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No. 2 Michigan defeats Illinois 74-60 SPORTS, 1B

The Daily Illini

Monday January 28, 2013

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The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

Vol. 142 Issue 88

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SEIU: We ‘really, really need more’

Union members vote 91% in favor of strike authorization BY AUSTIN KEATING STAFF WRITER

After eight months of unsuccessful negotiations with the University, Service Employees International Union Local 73 members voted overwhelmingly Thursday and Friday to authorize a strike. Ninety-one percent of union members voted in favor of the strike authorization. The union, which represents about 800 food and service employees at the University, will now assemble a committee that will make the final decision. SEIU lead negotiator Ricky Baldwin hopes this vote will show the University that members “really, really need more” in reference to wages. The SEIU is also opposed to the University’s insistence that the SEIU participate in the campus wage program, which the provost uses to determine pay increases adjusted for inflation. Campus wage program raises were about 2.5 percent last year and about 3 percent in 2011. In the two years prior, campus wages did not increase. “(Union members are) angry basically because of the way they’re treated and also because they know the University has money” and they think the University can afford better wages, Baldwin said.

Baldwin said that during the last bargaining session, the SEIU negotiating team made a proposal to the University that made several concessions in contested areas like wages. That proposal wasn’t accepted. “We’re ready to try to reach an agreement with the University, and we hope that they can get serious,” Baldwin said. “We need something to change.” When the bargaining team convenes Feb. 12, Baldwin hopes to make progress in the standstill. “If we feel that we’re making progress in negotiations, then we won’t give them the 10-days (strike) notice right now,” Baldwin said, referring to the notice to strike required by state law. “If it looks like they’re going to be stubborn and dig in their heels, then we’re going to have to.” Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said in an email that she expects the SEIU and University will reach a compromise. “We will continue to bargain in good faith to reach an agreement,” Kaler said. “We remain confident that if both sides continue to work together, we can reach agreement on the remaining issues.”

ROCHELLE WILSON THE DAILY ILLINI

University President Robert Easter speaks at the memorial held for Carl R. Woese at the Levis Center on Saturday. Woese was a distinguished faculty member known for his work in molecular biology.

Campus remembers Carl R. Woese Late MCB professor famous for discovering 3rd branch of life BY JACQUI OGRODNIK STAFF WRITER

Family members, colleagues and friends of the revolutionary professor, Carl R. Woese, gathered at his memorial Saturday. Woese is renowned for his discovery of archaea, the third domain of life, and adopting a “molecular approach to classifying organisms.” Woese died at 84-years-old on Dec. 30. The Institute for Genomic Biology, or IGB, along with oth-

Austin can be reached at akkeati2@ dailyillini.com.

Chancellor Phyllis Wise. Guests were also encouraged to share their stories about the influential professor. Easter said he is confident Woese’s story will be remembered. “It was the characteristics of the University, the honest dialogue, mutual support, academic freedom and tolerance for revolutionary ideas that made it possible for Woese to prosper here,” Easter said. “The challenge for those of us who remain is to sustain that culture, not just for ourselves, but for generations to come. We owe him nothing less than that.” Larry Gold, longtime friend

er departments in the University held the memorial at the Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois St. Gene Robinson, IGB director, opened the memorial and introduced each speaker. He said not only did Woese change the course of biology with his discovery of the “third domain of life,” he also was a deep and inspirational influence to several people. The memorial featured many speakers including University President Robert Easter and

Campus comes out for ‘Gays on Ice’ LGBT students, allies attend social event People began trickling into the Ice Arena on Friday night to lace up their skates and glide onto the ice. Soon after, a DJ began playing Lady Gaga’s hit song, “Born This Way,” an anthem for many LGBT students. The event, “Gays on Ice,” was a collaborative effort between the LGBT Resource Center and the Illini Union Board to create a diverse and welcoming social environment for all types of students. “LGBT (resource center) brings people out from their community, and Illini Union Board has a different reach,” said Snegha Ramnarayana ,

INSIDE

Police

ISS increases budget for off-campus travel BY TYLER DAVIS STAFF WRITER

The Illinois Student Senate is requesting more than $800 from its financial committee to send an observer to two off-campus University Senates Conference meetings. The University Senates Conference, which is made up of the faculty senates from all three University of Illinois campuses, acts as an advisory body to the board of trustees. At the Wednesday student senate meeting, senators voted 20-2 in favor of appointing a permanent senator observer to attend monthly senates conference meetings. “I’m very happy the student senate recognizes the importance of sending students to the University Senates Conference to act as our eyes and ears to the shared governance process,” said senator Jim Maskeri, senior in LAS and sponsor of the resolution. The committee on financial affairs originally allocated $160 for travel and hotel costs for the Feb. 19 meeting at the University of Illinois-Chicago. “To say that someone is staying somewhere close to UIC for $100 is unrealistic,” said senator Damani Bolden, junior in ACES. “Being from Chicago, I know that number is very unrealistic.” During discussion Wednesday, Maskeri amended the resolution to also allocate money for the senates conference meeting in April at the Springfield campus. At that meeting, the allocation was talked up to $842 because of many senators’ fears that $160 was not enough. “If we’re going to do something, let’s do it right; let’s do it with some class,” said Bolden, who was a main proponent of

HASAN KHALID THE DAILY ILLINI

STAFF WRITER

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ILLINOIS STUDENT SENATE

A student skates at the "Gays on Ice" event held at the Ice Arena on Friday. The LGBT community and allies came together for a night of free ice skating and hot chocolate.

BY MADDIE REHAYEM

of Woese and professor from the University of Colorado Boulder, also spoke at the memorial. The friends, who met when Gold was 19, talked about how the professor loved young people because they were “like sponges who were able to absorb knowledge easily.” He also described Woese as having an “impish sense of humor” because of how he liked to play jokes on others. Gold told a story about a time when he tried to hire Woese, but when his interviewers laughed at how Woese recited the ribosomal RNA sequences, Woese scolded the interviewers.

Director of Cultural Programs at the IUB and sophomore in Engineering, who organized the event. “They bring them out and have people interact with each other.” Students came to the event regardless of their sexual orientations. Lauren Mason, junior in Business, said she is gay and attended the event with her transgender friend and with her roommate, who is an LGBT ally. Mason is a transfer student and fi rst heard of the LGBT Resource Center when she received a Facebook invitation to the event. “I don’t really know anybody else on campus that’s LGBT, so it’d be nice to talk to different

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people here and just see what their walks of life are,” she said. “I’m from this town, but as a new student here...it’s kind of cool that there’s events like this.” Josh Jochem , senior in Engineering, came to “Gays On Ice” because he said events like it bring out members of the gay community that normally are not very active, and that there are a surprising amount of gay people on campus. “(Without LGBT events) there would be absolutely no way of knowing who is gay as when you people-watch on campus,” he said. Gay or not, the event provided a friendly social environ-

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ment to all students in attendance, said Tearria Beck-Scott, program advisor for the IUB who helped organize the event. “There needs to be an attempt to show unity amongst all students on campus and bringing a safe space for our LGBT community to not only socialize with each other but with other people on campus,” she said. Not only did students of all orientations attend “Gays On Ice,” but they also attended regardless of their skill on the ice. “I’m excited to fall on my ass a few times,” Mason said.

Maddie can be reached at rehayem2@dailyillini.com.

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ISS may send student senator to California The Illinois Student Senate hopes to send a senator to the rest of the University Senates Conference meetings this year. To pay for travel costs for the two off-campus meetings, the Illinois Student Senate’s committee on financial affairs recommended allocating $160. But while deciding to allocate money for an additional meeting at its last meeting, it raised the amount to $842. Original recommendation: Bus/train travel (Quantity: 1) — $60 Hotel room (Quantity: 1) — $100 Subtotal — $160 Illinois Student Senate response: Planes, trains and automobiles (Quantity: 2) — $330 Hotel room (Quantity: 2) — $200 Per diem, or daily allowance for expenses, for two days per meeting (Quantity: 4) — $28 Subtotal — $842

upping the allocation. Despite majority approval of the funding request, some senators were still unhappy with the final number. “Let me tell you, it does not cost more than $1,000 to spend a weekend in Chicago,” said Matt Gold, senator and senior in LAS. Senator Max Ellithorpe, grad-

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, January 28, 2013

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300 Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

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Theft was reported at Bath and Body Works, 2000 N. Neil St., around 2 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, an unknown male offender stole nine cosmetic items from the store. ! Retail theft was reported at Walmart Supercenter, 2610 N. Prospect Ave., around 5 p.m. Friday. According to the report, two electronic game accessories were reported stolen. ! Aggravated battery was reported at Firehaus Restaurant and Bar, 708 S. Sixth St., around 1:30 a.m. Sunday. ! Criminal damage to property was reported in the 1000 block of South Third Street around 2:30 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, an unknown offender broke the passenger side mirror of the victim’s vehicle.

Two 22-year-old males were arrested on the charge of cannabis delivery of 30 grams and under in the 200 block of West Griggs Street around 6 a.m. Friday. According to the report, a search warrant was executed at the arrestees’ home. Officers found cannabis, cannabis packaging materials, ammunition and drug paraphernalia. ! A 21-year-old male was arrested on the charge of possession of cannabis in the 500 block of West Green Street around 10 p.m. Friday. According to the report, the suspect gave police 3.36 grams of cannabis after a strong odor of burnt cannabis was detected coming from his house. A cannabis pipe was also recovered. The suspect was issued a city notice to appear.

Two suspects were arrested on multiple charges in the 600 block of East University Avenue around 3 a.m. Friday. According to the report, a 23-year-old male was arrested on the charges of possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of cannabis and possession of a controlled substance. A 21-year-old female was arrested on the charge of possessing a prescription drug without a prescription. A patrol officer noticed the male suspect’s car didn’t have working taillights. After pulling the car over and searching the car, the officer found cannabis, MDMA (ecstasy), digital scales and drug paraphernalia.

don’t rush into making choices. Double-check data and make sure a partner agrees. Compassion goes a long way.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

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Compiled by Klaudia Dukala

Check out our SAG recap online With the Oscars less than a month away, predictors got a closer look Sunday night at who could possibly take away the acting nominations. For a recap of the SAG awards show from actors in both movies and TV, be sure to click on the Features at Dailyillini.com.

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Today’s Birthday

It’s a time of fun, exploration and creative play until summer, when ideas sprout and get harvested. Career and income rise; balance time with work and family. Home changes may require a remodel or relocation. Surrender, forgive and have compassion (especially for yourself). To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is a 9 — Back to work, big time, especially for the next phase. Maintain objectivity. And ignore fear, or at least use it to your advantage. There will be resistance, and you’ll be stronger for it.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 9 — Be cautious where others are impetuous. Your creativity helps you solve the problem. You’re entering a cuddly phase. Things fall together for you today and tomorrow.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is an 8 — The next few days are good for domestic projects, but

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today is a 7 — You’re even smarter than usual. You may have to decline an invitation, but consider your decision carefully first. Take future appreciation into account.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is a 9 — Reconsider a risky move, especially around finances. Resist the urge to break things, no matter how justified you feel, and end up on top. Take deep breaths, often.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 6 — Assertiveness works well now, but be patient. It works here to have low expectations. Let yourself be surprised. Make a travel or educational plan that fits the budget.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is an 8 — Too many choices can overwhelm and even paralyze. Don’t stress about getting the decision right. Trust your intuition, and give yourself permission to change your mind. Be careful traveling now.

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Today is an 8 — The task ahead seems challenging and maybe even impossible, but you can handle it with a little help from your friends. Consider family opinions, too.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is an 8 — Open communication and risk-taking produces better results. If at first you fail, be patient. You’ll get there soon enough. Tinkering is required. Be nice to everyone to avoid jealousies.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) Today is a 6 — As you travel the twisty road, look into the distance to see obstacles ahead. Save out some for unexpected expenses. A rebellion flares and your direction may change.

Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 — Don’t buy trash; it’d be a waste of money. Invest instead in ideas that make the world a better place. Plant a seed through dialogue. You’ll figure out the costs.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 7 — Family matters vie with work for your attention. At the end, your relationships count double. See that your actions support your environment in the long run. Add love.

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Jan. 28 - Feb. 4

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31

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Men’s Basketball/ Indiana: Feb. 7 Wrestling/ Iowa: Feb. 8 Men’s Tennis/ Kentucky: Feb. 9

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1

˜%*A9B·GH9BB=Gvs. #5 Duke at 6PM / Atkins Tennis Center / FREE

° Krush road trip point ° FREE Taco Bell Tacos for students

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˜%*A9B·GH9BB=Gvs. #19 Tennessee at 6PM / Atkins Tennis Center / FREE

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˜)KF9GH@=B;vs. #1 Penn State at 1PM / Huff Hall / FREE

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Monday, January 28, 2013

3A

Anonymous hijacks government website THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The hacker-activist group Anonymous says it hijacked the website of the U.S. Sentencing Commission to avenge the death of Aaron Swartz, an Internet activist who committed suicide. The FBI is investigating. The website of the commission, an independent agency of the judicial branch, was taken over early Saturday and replaced with a message warning that when Swartz killed himself two weeks ago, “a line was crossed.”

The hackers say they’ve infi ltrated several government computer systems and copied secret information that they now threaten to make public. Family and friends of Swartz, who helped create Reddit and RSS, say he killed himself after he was hounded by federal prosecutors. Officials say he helped post millions of court documents for free online and that he illegally downloaded millions of academic articles from an online clearinghouse.

NABOR GOULART THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Family members and friends stand around coffins containing the remains of victims after the bodies were identified at a gymnasium in Santa Maria city, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, Sunday. Flames raced through a crowded nightclub in southern Brazil early Sunday, as panicked partygoers gasped for breath.

Brazilian nightclub fire kills more than 230 BY JULIANA BARBASSA AND MARCO SIBAJA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil — Flames raced through a crowded nightclub in southern Brazil early Sunday, killing more than 230 people as panicked partygoers gasped for breath in the smokefilled air, stampeding toward a single exit partially blocked by those already dead. It appeared to be the world’s deadliest nightclub fi re in more than a decade. Witnesses said a flare or firework lit by band members started the blaze in Santa

MEMORIAL FROM PAGE 1A “He said, don’t titter at ribosomal RNA sequences; they are sacred,” Gold said. “I knew two things then. One was that I loved him more, and I knew that the department wasn’t going to offer him a job.” Gold ended his speech by list-

Maria, a university city of about 225,000 people, though officials said the cause was still under investigation. Television images showed smoke pouring out of the Kiss nightclub as shirtless young men who had attended a university party joined fi refighters using axes and sledgehammers to pound at windows and walls to free those trapped inside. Guido Pedroso Melo, commander of the city’s fi re department, told the O Globo newspaper that fi refighters had a hard time getting inside the club

because “there was a barrier of bodies blocking the entrance.” Teenagers sprinted from the scene desperately seeking help. Others carried injured and burned friends away in their arms. “There was so much smoke and fi re, it was complete panic, and it took a long time for people to get out, there were so many dead,” survivor Luana Santos Silva told the Globo TV network. The fi re spread so fast inside the packed club that fi refighters and ambulances could do little to stop it, Silva said. Another

ing some of Woese’s rules. “Follow your passions. Study what you insist is important. Surround yourself with good people who like to giggle. Work hard. Respect the history of science. And be respectful of the lineages that got us here.” The next speaker, Nigel Goldenfeld, a University physics professor, described Woese as an inspiring man because of his

open-mindedness and the guidance he gave others. He said Woese’s sense of humor made working with him a lot of fun because they would make jokes and word play together. “No detail was too small to be gone over again and again and honed until it was perfect,” Goldenfeld said. “Carl’s ability to focus was extraordinary.” Richard Herman, a Univer-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This screenshot shows the website of the U.S. Sentencing Commission after survivor, Michele Pereira, told it was hijacked by the hacker-activist group Anonymous early Saturday. the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that she was near the stage when ing student governments from all members of the band lit fl ares that started the confl agration. three University of Illinois cam“The band that was onstage FROM PAGE 1A puses to convene regularly and began to use fl ares and, suddendiscuss University-wide issues. ly, they stopped the show and uate student, agreed with Gold. The proposal was originally on pointed them upward,” she said. “This is why we have failed the agenda for Wednesday’s meet“At that point, the ceiling caught our constituents,” Ellithorpe said. ing but was pulled for further fi re. It was really weak, but in “This is government at its finest, review before being discussed. a matter of seconds it spread.” and I think this is ridiculous that Maskeri said he asked Nicholas Guitarist Rodrigo Martins we’re discussing lavish expenses.” Burbules, chairman of the Univerconfi rmed that accordion player Kevin Seymour, chair of the sity Senates Conference; Matthew Danilo Jacques, 28, died, while committee on financial affairs and Wheeler, chairman of the Senate the other five members made it graduate student, finally comment- Executive Committee; and Joyce ed that the appropriations had Tolliver, vice chairwoman of the out safely. “gotten completely out of control” Senate Executive Committee, to and advised senators to send the look over the proposal. He said he sity professor of education poli- resolution back to the committee wants to incorporate their feedcy, organization and leadership, for review as it was. back into a final draft. spoke of Woese’s last few months. Maskeri said Friday that the “We’ll be able to really make “When Carl was diagnosed last final appropriation had been sent sure that our voices are heard at summer, he knew he was dying,” back to the committee after the that (University) level, and we’re Herman said. “Yet he chose to meeting. participating in the policy-makcontinue conversations and seeInspired by the concept of a ing discussion that is occurring ing people because Carl always University Senates Conference, with University administration,” chose life.” Maskeri said he is also working Maskeri said. on passing legislation that would Jacqui can be reached at establish a University Student Tyler can be reached at Governments Conference, allow- tadavis2@dailyillini.com. ogrodni2@dailyillini.com.

ISS


4A Monday January 28, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Censor your online work rants

SARAH GAVIN THE DAILY ILLINI

Strikes should be used in last resort, not as offensive

It’s

really the same story with unions and the University nowadays. A contract expires, negotiation begins, the union thinks the University is taking far too long to bargain, then the union authorizes a strike. The union makes the University administration out to be some unreasonable overlord, and the University maintains the position that the contracts are complex and require lots of time to settle. The Graduate Employees’ Organization went on strike in November 2009, following seven months of negotiation to guarantee tuition waivers for all graduate students. After the GEO contract secured in 2009 expired last year, the University saw a similar course of action from both the union and University administration. This time, fortunately, there was no strike. The Service Employees International Union Local 73 is following a similar pattern. Members of SEIU voted overwhelmingly Thursday and Friday to authorize a strike. The union represents roughly 800 building service and food service workers on the Urbana campus, and they have been negotiating a contract since June. Each time, including the negotiations with the SEIU, the union feels wronged by the University, and administrators argue that they are doing the best they can, given the lack of money the state provides the school. Whether it’s tuition waivers or higher wages, as is the case for the SEIU, money is almost always the central issue. We have a University that’s bad with its money and, in the eyes of the major unions it bargains with, is sluggish to negotiate, but we also have unions that are quick to authorize a strike when they are not necessarily needed. Negotiating these contracts is complex, and neither side would disagree with that. In most cases, workers deserve to be paid more, and it’s possible the University could be more pre-emptive in negotiating contracts with these unions. But the strike authorizations are getting a bit out of hand. Strikes are means of last resort, not an offensive. They are a way of making a strong and unified voice, but when they are authorized — to threaten the University — for contract negotiations as freely as they are, they lose their respect with the University and the University population. The union that represents teachers in the Pennsylvania university system has been in negotiations for 18 months, more than two times the length of any recent bargaining period between GEO or SEIU and the University. That whole time, they have been at work without a contract. On top of that, they just authorized a strike in November. Every workers’ rights at this institution must be respected — arguably, this University could not function without them — but those workers have to realize that seemingly small demands, such as the wage increases the SEIU is demanding, take time. Meanwhile, the workers represented by Local 73 have wages that are livable still, albeit unfair at times, and are competitive with other area employers. Always demand better for yourself, but don’t get impatient.

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TOLU TAIWO Opinions Columnist

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schools after benefactors or past historical figures. Wharton, Kelley and Kellogg seem like random words, but they signify highly influential brand names for specific business schools within larger universities. More importantly, average people are able to deduce which university students in those schools attend after simply hearing the name of the business program. Furthermore, 21 of U.S. News and World Report’s top 25 business schools are named. The four universities whose programs remain unnamed are Harvard, Stanford, Yale and Columbia — all of which have the luxury of a university-wide Ivy League brand name and multibillion dollar endowments. All of this is not to say that the University should begin a fire sale of naming rights to any and all unnamed programs and buildings, though. It is more important that they seek to brand the many pockets of this campus while remaining open to generous donations in exchange for naming rights. For example, my academic unit, the Charles H. Sandage Department of Advertising within the College of Media was named after a man regarded as the “father of advertising education” on this campus and across the country. While this name change came in the Spring of 2010 with no financial gift, it provided the department with a newfound brand equity that solidified the program as the “first and most prominent home of advertising education and scholarship.” Whether it comes through massive donations today or a strong brand name moving forward, the importance of branding cannot continue to be ignored by this University.

ere’s some good news: If you decide to post an impassioned status about how your workaholic boss assigns you too many hours in the week, you may be protected from being fired. Just last week, the National Labor Relations Board, an agency of the United States government that deals with unfair labor practices, declared that employees have a right to talk about office affairs without fear of punishment, even if that discussion occurs online. In the past, several companies fired employees for posting work troubles on Facebook, including letting caseworkers go at Hispanics United of Buffalo who spoke out against a fellow employee who accused them of low work drive and the Costco workers who got fired last fall for allegedly violating the store’s social media policy. It turns out that if the speech is not offensive and is legitimately about work, it’s protected. According to the NLRB’s chairman, Mark G. Pearce, “Many view social media as the new water cooler. All we’re doing is applying traditional rules to a new technology.” It makes sense. I’m all for the NLRB protecting online speech. Punishing employees for posting about job hardships? I believe that’s a violation of anyone’s right to free speech, and firing someone for speaking up about job hardships is extreme. However, one thing I have noticed is that just because you have the right to free speech doesn’t mean you should post the first thing that pops in your head. You could post that your employees don’t work as hard as you and your boss is basically the devil and your talent is what’s keeping the place together — but should you? I can already hear the accusations that I’m an old-fashioned, bureaucratic-loving, freedom-of-speech hater, but I can assure you I believe you should post, but do so cautiously. It speaks more toward the act of oversharing, a common problem with social media users. I do it, you do it, we all do it, and though it’s commonly done with many other topics (sucky roommates, unfair mothers, teachers who need to go back to school), it’s frequently done with work problems. To figure out what the line is between what is “postable” and what is not, I think we should look at what social media users want to accomplish. Is the end goal to raise awareness about a horrible situation at work and to call a boss or employee out on legitimate wrongdoings? I’d say that could be put out in the social-mediasphere. But if the end goal is to have an unproductive rant fest, then maybe you should think twice before putting that on Facebook or Twitter. There’s a difference between saying “I think my boss is making us work long, unfair hours with unmatchable pay” and “My boss is a total fat-cowed idiot for not giving me that promotion.” This is not to say that you shouldn’t tell someone your problems. We’re only human, and we need a sounding board every now and then. But call up your best friend and talk about it. Text your mom, email your significant other, talk to your roommates in person. Even go so far as to message your close friends on Facebook. But to post those problems to your 500 friends? That’s something that should only be done if your motive is to quickly spread awareness about actual problems. I was thinking of proposing a selfdriven Facebook ban on myself after reading about workers’ protected speech. Getting rid of Facebook would ensure that my bosses will never know when I’m having a crazy day (except I never have a crazy day, bosses, so you don’t need to worry). Plus, I’ll admit it: Sometimes I’m an over-sharer. Deleting my account would keep me from posting unhelpful work statuses that my friend circle could do without. But, let’s face it: That’s not realistic. I haven’t terminated my account because I love it too much. We enjoy social media because we need a place where we can express ourselves. We need a space to connect with others and stay in the loop. The problem is understanding that fine line between “expressing yourself” and posting something that probably shouldn’t be posted. A rule I’ve heard about angry postings is to wait a couple of minutes before you press “post.” Just walk away. When you come back, and you feel that you should still relay your current status to the world, then it’s obviously important for you to share. But if you come back, and you feel kind of silly, well, then. There’s your answer. If you don’t have anything nice to say, it doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t say it at all. But say what you need to say with discretion. At the very least, tighten your friend circle or think about what you post before you do it in plain view where dozens of people, including your boss, can see it.

John is a junior in Media. He can be reached at jbuyss2@dailyillini.com.

Tolu is a senior in Media. She can be reached at taiwo2@dailyillini.com.

Cycle of violence goes on JOSEPH VANDEHEY Opinions columnist

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ear reader, I am about to tell you a lie. On Dec. 14 of last year, something terrible happened. In Newtown, Conn., a man named Adam Lanza killed 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School, after having shot his own mother at home. I wish I could say that this was a lie, but it wasn’t. It really happened. The lie is yet to come. The tragedy has continued to fill the news even now, over a month since. Stories of heroism, of terror, of kindness toward strangers in need — all have been repeated endlessly. Images of grieving parents have been burned into the social consciousness. The debate over gun control and over how best to prevent another Newtown rages stronger than ever — so they say. Yet the feeling that wells up in me now is not terror, or fear, or even sadness. It is deja vu. I remember that on Aug 5, 2012, Wade Michael Page, a white supremacist, shot several people in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin. I remember more: countless nameless stories of violence and discrimination in the wake of 9/11, against Muslims or anyone who might be mistaken for one. I remember that on July 20, 2012, James Holmes — emulating

the Batman villain, the Joker — killed 12 during a midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises.” I remember most of all his brilliant orange hair as he sat in a courtroom, looking dazed and confused. On Jan. 8, 2011, Jared Loughner shot congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords at a meeting held outside of a Safeway store. I remember this event more clearly than most, due to Giffords’ occasional appearances since the shooting, each time having recovered a bit more. On Nov. 5, 2009, Nidal Malik Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, killed 13 people at Fort Hood. I can remember nothing more than this, try as hard as I might. And no, I have not told my lie yet. On April 16, 2007, Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 students and faculty at Virginia Tech, and on April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 13 at Columbine High School. The names of both schools have become synonymous with gun violence, but the burning fervor both initially inspired has dimmed to mere embers. And then, in 1998, in Springfield, Oregon, Kip Kinkel killed his parents after his father threatened to send him to a boarding school. Then he walked into Thurston High School, armed with over a thousand rounds of ammunition.

He killed Ben Walker and Mikael Nickolauson, injured many, many more, and was only stopped when he had to reload his weapon. But I do not remember that. I was only in middle school when the Thurston shooting happened. I had to search just to find a picture of him, to know what he looked like, to know the names of his victims. The only things I remember were the names: Kip Kinkel, Thurston, Springfield — all repeated endlessly. Names, especially Kip Kinkel, that sounded too silly to be spoken with such constant, deep seriousness in those first weeks after the shooting. The weeks turned to months, the months to years, the years to a decade plus a little more. Kip Kinkel is rarely mentioned anymore. The stories, the images and the debates have vanished from the news, except for the occasional remembrance that becomes more and more occasional with each passing year. And I still have not told you my lie. Here it is. Don’t worry. We will not forget about Newtown. We will not forget about the lives that were lost. It will be different this time.

Stories of heroism, of terror, of kindness toward strangers in need — all have been repeated endlessly

Joe is a graduate student in Mathematics. He can be reached at vandehe2@ dailyillini.com.

University needs to embrace branding JOHN BUYSSE Opinions columnist

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ast week, the University announced that it would be naming the new Ikenberry Commons dorm after a prominent female alumna. The dorm, set to open in the fall of 2013, will be named after Maudelle Tanner Brown Bousfield, the first African-American woman to graduate from the University and the only black woman on campus from 1903 to 1905. Although Ms. Bousfield undoubtedly has earned a place in University history, the decision to name a new dorm in her honor is a missed financial opportunity. I have always admired the administration for taking many painful yet necessary steps to ensure fiscal stability on this campus. However, they continue to waste opportunities to bring large amounts of money onto this campus by electing to name colleges, buildings and programs after historical figures or, even worse, nothing at all. This dorm is just one example, though, and it brings to mind the greater issue of missed opportunities when it comes to naming rights on campus. Currently, the University houses 17 colleges and other major academic units. Not a single one of these units has been named after either a historical figure from years past or a wealthy benefactor whose generous contributions will fund the mission of the college. Instead, these units begin with the bland phrases “College of,” “School” or “Institute of.” These names serve a practical pur-

pose, but the lack of a specific identity, or brand, for these units is detrimental in more than one way. Aside from the obvious issue of not inviting massive donations in for the naming rights to these institutions, the University is missing out on an opportunity to begin a tradition of setting itself apart from the increasingly competitive industry of higher education through branding. The case of Bousfield Hall is an example of a missed financial opportunity because the concept of branding is not as relevant to dorms like this one. Although this was a missed opportunity, the importance of our University’s mini brands in colleges and other departments should not be lost. In fact, this issue was brought into my sight when talking to one of my cousins over the holiday season. As a highly talented senior in high school, he essentially has his pick of what university to attend. However, he specifically mentioned that he was blown away by the brand that one prominently named business school showcased during his official visit. I was not surprised that this program impressed him, but the fact that he used the term “brand” without me prompting him shocked me. As an advertising major and branding fanatic, I use the term pretty often, but my 18-year-old cousin’s awareness and appreciation for a strong brand image opened my eyes to what this University could be missing out on. The business school on this campus is plainly called the College of Business. It is also called that at Illinois State, San Jose State, Colorado State, Ohio University, Northern Illinois and many, many more. Those schools were just the ones listed on the first page of a Google search. Other schools have elected to name


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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Over 50 dead after violent weekend in Egypt BY HAMZA HENDAWI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO — Egypt’s president declared a state of emergency and curfew in three Suez Canal provinces hit hardest by a weekend wave of unrest that left more than 50 dead, using tactics of the ousted regime to get a grip on discontent over his Islamist policies and the slow pace of change. Angry and almost screaming, Mohammed Morsi vowed in a televised address on Sunday night that he would not hesitate to take even more action to stem the latest eruption of violence across much of the country. But at the same time, he sought to reassure Egyptians that his latest moves would not plunge the country back into authoritarianism. “There is no going back on freedom, democracy and the supremacy of the law,” he said. The worst violence this weekend was in the Mediterranean coastal city of Port Said, where

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Egyptians carry the coffin of a man killed during a mass funeral in Port Said on Sunday. President Mohammed Morsi declared a state of emergency. seven people were killed on Sunday, pushing the toll for two days of clashes to at least 44. The unrest was sparked on Saturday by a court conviction and death sentence for 21 defendants involved in a mass soccer riot in the city’s main stadium on Feb. 1 that left 74 dead. Most of those sentenced to death were local soccer fans from Port Said, deepening a sense of persecution that Port Said’s residents have felt since the stadium disaster, the worst soccer violence ever in Egypt. At least another 11 died on Friday elsewhere in the country during rallies marking the second anniversary of the antiMubarak uprising. Protesters used the occasion to renounce Morsi and his Islamic fundamentalist group, the Muslim Brotherhood, which emerged as the country’s most dominant

political force after Mubarak’s ouster. The curfew and state of emergency, both in force for 30 days, affect the provinces of Port Said, Ismailiya and Suez. The curfew takes effect Monday from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. every day. Morsi, in office since June, also invited the nation’s political forces to a dialogue starting Monday to resolve the country’s latest crisis. A statement issued later by his office said that among those invited were the country’s top reform leader, Nobel peace laureate Mohammed ElBaradei, former Arab League chief Amr Moussa and Hamdeen Sabahi, a leftist politician who finished third in last year’s presidential race. The three are leaders of the National Salvation Front, an umbrella for the main opposition parties.

Driver IDs for illegal immigrants continue to raise concerns in Ill. BY MICHELLE JANAYE NEALY AND REGINA GARCIA CANO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — As Illinois becomes the fourth and most populous state to give illegal immigrants permission to drive, nagging concerns remain about whether there are enough safeguards to avoid the identity fraud and other pitfalls other states faced. Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn signed Illinois’ measure into law Sunday in Chicago. Backers, including Quinn, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and some of the state’s top Republicans, tout it as a public-safety measure. They argue that required facial recognition technology is reliable enough to prevent fraud. They hailed it as an important step for immigrant rights in Illinois, which approved its own Dream Act in 2010 to create a privately-funded scholarship program for immigrant students. President Barack Obama plans to discuss his plan to overhaul the immigration system during a trip to Las Vegas on Tuesday. “This was a bipartisan effort to pass an important law,” Quinn said. “When the president speaks on Tuesday, he can say about his home state of Illinois ... we not only passed the Dream Act last year, we passed driver’s licenses for those who are undocumented.”

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However, the law’s opponents have pointed to hundreds of fraudulent cases in New Mexico, Washington and Utah after those states began giving illegal immigrants permission to drive. Illinois will not require applicants to be fingerprinted, for fear that would discourage immigrants from applying. “How many people would apply for this document knowing that fingerprints will be going to (federal authorities)? Probably not all that many,” said Fred Tsao, policy director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, a drivingforce behind the measure. Proponents say it will allow an estimated 250,000 people unlawfully residing in the state to apply for a three-year temporary driver’s license and require them to get training and insurance. The Illinois secretary of state’s office said the licenses will be available starting in November. Those ready for the change include 45-year-old Victoria Chavez. “I need to get my driver’s license because I have two kids,” the Chicago woman said. “They need my support. This is a victory for all of us in the immigrant community.” The licenses will be like those already issued to certain for-

eign-born, legal visitors. Applicants will be photographed, and their photo will be entered into the state’s facial recognition database — like the rest of Illinois’ licensed drivers— to verify their identity. But other states’ driving programs for illegal immigrants have been abused. New Mexico and Washington both issue licenses, while Utah issues a permit. The Illinois secretary of state’s office says its facial recognition database is highly sophisticated and accurate. The program uses an algorithm to match more than a dozen facial features that are not easy to alter, such as eye sockets and sides of the mouth. “The integrity of our driver’s license system is a priority,” said Henry Haupt, a spokesman for the office. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Edward Acevedo, a Chicago Democrat, said state roads will be safer because illegal immigrants will receive training and be tested before obtaining a license. They also will be required to purchase insurance, Acevedo said. Tsao’s organization estimates uninsured illegal immigrant drivers cause $64 million in damage claims each year, an expense currently covered by increased premiums.

  1 Irish girls   7 Yacht, e.g. 11 Thérèse, for one: Abbr. 14 The ___ State (New York) 15 Roof extension 16 Rite ___ (drugstore) 17 Yesterday’s joe 19 331/3 r.p.m. discs 20 Cocktail with an umbrella 21 Popular PBS pledge drive giveaway 22 Quick punches 24 Scouring pad material 28 Enthusiastic response to “Who wants cookies?” 29 Banned insecticide 31 Credits over newspaper stories 32 Cake: Fr. 34 Regions 35 Bonus for showing panache 38 Not a dry eye in the ___ 39 Cosa ___ 42 Protections for inventors 45 They’re worth half of TDs 46 Floor cover 47 What Jackie Robinson did, famously, in the first game of the 1955 World Series 49 Feeling, slangily 50 Concert stage equipment 51 Had an in-flight wedding? 54 Captain’s journal 55 Informant 60 East Lansing sch. 61 Unfreeze 62 Savanna grazers 63 RR stop 64 Big laughs 65 Snapple rival

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PUZZLE BY MICHAEL SHARP

DOWN   1 “___ Misérables”   2 Tsp. or tbsp.   3 Automated in-box cloggers   4 Fictional weaver ___ Marner   5 “… ___ saw Elba”   6 Splinter group   7 Prove suitable for   8 Galoot   9 “___ Maria” 10 Golf ball raiser 11 Swinging-door establishment 12 Walk very, very quietly 13 1950s Ford duds 18 Brewing oven

21 Dances à la Chubby Checker, say 22 Lively Irish dance 23 Nabokov novel 25 Spain’s longest river 26 Scrutinizing 27 South American plains 29 The beginning 30 Minnesota city that shares a harbor with Superior, Wis. 33 Barrymore and Kennedy 34 Galoot 36 Place to fill up in Canada 37 Loudly critical 40 Massage 41 Ice, Iron or Bronze follower

42 Source of “The Lord is my shepherd …” 43 No more than 44 1986 Tom Cruise blockbuster 45 Tumbled 48 Cat calls 49 “What happens in ___ …” 52 Tournament that takes all comers 53 Heap 55 Filthy digs 56 Wed. follower 57 Acorn bearer 58 Keats dedicated one to a nightingale 59 Secretive org.

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

DOONESBURY

BEARDO

BILLY FORE

GARRY TRUDEAU

DAN DOUGHERTY

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Senior  Portraits Illio

ELI BAYLIS ASSOCIATED PRESS

The towboat Nature Way Endeavor banks a barge against the western bank of the Mississippi River, Sunday. The river was closed to all traffic eight miles north and south of Vicksburg.

Tanker hits railroad bridge, spills crude oil into Mississippi River BY JANET MCCONNAUGHEY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A barge carrying 80,000 gallons of oil hit a railroad bridge in Vicksburg, Miss., on Sunday, spilling light crude into the Mississippi River and closing the waterway for eight miles in each direction, the Coast Guard said. A second barge was damaged. Investigators did not know how much had spilled, but an oily sheen was reported as far as three miles downriver of Vicksburg after the 1:12 a.m. accident, said Lt. Ryan Gomez of the Coast Guard’s office in Memphis, Tenn. It wasn’t immediately clear

whether the second barge also hit the bridge or if it ran into the first barge, he said. The first barge was still leaking Sunday evening, and emergency workers set out booms to absorb and contain the oil, Gomez said. The river’s closure halted at least five northbound and two southbound vessels, he said. The bridge was found safe for trains, said Petty Officer Carlos Vega. Both barges were being pushed by the tugboat Nature’s Way Endeavor. The website for Nature’s Way Marine LLC of Theodore, Ala., identifies the vessel as a 3,000-horsepower, 90-foot-

long boat, making it the largest and highest-powered of the company’s five tugs. It was built in 1974 and underwent a complete rebuild in 2011, according to the company. A company manager referred calls to the Coast Guard command center at Vicksburg. The Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Vicksburg sent a team to assess the spill and oversee the cleanup, a Coast Guard news release said. The agency said a command center at Vicksburg included representatives from the Coast Guard and Nature’s Way, as well as local officials and law enforcement.

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Monday, January 28, 2013

Holocaust victims remembered, offered prayers BY VANESSA GERA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WARSAW, Poland â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holocaust survivors, politicians, religious leaders and others marked International Holocaust Remembrance Day on Sunday with solemn prayers and the now oftrepeated warnings to never let such horrors happen again. Events took place at sites including Auschwitz-Birkenau, the former death camp where Hitlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Germany killed at least 1.1 million people, mostly Jews, in southern Poland. In Warsaw, prayers were also held at a monument to the fighters of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943. Pope Benedict XVI, speaking from his window at St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Square at the Vatican, warned that humanity must always be on guard against a repeat of murderous racism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The memory of this immense tragedy, which above all struck so harshly the Jewish people, must represent for everyone a constant warning so that the horrors of the past are not repeated, so that every form of hatred and racism is overcome, and that respect for, and dignity of, every human person is encouraged,â&#x20AC;? the German-born pontiff said. Not all words spoken by dignitaries struck the right tone, however. On the sidelines of a ceremony in Milan, former Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sparked

outrage when he praised Benito Mussolini for â&#x20AC;&#x153;having done goodâ&#x20AC;? despite the Fascist dictatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-Jewish laws. Berlusconi also defended Mussolini for allying himself with Hitler, saying he likely reasoned that it would be better to be on the winning side. The United Nations in 2005 designated Jan. 27 as a yearly memorial day for the victims of the Holocaust â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 6 million Jews and millions of other victims of Nazi Germany during World War II. The day was chosen because it falls on the anniversary of the liberation in 1945 of Auschwitz, the Nazisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most notorious death camp and a symbol of the evil inflicted across the continent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those who experienced the horrors of the cattle cars, ghettos, and concentration camps have witnessed humanity at its very worst and know too well the pain of losing loved ones to senseless violence,â&#x20AC;? U.S. President Barack Obama said in a statement. Obama went on to say that like those who resisted the Nazis, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we must commit ourselves to resisting hate and persecution in all its forms. The United States, along with the international community, resolves to stand in the way of any tyrant or dictator who commits crimes against humanity, and stay true to the principle of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Never Again.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? As every year, Holocaust survivors gathered in the cold Pol-

ish winter at Auschwitz â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but they shrink in number each year. This year the key event in the ceremonies was the opening of an exhibition prepared by Russian experts that depicts Soviet suffering at the camp and the Soviet role in liberating it. The opening was presided over by Sergey Naryshkin, chairman of the Russian State Duma. Several years ago, Polish officials stopped the opening of a previous exhibition. It was deemed offensive because the Russians depicted Poles, Lithuanians and others in Sovietcontrolled territory as Soviet citizens. Poles and others protested this label since they were occupied against their will by the Soviets at the start of World War II. The new exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tragedy. Courage. Liberationâ&#x20AC;? and prepared by the Museum of the Great Patriotic War in Moscow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; removes the controversial terminology. It took years of discussions between Polish and Russian experts to finally complete it. The exhibition narrates the Nazi crimes committed against Soviet POWS at Auschwitz, where they were the fourth largest group of prisoners, and at other sites. And it shows how the Red Army liberated the camp on Jan. 27, 1945, and helped the inmates afterward. Also Sunday, a ceremony was held in Moscow at the Jewish

LEIF R JANSSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman lights a candle as she attends a memorial ceremony during the International Holocaust Remembrance Day on Sunday at Raoul Wallenberg Square in Stockholm, Sweden. Museum and Tolerance Center, which opened in November and is Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first major attempt to tell the story of its Jewish community. The museum portrays Russia as a safe and welcoming place for Jews today

despite its history of pogroms and discrimination. In Serbia, survivors and officials gathered at the site of a former concentration camp in the capital, Belgrade, to remember the Jewish, Serb and Roma vic-

tims of the Nazi occupation of the country. Parliament speaker Nebojsa Stefanovic said it is the task of the new generations never to forget the Holocaust crimes, including those against Serbs.

Stolen ink, toner sold on black market costs companies millions BY TOM HAYS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MARC A. HERMANN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Marque Gumbs pleads guilty to grand larceny in Manhattan Supreme Court in New York on July 26, 2011. Gumbs financed his lavish lifestyle by selling toner for copiers and printers that he stole from the hospital he worked at.

NEW YORK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Manhattan hospital clerk Marque Gumbs was doing so well moonlighting as a peddler of stolen property that he drove a BMW, shopped at designer stores like Burberry and vacationed in Las Vegas and Mexico. But unlike other more common thieves brazenly living beyond their means, his contraband wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t jewelry or electronics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it was toner for copiers and printers. The $1.5 million scheme at the prestigious Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center exploited what New York City authorities describe as a largely overlooked yet lucrative black market for toner cartridges and other office supplies. Businesses have long endured employees pilfering pens, paper clips and other items for personal use, called â&#x20AC;&#x153;supply-jacking.â&#x20AC;? But schemes like Gumbsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; go much

further, with the perpetrators using business accounts to place false orders for more costly items such as toner, then reselling them at a steep discount. Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson, a large law firm in Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial district, recently became the scene of another toner caper that ended with grand larceny charges against Adrian Rodriguez, who worked in the duplicating department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This defendant didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just take a box of Post-it Notes out of the office supply closet,â&#x20AC;? District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said in announcing the case. Prosecutors allege the 38-yearold Rodriguez, who pleaded not guilty this month, ordered more than $376,000 in excess toner from two vendors over a twoyear period. He would sell the cartridges â&#x20AC;&#x201D; worth $80 to $259 a piece â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for as little as $10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;out of the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back door ... and (use) the money to party and otherwise

Where will YOU be SHACKING next year? !"#$%&"#'(#)"'#*#+(,-#(.#(%&# /(%$01)#2%03"#(1#4"5&%*&-#6'7# !"#$#%&#'#()'*+#!"#),-+#%+.!#/+'01 !UIFEBJMZJMMJOJPO5XJUUFStGBDFCPPLDPN%BJMZ*MMJOJ

finance his lifestyle,â&#x20AC;? according to court papers. During a sting operation in late December, undercover investigators went to the law firm and delivered a shipment of cartridges that was marked so it could be tracked. They then watched as Rodriguez stashed the cartridges away before directing an unidentified buyer driving a van to pick them up at a loading dock, the court papers say. Who buys the stolen toner and the scope of the thievery in the city, and what the victims have done to keep from happening again, is unclear. Authorities declined to discuss an ongoing investigation of the black market and where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading, and there was no response to messages left with the Fried Frank law firm and Memorial Sloan-Kettering. Alicia Ellis, a spokeswoman for the National Office Products Alliance, said the Washington, D.C., trade group has heard many stories about office products dealers

getting ripped off by bogus clients using stolen credit cards to order products â&#x20AC;&#x201D; primarily toner â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but not about employees of legitimate purchasers enriching themselves with inside toner jobs. Still, there have been isolated cases. In 2007, two Pennsylvania men were accused of stealing $187,000 worth of ink and toner from their office-supply employer and then selling the goods on the Internet. The same year, an account executive at a New Jersey stationery supply company pleaded guilty to stealing 30,000 toner cartridges valued at $1.75 million. The con game at Memorial Sloan-Kettering dates to 2007, when one of Gumbsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; duties as a receiving clerk paid $37,800 a year was to order supplies from an Office Depot website. Prosecutors accused him of ordering $1.5 million in cartridges â&#x20AC;&#x201D; priced at $200 a piece â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit any of the copiers and printers at the hospital.

need a place to park for the 2013-14 school year?

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Sports Illinois can’t pull off upset vs. Michigan and forced him into tough perimeter shots — evidenced by Burke’s 7-forThere was a sliver of hope for 19 shooting from the field. Illinois, on one possession here and “Burke, we tried to make him another possession there, against earn it tonight,” Groce said. “I what will likely be ranked the No. thought we did a pretty good job of 1 team in college basketball come that, but some other guys hurt us.” Those “other guys” Groce Monday. But Michigan squashed any sem- referred to might explain why Michblance of a run Illinois made in the igan is so dangerous and effective second half and pulled away for a on the offensive end. Freshman Nik 74-60 victory in front of a sold out Stauskas scored 14 points on 6-for10 shooting, his freshman counterAssembly Hall crowd. The No. 2 Wolverines never let part Glenn Robinson III scored 12 their lead slip to less than seven points on 6-for-8 shooting and junior points after the 15:49 point in the Tim Hardaway, Jr. added 12 more second half and relentlessly pun- points. ished the Illini after each turnover Overall, Michigan shot 52.5 perthey committed. cent for the game and 57.7 percent “Give Michigan a lot of credit,“ in the second half. Illinois head coach John Groce said. “Stauskas was terrific. Glenn “They’re the No. 1 Robinson made offensive efficiency plays,” Groce said. team in the country. “They’ve got a lot of If you break down weapons out there.” or make one misMichigan might take, they exploit it have outclassed like that.” Illinois in talent Illinois’ last and execution, but gasp came facthe Illini had their ing a 12-point defichances to close the cit with close to 10 gap. Crucial turnminutes left in the overs dismantled second half. Senior a few Illinois runs, including a second D.J. Richardson hit a 3-pointer, which half stretch of four D.J. RICHARDSON, was followed quickpossessions in a row senior guard ly by a Joseph Berthat ended in an Illini turnover. trand runner to cut the Michigan lead “Guys are tryto 55-48. ing to make plays,” said RichardMichigan, the top offensive team son, who finished the game with 12 in the Big Ten, was not fazed by Illi- points on 4-for-15 shooting. “You nois’ run and spurted ahead with a can’t always hit the home run. We’ve 19-12 run to arrive at the final score. got to count on guys making plays as Spearheading each counterattack well. Sometimes it’s kind of forced.” for the Wolverines was their point Groce approved of the offensive guard, Trey Burke, who led all scor- looks his team generated for the ers with 19 points. Brandon Paul led first 30 minutes of the game, but Illinois in scoring with 15 points of most of those opportunities were squandered by missing an open his own on 5-for-12 shooting. Despite Burke’s point total, jumper. Illinois went 6-for-26 from Groce thought his team played solid defense on Michigan’s point guard See BASKETBALL, Page 2B BY THOMAS BRUCH STAFF WRITER

“You can’t always hit the home run. We’ve got to count on guys making plays as well. Sometimes it’s kind of forced.”

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Michigan’s Trey Burke takes a one-handed running shot over Tyler Griffey during the Illini’s 74-60 loss to Michigan at Assembly Hall on Sunday.

Illinois defeats Michigan State in annual pink meet BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

An emotional Saturday afternoon crowd at Huff Hall got to see the Illinois women’s gymnastics team beat Michigan State outright for the third time in four years. The pink-clad Illini honored those affected by breast cancer in the annual pink meet in front of a nearly full, almost entirely pink-wearing crowd. Illinois defeated Michigan State 196.125193.350, bringing the Victory Plank back to Champaign. “I think we did awesome,” junior Amber See said. “We took a large step forward in our score getting the 196, and we just kinda put all the events together.” After the meet, Illinois head coach Kim Landrus honored Jan Joannides — the mother of former Illini gymnast and two-time Big Ten champion Kelsey Joannides — with a speech commemorating her impact to everyone around her. “You know, Kelsey is one of my best friends and she was one of the best teammates I’ve ever had,” senior Alina Weinstein said. “And both Jan and Kelsey were such a great part of this

program that we just wanted to do so well just for them, and it’s awesome to be able to say that we did well for them.” The Illini kicked off the meet with an impressive performance on vault. Weinstein and freshman Giana O’Connor, who both scored 9.825s, led Illinois. Those were two of 10 scores of 9.825 or higher for the Illini. “Alina’s a gamer,” Landrus said. “She loves to compete and she does well in practice, so when she comes out to compete, she knows exactly what she’s doing, and so this is what I expect. This is what I know she’s capable of.” The Illini moved to bars on the second rotation, where they had another strong showing. Weinstein racked her second straight 9.825, which was good enough for an individual event win, and contributed to a 48.875 team score. “I think it’s really rewarding when you come out here and do what you’re capable of doing,” Landrus said. “When we came off our vault performance, the energy level was high. They went to bars and they just carried that momentum onto beam and floor.”

After a short break, the action resumed with beam. All six Illinois gymnasts scored higher than 9.70, and three — Weinstein, O’Connor and junior Sarah Fiedler — hit at least 9.825. In the final event of the day, four Illinois gymnasts scored 9.825 or higher on the floor, including See, who recorded a season-high of 9.875 on the event. “Floor went well,” See said. “Alina went before me and got a 9.9 with an awesome routine, but I kinda had to play off my routine because in the middle of one of my passes, I didn’t do a full pass so the difficulty went down a little bit. But I was still happy with my score, and overall I had a really great day.” Both O’Connor and Weinstein recorded season-high all-around scores on the day, with 39.250 and 39.350, respectively. “We’re so competitive that it’s awesome to have the Victory Plank back at home where it belongs,” Weinstein said. “It’s nice to have that kind of incentive to do well.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@ dailyillini.com and @IlliniSportsGuy.

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Alina Weinstein competes her floor exercise routine during a dual meet at Huff Hall on Saturday. She scored a 9.9 on the routine and recorded a season-high all-around score of 39.350.

Sluggish Illinois pulls through, defeats SIUE BY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

Although the Illinois hockey team came out sluggish in the first period of both games this weekend against Southern Illinois (Edwardsville), the final scores certainly didn’t show it. The Illini were victorious in both games, winning by 7-4 and 6-3 margins on Friday and Saturday, respectively. In both affairs, Illinois (19-8-2) fell behind 2-1 before burying SIUE with an offensive explosion. “We didn’t really do anything poorly in the first, but we didn’t really do anything well,” head coach Nick Fabbrini said after Saturday’s game. “It comes back to us coming ready to go off the bat, and I’m not sure that was the case this weekend.” Line partners John Olen and Scott Barrera had a big weekend. Olen accounted for six points, with two goals and four

assists, while Barrera recorded seven points with three goals and four assists. An Olen-to-Barrera goal would kick off the scoring in the first period of Friday’s game, but the Cougars would respond. With just over a minute to go in the first, SIUE got the equalizer, and then took the lead only 13 seconds into the second period. After the initial goal, however, the second period belonged to Illinois. The Illini scored four times in the period, including defenseman Anthony Carlsen’s first career goal. “It certainly took long enough,” Carlsen said. “I was playing more offensively and looking to take my chances. There were a lot of openings.” Both teams tacked on two goals in the third to reach the 7-4 final, although Fabbrini said

See HOCKEY, Page 2B

Medical woes end Magrum’s playing career BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ John Olen goes up the ice against Southern Illinois (Edwardsville) at the Ice Arena on Saturday. Illinois won 6-3 in the team’s annual “Paint the Pond Pink” game.

Illinois women’s basketball forward Kersten Magrum’s playing career is over. Doctors medically disqualified the junior earlier this week after recurring symptoms from her fourth concussion at Illinois and second of the season. “She’s down,” Illinois head coach Matt Bollant said. “But I think she realizes that it’s what’s best for her in the long term.” Magrum suffered the concussion against Illinois State on Dec. 21. She appeared in three games after the initial injury, but recurring symptoms forced her to miss the team’s four most recent games. Senior Adrienne GodBold replaced Magrum in the starting lineup after returning from

See MAGRUM, Page 2B


2B

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Illinois ends 8-day break at Minnesota against a Minnesota squad on a three-game losing streak. The The Illinois women’s basketball Golden Gophers are doing better team is hoping to end its eight- than their record suggests; they day break on a better note than gave No. 8 Penn State a scare in it started. State College, Pa., on Thursday A 62-58 loss to Northwestern before the Nittany Lions pulled on Jan. 20 began one of Illinois’ away for a 64-59 victory. longest breaks of the season. The Sophomore point guard Rachel Illini had defeated the Wildcats Banham, who averages 20.3 by 18 points just 10 days earlier. points and 4.0 assists per game, Illinois (10-8, 3-3 Big Ten) will leads Minnesota. end the stretch against Minnesota “Their point guard is real(13-7, 2-4) in Minneapolis, Minn., ly good, so they will try to run on Monday night. with her,” Bollant said of BanIllinois head coach Matt Bollant ham. “She’s one of the best point hopes the team will be re-ener- guards in the country.” gized after its lack of liveliness Banham and Micaella Riche in the loss to are the only GoldNorthwestern. en Gophers who Bollant gave average double the team two digits in scoring. Head coach Pam days off during the break in Borton plays nine hopes of relievplayers 10 minIllinois Minnesota ing fatigue. utes or more per (10-8,3-3 Big Ten) (13-7, 2-4) “As a coach, game. Monday, 8 p.m. anytime you Bollant defeatMinneapolis, Minn. lose, you don’t ed Minnesota two want a break,” years ago in his he said. “You The Illiini will need to contain point first and only trip want to get guard Rachel Banham, who averages to Williams Arena more than 20 points per game. as a head coach. back and be playing again, His Green Bay but I think it’s probably good for team won the Golden Gophers’ our players. Certainly there’s a season-opening Best Buy Claslot for us to work on and get bet- sic with a 79-75 win over Borter at.” ton’s squad. Illinois focused its efforts on Bollant grew up just two hours defensive communication and away from Minneapolis, in Wingaining a more complete knowl- ona, Minn., and he expects many edge of Bollant’s systems to make family members to be in attenbetter decisions. dance Monday night. “This is definitely a time where Early in Big Ten play, Illinois you either get better or you get has had more success when the worse,” sophomore point guard team travels. The Illini are 3-0 Alexis Smith said. “The coaches on the road, but 0-3 at home in are really pushing us to get bet- conference play. Illinois has defeated Nebraska, Ohio State ter and move forward.” Bollant gave forward Karisma and Northwestern at each of Penn an extra day off of practice. their home arenas. “She’s trying to help her body Illinois will be forced to play recover from the wear and tear, without junior Kersten Magrum, and she’s had some hurt knees a whose career ended last week little bit, so it’ll be good for her,” after doctors medically disqualified her from playing college Bollant said. After its loss to Northwestern, basketball again after recurIllinois decided to hold a players- ring symptoms from her fourth only meeting Thursday. concussion. “We just want to make sure everyone is on the same page Johnathan can be reached at and everyone’s good,” Smith said. hetting2@dailyillini.com and Illinois is ending its break @jhett93. BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

at

BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 1B 3-point range, a statistic that has evolved into a familiar one for this season’s team. Michigan head coach John Beilein said he could relate to Illinois’ shooting woes, as some of his previous teams went through arid times from beyond the arc. “My teams have had some incredible dry spots at times,” Beilein said. “When you play that way, it can get difficult at

times. They’ll shoot their way out of it eventually.” But for Groce, whose team plays three more conference games in a row against top-25 teams, the answer for the poor shooting might be a little more simple. “You’ve got to throw a couple in,” Groce said. “We’re in here all diagnosing this and that and looking at the stat sheet. We got what we wanted and we didn’t make enough of them.”

Thomas can be reached at bruch2@ dailyillini.com and @ThomasBruch.

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Kersten Magrum has been medically disqualified after experiencing recurring symptoms from her fourth concussion.

MAGRUM FROM PAGE 1B academic ineligibility Dec. 29. Junior Amber Moore has played in Magrum’s spot offensively in the new lineup, while GodBold replaces Magrum defensively. “Other kids will have to step up,” Bollant said. Freshman McKenzie Piper and sophomore Nia Oden have come off the bench in Magrum’s absence, and they will be expected to continue to contribute. When Magrum was forced to miss four games earlier this season because of a shoulder injury, Piper started in her

HOCKEY FROM PAGE 1B the team got “goal hungry” in the third period, leading to scoring chances for the Cougars. In the finale, sporting pink jerseys for breast cancer awareness, the Illini again jumped out in front, with Nick Stuercke scoring off of a wraparound move by Austin Bostock only 19 seconds into the game. With fans still celebrating the early Illini score, the Cougars came right back and knocked in

place. Piper has averaged 2.4 points in 11.6 minutes in 13 games this season. Magrum will continue as a traveling member of the team for the remainder of the season. Magrum appeared in 11 games for the Illini this season; she was a starter in seven, averaging 5.4 points and 4.1 rebounds in 21 minutes. Magrum was forced to medically redshirt during her second season with the team because of a foot injury. She also missed nine games last season with two head injuries. Her third concussion occurred during the offseason. Before the season, Magrum attributed her problems with

a game-tying goal only 20 seconds later. SIUE then took the lead on a long-range slap shot and led 2-1 at the end of the first. For the second night in a row, the second period was a savior for Illinois. Tallying three goals in the frame, the Illini retook control of the game. Barrera and Olen were at it again, when Barrera slipped the puck between a defender’s legs and dished it off to Olen, who flicked home the goal — the second Barrera-toOlen connection in the period. “Me, Barrera and (Kevin Chowaniec) all had good week-

concussions to being undersized in the post at 6-foot-1. Magrum came to Illinois as a member of the six-player recruiting class of 2009 that ranked No. 2 nationally. She is the third member of the class to prematurely end her time at Illinois. Destiny Williams, the class’s top recruit, transferred after one game. She now starts for top-ranked Baylor. Williams played a key role in the Bears’ national championship last season. Brianna Jones was dismissed from the team for a violation of team rules. Jones now plays at Toledo.

“She’s down, but I think she realizes that it’s what’s best for her in the long term.” MATT BOLLANT, head coach

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@dailyillini.com and @jhett93.

ends,” Olen said. “I think it’s huge when we’re rolling as a line, it picks everyone up to try and get to our level.” The Illini tallied their third of the period when the Cougars made an egregious error on their power play. After Illinois cleared the puck from its defensive zone, Bostock raced down the ice to chase after it. The SIUE goaltender came out of the crease and flipped the puck behind the net, but Bostock beat the goaltender back to the net and slipped in the short-handed goal to extend the lead to 4-2.

The Cougars wouldn’t get within two goals for the rest of the game, as the Illini won 6-3. “It says a lot about us again to be able to come back and respond from a subpar period and to put out two good ones,” Fabbrini said. “But in a couple of weeks, we can’t expect to come out with two bad periods and expect to come away with two wins against (No. 4) Robert Morris.”

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini.com and @steve_ bourbon.

Men’s tennis, women’s tennis, swimming go winless DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

The Illinois men’s tennis team dropped both of its dual matches this weekend at an ITA Kick-Off tournament. In their home-opener, the No. 16 Illini fell 4-0 to No. 19 Tennessee on Friday and 4-2 to No. 24 Tulsa the next day in the consolation game. Illinois (2-2) started off slow, losing the doubles point in both matches. The duo of Alex Jesse and Farris Gosea lost on both days in the No. 1 position, and their teammates weren’t able to come back. The Illini were more competi-

tive in singles competition, but to no avail. Friday night, Illinois took four out of six matches into the deciding third set, but No. 19 Tennessee was able grab the first three points to clinch the victory. At the No. 1 singles slot, freshman Jared Hiltzik lost against No. 9 Mike Libietis in three sets, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, then giving the Volunteers their second point. Tennessee would go on to defeat North Carolina 4-1 on Saturday night, earning a spot in the ITA National Indoor Championships in mid-February.

In singles competition Saturday, Hiltzik defeated No. 24 Tulsa’s Japie De Klerk 6-2, 6-3. The Illini would earn their second point when Ross Guignon beat Tristan Jackson 6-0, 6-3. The women, meanwhile, were in Oxford, Miss., for their ITA Kick-Off tournament. Illinois (2-3) lost on Sunday against No. 25 Vanderbilt by a final of 4-1. The Illini dropped the doubles point at the Nos. 1 and 2 slots. They are now 0-3 when losing the doubles point. The only highlight for the team in the singles spot was

sophomore Melissa Kopinski, who claimed the Illini’s only point with a 7-6 (4), 6-1 straightset win against the Commodores’ Marie Casares. Sunday’s victory was Kopinski’s second consecutive victory in the No. 1 position. The Illini women face Ole Miss Monday morning in the consolation game.

Swimming and diving falls to Nebraska in final dual meet The Illinois swimming and diving team dropped its final

Can you name this Illini basketball player? !"#$%&#%"'&()%*+%,-+'+. ())(#('"$(&/0+'%1(*2%*2(3% ,)&4"-53%#&'"%&#$%4+6% 1())%7"%"#*"-"$%*+%1(#%8-""% *(09"*3%*+%&%:(;%<"#%2+'"% 7&39"*7&))%;&'"= !"#$%&'%()%*'+,#%-.%+/'%-,%-01',%$-%2345% 600343%!'13+%'780-*''#%+,'%34'03/3&0'5

home meet Saturday afternoon against Nebraska, falling to 2-4 (1-3 Big Ten) on the season in the last head-to-head meet. Illini swimmers won only four out of 16 events, while 11-1 Nebraska broke three ARC Pool records en route to a 194-106 victory. For Illinois, sophomore Alison Meng won the 100-meter backstroke in 56.30 seconds. Senior Kathleen Knight won the 200 fly with in 2:04:57, while junior Erica Lynn finished the 200 breast in 2:20.20. Freshman Sarah Sykstus won the 200-meter IM in 2:09:00.

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“We have to keep sharpening things up at practice. I believe the biggest thing that we have to work on is the team aspect. We are just missing a few things right now and need to respond better in pressure situations,” head coach Sue Novitsky said in a news release. Nebraska started the meet off strongly, winning the 200 medley with a time of 1:41:63 — nearly four seconds ahead of Illinois. In diving, the Cornhuskers’ Amy Herman won both the 1-meter and 3-meter dives.

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Illini stop losing streak against Hoosiers BY DAN WELIN ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

After dropping two tightly contested road conference duals to No. 13 Nebraska and No. 3 Minnesota by a combined four points, a dual meet against winless conference foe Indiana at home provided the No. 6 Illinois wrestling team with a chance to regroup. The Illini took advantage of the opportunity, collecting 35 takedowns on their way to cruising the Hoosiers 30-9 Sunday at Huff Hall. Six Illinois wrestlers scored bonus points and the Illini claimed seven of the 10 matches, including four major decisions and one technical fall, as Illinois evened its conference record at 2-2. Sophomore All-American Jesse Delgado got the Illini on the board first with a 24-9 major decision over Indiana’s Joe Duca to give Illinois an early 4-0 advantage. When a dual meet starts at 125 pounds, Delgado’s consistency gives Illinois head coach Jim Heffernan confidence his team will get off to a good start. “It’s always good to have Jesse out there first because you know what you’re gonna get and that’s always a good thing,” Heffernan said. “He does set the tone and Daryl (Thomas is) kinda doing the same thing, which is good.” Thomas, a senior 133-pounder, kept his impressive stretch going with his technical fall of Indiana’s Alonzo Sheperd after two periods, his third consecutive victory after defeating Nebraska’s Shawn Nagel by decision and recording a major decision over Minnesota’s sixth-ranked Chris Dardanes. Once Thomas finished off his technical fall, the rout was officially on, as Illinois

closed out the remaining eight matches with five victories. The Hoosiers did catch the Illini by surprise, though, as unranked Luke Sheridan captured a 10-5 victory over 12th-ranked Tony Dallago at 184 pounds. Sheridan and Dallago traded takedowns for the first two periods, but Sheridan pulled away in the third with takedown that put his lead at 9-4 with little time remaining for Dallago to attempt a comeback. “I think Tony probably tried to do too much,” his head coach said. “(He) had some opportunities to score and tried to make too much of the situation.” With four conference dual meets remaining, Indiana was Illinois’ last unranked opponent on the schedule. “It’s just moving forward and getting ready for the big ones,” Delgado said. “We got Penn State and Iowa next week.” Before they face the nation’s top- and fourth-ranked teams at home, the Illini get back on the road, as the fifth-ranked Buckeyes await them in Columbus, Ohio, on Friday night. “We’re on the right track,” Heffernan said. “I think we’re doing the right things in practice. But they’re a really good team. And just like anybody else, we need to win the toss up matches and the ones we’re favored in to have a chance.” With their two close losses at Nebraska and Minnesota still in the back of their minds, Sunday’s victory over the Hoosiers gave the Illini a chance to work out some of the problems they had on the last road trip. Now they’ll bide their time until their next chance to show it off.

Dan can be reached at welin1@dailyillini.com and @WELINandDEALIN.

JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Jordan Blanton holds onto Indiana’s Cheney Dale at Huff Hall on Sunday. Blanton’s victory contributed to Illinois’ 30-9 win.

Men’s track wins 7 overall titles at IU

Hoosiers defeat Spartans on back of Oladipo

STAFF WRITER

BY MICHAEL MAROT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Victor Oladipo wasted no time getting Indiana’s fans riled up Sunday. They responded to his energetic play with loud, boisterous support for the next two hours and he responded to their cheers by delivering a performance to remember. The junior guard finished with 21 points, seven rebounds, six steals and three blocks, leading the seventh-ranked Hoosiers to a 75-70 victory over No. 13 Michigan State on a day Oladipo was already thinking about doing more. “There are still things I need to improve on, even today,” Oladipo said. “So I have to keep getting better.” This one will be hard to top. Indiana (18-2, 6-1 Big Ten) has won three straight since a Jan. 25 loss to Wisconsin. It has won backto-back games over the Spartans after ending a six-game losing streak in the series. The Hoosiers picked up their ninth win in Assembly Hall over a Top 25 foe during the past 24 months, and their latest victory helped break up a three-way logjam atop the Big Ten. Indiana was awaiting the result of the Michigan-Illinois game to see if it would share the conference lead with the Wolverines or have it all to themselves. How much did this win mean to coach Tom Crean? After shaking hands with

finals of the 60-meter hurdles, setting the third-fastest time in On Friday at the UI Relays at school history along the way. He Gladstein Fieldhouse on the cam- finished second in the finals. pus of Indiana University, men’s Senior Ryan Lynn returned to track and field team member Gra- the event he is most comfortable ham Morris dashed into the Illi- in, 800 meters. Running in his nois record books. Morris broke third different event in as many the school record in the mile with weeks, Lynn came away with a a time of 4 minutes, 0.47 seconds, first-place finish in a time of 1 minedging out the original record set ute 51.70 seconds. Malcolm Taylor by Len Sitko in 1991 by .09 sec- and Josh Carroll won the 600 and onds. Morris’ record-setting per- 800 opens, respectively. formance in the mile was one of “Our middle-distance guys realseven overall Illini titles, including ly stepped it up this week,” Turk both invitational and open events, said. “We know what to expect from our short-distance squads, in Bloomington, Ind. “I’m glad to see Graham have so it’s great to get some contrithe success that butions from our sometimes inconhe did,” head coach Mike Turk sistent middle-dissaid. “He ran in tance guys.” Illinois roundthe right race and he ran it the ed out its sevenright way. He overall title permade some misformance over takes early on but the weekend with responded well a title from Matt Bane in the pole and ran a truly gutsy race.” vaulting event. T he Illini Bane set a perreturned to form sonal record in in the 200-meter his title-winning MIKE TURK, dash, as Brandon jump, breaking a head coach Stryganek took personal record he set a week ago. home the first place title in the event. Finishing The Illini finished out the weeksecond in the event was Stephon end’s competition with a team title Pamilton, only a week following in the 4x400 relay. The squad cona false start and subsequent dis- sisting of Pamilton, Taylor, D.J. qualification at the Illini Classic. Zahn and Juan Paul-Green fin“It was good to see Stephon ished with time of 3:11.97 in the come back after a tough-luck false event. start a week ago,” Turk said. “We “Ultimately, I would say that need him and Brandon to run on this was a very successful meet the track with each other to have for us,” Turk said. “Going forward, the success our 200 meter guys there are plenty of things we can have in them.” focus on in order to get better from Returning from a hamstring keeping up our health and bringinjury he sustained two weeks ago ing a consistent work ethic.” was Vanier Joseph, who returned to the track for his first meet and Dan can be reached at promptly secured his spot in the descalo2@dailyillini.com. BY DAN ESCALONA

DARRON CUMMINGS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana’s Victor Oladipo, right, shoots against Michigan State’s Branden Dawson on Sunday in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana defeated Michigan State 75-70. his old friend, Tom Izzo, Crean walked to the corner in the south end of Assembly Hall, raised both arms and thanked the students for their constant noise. A few minutes later, he was thanking others. “He (Oladipo) was a tremendous difference from the start of the game. He had a knowledge base that he put into his game as to how he was going to defend,” Crean said. “If you’re not cerebral like that and, at the same time quick, it’s hard to defend like that. But he’s been good. We knew he was going to play well on the offensive end and to take away things on the defensive end, too. And we don’t win this game without Will Sheehey, we really don’t.” The impact of Oladipo was evident in the box score and beyond. He was 8 of 12 from the field and 4 of 6 from the line with more offensive rebounds (four) than defensive. Crean also credited him with 15 first-half deflec-

tions, something Crean said he’s never seen before. And when Oladipo wasn’t making plays, there were plenty of others willing to help. Cody Zeller made only two baskets and finished with nine points but scored on a layup with 1:38 to go to make it a twopossession game. He also took a charge with 14.3 seconds left that essentially sealed the win. Christian Watford finished with 12 points and six rebounds, Yogi Ferrrell had 11 points and a key 3-pointer just before halftime and Jordan Hulls had 10 points and four assists. Most of it was the result of Oladipo and the threat he posed on every possession. “That’s just Victor,” Watford explained. “We feel like we’re a great team when Victor does this. He brings a lot of energy. Not only that, he gets us open by the way he attacks the basket. He did a great job today.” Michigan State (17-4, 6-2) just couldn’t keep up. Gary Harris, last year’s Indi-

ana Mr. Basketball, was booed relentlessly, yet made five 3-pointers and finished with 21 points. Adreian Payne added 18 points and was 3 of 4 from beyond the arc, matching his season total of three 3s. The only other player to reach double figures was Branden Dawson, another Indiana native, who has 12 points and eight rebounds. Still, it wasn’t up to Izzo’s standards. The Spartans, playing in special green-and-gold uniforms, committed 19 turnovers, allowed Indiana to shoot 50.9 percent from the field and essentially wound up with a rebounding draw, 32-31. Guard Keith Appling fouled out with 5:14 to go, too. “Our whole deal was to keep them out of the lane and not turn the ball over and we didn’t do either one of those very good,” Izzo said. “We got tired, and we’ve been so good down the stretch and with three minutes left. I thought we had a chance.”

“I’m glad to see Graham have the success that he did. He ran in the right race and he ran it the right way.”

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420 APARTMENTS

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606 E White, Champaign

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GUARANTEED COMPLETION! *Available

$890 $950 $685 - $745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775 Most apt. furnished, parking available, laundry available

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211 W. SPRINGFIELD AVENUE | CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820

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440 HOUSES FOR RENT

!"#$%&'(%)!*#+,#-,')./0 !"#$%#&'(()*("#$%+,-.$/0'"12-#&.$ !"#$%3(45$6#2,$(7$8+1"$90+&.$$ :(",+4,;$$ -+<#2=>1331"(12.#&0$

6

010

Full time

420 SUBLETS

Furnished

"

Furnished

7

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

9

420 APARTMENTS

!

Furnished

!"#$%&'%()*"%+"##%*,'+,%'-%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(5 6'/%#2*"%&72.%+"8.2&"9%:7",%;"3'((",0%2&%&'%<'/;%-;2",0.4 =-%<'/%'+,%<'/;."#-%)%+"8.2&">%$#)3"%)%#2,*%&'%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'( =-%<'/%$;2,&%'/&%&7"%./0'*/.%&7",%$;2,&%&7"(%&+23"%),0%?2@"%',"%&'%',"%'-%<'/;%-;2",0.4 :"##%<'/;%)3A/)2,&),3".>%-;2",0.%),0%&")(()&".%)8'/&%./0'*/1&'$23)#43'(4 B/.&%7"#$%&'%()*"%&72.%.2&"%+"##%*,'+,45

HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS

8

employment


The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 88  

Monday, Jan. 28, 2013

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