyes just turned and looked because they aren’t used to me being back on the rings,” Maestas said. “Everyone expression was, ‘Whoa, he’s coming back quick.’ Little things like that push me even harder.”

and the media feels like they have to do something drastic. It’d be different if it were the same places that have covered these teams through the year, but it’s not. It’s everyone who can con his or her way into a credential. And it’s silly. And now they charge to see it. And people purchase the tickets. Super Bowl Media Day is

WOMEN’S BBALL

lor Tuck stepped up and made several clutch plays, finishing the night with a career-high 16 points. Three other Illini scored 16 points or more, helping Illinois win its first four roads games in the Big Ten since the 2000-01 season.

“The doctor said it looks like someone just took a hammer to my bone.”

the epitome of athlete glorification, the quintessence of media suckerdom, and for whom? Other than the unintelligible ogling gossip “superfan,” I can think of no one.

Eliot is a junior in Media. He can be reached at sill2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @EliotTweet.

FROM PAGE 1B the season. Banham was a terror for the Illini, keeping Minnesota in the game with 37 points, the most by an Illini opponent this season. With GodBold out of the game, sophomore guard Tay-

Can you name this Illini basketball player? !"#$%&#%"'&()%*+%,-+'+. ())(#('"$(&/0+'%1(*2%*2(3% ,)&4"-53%#&'"%&#$%4+6% 1())%7"%"#*"-"$%*+%1(#%8-""% *(09"*3%*+%&%:(;%<"#%2+'"% 7&39"*7&))%;&'"= !"#$%&'%()%*'+,#%-.%+/'%-,%-01',%$-%2345% 600343%!'13+%'780-*''#%+,'%34'03/3&0'5

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Michael can be reached at wonsovr2 @dailyillini.com and @m_dubb.

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Men’s golf wins 10th straight vs. ISU BY CLAIRE LAVEZZORIO STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s golf team won its 10th straight Tinervin Cup against Illinois State this past Saturday in Placida, Fla. The Illini defeated the Redbirds 8-1 at the event, held on the 7,038-yard, par-71 Coral Creek Golf Club. Illinois has traditionally dominated this competition, winning by a wide margin in every year except 2006 and 2007, when the Illini only won by one and two points, respectively. The Tinervin Cup was hosted by supporters Jeff Tinervin and his wife, Madalyn, who also contributed to the development of the Demirjian Golf Practice Facility, where the Illini regularly practice in the winter. The annual competition’s format resembles the prestigious Ryder Cup, a match-play tournament administered by the PGA of America and the PGA European Tour. The tournament began with three two-on-two, head-to-head best ball morning matches. Each individual match was worth one point, and at the end of the morning, Illinois capitalized on all three. Junior Thomas Pieters’ and freshman Charlie Danielson’s win over Wils Hawn and Matt Solis gave the Illini their first point of the morning. Illinois freshman Thomas Detry and sophomore Brian Campbell followed by defeating Ricky Hearden and Parker Freiburg, while senior Mason Jacobs and freshman David Kim beat Tyler Gentilella and Tyler Pope-Ferguson to give the Illini the sweep in doubles. Pieters, who last week announced his plans on turning professional after the season, continued his hot streak from the fall season in which he totaled 16 rounds under-par. That afternoon, Illinois won all but one of its six individual head-to-head stroke-play matches. “We got some competition under our belt and identified some things we need to work on before the Big Ten matchplay tournament in two weeks,” Illinois head coach Mike Small said. This win will give the Illini momentum before they travel to Sarasota, Fla., on Feb. 8-9 for the Big Ten Match Play Championship.

Claire can be reached at lavezzo2@ dailyillini.com.

Tinervin Cup history

2013 - Illinois 8, Illinois State 1 2012 - Illinois 7, Illinois State 2 2011 - Illinois 8.5, Illinois State 0.5 2010 - Illinois 9, Illinois State 0 2009 - Illinois 8, Illinois State 1 2008 - Illinois 8, Illinois State 1 2007 - Illinois 5.5, Illinois State 3.5 2006 - Illinois 5, Illinois State 4 2005 - Illinois 8, Illinois State 1 2004 - Illinois 9, Illinois State 0

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

3B

Miami Heat welcomed to White House

LeBron James presents Obama with autographed basketball there for them day in and day out, that’s a good message to send,” WASHINGTON — President Obama said. Barack Obama honored the Miami Miami Heat coach Erik Heat for winning the 2012 NBA Spoelstra said the team hopefully Championship title after falling will serve as an inspiration to the short just a year before. nation of what can be done “when “Everybody doing their part, you come together and sacrifice is what finally your egos for a put the Heat greater goal” and “hard-hat work over the top,” ethic.” Obama said, as he welcomed the James, who team to the White p r e s e n t e d House Monday to Obama with an celebrate their autographed victory. basketball, T he He at said the team defeated the i n c l u d i n g Oklahoma City members that hail from Illinois, Thunder in five games in the NBA Texas, Michigan, Finals last June. Ohio and South The president Dakota were also recognized honored to be the franchise’s in the executive work off the court. mansion. He thanked them “We’re in the for supporting White House military service right now, which is like, like ‘mama members at I made it,’” James Walter Reed National Military said, as the BARACK OBAMA, Medical Center. audience laughed president of the United States Obama said one and cheered. The crowd of the things he’s proudest of is that many of of well-wishers included the team members— including actress Gabrielle Union, U.N. LeBron James, Chris Bosh and ambassador Susan Rice, U.S. Dwyane Wade— “take their roles Education Secretary Arne as fathers seriously.” Duncan, and Congresswomen “For all the young men out there Debbie Wasserman Schultz and who are looking up to them all the Frederica Wilson. The Heat last time, for them to see somebody visited the White House after who cares about their kids and is winning the 2006 title. BY STACY A. ANDERSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“For all the young men out there who are looking up to them all the time, for them to see somebody who cares about their kids and is there for them day in and day out, that’s a good message to send.”

CAROLYN KASTER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama accepts a signed basketball from Miami Heat forward LeBron James as he welcomes the NBA basketball champions, to the East Room of the White House on Monday in Washington.

Woods wins 75th PGA Tour event at Farmers Insurance Open BY DOUG FERGUSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Tiger Woods is a winner again at Torrey Pines, and the only question Monday was how long it would take him to finish. Woods stretched his lead to eight shots in the Farmers Insurance Open before losing his focus and his patience during a painfully slow finish by the group ahead. Despite dropping four shots over the last five holes, he still managed an even-par 72 for a fourshot victory on the course where he has won more than any other in his pro career. He won the tournament for the seventh time, one behind the record held by Sam Snead, who won the Greater Greensboro Open eight times. It was the eighth time Woods won at Torrey Pines, which includes his playoff win in the 2008 U.S Open. This one was never close. Woods built a six-shot lead with 11 holes to play when the final round of the fog-delayed tournament was suspended Sunday by darkness. He returned Monday — a late morning restart because CBS Sports wanted to show it in the afternoon on the East Coast — and looked stronger than ever until the tournament dragged to a conclusion. Having to wait on every tee and from every fairway — or the rough, in his case — Woods made bogey from the bunker on the 14th, hooked a tee shot on the 15th that went off the trees and into a patch of ice plant and led to double bogey, then popped up his tee shot on the 17th on his way to another bogey. All that affected was the score. It kept him from another big margin of victory, though the message was clear about his game long before that. One week after he missed the cut in Abu Dhabi, he ruled at Torrey Pines. It was his 75th career win, seven short of the Snead’s all-time tour record. “It got a little ugly toward the end,” Woods said. “I started losing patience a little bit with the slow play. I lost my concentration a little bit.”

He rallied with a two-putt par on the 18th hole to win by four shots over defending champion Brandt Snedeker and Josh Teater, who had the best finish of his career. Like so many of his big wins, the only drama was for second place. Brad Fritsch birdied his last two holes for a 75. That put him in a tie for ninth, making him eligible for the Phoenix Open next week. Fritsch, a rookie from Canada, had been entered in the Monday qualifier that he had to abandon when the Farmers Insurance Open lost Saturday to a fog delay. Woods effectively won this tournament in the final two hours Sunday, when he stretched his lead to six shots with only 11 holes to play. Nick Watney made a 10-foot birdie putt on the par-5 ninth when play resumed to get within five shots, only to drop three shots on the next five holes. Everyone else started too far behind, and Woods wasn’t about to come back to them. Even so, the red shirt seemed to put him on edge. It didn’t help that as he settled over his tee shot on the par-5 ninth, he backed off when he heard a man behind the ropes take his picture. Woods rarely hits the fairway after an encounter with a camera shutter, and this was no different — it went so far right that it landed on the other side of a fence enclosing a corporate hospitality area. Woods took his free drop, punched out below the trees into the fairway and then showed more irritation when his wedge nicked the flag after one hop and spun down the slope 30 feet away instead of stopping next to the hole. He didn’t show much reaction on perhaps his most memorable shot of the day — with his legs near the edge of a bunker some 75 feet to the left of the 11th green, he blasted out to the top shelf and watched the ball take dead aim until it stopped a foot short. He failed to save par from a bunker on the 14th, and he hooked his tee shot into the ice plant on the 15th hole. He had to take a penalty drop and wound up making double bogey. More than his 75th career win, it was a strong opening statement for

what could be a fascinating 2013. Before anyone projects a monster year for Woods based on one week — especially when that week is at Torrey Pines — remember that he just missed the cut last week in Abu Dhabi. Woods said he wasn’t playing much differently, and would have liked two more rounds in the Middle East. Instead, a two-shot penalty for a bad drop sent him home.

Still, in healthier and happier times he usually was sharp coming after a long layoff. Throw out the trip to the Arabian Gulf, and he is. Woods was eight shots ahead with five holes to play when he stumbled his way to the finish line, perhaps from having to kill time waiting on the group ahead. Erik Compton, Steve Marino and Fritsch had an entire par 5 open ahead of them at the end of the round.

Still, Woods played a unique game at Torrey Pines. “I think he wanted to send a message,” said Hunter Mahan, who shares a swing coach with Woods. “I think deep down he did. You play some games to try to motivate yourself. There’s been so much talk about Rory (McIlroy). Rory is now with Nike. That would be my guess.” Mahan got a good look at Woods

this week, playing in the group behind him on the front nine because Mahan was first off on the two-tee start. “He looked strong,” Mahan said. “He had great control of his swing. He was hitting some strong shots, different from any other player I saw out here.” Woods is not likely to return to golf until the Match Play Championship next month.

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Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker during the fourth round of the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament at the Torrey Pines Golf course Monday.


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A publication of

The Daily Illini

Tuesday January 29th, 2013

SPRING CAREER GUIDE

How to impress at the career fair

Do you know how to tie a tie?

Will this job be right for you?

Learn how to stand out in a crowd for potential employers

If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t (and you really should) figure out how inside

You can find out by shadowing people in relevant industries

PAGE 4

PAGE 5

PAGE 8


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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

You might believe them, but don’t fall for these job myths

ONLINE & CONTINUING EDUCATION oce.illinois.edu

ALICE SMELYANSKY Staff writer

Website: oce.illinois.edu | Phone: 217-333-1320 | E-mail: oce-info@illinois.edu

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W

alking into an interview can seem like a staged act. As you enter the office, you flash an impeccable smile, reach out your hand to offer a firm yet friendly handshake, and maintain eye contact with the interviewer throughout the entire performance. The moment you finally take a seat and brace yourself for the invasion of questions on the opposing line can seem dreadful, since you may have been told that there’s a right way to answer a question and the interviewer will know exactly what to ask. But are the myths and rumors about job interviews actually true? Often times, the act is flawed.

Job Myth #1 The interviewer is always prepared. According to experiences had by Cole Gleason, sophomore in Engineering, the interviewer may not be as reliable as one might expect. “I once had an interview show up 10 minutes late and hungover since they were at Murphy’s the night before,” Gleason said. Though you shouldn’t always assume this behavior from

an interviewer, even in the midst of preinterview anxiety it might qualm your nerves to know that interviewers are not autonomous robots spewing out questions. They’re humans too, occasionally guilty of tardiness and a deviation from the socalled interview script.

Job Myth #2 You won’t get the job without a suit. Dressing appropriately is a given when you’re trying to market yourself, but is it always necessary? For some jobs, there’s no getting around a trip to the mall in search of a suit. But other students claim they’ve never had to wear one at an interview. “I was once told that I would need a suit to interview. The truth is that I bought one freshman year and have never used it for an interview,” said Islam Sharabash, senior in Engineering. “I’ve only worn it to go to career fairs, and I’ve never gotten an internship from a career fair.” Luck could play a large role if this myth proves to be false; nevertheless, dressing the part will never sabotage the job hunt.

Job Myth #3 There is a “right” answer to every question. When asked, “Where do you see yourself in five years?” or,

“What’s something you could improve on?” some believe there is a perfect answer that could get you the job. But contrary to this assumption, a “wrong” answer has benefits too. “I think the best guideline is to simply be straightforward and honest about what you do,” said John Kindt, a business professor at the University. While he’s a senior executive now, Kindt recalls a student who unknowingly gave the wrong answer during an interview. While interviewing for GM, the company was describing its many operations when suddenly the student blurted out, “Oh, does GM make cars?” “All the company people thought she was joking, and they laughed, and they gave her the job, right there and then,” Kindt said. “Of course she had good credentials and a very good ethical background ... but I think being straightforward, even if you’re naive can have unexpected benefits to it.” Kindt also offered advice that always holds true when interviewing for a job. “It’s not all about ability. There are a lot of people with great ability,” he said. “Good character and reputation should not be underestimated.”

Alice can be reached at features@ dailyillini.com.

Career etiquette for dummies: Be serious, but not too serious LYANNE ALFARO Staff writer

P

laying ill-humored pranks on your co-worker. Letting your generosity get the best of you when you decide to create a page for your boss on match.com. Altering your resume. Although we can always turn to a “Career Etiquette for Dummies”-esque textbook to tell us what behavior to embrace and avoid in the office setting, we may not have to look further than contemporary fi lms to learn a few of the basics.

Dummies Rule #1: Honesty is key. Television Show: Suits

Mike Ross is in quite the pickle. He’s working at one of New York City’s top-notch law firms, a job he landed with his wits but also with one increasingly hard-to-keep lie. To most of his co-workers at Pearson Hardman, he is a Harvard Law School graduate, just as everyone else in the room. But to senior partner Harvey Specter, Ross is really a college dropout with a vast knowledge of law. Now, Specter and Ross have to work twice as hard to keep the secret from the other lawyers at the firm. And while watching a dramedy about lies,

deceit and a heightened version of legal profession may have true entertainment value, it would be unfortunate to have to go through. Take a tip from Ross’ experience and be honest.

Dummies Rule #2: Do dress accordingly. Film: The Devil Wears Prada

Avoid the wrath of Miranda. If you recall Miranda’s dismissive look when she sees Andrea for the first time — a young, scraggly girl wearing black dress pants, a button-up and a lilac sweater vest—you also know that she followed it up with a, “You have no style or sense of fashion.” Especially if you are meeting with your potential boss for the first time, be sure to dress appropriately. When applying for a business job, wear business apparel. If interviewed to work at a fashion company, wear a well-coordinated outfit. What you wear demonstrates part of the reason why are you are fit or equally unfit for the position.

Dummies Rule #3: Do have a rational amount of fun. Television Show: The Office

Remember how much you laughed when Jim Jell-Oed Dwight’s stapler? In theory, a prank like that is priceless. But unless your co-worker is your younger sibling and your

boss loves April Fools’ Day, you might not want to try that in your office. However, after gaining a certain level of comfort with the peers you work with, having some fun may be permissible. A study from the Journal of American Medical Association demonstrated that surgeons working in a laboratory better performed and completed tasks when there was music playing in the background. Perhaps a distraction from work once in a while might result in increased work productivity.

Dummies Rule #4: Do not forget to visit Paradise Falls. Animated Film: Up

You workaholic. While it’s wonderful that you are earning that Employee of the Month award, the complementary bonus check and the envy of your co-workers that comes with it, have you even had a chance to check out your personal life? Do it now. If you’ve always wanted to marvel at the Louvre in person, there is still time to purchase your plane ticket. We can get so caught up in piles of work and making sure everything goes according to plan that, just as 78-year-old Carl almost did, we might miss Paradise Falls. Do not let work keep you from missing the main attraction.

Lyanne is a sophomore in Media and can be reached at alfaro2@dailyillini.com.

Illio Yearbook

Senior Year Memories And so much more. Senior Portraits You know your mom (dad, grandparents, girlfriend, boyfriend…) wants you to  have your senior portrait taken.

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Reserve Your Book Illio yearbook, hundreds of pages and hundreds memories, will arrive at the  end of spring semester. 

Visit illioyearbook.com or call 217­337­8314 for answers!


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

3C

Internships can turn to servitude Employers may confuse your offer to work for free as one to work as a slave TAYLOR ELLIS Features columnist

W

hen it comes to internships, it’s very common for them to be unpaid these days. Whether you’re a business or agricultural major, there’s no doubt that finding an internship is very competitive. It’s typically a wise decision to accept an internship even if you won’t be raking in cash. You would think that as long as you’re gaining experience and have your parents’ roof over your head, it should be a great preparation for the real world. Unfortunately, this past summer I learned the hard truth — sometimes employers will confuse the words “unpaid internship” with “personal slave.” From paying for errands out of my own pocket to being told to plate food for a party without any experience in catering, I experienced the summer from hell, to say the least. As an unpaid intern, I happily accepted the idea that I wouldn’t receive biweekly pay checks; however, I couldn’t accept the fact that I was using my own money to better my boss’s business. And the fun didn’t stop there — I can recall a few times when I was personally embarrassed and yelled at by my boss in front of other interns. Even though their business was just taking off and stress levels were high, I was surprised to be insulted when I was working as an intern for free! However, I think the worst part about my internship

PHOTO FROM THINKSTOCK.COM

experience was that I didn’t gain anything from it; well, except for finding out I would never work for those people again. When I had my interview, I got the impression I would be assisting in writing and editing, and as a journalism major, I was immediately interested in the position. After accepting the internship, I learned quickly

that my job would be less about my writing skills and more about delivering gift bags to clients across the city and rearranging furniture for events. Of course, I am thankful I was able to add the internship to my resume, but it would’ve been nice to actually gain some valuable experience. Sadly, I don’t believe I have

anyone to blame but myself for my slave-like internship. On the day of my interview, I was delighted with the idea and as I arrived in Chicago, my excitement only grew. This excitement quickly grew into aggravation as when my boss changed the time of my interview twice throughout the day. Through it all, I have

learned that, as young professionals, we might not always get the job of our dreams. Although the summer was a rough experience, I came out of it ready to tackle the next round of obstacles that are sure to come in my career. After spending a few months in a world where I was treated like my time and ability didn’t

really matter, I’ve definitely learn my lesson. For my next internship, I’m doing all the research possible on the company beforehand and not letting myself ignore the signs that an internship is possibly not for me ... I hope you do the same!

Taylor is a junior in Media. She can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.


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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

How to stick out of the crowd at a career fair BY SARAH SOENKE STAFF WRITER

The Internet can sometimes feel like a black hole when it comes to applying for a job. When it’s just text on a computer screen, submitting a job application online can simply put a student’s name on a long list of similarly qualified candidates. How can a student stick out? Despite the countless resources and means of connecting people the Internet offers, in-person communication is still important. That’s why the University offers so many opportunities for career networking, one of the most important being career fairs. Career fairs are venues for students to not only learn about the companies that are looking to hire, but also market themselves and their specific skill set to potential employers. They bring in as many as 100 to 150 recruiters to campus who are interested in hiring University students so that students have the opportunity to engage with multiple employers in person in order to build relationships that will help them in the job market. Research is key to success at a career fair. Katie Flint, assistant director of employer connections at the Career Center, works with both students and employers to coordinate employment efforts on campus. Students should compile a list of five to 20 companies that are offering a position aligned with their career aspirations, Flint said. Being able to ask specific questions about a company and its open position at the fair will go a long way. “The biggest pet peeve we hear from employers is that students come up to them and say things like, ‘Well, what do you do?’ or ‘What are you about?’” she said. “That automatically is going to take you off an employer’s list.” Another important aspect of making a good first impression is the dress code. A student should dress business professional, said Zelda Gardner, senior assistant director at the Career Center. Whether that is a suit for men or skirt suit for women, students need to “dress to impress when they attend career fairs.” Students should come equipped with several copies of their resume to hand out, along with a portfolio to organize business cards, contact information and notes they may take down during conversations with recruiters, Flint said. Jennifer Neef, associate director for career connections at the Career Center, addressed things

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK.COM

students shouldn’t bring to a career fair. Students should avoid bringing a big backpack, use coat check when possible and find a place to stash any giveaway items they may collect at the fair. Holding extra items can make students look unprofessional. When approaching a recruiter, students should also prepare an “elevator pitch,” or a one- to twominute speech about their personal information, their interest in a specific job position and the skills they can bring to the company. The main point students should get across is sincere interest in a position, Neef said. Flint advised incorporating plans of action into conversations with recruiters as well. When

doing research beforehand, students should fill out online applications, if available, so they could be used as a talking point at the fair. She also advised students to ask questions about the company’s hiring process and contact information. After attending a career fair, students should be proactive about contacting the employers with follow-up emails to further communicate their interest in a position with specific references and questions. “Things like ‘I had a great conversation with you at the career fair’ is not specific enough, because many of these recruiters are going from fair to fair to fair,” Neef said. “So students need to be

really specific — ‘I had a great conversation at the University of Illinois Business Career Fair on Wednesday.’” Career fairs are great opportunities for upperclassmen to speak with future employers but can also provide learning experiences for underclassmen. While some companies may not be interested in underclassmen, others do offer internships and other employment opportunities. At the very least, attending career fairs early will help students become comfortable in the environment, learn more about the type of companies that attend career fairs and get a head start on networking. “There are not many freshmen or sophomores that go, and

so those that do — those that can deliver a nice message about their professional goals — recruiters are going to remember year after year,” Neef said. To begin the career fair process, students can start by looking up the companies that will be attending future career fairs through I-Link, the career services management system. I-Link can also be used as a resource for job and internship postings, interview scheduling and other career networking opportunities. The Career Center also offers career fair workshops and a resume review service to help students perfect their material for the upcoming fairs. On Jan. 29 and 30, the Engineer-

ing Career Services Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and the Business Career Fair will be held from noon. to 4 p.m. The All-Campus Career Fair will be held from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. April 3. “If you honestly see a company that you’re in interested in applying, it doesn’t matter what the career fair is titled — go and talk to that company because they’re open to all students,” Flint said. “The more you can use the resources at your disposal while you’re here at Illinois, it’s just going to increase your chances of fi nding something.”

Sarah can be reached at soenke2@ dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

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How to buy business casual on a college student’s budget HANNAH BOLLMAN Staff writer

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uying proper clothes for business casual events such as career fairs, internships and job interviews can be a challenge while living on a student budget. One of the easiest ways to achieve a professional look is to invest in just a few simple wardrobe staples.

Hannah is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at features@ dailyillini.com.

WOMEN

MEN

Collared Blouse: These are available at many retail stores, but H&M sells trendy, youthful blouses at affordable prices. While it is advisable to avoid low-cut blouses, this staple can still be livened up with studs or bright colors. Pencil Skirt: Forever 21 has cheap, age-appropriate skirts of varying lengths and colors, but for a more professional look, stick with skirts that hit right at the knee or directly above. Dress Pants: Usually, buyers can get the most out of this wardrobe staple when it is bought in neutral shades such as dark gray or black. If you want to splurge on this item, New York & Company has a variety of styles, or try Kohl’s for nearly half the price. Blazer: This item can function as either a statement piece or as a simple and sophisticated wardrobe staple. While Express is pricier than Forever 21 and H&M, the quality of the clothing is higher, and the blazers come in a variety of colors and fabrics. This is the finishing touch of any business-casual look, adding that final refinement.

Collared Shirt: TJMaxx sells brand names such as Ralph Lauren for extremely discounted prices. Dress shirts of all styles and brands can be found at this outlet-type store, allowing you to buy multiple shirts and spend less than you would at a designer store. Slacks or Dress Pants: If you’re looking to splurge, Express Men’s carries various styles and colors and a range of fabrics. If you need to stick to a strict student budget, Kohl’s has reliably low prices on essentially the same slacks. Tie: This article of clothing is often deemed optional for business casual attire, but it can really sharpen the look. JC Penney has high-quality men’s ties for relatively cheap and almost always has a clearance section, where some of the lowest prices for both neckties and collared shirts can be found.

TAMING TIE the

In a big interview, The Knot may save your neck

ADLAI STEVENSON Staff writer

M

any poor souls across campus have gone into a cold, harsh interview or workplace without knowledge of crafting The Knot. While carefully slipping an already assembled tie on and off is a suitable method, actually learning how to do it properly can prove useful. Follow the easy steps below to learn how to tie a tie.

2

1

Hang the tie around the back of your neck and let it drop across the front of your body. Make sure the wide end of the tie is on your left side and around 12 inches below the narrow tail.

4

3

Cross the wide end over the narrow part of the tie near your neck line, then wrap it around the narrow side.

6

5

Next, take the wide end and push it through the top opening area near your neckline.

Wrap the tie back around the front again to create a loop for the next step.

Squeeze the wide end through the narrow loop formed by the unfinished knot.

Accommodate and move around the knot so that the tie fits comfortably. The narrow tail should loosely hang in the back by now — pull on it to make it tighter. PHOTOS BY BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Discover the opportunities that await you. Open House UI College of Law 504 E Pennsylvania Ave February 4 5 – 7 p.m.

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Register by February 1 law-admissions@illinois.edu

JANUARY 30TH, AT THE UIUC CAREER FAIR! EFCO Corp., a leader in manufacturing, engineering, and sales in the concrete forming industry, seeks qualified candidates for Territory Manager-in-Training positions nationwide, including our Chicago District Office. This is an exciting opportunity with a multinational company that has been in business for almost 80 years. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.EFCOFORMS.COM OR VISIT OUR BOOTH AT THE CAREER FAIR ON JANUARY 30TH!

If you desire to be the best at everything you do, then you may be the type of person we are looking for to join EFCO Corp.! Focusing on product knowledge and sales procedures, you will spend time with experienced employees in the field. You will learn to develop leads, propose solutions, and manage relationships inside the concrete forming industry. Ultimately, you will utilize your skills and training to work with commercial, treatment plant, and bridge contractors to evaluate their formwork needs. Qualified candidates will have a Bachelors degree or equivalent experience, preferably in the field of Civil, Construction, or Mechanical Engineering. Other majors with a passion for construction are encouraged to apply. Candidates MUST have a strong mechanical aptitude, excellent communication skills, and be willing to travel. Knowledge of AutoCAD, the construction industry, and/or an ability to read blueprints are all preferred.


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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

ADLER.

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

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Tips on how to perfect the ‘elevator pitch’ Be succinct, focus on ‘big ideas’ during one-on-one time with potential employers ADLAI STEVENSON Staff writer

O

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK.COM

pportunity is on the mind of any driven individual eager for the next step up in his or her life. That chance may arrive with well-deserved results or come up entirely by luck. The “elevator pitch” scenario can occur beyond its literal setting, and they may happen in only rare, strange occurrences. But those who prepare for even the most unlikely circumstance can make the best out of those uncommon opportunities. Here are several tips to stick to so that your Cinderella moment can go smoothly. First, use your pitch time wisely. Time in an elevator could range from many levels of floors to just two. Maybe they are just walking across the office or washing their hands. As long as a moment with superiors is relatively isolated and comfortable, cover as much important material of your pitch as you can. Shape the big ideas around the scenario you have to work with. With that in mind, clearly address the point of your pitch. Lay out why you are talking to them one-on-one and why this proposition will benefit what they work for — or better yet, them. Specificities are out the door unless absolutely necessary to make sense. The outcome of your proposed idea usually matters much more than the process or methods to get there. That comes later when they call in for additional meetings. Next, talk succinctly. No time for fancy words or flattery. A straightforward approach will allow you to hit on many key points and the higher-up will have an easier sense of what you are pitching. If done correctly, employers should

be impressed with your knowledge and effective communication skills, both desirable traits they look for. Defi nitely go beyond the niceties and formality usual for display. Time may be short but stay calm and focused. Nothing can go worse than appearing desperate for someone’s attention or posing as a bigger hassle than the one you want to solve. Appear like an admirable human being, not as an another annoyance. Look potential employers in the eye and gauge their reactions. If signs show you can’t handle this level of pressure, odds are they won’t want you for the bigger leagues. To get there, make sure you are at least semi-familiar with whom you intend to talk to. They probably won’t remember and a chance encounter may throw them off. Before you make the pitch, introduce yourself somehow and fi nd out more about them. Read how they act, see what they respond to more favorably. This will increase your chances of running into them and give higher chances for their approval. Practice is also essential, but remain flexible. Odds are the pitch won’t go the way you have planned, so be ready to catch yourself for changes. If you want to write out a script, stick to remembering big ideas so you won’t trip up over the small things. Have friends randomly ask you about your “big project.” Little tests such as these will help you think on your feet more effectively. The elevator pitch is rarely the be-all and end-all of a career or brought toward high-end executives. So remain calm and work on it in time. Put these principles into your real-life scenario and good things should happen. Just make sure it’s not between bath stalls.

Adlai can be reached at aesteve2@ dailyillini.com.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

ARTS &

ENTERTAINMENT EVERY THURSDAY

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK.COM

!"#"$%&'

one year

Business education with a technology focus

Master of Science in Technology Management

Job shadows offer unique opportunity Shadows allow students to gain experience, forge new connections

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KELLY CHUIPEK Staff writer

In

INFO SESSION

Thursday, January 31st, 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 p.m. 2041 Business Instructional Facility 515 East Gregory Street, Champaign Pizza and soda provided

www.ms-techmgmt.illinois.edu

todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world of hunting for both internships and full-time positions, the competition for securing a job is high. While internships, solid grades and a wellrounded resume are all beneficial when trying to stand out in a stack of applications, one opportunity many students overlook is the possibility to participate in shadowing experiences. As I fi nish up my senior year and decide what companies I want to apply to, I decided to participate in two job shadows this past winter break. Although nervewracking, I am convinced they are going to help me more in my job search than any resume workshop.

Four Benefits of Participating in a Job Shadow 1. Get to know the business:

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As much as learning in classes and reading about certain jobs in textbooks or online is helpful, nothing is as good as experiencing the job fi rsthand. Participating in a job shadow is a great opportunity to see the dayto-day operations of the company. It also can give insight into if it is the right environment for you or if another career would be a better fit. Tory Cross, sophomore in LAS, shadowed an oncologist at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, Calif., for a few days during winter break. In the end, the job shadow solidified her decision to pursue a career working with cancer patients. Cross wants to pursue a career in the medical field, but it can be difficult to get internship experience as medicine requires a license. Her job shadow let her follow around an oncologist and observe meetings with patientsand meet other people, such as nurses and physicians assistants, to understand why they went into oncology.

2. Make connections: One of the most important pieces of advice given to students on the job hunt is that connections are everything. The phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not what you know, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who you knowâ&#x20AC;? has been pounded into my head over and over. But how do you go about making connections in the professional world?

A job shadow is one way to get to meet people in a more casual environment. Career fairs and recruiting events can be more stressful because hundreds of students are trying to talk to and impress one person. There simply is not enough time. Job shadows offer students the chance to have more personal conversations and form relationships with professionals in a much more intimate setting. During my job shadow, I sat down for decent amounts of time and learned what working at the company is really like. People are fl attered when asked for their advice. I received a lot of solid information and make connections that will help in my job search.

3. Practice run: In the job search and application process, nailing the interview is the most crucial part of landing a job. Looking like a good applicant on paper does not mean anything if you cannot persuade the interviewer to hire you. One benefit of a job shadow is being able to sit down with professionals and practice talking to them about the field you are interested in working in. Talking to professionals is much different from talking to friends or fellow classmates, and it is nice to get some practice in a nonthreatening environment. I even picked up some terminology from my job shadowing experience that I had never learned in school that could help distinguish myself in any upcoming interviews. A job shadow is in some ways a practice run for interviews.

4. Available to everyone: While internships can be highly competitive and difficult to secure, especially for younger students, job shadows are much more accessible to people. As I have found out, it is simple to reach out to companies or professionals that seem interesting and relevant to future career goals. People are usually fl attered that you ask for their advice in the field and want to hear their stories. They are often more than happy to set up a time for them to bestow their knowledge and guidance on the future employees of the company.

Kelly is a senior in LAS and can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 87