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University hosts two-day obesity conference The UH Texas Obesity Research Center is hosting a two-day conference titled “Advancing Obesity Research in a New Decade” from 2 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday at the Rockwell Pavilion on the second floor of the M.D. Anderson Library. “Obesity is a national health crisis,” assistant vice president of University health initiatives Kathryn Peek said in a news release. “By bringing together researchers from a variety of fields, UH’s TORC is emerging as a national leader in finding workable solutions for the obesity epidemic.” For more information or to register, contact the UH TORC at 713-743-9310.

@thedailycougar

KUHF plans to air a special anniversary program over the weekend Michelle Reed

THE DAILY COUGAR For 60 years, KUHF has been transmitting quality programming through the airwaves from UH as one of the oldest continuously-operated stations in the city. “We now have in 2010 — our 60th year — about 400,000 weekly listeners, which puts KUHF in the top-tier of radio stations

in Houston,” Senior Producer of News and Public Affairs Paul Pendergraft said. “It’s an accomplishment for the little radio station at UH that has done a lot of really good work that Houston is acknowledging and recognizing. Now we have a chance to celebrate it.” UH alumni Mayor Annise Parker and CBS Sports announcer Jim Nance, who got his start at KUHF, have recorded testimonials within this past year congratulating them on their success. To celebrate 60 years, KUHF is having a special program of A Prairie Home Companion during its show airing Nov. 20.

THE DAILY COUGAR

— Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

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RADIO continues on page 3

Henok Tekeste

For more information, visit ISSSO’s website at http://issso.uh.edu.

!!

In 1950, KUHF started off as a student volunteer radio station when it broadcasted for the first time from the Ezekiel Cullen Building on Nov. 4. However, 30 minutes into the broadcast, the transmitter failed, and KUHF had to pick back up again on Nov. 6 broadcasting at 9,600 watts of power at 91.3 FM, Pendergraft said. “In the early days it was a training opportunity for students to learn how to do what we are doing now,” he said. “It signed on in the afternoon after school, and it was on

Students join organization to help needy African schools, children

The seminar will cover issues concerning H-1B visas and employment based-immigration, as well as general advice about work options and the job search.

Find more campus and local events or add your own at thedailycougar.com/calendar

November 18, 2010

Group helps collect pencils

The UH International Student and Scholar Services Office is giving international students a chance to prepare for their job search at its employment seminar from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday in room 150 of Melcher Hall.

Career opportunities with U.S. Department of State The U.S. Department of State representatives will be in room 156 at the Student Service Center 1 building today and discuss career opportunities. The session will be held from 3 to 4 p.m.

®

Radio celebrates 60 years

Employment seminar offered for international students

Documentary screening The Women’s Resource Center will host a screening of the new documentary “Out of Our Right Minds: The Rise of Depression Among Black Women” directed by Stacey Muhammad. The showing will take place in room 279A at the UC at 11:30 a.m.

Thursday

facebook.com/thedailycougar

— Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

today

Issue 063, Volume 76

Band takes center stage

S

tudents sat outside on the UC-Satellite patio while taking a break from classes or eating lunch and enjoyed performances by live bands at UH. Different student groups take advantage of the open stage space provided at the entrance on an almost weekly basis. | Newton Liu/The Daily Cougar

Many students in Ghana, West Africa are forced to drop out of school because they don’t have basic school supplies — not even pencils. A new organization, Pencil Project, has formed to help with this issue. “I was inspired to begin the project after seeing a photo of an African boy clutching a stubby broken pencil,” founder of the Pencil Project Maria Vick said. “My thought was that all the world’s children should have access to the tools they need to learn. If a needy child had a pencil, they could write down assignments to get educated and then return to their communities to empower others.” In the summer of 2009, they went with the UH African American Studies Department to Ghana to assist the communities and donate school supplies. It wasn’t until after their visit that the Pencil Project formed. They went back to Ghana in summer 2010 and donated 30,000 pencils to several schools. “I think it is a very thoughtful and wonderful idea that they would do this to help other students in other countries,” biology junior Karen Harris said. “I admire them for donating their time and supplies to such a great cause.” On Nov. 21 they will be going back to Ghana and will hand out another 20,000 pencils, which puts them at CHARITY continues on page 10

Advertising team promotes Chevrolet Ashley Evans

THE DAILY COUGAR The UH advertising organization, Cougar Concepts, is one of the 23 teams invited to participate in the Chevy Campus Promotions program. Chevy and EdVenture Partners, an

organization that fosters industry-education partnerships, are working together in the Campus Promotions program to provide students with hands-on experience in creating and implementing marketing strategies. Advertising professor Larry Kelley works with the group every year. “Working with EdVenture Partners is

great,” Kelley said. “It provides students with a budget in order to implement it in a real world scenario.” The teams of students from universities around the nation were asked to research and develop a marketing strategy ADVERTISING continues on page 10


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FEATURED BLOGS

1. ‘For Colored Girls’ not the best movie at the box office 2. Perry trumps White to win reelection in governor’s race 3. California’s Prop 19 just first step toward legalization of marijuana

Thoughts That Pop!

FEATURED COMMENTS Re: Perry’s unprecedented perilous tenure continues

Blast from the Past: Fujifilm Instax 210 Remember Polaroids? You know, the little square pictures that developed before your eyes? Yeah, those. The era of digital cameras is upon us and film isn’t as popular as it used to be. Of course, you could never really phase our film, but Polaroids aren’t film.

“My sentiments exactly. I am ashamed of my generation’s Back in 2008, the company Polaroid ineptitude in exercising our civil decided to stop film production. In rights to impinge on Perry’s new age of technology, digital ingress on our and Texas’s future. this was the way to go. So there goes His interests are to serve those Polaroid, or so you think (check out who put him in office and the impossible project) ... Read more @ keep him there. That being the fi xthefocus.thedailycougar.com corporations that hold the most financial interests in this state... read: energy. There are at least 5 Thoughts That Pop! people I personally know who did Portable Apps and Why they Rock For those of you who have used not vote and it infuriates me. ...� — user “Aurash Fidel Kamalipour� Re: SGA needs to consult other organizations

“Editors, your heart is in the right place, but some of your facts are not. Last time I was at the Cougar, it was largely funded by advertising dollars, not student fees. Yes, student fee money does make the Cougar possible. But make no mistake: the Cougar brings money TO the university, way more than it gets FROM it. ...�

computers in the library and for the most part the rest of the school, they lack programs. Of course they have the essentials such as Microsoft Office, Firefox, and a few others that apply to our majors, sometimes the programs that come installed come up short. For this reason I have chosen to do a little piece on Portable Apps. A Portable App is something you can carry around on a USB(which many of us have) and they are programs that are able to run on the computer from the USB. For those of you who don’t know, we lack administrative privileges to install things onto ...

— user “DC alum�

Read more @ fixthefocus.thedailycougar.com

OUT OF OUR RIGHT MINDS: contact us: THE RISE OF DEPRESSION AMONG BLACK WOMEN Sports Editors

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Join us, Thursday, November 18, at 11:30am Room 279A, University Center for a free screening of a brand new documentary by Filmmaker Stacey Muhammad who will screen the film and be available for a Q & A Popcorn and drinks served

John Brannen Chris Losee (713) 743-5303 sports@thedailycougar.com Life & Arts Editor

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Direct news tips and story ideas to the News Desk. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@thedailycougar. com or fax (713) 743-5384. A “Submit news item� form is also available online at thedailycougar.com. COPYRIGHT No part of the newspaper in print or online may be reproduced without the written consent of the director of the Student Publications Department.

ISSUE STAFF Co-Sponsored by: WHEW: Women Healing and Empowering Women Check out their 5th Annual "Second Chance" Conference Downtown Branch of Houston Public Library Saturday, November 20th, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM. For more information: www.whew-now.org

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Thursday, November 18, 2010

NEWS

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Groups collaborate to create health treatment center Katie Rowald

THE DAILY COUGAR The UH College of Technology and the Methodist Hospital Research Institute partnered and produced the Abramson Center for the Future of Health, with research professor Clifford C. Dacso serving as executive director. The center focuses mainly on giving patients the tools that they need in order to make informed judgments in regards to their treatment. Treatment is, first and foremost, something that a patient and medical personnel do together, starting with placing technology in the hands of the patient, Dacso said. The Abramson Center was recently awarded a $1 million grant from the Texas Emerging Technology Fund for research and work on an easy-to-use technology suite that

Research professor Clifford C. Dasco at the UH College of Technology is the executive director at the new Abramson Center for the Future of Health, which will teach patients the information they need to make their own judgements. | Katie Rowald/The Daily Cougar allows the patient a greater amount of control in medical testing. “One of the things we’ve been

working on is this notion of ‘can we give you information that you ordinarily would not be able to get

outside of a hospital or a doctor’s office or a lab,’” Dacso said. “All our technology that we’ve been working on for the past several years is focused on that idea, giving you information in real time that’s actionable.” Focusing on what is normal to the masses is not necessarily the best way to approach individual treatment, Dacso said. The instruments that the center is currently working on are calibrated specifically to the patient that is using them, establishing a new set of norms that apply only to them—thus making it easier to identify when preventative measures should be taken to avoid hospital visits. “Most chronic illnesses… Are characterized by stability punctuated by decompensation events. Most of those decompensation events, on the surface at least, come without warning,” Dacso said. “On

the other hand, if you know what to look for, there are plenty of signs that would give information that said, ‘if you don’t do something in the next six or 12 hours, 36 hours from now, something really awful is going to happen to you.’” The Blue Scale, which looks like a bathroom scale with handlebars, is a tool for heart patients that the center is working to commercialize through Dacso’s company, Blue Box Health. The Blue Scale reads heart rate, fluid retention, cardiac output and weight in less than a minute. “You stand on it, hold onto the handles, and it takes a series of noninvasive readings that correlate with the amount of blood your heart is pumping,” Dacso said. Blue Box Health was one of 50 companies competing for the grant that it received. news@thedailycougar.com

RADIO continued from page 1

until 10 p.m. through midnight each night.” Pendergraft said that sometimes the equipment failed and it was off the air for several weeks at a time. The programming featured music from the days of rock, classical music and even show tunes on Broadway. In 1976, KUHF received a grant from the Corporation of Public Broadcasting and was able to hire professionals. “The format was jazz then, and this was about the time that NPR was getting started,” Pendergraft said. “In 1986, a commercial radio station KLEF donated its entire music library of 25,000 records and CDs that were all classical to UH. It was decided then that the format would change from jazz to classical music.” Despite the change, students still find the original aspects of KUHF captivating. “I love that they have the NPR programming,” public relations senior Kendall Zurbuchen said. “It lets me know what is going on in the world and gives me traffic and news updates.” As the voice of the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Grand Symphony and many other cultural arts, Pendergraft said that he hopes students will be able to use KUHF as a way to take part in their community. He also said he hopes this achievement will help motivate more students to become interested in radio and participate in KUHF’s active internship program. “We’re out there in a very public way waving the UH flag,” Pendergraft said. “We want the students to recognize that they are a part of the UH family and we’re all in this together.” news@thedailycougar.com

Covering UH’s quest for greatness since 1934. Watch UH’s story unfold at thedailycougar.com

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COME ALL Inaugural Ceremony Monday, November 15: 12:00pm - 1:00pm University Center Arbor

!

Study Abroad Forum Tuesday, November 16: 10:00am - 2:00pm Elizabeth Rockwell Pavilion-M.D.Anderson Library

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Citizenship Dialogue Tuesday, November 16: 2:00pm - 2:30pm Elizabeth Rockwell Pavilion-M.D. Anderson Library

!

International Marketplace Wednesday, November 17: 11:00am - 2:00pm Butler Plaza

!

! 5)&'F!!!!!!! G*4'F!!! Q'%/'F!

Careers with U.S. Dept. Of State Thursday, November 18: 3:00pm - 4:00pm Room# 156, Student Service Center 1

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Thursday, November 18, 2010

The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

WHAT?! NO BUY IT NOW OPTION? Courtesy USBICEF Stranahan Program

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Matthew Keever Newton Liu Hiba Adi, Jose Aguilar John Brannen, Christopher Losee Travis Hensley Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

GM proves hard work has its rewards

O

n wednesday, Wall Street saw financial services firm Morgan Stanley’s stock ticker welcome back General Motors, and with good reason.

GM has made a comeback and has now opened itself up to the stock market, selling an incredible amount of shares, which is large enough to qualify as what may be the second largest initial public offering in the US ever. GM sold roughly 478 million shares yesterday at an impressive $33 a share, up from the $26 the automaker was originally hoping for. As a result, the trade will help GM raise more than $20 billion and cut its debt to the US government — who shelled out over $49 billion in an attempt to bail out the desperate motor company — by nearly half. The news revealed the first steady profits for GM in more than six years. Already, the US Department of the Treasury has decided to pull back its stake in the company down to 26 percent from 61 percent. While the department must sell its remaining 500 million shares at an average price of $53 per share to break even, experts are optimistic in the financial future of GM. Taking a step back from all the number crunching could display several things to be learned from all this. Even if it was arguably a product of luck, it was a risk worth attempting on the part of the government to invest in a bailout. Amid all the criticisms of President Barack Obama’s administration, it may be difficult to identify anything deserving of praise, but this could be one piece of news that would qualify. It’s fair to acknowledge that the other automaker operating on taxpayers’ funds — Chrysler Group LLC — has yet to come to as respectable terms, but both GM and Chrysler have driven out cars better in quality than what Americans and the world has seen from them in a long time. For this, commendable are their efforts to make products that Americans once again desire — and products that prove those who believe that the US can’t make cars that are worth driving wrong.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Get rich on lies and risky gambles

M

any people have the desire to acquire wealth and be successful in life. A few of those people who desire that success desire it to be an overnight deal. OK, not a few, but most of them. Who hasn’t wanted to cut corners and still make the grade? Who hasn’t wanted the shortcut to millions? This might be a big desire amongst Ian us college students in Everett particular. We spend so much money on our education, the books and fees that come along with that and our living situations that it can be overwhelming to think about coming out the other side of college with a mound of debt on our hands. So naturally, a get-rich-quick plan might seem like an easy way to deal with all of this. But can one actually get rich quick? Is it possible? The quick answer is yes, but the long answer is probably not for you. In a recent article published on MSN.com, Bloomberg Businessweek presented ways to get rich practically overnight. Every way to do so was legitimate, no illegality to it — except there was one

problem. Each way was so improbable, the author shouldn’t have even bothered to write the article. At the top of the list was winning the lottery. Another was inheriting a large business, like Walmart. The more ridiculous examples include “Divorcing a Beatle,” and “Being born as royalty of a country.” I don’t know very many people married to Paul McCartney. Do you?

The problem with these get-richquick plans is that they don’t happen to everyone; in reality, they happen to almost no one!” These things rely on astronomical luck, something that 99 percent of the population doesn’t have. The problem with these get rich quick plans is that they don’t happen to everyone; in reality, they happen to almost no one. And as for the get-rich-quick schemes you see in infomercials, the ones that say, “Send me $20, and you’ll get a pamphlet that tells you how to make one

million dollars,” those do work, actually. They work for the people publishing the pamphlet! This was parodied on the Foxtrot comic by Bill Amend, where the pamphlet the main character received actually said, “Make pamphlet, sell to fifty thousand people for twenty dollars each.” This is often the strategy used by these get-rich-quick guys. The pamphlets could be full of facts and information, but in reality, they could be empty — and it wouldn’t make a bit of difference. As college students caught in the middle of a world trying to make a quick buck, we need to keep our feet on the ground. There is no such thing as an overnight millionaire. Money and success will take work, and that’s why most of us are here to study. We are working hard so that we can ensure a financially sound future. Don’t forget that hard, smart work does pay off and that you don’t need piles and piles of money to be happy. Often, we are happiest knowing we truly earned what we worked for, not spinning the wheel for wealth. Ian Everett is a literature freshman and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar.com.

views Do get rich quick schemes really work?

Photos and quotes compiled by Ian Everett.

Money schemes or get rich quick schemes work for the person publishing them.

They are dumb. They’re halfbaked plans that do nothing.

Nicholas Heisig

English freshman

History freshman

Rebecca Winkler

Money schemes do not work. If they worked, everyone would use them, and there wouldn’t be a new one every year.

I think that they don’t work. Some people would probably be all, ‘Yeah, great, get it done,’ but then they would regret it.

EB Novak

Josh Aguirre

Business freshman

Biology freshman


Thursday, November 18, 2010

OPINION

The Daily Cougar

COMMENTS FROM THE WEBSITE

Visit the thedailycougar.com to submit yours!

In response to: Imperfect criminal courts failing at justice

sanctions to violate that truism. - “Dudley Sharp”

First, innocents are more at risk without the death penalty. Secondly, Jones would still be guilty of capital murder under the law of parties; futhermore, the hair certainly does not exclude him as the shooter in this murder. Thirdly, if you are going to use cost studies, it is important to fact-check them. I have told the Dallas Morning News — for many years — to stop using their totally inaccurate cost review. They still use it. They found that it costs $2.3 million per average death penalty case (for 5 cases), more than 3 times more expensive than a $750,000 life sentence. (C. Hoppe, “Executions Cost Texas Millions,” The Dallas Morning News, March 8, 1992, 1A). The death penalty costs are for pre-trial, trial and appeals and incarceration. Yet, the life cost is only for confinement for life. Big problem. In addition, an academic review by a neutral academic found that the verifiable costs in the DMN article actually found the death penalty was cheaper. Fourth, you misunderstand deterrence. All prospects of a negative outcome deter some. It is a truism. The death penalty, the most severe of criminal sanctions, is the least likely of all criminal

People miss the point that the death penalty is a 100 percent guarantee that the person will never commit that crime again. There is a possiblity that the person may escape or cause problems while in prison or through connections to the outside. As for the above murder rate, I believe there is more cause for us to look at our unsecure borders for the increase of the murder rate. - ”Jacob”

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In response to: Perry’s Texas to leave UH with budget crunch Just in case you didn’t know, in Texas we spend about 13 percent more money on education (44 percent of the budget) than social welfare programs. Also, business development programs, the justice system costs, natural resource management and normal government expenditures combined don’t even come close to the amount we spend on education. So please, before you criticize Perry and his stance on education, look up some facts. You are an economics senior aren’t you? Those facts were from the Texas Budget Source by the way. - ”Warren”

Speak up whenever you want.

866.768.1014 or www.smu.edu/resolution

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EDITORS John Brannen, Chris Losee E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

overtime

FILE PHOTO THE DAILY COUGAR

SWIMMING & DIVING

Meet on campus begins today The Cougars are set to host the Phil Hansel Cougar Classic Invitational today through Sunday at the CRWC Natatorium inside the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center. Among the schools attending are No. 8 Texas A&M, No 18. SMU, No. 22 LSU, New Mexico, Nebraska and conference foes Rice and Tulane. “It’s a pretty important meet for us,” head coach Mark Taylor said in a release. “We’re looking to see some great performances and we’re hoping to see some NCAA provisional times. If we can get some NCAA provisional times out of the way, I think we’ll have done a really good job with fall preparations.” — Cougar Sports Services

BASEBALL

Former UH player thriving in minors

Center Jordan Shoemaker (73) and the rest of the UH offensive line hope to limit interceptions Saturday, by keeping the pressure away from quarterback David Piland and giving him plenty of time to throw in the pocket. | Jairo Razo/The Daily Cougar

After being selected in the 16th round of the MLB draft, former UH catcher Chris Wallace was selected to the 2010 Appalachian League All-Star team.

FOOTBALL

Wallace led the Greeneville Astros with 53 hits, eight home runs, six doubles and three triples. He was second on the team in getting on base and posted a batting average of .310. The Texas native spent four years behind the plate for the Cougars. He was named to the All-Conference USA Second Team in 2009.

Cougars in must-win situation It’s do-or-die time for UH in final conference matchup against Southern Mississippi

— Cougar Sports Services

NCAA FOOTBALL

Newton saga continues; action rolls on tonight Quarterback of the No. 1-ranked Auburn Tigers Cam Newton is facing allegations that he and his father Cecil arranged a pay-for-play scheme when he was deciding to play for Mississippi State or Auburn. The case remains under investigation as Newton is the front-runner to win the Heisman Trophy and Auburn is poised to make a run at the NCAA championship. A booster and former Mississippi State player Bill Bell said to ESPN.com that Kenny Rogers, a man representing Cecil Newton gave details on a payment plan. “He told me this kid’s dad is going to want money, and the next day he sent me a text message,” Bell said to ESPN.com. “He didn’t say anything other than, ‘This is what I want and I want it in three installments.’” No. 10 Alabama will host the Georgia State Panthers at the Bryant-Denny Stadium. Kick off is slated for 7:30 p.m. and will be aired on ESPNU. Air Force will match up against UNLV for a 9 p.m. contest at Sam Boyd Stadium. The game will be televised on CBS College Sports HD. UCLA will face off against Washington at 7 p.m. on ESPN. Friday, No. 3 Boise State will put its 9-0 record on the line for an 8:30 p.m. matchup against Fresno State on ESPN2. — Cougar Sports Services

Christopher Losee

THE DAILY COUGAR Looking to bounce back from their loss in the Homecoming game against Tulsa, the Cougars will be put to the test this Saturday when the team travels to Hattiesburg, Miss., to face off against Southern Mississippi and the No. 1 ranked rush defense in Conference USA. The Cougars (5-5, 4-3 C-USA) fell 25-28 last week to Tulsa after freshman quarterback David Piland threw a season-high five interceptions. Heading into Saturday’s contest against the Golden Eagles, the team is still in contention for a slot in the conference championship and a bowl bid. “They are going to be running all kinds of things,” head coach Kevin Sumlin said. “We are going to have to be on our toes defensively. Offensively, we are going to see a big, strong defensive front and some real fine athletes in that second level. It’s your typical Southern Miss team. They’re an athletic, tough team and they play very well together.” The Golden Eagles (7-3, 4-2 C-USA) recently made national headlines when linebackers Martez Smith and Tim Green and senior defensive lineman Deddrick Jones were seriously injured after being shot inside of a club Sunday. All three players still remain hospitalized. “Right now, we are worried about this week,” Sumlin said. “We are worried

about how we can move the ball and score points. Obviously, we are a better team when we are balanced. I think it’s a bit of a misnomer conceptually because we are a lot more balanced than we were two years ago as far as running the ball.” After losing to Tulsa, the Cougars are surrendering 29.2 points per game and 204 rushing yards to opponents. The defense delivered a consistent performance against the Hurricane, holding them to 28 points and forcing five punts, but the Cougars weren’t able to come away with the win. Sumlin said the performance from his defense was one of the best he has seen this season, but the Southern Miss. offense presents challenges. “They’re going to attack us on all cylinders,” Sumlin said. “They’ve got weapons on the outside and receivers. Probably the biggest difference from last year is the loss of the running backs, but the way Austin Davis is playing, he has kind of picked up the slack for the running game.” For running back Bryce Beall, it will be his first visit to M.M. Roberts Stadium. Beall said that he has been told it is a rowdy environment to play in, but he is eager to hush up the crowd. “We want to give our seniors a chance to go to a bowl game and extend their career as far as we can,” Beall said. “We will go out there and try to get that sixth victory. We will see what happens; you never know what will happen in Conference USA.” Beall will join his counterpart Michael Hayes in the backfield to take on the No. 1-ranked rush defense in the conference. Beall said that this week’s game is a must-win situation for the Cougars and

that the players are ready to face the challenge. “We have seen this before,” Beall said. “We are just going to have to go out there, read our keys, be physical, make plays and try to do what we have been doing all year and be consistent.” Stuffing the run The Golden Eagles have stopped opponents from utilizing the running game, holding opponents to 110.8 yards per game. The Golden Eagles are also averaging 34.2 points per game. Quarterback Austin Davis has recorded 10 touchdown passes in his last four games. The junior quarterback poses a threat in the running game, with six rushing touchdowns so far this season. Sumlin said that Davis’ style of play was similar to that of Tulsa’s quarterback — he runs when he sees open field. “They are now the number one rush defense in the league,” Sumlin said. “We will have a plan for what we want to do. Every week presents something different to coaches. Anything that is successful against you; you have got to improve against that. “When you face teams that are quarterback-run designed teams, then it becomes a gap-responsibility-type of situation. With the added gap or the added blocker, you have to fit things exactly right and tackle them.” Saturday’s matchup will be airing at 7 p.m. on CBS College Sports. Following Saturday’s game, the Cougars will prepare for the final game of the season against Texas Tech on Nov. 23. sports@thedailycougar.com


SPORTS

The Daily Cougar

Thursday, November 18, 2010

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COMMENTARY

Better days forthcoming for freshman quarterback John Brannen

THE DAILY COUGAR When David Piland emerged as the starting quarterback Oct. 9 against Mississippi State, Terrance Broadway became the most popular player on campus. Once senior Case Keenum was lost for the season after the UCLA game, it was assumed among Cougar fans that Broadway would be the next signal caller to lead the program. After Broadway won his first and only start against Tulane, fans had custom-printed T-shirts that read “Case closed…slight detour to Broadway.” Maybe they should have waited another week to press their shirts. Fast forward to last Saturday against Tulsa when Piland threw his fifth interception to end a potentially game-winning drive. Broadway came into the picture again — at least from the fans’ perspective. They chanted his name in hopes he would replace Piland and rescue the Cougars. It is only natural for fans to call upon the backup the instant the starter shows some inconsistency. Armchair coaches may believe the only thing ailing the UH offense is a change at the quarterback position. It worked for the No. 18-ranked Texas A&M when junior Ryan Tannehill replaced senior Jerrod Johnson midway through the season. The Aggies lost several important games by small margins with Johnson at the helm. Despite holding school records, Johnson lost his job. Since A&M head coach Mike Sherman made the change, the team has gone 3-0, ascended into the top 25 — and has a shot to win the Big 12 South. In some cases, that is the only thing holding the team back, but not here. Head coach Kevin Sumlin and his staff are in a different predicament with two true freshmen six months removed from their senior proms. Piland and Broadway were originally not even supposed to play this year with redshirts; both were thrust into the action. This left the coaching staff in a scramble to acclimate the freshmen to the elaborate offense ranked No. 1 in the country last season. With little preparation, both have done a good job, considering their lack of experience. Complaints are at their highest this week after the Tulane loss, but fans must realize Piland will likely be a constant in UH Athletics the next three years. In the Cougars’ losses to Rice, UCF and Tulsa, they were just one big offensive play away from winning the game. Piland is not solely to blame for the Cougars being .500 — or for his eight interceptions. We knew there would be growing pains, and they could last into next season. But there is no denying Piland’s skill. He has a quick release and still throws confidently after making mistakes. While he does not have the speed that Keenum has, he has still shown an ability to escape pressure. Unlike Keenum, Piland can throw the deep ball with more accuracy. If not for the stellar performance of freshman Jeff Godrey at UCF, Piland should be under consideration for Conference USA Newcomer of the Year.

On the upside, much of the depth on offense is all likely to return next season. Patrick Edwards should be back for his senior season, itching to show NFL scouts he deserves to be playing on Sundays. The track speed of Tyron Carrier will also return. The Cougars will be stocked at the running back position with running backs Bryce Beall and Michael Hayes. Charles Sims will also return after being ruled ineligible this season. With a year of familiarity to the offense and a stable of weapons, Piland should be more comfortable manning the UH offense. After this season, the quarterback situation is a mystery. There has been no word on Keenum’s appeal for a sixth year of eligibility. If Keenum is not granted the extra year, Cotton Turner’s shoulder will be healed, and he could be the starter. The possibility exists that Piland may not play again until his junior season, but either way, he will have the experience of seven games from this year. The Cougars will have to fight just to have a winning season, and Piland’s performances will be heavily analyzed now that the team is in direstraits. He has a chance to change his critics’ minds and get UH bowl-eligible — or encourage a quarterback controversy going into the spring season.

Freshman quarterback David Piland has found out that filling the shoes of Case Keenum is no easy task. Through five games he has gone 2-3 as a starter. | Jairo Razo/The Daily Cougar

sports@thedailycougar.com

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Thursday, November 18, 2010

The Daily Cougar

life+arts

EDITORS Travis Hensley E-MAIL arts@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/arts

showtime

WARNER BROTHERS

BOX OFFICE

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 Rated: (PG-13) For some sequences of intense action violence and frightening images Genres: Action/Adventure, Family, Sci-Fi/Fantasy Director: David Yates Cast: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Helena Bonham Carter, Ralph Fiennes

The Next Three Days Rated: (PG-13) For violence, drug material, language, some sexuality and thematic elements Genres: Drama Director: Paul Haggis Cast: Russell Crowe, Elizabeth Banks, Liam Neeson, Brian Dennehy, Olivia Wilde

Moores School of Music Jazz Ensemble prepares for a performance with assistant director of Jazz Ensembles Ryan Gabbart. | Jack Wehman/The Daily Cougar

MOORES MUSIC

Jazz Ensemble, Orchestra perform

STILL IN THEATERS

Due Date

Rated: (R) For language, drug use and sexual content Genres: Comedy Director: Todd Phillips Cast: Robert Downey, Jr., Zach Galifianakis, Jamie Foxx

MegaMind Rated: (PG) For action and some language. Director: Tom McGrath Cast: Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, Jonah Hill, Brad Pitt

For Colored Girls Rated: (R) For some disturbing violence including a rape, sexual content and language Genres: Drama Director: Tyler Perry

Moores Opera House hosts a night of jazz, showcases students’ talent Mary Baak

THE DAILY COUGAR The Moores School of Music Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Orchestra took the stage on Tuesday night in the Moores Opera House. The Jazz Ensemble performed tunes by the likes of Thad Jones, Dan Cavanaugh, Rob Vuono, Jr., Antonio Carlos Jobim, Harold Adamson and Jimmy McHugh. The first half of the show moved a little slowly, but the ensemble ended their performance with a very upbeat “It’s a Most Unusual Day,” arranged by James Sochinski. The latter half of the concert featured the very talented Jazz Orchestra. Performances

were solid gold — and we’re not making a pun because most of their instruments are, too. They performed charts from composers like Dan Cavanaugh, Neil Slater, Charlie Parker, Bob Brookmeyer and a piece originally written by saxophonist Michael Brecker that was later arranged by Rob Lussier into a big band piece. Each chart was performed soulfully, with each member of the Orchestra visibly enjoying their performance. The musicians really got into it and danced along with the music as though they could feel the rythym in their bones. Toward the end of the set, Director of Jazz Ensembles Noe Marmolejo had the Orchestra sightread a tune called “The Duke.” The members received the chart for the first time onstage and were given six minor instructions about specific stylistic features of the piece. Marmolejo said that he refers to the sightreading portion of the concert as the

“jihad,” not with a negative connotation, but because sightreading can be a struggle (jihad’s literal translation) to perform the tune without ever doing so before. He also said that jazz musicians aren’t really musicians at all if they can’t sightread well. The Orchestra performed this tune almost flawlessly. Soloists executed their respective parts marvelously — it was an exhibition of the sheer talent these students possess. Ending their set with a saxophoneturned-big-band piece “Slings and Arrows,” the Jazz Orchestra delivered a jaw-dropping performance, for which they received a well-deserved standing ovation. We’ll give both the Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Orchestra nine out of 10 stars for their stellar performances. After all, we were thoroughly impressed — and that’s what really counts, right? arts@thedailycougar.com

Cast: Janet Jackson, Loretta Devine, Michael Eal

Unstoppable Rated: (PG-13) For sequences of action and peril and some language Genres: Action/Adventure Director: Tony Scott Cast: Denzel Washington, Chris Pine, Rosario Dawson

Sky Line Rated: (PG-13) For sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence, some language and brief sexual content Genres: Suspense/Thriller Director: Colin Strause, Greg Strause Cast: Donald Faison, Eric Balfour, David Zayas, Brittany Daniel

DRINKING NEWS

Four Loko crazy, but it shouldn’t be banned Matthew keever

THE DAILY COUGAR Earlier this week, the Food and Drug Administration told four manufacturers of caffeinated alcoholic beverages, like the notorious Four Loko, that they had 15 days to either stop adding caffeine to the drinks or stop selling them. The New York Times reports that, in a warning letter to the companies, the FDA claims that consuming the products can lead to “hazardous and life-threatening situations.” Doesn’t this reign true for all alcoholic products? I guess the FDA knows best, so we shouldn’t really question them, right? Right!

Four Loko has been a best-seller; it’s highly caffeinated, highly alcoholic and (some would argue) extremely tasty. So let’s ban it, because we can’t control our kids or teach them common sense. But you stay away from my whiskey and Coke; that was my daddy’s drink, and it’s American. Darn tootin’. Traditional media outlets are reporting on this issue as they were expected to. “Good riddance,” they say, but what does this say about the direction of business in America? The FDA says that the caffeine masks the alcohol and gives consumers a feeling of sobriety, when in fact they’re intoxicated. But isn’t this an issue of personal accountability? Maybe we should take

all the tasty additives out of McDonald’s seasoning, because people don’t realize they’re getting fatter. The state of Washington has already banned Four Loko after nine underage college students were stupid, drank too much and ended up in the hospital. Thanks to Washington State Attorney General Robert McKenna, the focus has been placed on the producers of Four Loko rather than the nine freshmen who were hospitalized after drinking it. Never mind the fact that these students illegally purchased the beverage, illegally consumed it and then suffered repercussions. No, no; this is America, and in America, we need to place blame. LOKO continues on page 9


&

The Daily Cougar

LOKO continued from page 8

Hey, you! Yeah, you with the successful business idea. C’mere! Had they been drinking vodka and Red Bull, they would have been fine, I’m sure. Next we’ll be banning Red Bull, Coke and Sprite at bars, because they make alcohol taste better. Fantastic. The product has been called out for being geared toward college students — it’s cheap and comes in a bright can — but isn’t anyone else outraged with the stupidity of this nonsense? Is it so hard to believe that people over the age of 21 drink this stuff? Perhaps young college students don’t have the maturity to decide whether alcoholic energy drinks are a “smart decision,” so the legal drinking age should be raised, instead. Oh, now you’re furious? Good. You should have been since you started reading this, but I’m glad you’re finally here. Maybe this is why America’s economy is failing. People are losing their jobs because of idiots who are forcing companies out of business. Where’s the personal accountability? Where are the people taking responsibility for their actions? Did they all move to Canada? Is the American public that dumb? Personally, I’m not much of a drinker, but I plan to stock up on Four Loko over the weekend. It will sit on my shelf for years, and I’ll crack open a can when I’m older, euphoric and trying to remember when this country was comprised of dreamers who made something out of nothing, not a bunch of whiny fools.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

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Is anybody out there playlist

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he Playlist is something that takes a great deal of time and doesn’t end up on the website. For this reason, we’ve decided to do an “are you paying attention” list. The theme of this week is serial killers and mass-murders. That’s right — all of these songs are about killers. Some of them, like “Evil,” we didn’t know for quite some time, and “John Wayne Gacy Jr.,” which is a pretty song that really made us perk our ears up and say, “Wow, I’ve been singing along to a song about a murder.” So here’s to paying closer attention to music and, more importantly, the playlists. Dirty Frank Pearl Jam

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NEWS

The Daily Cougar

CHARITY continued from page 1

REGISTERING

CLASS? DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGET TO BUYYOUR YEARBOOK FOR

300,000 pencils and counting. They will also perform quarter assessments of the schools that they visited in July. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had never heard about this project before, but it sounds wonderful, and I think I would love to make a contribution to it,â&#x20AC;? psychology freshman David Grant said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are helping a great cause.â&#x20AC;? They have already seen a lot of people donate and continue to help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The response has been completely overwhelming and exceeded my expectations,â&#x20AC;? Vick said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are always eager to help and I am never short of volunteers. It is an easy

ADVERTISING continued from page 1

At $45, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheaper than most of your textbooks. Login to my.uh.edu and go to Student Financials > Optional Fees to place the yearbook on your next fee bill.

for four of Chevroletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicles: the Camaro, the Equinox, the Malibu, and Chevyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest model, the Cruze. Each team was given a $3,000 budget to market the vehicles to students 18-24 years old, find a way to integrate the vehicles into campus life and align Chevrolet with the University. The Cougar Concepts team came up with the slogan, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A New Tradition of Excellence.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just like UH strives for excellence, Chevrolet is (too) by building more fuel-efficient, stylish and reliable vehicles,â&#x20AC;? Account Coordinator Stephanie Villacorta said. The Cougar Concepts team has conducted over 400 surveys. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a part of the market we

Questions? Call Student Publications @ 713-743-5350

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are trying to target,â&#x20AC;? Villacorta said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just tried to think about what advertising would appeal to us and call our attention.â&#x20AC;? The culmination of the campaign classâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work was an event held at the University Center on Nov. 10, where over 300 consumers turned out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The all-new Chevrolet Cruze piqued the most interest since it hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been seen before,â&#x20AC;? Villacorta said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the Camaro definitely stole the show.â&#x20AC;? The Cougar Concepts team is now moving on to the final step of the competition, which involves creating a 100-page plan book to pitch to the client in a formal presentation on Dec. 2. The plan book will also be sent to senior Chevrolet management in Detroit.

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project for volunteers of all ages.â&#x20AC;? The Pencil Project not only donates pencils, but other school supplies as well. Students can donate pencils in the AAS Department, located in room 629 of the Agnes Arnold Hall. UH student Randryia Houston, who participated in the AAS Summer Study Abroad in Ghana and later joined the Pencil Project, said that they hope to have a school compound or a clinical boarding school in three to five years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The future of the Pencil Project is bright,â&#x20AC;? Vick said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are currently considering becoming a nonprofit organization so we can collect more items like Smart Boards and computers for schools in need.â&#x20AC;?

A NEW UNITED METHODIST FAITH COMMUNITY

www.1CHURCH.NET Sundays at Pearland ISD Berry Miller Junior High School Worship- 10:30am Haley Brown- Worship Leader Peter Scafidi- Worship Leader Dariel Newman- Pastor SELL YOUR STUFF. Buy a Classified ad and reach thousands of potential buyers in the UH community. ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HARD TO FIND GOOD HELP these days, but not with The Daily Cougar Classifieds. One ad can reach thousands! Call 713-743-5356.

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comics Robbie & Bobby by Jason Poland

Artist’s Alley by Paolo Aninag

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

COMICS & MORE

ELECTION WHEN 4 P.M. NOVEMBER 18, 2010 WHERE CAREER SERVICES CONFERENCE ROOM, STUDENT SERVICE CENTER 1 WHAT ELECTION THE SPRING 2011 EDITOR IN CHIEF OF THE DAILY COUGAR MEETING IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The SPC meets monthly during the school year to hear updates from the department’s units, to give a forum for public comment and to elect the editors in chief of The Daily Cougar and Houstonian yearbook. For more information, visit www.uh.edu/sp/committee

If you require disability accommodations to attend the meeting, please call (713) 743-5353 to make arrangements.

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SPORTS

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MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

Louisiana Tech avoids late charge from UH Cougar Sports Services

EGG DONORS NEEDED! *Anonymous Women

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The Cougars hit a dry spell late in the first half and gave the ball away 21 times, as Louisana Tech handed them their first loss Wednesday 60-54 at Thomas Assembly Center. The Cougars (2-1) went into the half with a 28-19 deficit. The Bulldogs scored seven points off 11 UH turnovers to build the advantage. The Cougars were a mere seven of 23 overall in the first half, and shot 50 percent from the free throw line. With 8:35 remaining in the second half the Bulldogs extended their lead to 12, before UH attempted to mount a comeback. With 5:38 to go the Cougars closed the gap to three points on a layup from forward Kendrick Washington. But they were not able to get any closer as Louisana Tech held off the Cougars. The game marked the debut for Washington after he was suspended for an unspecified team

AT A GLANCE

SCOREBOARD

La. Tech .............28 32 Houston .......... 19 35

60 54

KEY STAT:

6-14

The Cougars missed eight free throws.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEXT?

UH faces Northwestern Oklahoma State at Hofheinz Pavilion on Saturday at 2 p.m. violation, and was held out of the first two games by head coach James Dickey. Guard Darian Thibodeaux and forward Maurice McNeil led the Cougars in scoring with 11. McNeil also added nine rebounds. The Cougars will try to bounce back when they return to Hofheinz Pavilion for a two-game homestand. Saturday they Host Northwestern Oklahoma State (0-1) in a 2 p.m. matchup, followed by a game Nov. 23 against LouisianaLafayette. sports@thedailycougar.com

Join the crowd.

www.thedailycougar.com/register %-!),TOBEADONOR Hl IVFCOM

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