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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Student body presidential candidates debate today The Student Government Association will be holding a presidential debate among candidates running in the 2011 student government elections at 12:30 p.m. today in the University Center Houston Room. The candidates for the election are Jared Gogets, Michael Harding and Michael McHugh. The student election will begin on Monday, Feb. 28. Associate Vice President for Student Affairs David Small will be moderating the debate. The event is free and open to the public. Students wishing to learn more about the candidates can go to http://thedailycougar.com/2011/2/22/sga-presidential-debate-tomorrow/ to post questions. The best questions posted on the page will be asked to the candidates.

Issue 100, Volume 76

Wednesday ®

February 23, 2011

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Read. Recycle. Repeat daily.

Cheap degrees, less quality Governor’s address raises student concerns for tuition and quality of education Jourdan Vian

THE DAILY COUGAR In his State of the State address earlier this month, Gov. Rick Perry proposed a plan for a tuition freeze and a challenge for universities to offer students a lowercosting education.

“Today, I’m challenging our institutions of higher education to develop bachelor’s degrees that cost no more than $10,000, including textbooks,” Perry said in his State of the State address. Perry suggested online classes, new teaching techniques and higher efficiency within universities as methods to bring the cost of a college degree down. Students at UH, while thrilled at the idea of a cheaper education, are dubious of his plan. The goal is good, according to Hanny Abouekde, a sociology junior, but he

doesn’t think online classes are the answer. They are good in theory, he said, but Blackboard doesn’t always work. Amanda Cottrell, a finance junior, agrees. “Whenever it works, its good,” Cottrell said. “You don’t learn as much in online classes.” Perry’s call for the renewal of a fouryear tuition freeze, which would lock in tuition rates at or below the freshmen TUITION continues on page 3

STUDENT SERVICES

Volunteers assist filing

— Julian Jimenez/The Daily Cougar

BLAFFER GALLERY

Free discussion today in Blaffer Gallery focuses on exhibition The Blaffer Gallery and the UH Mitchell Center will be hosting a roundtable discussion for the new Okay Mountain exhibition 6:30 p.m. today at the Blaffer Gallery.

Out-of-state students make free appointments for tax guidance

Moderated by Blaffer director and chief curator Claudia Schmuckli, the event will include Okay Mountain artists Sterling Allen and Nathan Green.

Elize Najm

THE DAILY COUGAR

The discussion is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a wine-and-cheese reception. The Blaffer Art Gallery hours will be extended to accommodate the event. For more information, call (713) 743-9521. —Julian Jimenez/The Daily Cougar

CORRECTIONS !!

Report errors to editor@thedailycougar.com. Corrections will appear in this space as needed.

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EVENTS Free Instructor-Led, Hands-On Computer Training Computer classes are being offered to students, alumni, faculty and staff. A class about creating Podcasts will be held from 10 a.m. to noon in room 110-6 of the Social Work Building. Lucero, Robert Ellis & The Boys The band Lucero is showcasing their skills at Fitzgerald’s. Doors open at 8 p.m. and tickets cost $15.

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT

thedailycougar.com/calendar

60th Anniversary of EAA

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ast night the Engineering Alumni Association celebrated its 60th anniversary at the UH Hilton. About 200 engineering alumni, students, sponsors, faculty and staff participated in the event, which included a game of “Engineering Jeopardy.” | Rebekah Stearns/The Daily Cougar

Beginning this Saturday, international students can attend a free tax filling session provided by the Houston chapter of the Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants. The sessions will occur from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Feb. 26, March 19, March 26, April 2 and April 9 in the University Center Bayou Room 202. “To date we have 32 volunteers, with the majority being accounting students from the University of Houston. Others are CPA’s who coordinate the site and review each [tax] return prepared,” said Judith Butcher, CPE Director for the Houston CPA Society. Houston-based tax and bankruptcy attorney and CPA, E. Rhett Buck, will lead accounting students and volunteer CPA’s in this year’s effort. Buck has been the Site Manager for this organization, which has helped over 230 students with their taxes. “The volunteers are typically half CPA’s and half students. The CPA’s come from various Houston firms,” Buck said. Tax filing has changed this year and tax preparers are being faced with new rules, including identification if the preparer is not the one being taxed. Taxpayers now have until April 18 to file. TAXES continues on page 3

CAMPUS

Legislation steps up insurance options Misti Mynhier

THE DAILY COUGAR The Department of Health and Human Services, HHS, released a new rule in the Affordable Care Act this past week,

ensuring that all students will have more freedom and control over their health care decisions through more consumer protections. “Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, college students will have more control over their health care,” said Kathleen

Sebelius, secretary of health and human services. The proposed rules for the Affordable Care Act make it clear that all students who purchase health care through their INSURANCE continues on page 3


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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

ONLINE

Sound like you? These symptoms could be more than just PMS — they can also describe PMDD (Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder). Baylor College of Medicine is conducting a clinical study of FDA-approved drugs ,YAZ and YASMIN, to determine if they are effective in relieving PMDD stress in women ages 13 to 20. Participants will complete a diary in addition to receiving medication in this study. Females between 13 and 20 experiencing these symptoms and comfortable with tampon use may be able to participate. Parental consent is required under age 18.

Call 713-798-7549

We’d love to hear from you. Share your thoughts, opinions, cheers and jeers with the Cougar and the campus: letters@ thedailycougar.com

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1. Streets off-limits for UH 2. ‘I Am Number Four’ should be No. 1 3. Employee-flavored yogurt not too tasty 4. Congress decides to show patriotism 5. Young learns new role with veteran help

Re: Staff Editorial - Abortion legislation gets green light from Senate “It is fine and good that this bill makes doctors provide these services and literature to women considering an abortion. But until the pregnant woman is made to listen to and see what she is about to do, this bill will be ineffective.”

— user “Joshuaism”

FEATURED COMMENTS Re: Creationism hinders intellectualism “Wholesale firing of teachers is not going to be a successful approach to the issue either. For a moment, consider the contractual issues, which alone would block such an effort. What Berkman and Pultzer found was that in highly conservative school districts, up to 40% of science teachers promoted creationism, while in better educated, liberal districts they were rare. So, creationist teachers live and work in creationist communities. I doubt that creationist parents will complain their children are taught creationism.”

— user “Gary Hurd” Re: America dithers in the Middle East “It’s not our fault, even if we went about this clumsily or horribly, our intentions were clear. Our fault lies in not realizing that democracy and Islam are completely incompatible. That’s why wherever we see Islam we see strongmen, dictators, despots and insane theocrats...” Iranians were dancing in the streets of Tehran after the “succssful” uprising there in 1979. Now they are thrown in prison for dancing. Isn’t there a good chance this is where Egypt and Tunisia will end up?

— user “The Truth”

Re: Patrols increase after robbery; vehicle burglaries on the rise “UH has video monitoring (490+ cameras) of all campus parking lots and other selected areas - 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Someone is not watching.”

— user “Don” Re: Petition to fight cuts started “It isn’t only “poor people” who are being forced out of an education but middle class people as well. I don’t think it is a selfish thing to want to be a productive member of society. I don’t see anyone as being selfish. A college education is a necessity, not a luxury, and it is beneficial to the state as a whole for there to be an educated workforce. I would rather help finance an education than watch members my generation who want to better themselves, spiral into poverty because they could not afford school.”

— user “Wendy” Re: Patrols increase after robbery; vehicle burglaries on the rise “There is hardly any officers patrolling the campus of UH... you would think there would be more police officers on patrol keeping students safe...but no. UT is much larger than UH yet it has an oncampus police department and officers patrol the campus day and night.”

— user “Je’Ron Stokes”

You heard right. Buy your UH yearbook and you’ll be entered to win a FREE 16gb Apple iPad — surely the year’s hottest tech toy. More importantly, you’ll be investing in a keepsake you’ll cherish for a lifetime: your college memories encapsulated in the Houstonian Yearbook.

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015.

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CAMPUS

Series display debut opens eyes to meat production practices Jasmine Umenyi

THE DAILY COUGAR The first of three exhibits, “From the Farm,” will provide viewers with a visual representation of a cattle farm. The exhibit is the accumulation of the research by the Community Learning Agricultural Sustainability Program interns regarding the consumption and farming practices of food.

TAXES continued from page 1

“I know all the hard work that must have been put into setting this up,” Houston-based CPA and recent graduate Justin Rubio said. “There are hundreds of people who donate their time and it is a great testament to the true spirit of Houstonians ‘paying it forward.’” International students can bring W-2 forms from any employment they may have, in addition to any other tax deducting paperwork to receive help with their taxes “I have been at UH for 3 years now and had no idea this program

INSURANCE continued from page 1

university will benefit from the new consumer protections in the law. There will no longer be lifetime limits on coverage expenditures for health benefits, students will not be dropped from current coverage if they become ill, and insurance coverage will no longer be denied for students under the age of 19 with pre-existing conditions. “My friend is 17 and has cancer; with this new ruling, she will finally be able to get affordable health care when she enters UH next year,” business graduat Krista Goodwin said. Many students purchase university health care when they do not have family medical plans or insurance is unaffordable. However, what benefits are covered in these current plans varies from university to university. Last semester UH had 4,044 enrolled in the UH medical plan and this new decision will mandate

TUITION continued from page 1

level for the next four years, also concerned students about how it would interact with the cuts in state funding. “Tuition’s going to go up with him cutting spending,” Abouekde said. “Does that pressure them to spend more wisely?” Cottrell is concerned with what the budget cuts will do to UH’s

“This spring semester there will be a total of three one-day exhibits, one per month,” director of C.L.A.S.P. Leah Wolfthal said. “This is the first in the series. It will help passersby examine their assumptions about meat production/consumption in sustainable food systems.” In preparation for this exhibit, the interns and a few other UH students visited Georgia’s Texas Grass-Fed Beef, a Waller farm

with organic beef, chicken, vegetable and other products, according to Wolfthal. Two students created this exhibit as part of the C.L.A.S.P. Art and Agricultural Sustainability Internship. Albert Sosa, an art junior, experienced the preparation. “We are making this huge barn feel towards it and we are juxtaposing industry farming practices along side organic ones,” Sosa

existed,” said Pedro Berizzbeitia, an engineering student from Venezuela. “I will definitely go and get help with this year’s taxes.” To qualify for this free service, one must be a non-resident student. If you do not qualify, there are referral services through the organization which are available through their website. “Even though I do not qualify as a non-resident, I am going to attend the March 19 event to talk with someone about a referral,” said Sean Vensuela, a criminal justice graduate. “It is hard, in a city this big, to find an accountant who you can trust. Getting a referral from this group would make me feel more secure in

my choice.” Though UH is holding this area’s event, it is not solely open to UH students. HCC, Texas Southern University, Houston Baptist University and any other university students are welcome to participate. The Houston CPA Society is teaming up with Neighborhood Centers, Inc. for the 13th year. This chapter is the third largest CPA chapter in the country, made up of more than 8,200 members in Houston and surrounding areas. Interested students must make an appointment by calling (713) 743-5065. news@thedailycougar.com

said. This exhibit will explore the nature of the food that we eat, how processed they are and the difference between organic and naturally produced foods, according to Sosa. “I want people to realize what’s going on with the food they are eating,” Sosa said. C.L.A.S.P. is one of UH’s Green Initiatives. It is housed in the Department of University

Services. The exhibit is free and open to the public. It will be open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday in Butler Plaza, weather permitting. For details of the three oneday exhibits, visit their Facebook page at http://www.facebook. com/pages/Campus-CommunityGarden/160638127118. news@thedailycougar.com

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Pastor David C. C Burkley, B Fellowship of Faith Church Pastor Brian Nelson, Jericho City Church clearer benefit coverage. “This rule would ensure that these past plans remain a viable, affordable option for students while guaranteeing that they are regulated consistently and offer transparent benefits to students,” Sebelius said. Most student health plans offer limited benefits with low annual dollar limits they can spend on health care, or limits doctors access to smaller networks and other health care providers. For many students, these health plans are their only health insurance option. The Affordable Care Act will now allow HHS to take steps to create insurance stability and further regulate that student health plans remain at low rates until all Americans have new coverage options through the state-based programs coming in 2014. With the new ruling, students are allowed to have annual dollar limits for necessary health benefits of no less than $100,000 for policy years beginning before Sept. 23,

2012. Student health plans with policy years beginning after that date must fully comply with the Affordable Care Act’s annual limit restrictions. “The Affordable Care Act has expanded an already controversial issue regarding medical care in the US,” Adam Canow, a marketing UHDowntown student, said. “Many are in favor to allow college students to have more privileges and benefits true, but there are others who are concerned as to how the plans will be paid, or who will pay them.” For more information on the new proposed rule, visit www.ofr. gov/inspection.aspx. For additional details about the new patient protections created under the Affordable Care Act, visit www.HealthCare.gov. For specific questions regarding how the new rulings will benefit your existing UH insurance plan, contact the UH Health Center directly at (713) 743-5137.

4800 CALHOUN ROAD University Center, World Affairs Lounge (UH Entrance 1) Celebratory Concert 6 P.M. An Evening of Song, Dance, Step and Spoken Word! University Center, Houston ston Room

FEATURING: Good News Gospel Choir and its annointed ted praise dance (Favor in Radical Exaltation), mime (Ministering in Majestic Excellence), & step (Adoring Christ Through Step) ministries!

-Various College and University Gospel Choirs from Texas -Alief Elsik High School Gospel Choir & Many More! FOR MORE INFORMATION: UH_GNGC@YAHOO.COM OR (832) 216-2474

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Daily, Weekly & Monthly rentals available! many scholarship programs, she said. The University is already under pressure due to the cuts to UH’s funding by the state. “Under the introduced version of House Bill 1, the UH System’s general revenue appropriation would be reduced by $100 million (20%) for the biennium,” President Renu Khator said in her address to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Education in Austin last week.

“It is not an exaggeration to say that cuts of this magnitude would severely limit our ability to achieve our goals,” Khator said. The University is stepping up fundraising and reallocating resources, Khator said, but the budget cuts would take away from the University’s ability to support its current students and the projected increase in enrollment over the next few years. news@thedailycougar.com

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Jack Wehman Newton Liu, Christopher Losee Jose Aguilar, Cristi Guerra John Brannen, Joshua Siegel Mary Baak Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

You got to fight for your right to party

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isconsin is not Egypt. And it’s definitely not Libya. There’s no need to call what is happening the “Cheese Revolution,” or some other catchy name.

The uprisings that continue to take place in the Middle East are much more serious and for a much greater cause — they are fighting for freedom. Those masses in Wisconsin, like all of us, have their freedom; they are just trying to hold onto the rights it gives — and all the rights that have been granted over the past century. What is happening in Wisconsin is great to see, considering the level of apathy and complacency the American electorate has recently shown. And whether you agree with the protestors or not, you have to agree that seeing Americans actively engaging in politics draws up some level of pride. It is unfortunate that Fox News and the right wing have taken this demonstration of civil disobedience and tried to label it nefarious, especially considering that they heaved praise on the scores of Americans who showed up for Tea Party rallies almost every other weekend. The same praise should befall those people protesting in Wisconsin. As more states begin to face seemingly unending budget deficits, the call that Gov. Scott Walker makes is likely going to continue. Said Tea Partiers will once again jump in their corporate buses or personal RVs and trek to wherever the battle will take place — isn’t it nice that they have so much free time? Unions fought for other mainstays many now take for granted. According to the AFL-CIO, unions were instrumental in “helping to pass laws ending child labor, establishing the eight-hour day, protecting workers’ safety and health and helping create Social Security, unemployment insurance and the minimum wage.” In effect, the collective bargaining tools of unions over the years have allowed us to now enjoy a much better life than even a few decades ago. People who make less than $100,000 and are crying for their demise should rethink where they stand, before they end up working for more than they expected.

tudents mingle with each other daily and in doing so they increase their own exposure to disease, especially if they live on campus. Paradoxically, most healthy people in their twenties are less likely to become ill when compared to children or elderly. The former point is why students risk contracting bacterial meningitis more than others. A 20-year-old David student at Texas A&M, Haydon who lived off campus died from the disease earlier this month and created a harsh reminder of the fact. According to the Center for Disease Control, meningitis is caused by the inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. It is a serious but rare disease transmitted by coughing, sneezing, sharing utensils and drinks, etc. Now the father of that A&M student wants Texas lawmakers to mandate that all

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S

Parking woes present true parking foes

STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Vaccines inject students with fees

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ell it has happened and without complaint or much opposition, the University has sealed the fate of its students again by idly allowing the residents of the University Oaks community to go private, and thereby restricting parking from UH students. In a Daily Cougar article, UH students were told that the University Oaks comNeimon munity, a quaint, yet James beautiful neighborhood adjacent to the University, has certified its community with the City of Houston as a “Residential Permit Parking” neighborhood, which in essence bans UH students from parking in the neighborhood. The ban, now enforceable by the good ol’ boys of HPD as of Feb. 15, comes as surprise for many students who had been utilizing the neighborhood for

students get the Meningococcal (meningitis) vaccine, regardless of where they live. Currently, the Jamie Schanbaum Act, named after a student who contracted the disease in 2008, states that students who live on campus — mostly incoming freshmen — must get the vaccine. Governor Rick Perry signed the act into law Jan. 1, 2010. Several other states have similar laws, but it’s a weak mandate. Students can opt out of the vaccine by a doctor’s signed affidavit, or a form stating ethic or religious beliefs. This is why the topic is especially relevant to me. In the 2010 fall semester, I moved on campus for the first time and the law required I get the vaccine even though I was not a freshman. I filled out an exemption form for reasons of conscience and after a lot of red tape, I was exempt from vaccination. Parents and students find this irresponsible. There is an increased risk among

reasons of affordability and proximity, as it is the closest free “parking lot” for University students. Students should be outraged by the current parking conditions, as well as the economic conditions of the average student — broke! Many students are strapped for cash, which makes parking permits, or paying parking citations an egregious expense. To the students who park legitimately and visibly display the proper parking permits with Cougar pride, I commend and praise you for your respect and obedience to the law. To those whom genuinely cannot afford parking, for whatever reason this year, you have my sympathy. The University Oaks neighborhood, which is mostly up for sale, was a convenient, cost-free alternative and the University should have negotiated, at least, for an extension, perhaps until the end of May.

students for contracting the illness, and prevention is better than cure. However there are several reasons not to get vaccinated. Financially — without insurance — a visit to the UH clinic is $20 and another $125 for the Meningococcal vaccine (plus $10 for an “administration fee”). Not all students have rich parents with money and insurance, nor do all students have a job to cover expenses; in a time when tuition and campus costs will only increase, every penny counts. No vaccine is without side effects as well. The CDC reports rash, fever, inflammation, and sometimes death from the vaccine, rare but possible. Then again, meningitis itself is rare but possible. Only three thousand people in the U.S. contract meningitis annually; ten percent die. Twenty percent suffer hearing loss, amputated limbs, or brain damage. These HAYDON continues on page 5

But to sympathize with University Oaks’ residents: enough is enough. The reality of it is that UH has a really bad parking problem that is one parking spot past becoming a parking crisis. The University has not slowed or deterred ambitions, in-line with Tier One strategies to add to its 40,000 plus students with more students, many of which are predicted to live on campus. It’s really a no-brainer at that point to realize that many of those students will occupy several spaces well before the morning influx of the other 70 to 85 percent of students who do not live on campus. So where will they park? In a quiet lot several miles from the University, serviced by a sluggish shuttle that will be the University’s solution until that too, would be overwhelmed. However, the good folks in the JAMES continues on page 5


Player’s suicide sends NFL message

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

OPINION

The Daily Cougar

ast Friday, Dave Duerson, a former NFL legend, was found dead in his Florida home. Duerson, a two-time Super Bowl champion and four time Pro Bowler, allegedly shot himself in the chest in order to send the NFL and game of football a powerful message. According to a CBS news report, Andrew written by Armen Taylor Keteyian, Duerson had made it clear to his friends and family that he wanted his brain to be donated to science in the case of his death. “Just hours before the shooting, Duerson had texted family members requesting his brain be donated to science and examined for a disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, caused by repeated blows to the head,” Keteyian wrote. Duerson’s death will surely send a message to the entire sports community. His brain has already been donated to Boston University, in accordance with his last wishes. Boston University is home to The Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, which is a joint venture with the Sports Legacy Institute. Together, the partnership of these two groups aims at finding solutions to this disease. Studying Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy isn’t a new development; In fact, the story of how the disease was discovered is a very interesting one.

In an article published by GQ in 2009 by Jeanne Marie Laskas, the story of the original neurologist responsible for the groundbreaking discoveries in CTE was told. The story was about a doctor whose findings were so incredible, so groundbreaking, and so bold that it resulted in a whirlwind of turmoil that eventually led to one scientist being cheated out of the credit he deserved. Laskas’ story is about Bennet Omalu, the first forensic pathologist and neurologist to discover CTE in football players. Omalu’s findings came as a result of dissecting the brain of Mike Webster, a Hall of Fame football player who earned nine Pro Bowl appearances and four Super Bowl rings during his NFL career as a center for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Omalu, at the time, was a scientist who had very little knowledge of the game of football, yet he saw his job like all doctors should, as a calling to solve problems in the world of medical science in order to better other people. Omalu’s determination to solve the abrupt death of a football legend would eventually lead him to findings that would change the scientific literature on athletes and concussions forever. Mike Webster died of a heart attack, but before having the fatal heart attack, Webster had become mentally ill just like many football players do. We now know that this is due to the level of CTE within these players’ brains. When Webster died at the age

of 50 — the same age that Duerson died last Friday — he had fallen into a debilitative mental state like the majority of players who have been found to have CTE. Webster became so mentally ill that he began self-treating his own back problems by tazering himself into an unconscious sleep, according to Laskas’ GQ story. “Mike Webster forgot how to eat, too. Soon Mike Webster was homeless, living in a truck, one of its windows replaced with a garbage bag and tape,” Laskas said. According to the article written by Laskas, Omalu received a few other brains and all of them contained CTE. All of them also died young, dramatic, irregular deaths. Terry Long “died at 45 after drinking antifreeze,” Laskas said. It is very likely that Duerson, the player who took his own life last Friday, was suffering from the same mental illness caused by CTE. The NFL needs to address the issue of concussions and player safety. They could start by recognizing the scientist who founded this phenomenon among NFL players and then go further by investing in his medical research. We all love football and the sport’s hard hitting aspects, but seeing players die at such a young age and the number of suicides that are related to these cases of CTE is one sack that this sport can’t afford. Andrew Taylor is an economics senior and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

JAMES continued from page 4

University Oaks neighborhood were forced to endure a small, but heavily concentrated percentage of those frustrated commuters adding traffic, noise and even a degree of crime. Their solution was simple, effective and enacted rather quickly. And who can blame them? This is the mess of the University spilling over into their community. If we must point fingers then we have to point those fingers at the people responsible for parking and transportation here. If their efficiency in citing and towing student’s cars is any indication, then parking and transportation is not a division or department, but what seems to be a multi-million dollar business. It’s almost as if the towing contractors have a sixth sense for students parked illegitimately on campus. Currently, the University doesn’t seem able or capable of accommodating any more students, as far as parking is concerned.

HAYDON continued from page 4

figures amount to a few hundred people a year dead or permanently affected. More people die annually from traffic accidents in Texas alone. I risk contracting meningitis since I‘m not vaccinated. Students take plenty of risks though. Students

Neimon James is a political science junior and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

risk an accident when in traffic. Students risk food poisoning at fast food restaurants. Students risk endless health problems when they binge drink. Students risk getting mugged when walking on campus at night. Why should choosing not to vaccinate be any different? David Haydon is a political science junior and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE Houston Room, UC 2nd oor

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An extension until May would have allowed students utilizing the University Oaks community a considerable amount of time to find an alternative, or to save the money to purchase a parking permit. But that would be looking after students, a service UH does not commit to well. Instead it will allow those students to take on risky ventures by parking on campus without authorization, out of frustration and desperation. This is actually more profitable for the University when you add up the citations and possible towing fees those students will face. What more authority do students need to park on campus other than to be enrolled as students on campus; is tuition not enough? Most students are very proud of the Tier One designation and all the strategies the University has in place to better this campus. But sometimes we wonder: are we the pride or simply the purse?

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Daily Cougar

sports overtime

EDITORS John Brannen, Joshua Siegel E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

BASEBALL

UH cuts down Lumberjacks Productive second inning allow Cougars to pull away, ease to fourth straight win Gilbert Requena

THE DAILY COUGAR AARON CISNEROS/THE DAILY COUGAR

SOFTBALL

Cougars gain recognition; Gaber honored The Cougars are making a national splash. Victories over No. 18 Oklahoma State and No. 20 LSU over the weekend earned UH its first appearance in the USA Today/NFCA Top 25 poll in two years. “We’re really excited. It’s really difficult to get in,� head coach Kyla Holas said. “It takes a lot of recognition and work when you’re not one of those teams that gets in all the time. We’re excited that they finally noticed what we’re doing.� The Cougars were powered by the pitching of Amanda Crabtree and the plate prowess of Reina Gaber and Brooke Lathan. Crabtree was named Conference USA Pitcher of the Week after no-hitting Nicholls State and following that with a complete game three-hitter against LSU. “I thought this was by far the best weekend that we’ve ever seen from her,� Holas said. “Last year she was close and this is it. She’s really stepped up her mental game and she took pride in working hard this fall. She worked harder this fall than we’ve ever seen .� Gaber was recognized as the USA Softball National Player of the Week for her two clutch pinch-hitting performances that helped earn the Cougars wins over Tigers. She went three-for-four over the weekend with three RBI and is currently second in C-USA in batting average (.500). Lathan is tied for the lead in C-USA in home runs after mashing two over the weekend. “She’s finding her balance between offense and defense,� Holas said. “She was leading us so much offensively early in the first weekend and then this past weekend she really stepped up defensively.� The Cougars will work to keep their eight-game win streak alive at a doubleheader at 4 p.m. tonight against Sam Houston State in Huntsville. Crabtree (4-0) and Donna Bourgeois (3-1) will take the mound to try to foil the Bearkats. — Cougar Sports Services

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

UH climbs into top 25 For the first time in more than six years the Cougars have made it into the Top 25. The USA Today/ESPN coaches’ poll voted the Cougars (22-4, 13-0 Conference USA) to No. 25 on Monday. The Cougars will look to stretch their win streak to 14 games when they travel east to Huntington, W. Va. tomorrow to take on Marshall (8-18, 4-9).. — Cougar Sports Services

The Cougars blasted Stephen F. Austin 10-3 at Cougar Field on Tuesday to extend their winning streak to four games. After giving up two runs in the top of the first, the Cougars tied the game by scoring two runs in the bottom of the inning. The Cougars offense exploded for six more runs in the second, thanks in large part to sloppy Lumberjack defense. The Lumberjacks had a passed ball, a wild pitch and three errors in the inning. Joel Ansley added a home run in the third inning and the Cougars tacked on another run in the fifth inning. Pitcher Chase Wellbrock made his UH debut going six innings, allowing two runs and five hits while striking out six batters. “The game starts, and lights come on, he was lights out tonight,� head coach Todd Whitting said. The Cougars offense continued its exceptional play by scoring 10 runs. The team has scored 40 runs through four games this season. Strong defensive eff ort Offense was not the only unit that

An early two-run deficit in the first inning did not deter the UH offense from bouncing back to win 10-3. The Cougars took advantage of four miscues from Stephen F. Austin, and the pitching staff did not allow another run until the ninth inning. | Newton Liu/The Daily Cougar shined. The defense played exceptionally with several highlight reel-type plays from shortstop Chase Jensen. “He had a couple of web-gem plays tonight that were big-time, and a huge two-out triple that put the game out of reach,� Whitting said. The team has executed to Whitting’s standards but he said, it still has areas to improve upon.

“We have some baserunning issues,� Whitting said. “A ground ball was hit and the runner didn’t score from third, but in close ballgames those are big plays.� The Cougars will play again at 6:30 p.m. Friday when they face Ole Miss in a three-game series at Cougar Field. sports@thedailycougar.com

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Cougars unable to handle Memphis Cougar Sports Services

When dealing with a perennial Conference USA powerhouse, mistakes must be few and far between, the defense must create opportunities and shots have to go down. UH was able to do that in spurts, but not long enough required for a winning result. The Cougars were outpaced by Memphis 69-58 Tuesday at the FedEx Forum, to lose their ! Alandise Harris third straight game. The Cougars have led the Cougars with 16 points and now lost seven of their last eight games. seven rebounds. With a six-point lead at halftime, the Tigers started to pull away from the Cougars (12-14, 4-9 C-USA) in the second half, pushing their advantage to nine points with 12 minutes remaining. UH battled back cutting the deficit to

two at the 4:44 mark after Kirk Van Slyke made a pair of free throws. Memphis answered with back-to-back 3-pointers from Charles Carmouche and Antonio Barton to make it 63-55 with 1:58 to go. UH managed to stay competitive in the first half, taking a 21-15 lead with 9:12 in the first half. But the defense was no match for a quicker Memphis team, as the Tigers eventually took a 38-32 lead at halftime. UH falls victim to unfriendly rims The Cougars made a dismal 19-of-48 shots, and turned the ball over 16 times. Alandise Harris recorded 16 points to tie all leading scorers, he also had seven rebounds two assists, two blocks and three steals. Maurice McNeil and Zamal Nixon scored 11 points apiece. Darian Thibodeaux added nine points, four rebounds and two steals. The other five players in Tuesday night’s rotation managed to score just 11

combined points. Ball movement stalled as the Cougars mustered just eight assists as a team, compared to 16 from Memphis. UH is in the midst of the roughest portion of its C-USA schedule, taking on three of the conference’s top four teams. The Cougars will return home to play UAB (19-7, 9-4) at 5 p.m. Saturday at Hofheinz Pavilion. sports@thedailycougar.com

AT A GLANCE SCOREBOARD

Memphis ...........38 31 Houston .......... 32 26

69 58

KEY STAT

16,550

Attendance at FedEX Forum

WHAT’S NEXT?

The Cougars face UAB (19-7, 9-4 C-USA) at 5 p.m. at home on Saturday..

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Daily Cougar

life+arts showtime

EDITOR Mary Baak E-MAIL arts@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/arts

MOORES

AURA Ensemble takes stage Terence Yung

THE DAILY COUGAR

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

ENTERTAINMENT

Larry King adds comedy to his resume Since leaving CNN’s “Larry King Live” after 25 years in December, Larry King has announced that he will be launching a series of one-man comedy shows in April. Most widely known for interviewing public figures — and of course, wearing his trademark suspenders — King is turning the tables and doing some talking of his own for once.

A good way to start off the week is to hear “In Motion” by the AURA Contemporary Ensemble. On Monday evening, the ensemble offered this option by presenting a concert at the Moores Opera House. “(The program) features the ensemble in performance with the innovative and genre-bending violinist and composer Todd Reynolds and performing works by composer Bill Ryan,” Director of the AURA Ensemble Rob Smith said. The program also included the UH Saxophone Studio under the direction of Dan Gelok.

quartet titled “Uh … It All Happened So Fast,” keeping with the program’s theme of motion. “Todd has performed professionally in a wide range of genres,” Smith said. “From orchestral to jazz, pop and folk — (he) brings all of these influences to his playing.” Other composers whose works were featured include Derek Bermel, Michael Gordon, Krystof Penderecki and Michael Steinberg. One thing unique about the AURA Ensemble is that they’re savvy in selecting repertoire. AURA is very aware of the trends within the past twenty or so years. Noticeably, all of the composers having AURA continues on page 9

HEALTH CHECK

King started as a radio broadcaster in 1957. Since then, he’s hosted numerous television and radio shows and has been a broadcaster on national radio programs. He also had a regular column in USA Today from 1982 until 2001.

Don’t let bad breath ruin your pearly whites

The series of shows is set to begin April 14, 2011 in Torrington, Conn.

Reesha Brown

In “Larry King: Standing Up,” he will give fans an inside look at his life. From his childhood in Brooklyn to his career as a successful television show host, King is set to give audiences an unforgettable evening.

Thematically, the works that comprised the concert all bore a common thread — being in motion. Part of the groundbreaking work of the AURA ensemble includes giving world premieres. This concert was no exception. The evening’s premiere performances included “RPM” by Robin Cox and “New Work” by guest composer Bill Ryan. The other work by Ryan was titled “Blurred.” “Bill Ryan directs a highly influential new music ensemble at Grand Valley State University,” Smith said. “(They have) several critically acclaimed commercial recordings to their credit, including one of Steve Reich’s ‘Music for 18 Musicians.’” Guest violinist Todd Reynolds also contributed compositionally with a string

THE DAILY COUGAR

ENTERTAINMENT

Oscars change things up for 2011 award show Next weekend, viewers will see noticeable changes to the biggest award show of the year. It has been reported that producers have cut the infamous — and time consuming — movie montage sequences that occur throughout the telecast and cause the ceremony to have an incredibly lengthy running time, Yahoo! News reported. There will, however, still be film clips of the actors nominated for the best picture award. Another change in the ceremony is in the presentation of the Oscar award itself. For the past two years, five presenters have given testimonials about every nominee. This year, however, producers are modeling the 2011 ceremony after an older version of the show. “It was a moment where each of the nominees really gets their due,” co-producer Bruce Cohen told a Hollywood reporter with Yahoo! News. “We found a version of that, without using five people on stage, from the 1970 Oscars and we stole it.” The 83rd annual Academy Awards will air Sunday, Feb. 27 on ABC at 7 p.m. CST.

JUSTICE

Brown now allowed to be near the ‘Only Girl in the World’ Chris Brown breathed a sigh of relief on Tuesday after a Los Angeles judge agreed to lift the restraining order Rihanna held against him. According to TMZ, the restraining order was replaced with a Level One order, which means that the two pop stars will be allowed to have contact, so long as Brown “does not harass, annoy, or molest her.” Though Rihanna didn’t show in court, she reportedly felt no incertitude toward the ruling.

Behind that pretty smile could be an ugly truth. Its name is bad breath and it has outstayed its welcome. Smelly breath is always a touchy issue, especially for those who have it and bystanders who smell it. But just because you’ve found ways to ignore that monster doesn’t mean it doesn’t need to be tamed. Don’t worry, there’s a fresh side to every smelly situation. Studies show there are ways to tame the beast. According to a recent CNN report, more than 90 million Americans suffer from bad breath, also known as halitosis. After meals, you can expect odors to carry on, especially when eating spice-heavy foods. Studies suggest that bad breath from food should disappear after 24 hours. If conditions worsen, it could be caused by lingering bacteria in the mouth, said periodontist and associate dean at Tufts School of Dental Medicine James Hanley in an article. Just think of your mouth as the odor beast’s home. The interior design concept for its house is a germ-infested bacterial playground, with the tongue as its bed. In the crevices of bad breath’s home is plaque that is hard to get rid of and that can lead to periodontal disease; chronic bad breath can be an indicator of this disease process, according to studies. The best way to get rid of bad breath and all the bacterial décor in your mouth is to use good hygiene practices. If you’re out or don’t have time to brush your teeth, chew a stick of gum to save you and passersby from a bad breath beat down. As an avid Italian food eater, I would be lying if I said the beast hasn’t released its fury before, but I attack the smelly assailant with sticks of gum. Those unsure about their breath should follow CNN’s advice and lick the back of your hand, let it dry and then smell it. Bad

The mouth is a cozy breeding ground for bacteria, which causes bad breath. There are several ways to keep the bad breath monster at bay. Among other things, be sure to keep floss handy, stay hydrated and chew sugar-free gum. | Photos.com breath germs are normally found riding the slippery slopes of taste buds on the tongue. When you know there’s a pungent smell itching to break free from your mouth, don’t turn your back on it. Instead, fight back before the sneaky enemy plans another stinky attack. What lies beneath Inside your mouth is a hot, wet, cozy place for complex bacteria to live. The bacteria feed on particles from leftover food and produce chemical byproducts that leave an odor. In most cases, bad breath cases are the cause of food and bacteria that have collected in the mouth for long periods of

time; they later form plaque in pockets on the teeth and in the gums. Remember that bad breath doesn’t always mean bad hygiene. Normally the tongue is the culprit. “More than 600 types of bacteria are found in the average mouth,” CNN reports. “Many of those bacteria get trapped under the surface of the tongue and cause the bad breath.” Weapons of breath destruction Brush your teeth and floss. I know this seems like a remedial concept, but based on what I’ve smelled, I’m not sure everyone BAD BREATH continues on page 9


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

LIFE&ARTS

The Daily Cougar

MUSIC

Sun Airway debut album is crystal Julian Jimenez

THE DAILY COUGAR

Led by Jon Barthmus and Patrick Marsceill, Philadelphia-based Sun Airway provides a sensory overload with catchy, synthetic tunes. | Courtesy of Dead Oceans vocals that swirl into something beautiful. As the album progresses, there’s no doubt that Sun Airway has managed to capture the same melancholy yet addictive sound that defines genre contemporaries like The Postal Service. In capturing this dynamic, however, the album signals its biggest weakness. While Sun Airway could do much worse in their choice of influences, there’s little space in the album for actual innovation. Though each song has its unique distinctions, some listeners will have their minds wandering as they think of how alike the songs seem, or may find fault in how there’s very little distinguishing the record as its own standalone work. It would be far too harsh to write

Because Chris can be a woman’s name, too.

Corrections will run on Page 2 as needed to amend the record. To report a correction, e-mail editor@thedailycougar.com or call (713) 743-5362.

continued from page 8

is getting the message. If you cannot brush two to three times daily then try doing it once efficiently, then stuff your mouth with sugar-free gum throughout the day. Drinking plenty of water also helps get rid of bad breath. “Stay hydrated,” CNN reported. “A dry mouth is a breeding ground for offensive-smelling bacteria on your tongue.” Eat away foul breath Food fixes bad breath. According to the CNN report, green tea has anti-bacterial properties in it that help fight the funk. Cinnamon also contains essential oils that also help fight bad breath. But the secret is in the chewing. Fruits are also good at scrubbing away bad germs, because of the texture. As a general rule, the pinker the tongue, the better the breath.

AURA continued from page 8

works performed are living people, which is different from the many classical programs — orchestral concerts, operas, recitals — that currently dominate the musical landscape. Also, the willingness to bring a widely respected “cross-over” artist like Todd Reynolds — who has worked with the likes of Yo-Yo Ma,

It’s not entirely your fault “Roughly 10 percent of bad breath cases are a symptom of chronic sinus or respiratory infection, reflux disease, liver and kidney disorder, cancer or diabetes. These diseases can release chemicals into the body that result in bad breath,” CNN recently reported. If you’re experiencing persistent bad breath, it could be a sign of something worse. If this is an area of concern for you, have it checked out with your dentist or family doctor. Close encounters of the foul kind It’s hard to break foul-mouthed news to a family member, friend, coworker or any other affiliation, but just one talk could be life-altering. Socially and professionally, bad breath is bad news. Sit down with someone you know who has bad breath and inform them that there are ways to kill the beast. arts@thedailycougar.com

David Lang and Julie Wolf, as well as in the pop, folk and jazz fields — helps to promote classical music and new music to a wider audience. The AURA Contemporary Ensemble will return on April 15 with another program titled “Between the Lines.” This will include collaboration with the UH Dance Ensemble, UH Saxophone Studio and guest choreographers. arts@thedailycougar.com

arts@thedailycougar.com

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Though The Daily Cougar strives for accuracy and fairness in its reporting, mistakes happen. Please report any errors you see in the paper to the editorial staff.

this off as derivative, but it’s hard to ignore how much of the music seems closely inspired by other bands. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing though, because there’s still no denying that the album is a great success in terms of just how enjoyable it is to listen to. Make no mistake, “Nocturne of Exploded Crystal Chandelier” has an almost contagious allure threaded into its songs. Relaxing, yet fun; exciting, yet subdued. The album manages to hit a sweet spot that, while somewhat familiar, would be just as comfortable in the background of a study session as it would be playing in the car with the windows down.

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It’s difficult to define what it is exactly that makes Sun Airway’s album, “Nocturne of Exploded Crystal Chandelier,” such a great find among the great swaths of independent artists clogging the Internet nowadays. It might be the record’s addictive and catchy composition, its unshakably feel-good mood and charming aesthetic or how the album sneaks up on you, gentle and unassuming, with beats and rhythms that’ll have you dancing in your car at stoplights. This is an album that manages to combine the ethereal electronica sound of bands like Passion Pit and Animal Collective with the bouncy indie-pop of The Postal Service. Singer Jon Barthmus shines with his confident, echoing vocals that still bring to mind the longing lyricism of the Notwist with a dash of Coldplay. It’s an easy album to pick up, and it draws in listeners with melodies so buoyant and light-hearted that the songs almost float in the air. Listeners will have little trouble getting hooked into the sweeping melody of the opening track “Infinity,” a dreamy track that sets the tone well for the rest of the record, and by the time the album swings around to the eminently danceable “Your Moon” or “Put the Days Away,” it’s too late to resist. Again and again, the densely layered tunes fold in synthesized, lightly computerized beats and wispy

BAD BREATH

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

SPORTS

The Daily Cougar

PLAYER PROFILE

Senior transfer adds depth, makes immediate impact everyday and do what I love.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to lose in order to gain some knowledge about how THE DAILY COUGAR Instant leadership youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to win in the long Bourgeois has been in postrun,â&#x20AC;? Bourgeois said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just have Donna Bourgeois has had an season play in each of her three to bring my best on a daily basis.â&#x20AC;? outstanding career, but people seasons and has advanced to a Bourgeois â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from Lafayette, who are not avid softball fans may Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College World Series. Louis. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; attended Teurlings not know who she is. Even though she is in her first Catholic High School where she Bourgeois transferred to UH year with the team, Bourgeoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; had a prestigious career that from Louisiana-Lafayette after resume and experience make her included pitching a no-hitter in a three stellar seasons with the a leader. state championship game. Raginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cajuns. After being released â&#x20AC;&#x153;She has a really good mental Bourgeois is a pre-med neufrom her scholarship at Louisiana- approach to the game,â&#x20AC;? head ropsychology major and plans on Lafayette, she decided to attending medical school attend UH for a better choice after she graduates. in academic options, while still Eight games into the Games Started 4 being able to participate in season, Bourgeois is Complete Games 3 softball. confident about what â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have a great program the team can accomplish W-L 3-1 here,â&#x20AC;? Bourgeois said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re during remainder of the IP 29 competitive on a national season. level, and they have a great â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel good about this ERA 1.93 Donna coaching staff and group of season,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every WHIP 1.00 Bourgeois girls.â&#x20AC;? game we have made Bourgeois is also a two-time adjustments and we have Louisiana Sports Writers Assoprogressed. ciation Player of the Year and is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The season is only among the 50 players selected to coach Kyla Holas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She going to get better.â&#x20AC;? this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s USA Softball Collegiate tends to follow up an error with a Bourgeois and the Cougars will Player of the Year watch list. She strikeout. look to continue their winning also comes with a 69-24 career â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that kid in the clutch ways, as they take on the Sam record and a 1.37 career ERA. that can really make a difference.â&#x20AC;? Houston State Bearkats (8-1) at â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t identify myself with After losing her Cougar debut, 4 p.m. today in Huntsville for a any of the awards,â&#x20AC;? she said. Bourgeois won her next outing double-header. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More than anything, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just and recorded two saves in as about being able to come out many opportunities. sports@thedailycougar.com Gilbert Requena

In her short UH campaign pitcher Donna Bourgeois has made her presence felt with 20 strikeouts in 29 innings for a 3-1 record. She has also capitalized late-game situations earning two saves.| Aaron Cisneros/The Daily Cougar

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COMICS & MORE

The Daily Cougar

comics

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

!

11

crossword

Pepe by Felipe Campos

Dim Sum by Ho Yi Lau

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

ACROSS 1 Railroad siding 5 — Minor 9 Pack animal 14 Madame X portrayer 15 Caroler’s tune 16 PC chip maker 17 Tel — 18 By heart 19 Vista 20 Small sizes 22 Vanna and Pat 24 Address the crowd 26 Luau fare 27 Strolled 30 Vestment 35 Mumbai wraps 36 Sicilian landmark 37 Bachelor party 38 Links org. 39 Put away a sword 42 Joule fraction 43 Captain Kirk’s home 45 Low voice 46 Fiesta Bowl site 48 Talk 50 Pursued 51 Paneling wood 52 Auctions 54 Martial art 58 Pouched animal 62 Crumble away 63 Frond producer 65 “Mack the Knife” singer 66 Buyer 67 Sheik’s cartel 68 Cesspool 69 Sleighs or luges 70 Cummerbund 71 Hot drinks DOWN 1 Give a high-five 2 Blacktop 3 Volt or watt 4 Pasta dish 5 Like junk mail, usually 6 Perch 7 Clique 8 Guinness or Baldwin 9 Miter wearer

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LAST CHANCE FOR YEARBOOK + SENIOR PORTRAITS Class of 2011 grads and yearbook portraits are being photographed FREE ALL WEEK! The photographer will be available at the following locations from 9am-2pm & 3pm-5pm each day.

TODAY UC Aegean (Rm 82) TOMORROW Room 7, UC Satellite (behind Starbucks)

Walk-ins welcome! Dress sharp and show up! Visit houstonianyearbook.com/photos or call 800-883-9449 to find out more.

GRADS: TAKE YOUR CAP & GOWN PHOTO!

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Straightens out AAA suggestions Monthly expense Corrida shouts Long lock Big name in talk shows Probate concerns Tomato jelly Myopic Mr. Brains’ alternative Golden Rule word Tabloid twosomes — diem (seize the day) Urged on Morays and congers Listens closely Fred Mertz’s wife Shunned

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47 Least hard 49 Carnivores and herbivores 50 Make a fist 53 — -ski wear 54 Nozzles 55 Eurasian range 56 Prank 57 Alien craft 59 Gumshoe’s find 60 — mater 61 Has a snooze 64 Envir. monitor

2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

Previous puzzle solved T I B E R

I R E N E

J A K E

U C L A

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A S EM I S P L A N T R I C C RG Y H A I N OU S D U E L D E Y E T E ROOM U DG E P E S E L A L A S H E D I E DOU T S T AMU S B E P A D R N D S N E A

S H E K O B I MO R D E N T E R J U I L A N D Y E N H E X L E OR C F OR A E I M E N E D G L

A I D E

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

ADVERTISING

rs e v i

ST

AF

ity of Hou s

n to

Un

12

F COUNC

The Daily Cougar

Celebrating a legacy of service

IL

Staff Council is proud to announce the beginning of its 25th year of representing staff and helping the University achieve Tier One.

PAST PRESIDENTS 1986 - 1987 1987 - 1988 1988 - 1989 1989 - 1990 1990 - 1991 1991 - 1992 1992 - 1993 1993 - 1994

Eric Miller Boyd Armstrong Richard Nix Craig Ness Don Fernandez Carol Barr Howard Jares B. J. Greer

1994 - 1995 1995 - 1996 May - Aug. 1996 1996 - 1997 1997 - 1998 1998 - 2000 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2003

Al Armand Mary Meyer Johnson Tyrone Macklin Nina Goan Dick Cigler Charles Henry Don Waterman Jeff Fuller

2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005 2005 - 2006 2006 - 2007 2007 - 2008 2008 - 2009 2009 - 2010 2010 - 2011

Angie Shortt Joe Papick Charles Henry Carol Barr Keith Kowalka Sandy Coltharp Ann McFarland Carol Barr

Learn more about Staff Council at www.uh.edu/sc


76.100-022311