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Issue 061, Volume 76

Tuesday ®

November 16, 2010

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FACULTY SENATE

newsline Find more news items at newsline.thedailycougar.com

Prominent civil rights lawyer to give lecture today

Cuts take center stage Monthly meeting tackles upcoming budget difficulties, campaigns for senate leadership

Civil rights attorney Jeffrey Haas will visit students and give a lecture on behalf of the UH African American Studies Program at 10 a.m. today in Agnes Arnold Hall, room 628.

Jack Wehman

THE DAILY COUGAR

Haas is the author of “The Assassination of Fred Hampton: How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther” and has worked on cases involving prisoners’ rights, police torture and the wrongfully accused. For more information, visit the African American Studies website at www.class.uh.edu/aas.

Carl Carlucci, vice president of administration and finance, told Faculty Senate members of upcoming measures UH would take to counter cuts in state funding. | Jack Wehman/The Daily Cougar

— Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

Resource center hosts awardwinning filmmaker Thursday The UH Women’s Resource Center and the nonprofit group Women Healing and Empowering Women are bringing Brooklyn-based filmmaker Stacey Muhammad to the University for a screening of her new documentary “Out of Our Right Minds: The Rise of Depression Among Black Women” at 11:30 a.m. Thursday in room 279A of the University Center. The screening will be followed by a question-andanswer session, and drinks and popcorn will be served at the event. For more information, contact the director of the Women’s Resource Center, Beverly McPhail, at 713-743-8156.

The state is facing a budget shortfall of up to $30 billion, and the repercussions for the University will be dire. The Faculty Senate has already been told to expect a 10 percent cut in state funding, but the cut could be as deep as 20 percent. Because the budget deficit won’t be officially announced until next

year, the Senate is focused on making sure it isn’t caught off guard. “Unfortunately, it does appear that on the larger end of the cuts we’re looking at cutting operations that impact faculty directly,” Senate president Mark Clarke said. “It’s making everybody a little nervous.” Vice President of Administration and Finance Carl Carlucci spoke about the deficit, giving specific FACULTY continues on page 3

BUSINESS

Author speaks, inspires students

— Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar Jessel Parra

THE DAILY COUGAR Got an item for Newsline? Let us know! E-mail newsline@thedailycougar.com

today

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ON CAMPUS International Attire Day As a part of International Education Week, today is International Attire Day. Feel free and be proud to wear international clothing! Study Abroad Forum In the spirit of International Education Week, those who are interested in studying abroad can attend a session which will seek to answer any questions you may have. Visit the Rockwell Pavilion inside the library today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Taekwondo Demonstration A quick Taekwondo demo will be held at the Hilton courtyard today from 6:15 to 6:30 p.m.

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Report errors to editor@thedailycougar.com. Corrections will appear in this space as needed.

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Over the course of three days, author and entrepreneur Peter Thomas shared advice and exciting stories about his life with UH business students and members of the Houston community. Thomas visited UH from Wednesday to Friday as part of his “Be Great” book tour, which was presented in Houston by the C.T. Bauer College of Business and the Bauer Leadership Consortium Advisory Group. What motivates Thomas on his journey is the opportunity to give back to the community. “I have had a very blessed life, so to have the opportunity to be able to give back is what keeps me going,” he said. Thomas shared with people the advice he talks about in his new book “Be Great: The Five Foundations of an Extraordinary Life.” As simple as it may sound, Thomas says that having values, focus, visualization, inspiration and reflection as important foundations in your life can make one a successful person. “When your values are clear, your decisions are easier,” Thomas said. Every person has his or her own values, and having one’s own values straight is always essential. THOMAS continues on page 3

Freshman Bethel Glumac collected a full deck of UH trading cards, earning a $1,000 scholarship. The program is offereing a total of 35 scholarships to students. | Jack Wehman/The Daily Cougar

STUDENTS

Cards traded in for a cool grand UH trading card program encourages campus activities Charne Graham

THE DAILY COUGAR Students that are dedicated to collecting UH trading cards are also collecting free prizes — some are even receiving scholarships. No essay writing or certain GPA is required. The only requirement is that a student collects all the cards. “I heard about this opportunity from heavy advertising on campus at my freshman orientation and I started to collect after the first day of the semester,” media production freshman Bethel Glumac said. Glumac is the second and most recent student of the Fall 2010 semester to win the $1,000 scholarship. Pharmaceutical science senior Anthony Vu won the scholarship in mid-October.

“I think this was a really good chance for other students and myself to become aware and get involved with things on campus,” Glumac said. Students can collect the cards at various events on campus, from instructional seminars to softball games to poetry readings in the library. Besides attending the many campus events, a key to gaining cards that are needed is meeting up with other students to trade cards. “I received about a quarter of my cards through trading. I don’t think I was as active in trading as other people, because I really wanted to attend many of the events,” Glumac said. “When I did trade, though, it really simplified the process, especially since I eventually had so many extra cards to trade off.” UH chemistry professor Simon Bott developed the trading card program last fall. CARDS continues on page 3


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NEWS 101

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

The Daily Cougar

crime log

OUT OF OUR RIGHT MINDS: THE RISE OF DEPRESSION AMONG BLACK WOMEN

Join us, Thursday, November 18, at 11:30am Room 279A, University Center for a free screening of a brand new documentary by Filmmaker Stacey Muhammad who will screen the film and be available for a Q & A Popcorn and drinks served Co-Sponsored by: WHEW: Women Healing and Empowering Women Check out their 5th Annual "Second Chance" Conference Downtown Branch of Houston Public Library Saturday, November 20th, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM. For more information: www.whew-now.org

Have information on these or other incidents of crime on campus? Call 713-743-0600

The following is a partial report of campus crime between Nov. 9 and Saturday. All information is selected from the files of the UH Police Department. The information in bold indicates when the event was reported to UHPD and the event’s location. Information or questions regarding the cases below should be directed to UHPD at (713) 743-0600.

Theft – Nov. 9, 8:32 a.m. – Graduate School of Social Work — A staff member reported that someone stole a UH owned VCR/DVD player from the Graduate School of Social Work. There are no suspects. Burglary of a Motor Vehicle – Nov. 9, 7:43 p.m. – Lot 16 E — A student reported observing a vehicle being burglarized in lot 16 E by an unidentified male. The suspect left the area in an unknown make/model pickup truck. There are no suspects. Theft – Wednesday, 11:52 a.m. – Lot 18 A — A student reported that someone stole the hood emblem from her parked vehicle in UH Lot 18 A. Disorderly Conduct – Wednesday, 11:46 a.m. – Melcher Hall — A faculty member and a student were involved in a verbal and physical altercation after the faculty member asked the disruptive student to the leave the class. Both decline pressing charges. A Student Life Referral will be issued. Motor Vehicle Theft – Wednesday, 2:07 p.m. – Lot 16 C — A student reported that someone stole his unattended and secured vehicle from a UH parking lot. There are no suspects. Theft – Wednesday, 1:24 p.m. – Oberholtzer Residence Hall — UH DPS has received numerous reports of mail theft from a UH Residential Hall postal area. There are no suspects. Theft – Thursday, 10:37 a.m. – Calhoun Lofts — A staff member reported that someone stole a UH owned television from the Calhoun Lofts. There are no suspects. Stalking – Thursday, 9:36 a.m. – Heyne Bldg. — A staff member reported receiving upsetting electronic message from a former student

who follows her around campus. The student was advised to stop contacting the staff member. Criminal Mischief – Thursday, 4:39 p.m. – Agnes Arnold Hall — A faculty member reported that someone poured paint onto his unattended vehicle while it was parked in a reserved spot in front of Agnes Arnold Hall. There are no suspects. Indecent Exposure – Friday, 11:05 a.m. – Entrance 7 — A student reported that a man exposed himself to her and then ran off down Cullen Boulevard. There are no suspects. Possession of Marijuana – Friday, 2:39 p.m. – Bates Residence Hall — A student was arrested for Possession of Marijuana and transported to Harris County Jail. The student also received Student Life and Residential Life Referrals. Theft/Fraud – Friday, 8:42 p.m. – Cullen Oaks Apartments — A visitor was arrested for the theft of a student’s wallet and cell phone and was later charged with the additional offense of fraudulent possession of identifying information. The visitor was transported to the Harris County Jail. A second visitor suspect was issued a campus wide trespass warning in connection with the incident. Minor in Possession of Alcohol – Saturday, 5:07 p.m. – Lot 15 F — Nine students and one visitor received citations for Minor in Possession of Alcohol when they were found drinking alcoholic beverages while attending a UH football game. All of the students also received referrals in the incident.

For the complete report and to view past reports, go to www. uh.edu/police/home.html

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FACULTY continued from page 1

examples on what may or may not happen come next year. More faculty furloughs were among the topics discussed. “As a result of conversations with the staff council, they said let’s lock in dates now. They said they’d rather know when the dates for possible furloughs would be,” Carlucci said. “There were a number of suggestions made as to possible dates.” However, more furloughs are not being considered lightly; the last thing the Senate wants to do is impact the education of the students, Carlucci said. “We can’t cripple the instructional program,” he said. “Tuition revenue is our main support. We cannot do anything to reduce that. “On the other hand, there are

CARDS continued from page 1

“We had 12 people win the scholarship last year, and I want to continue to offer the opportunity for students to win the scholarship and attend events at UH,” Bott said. Every school year, 35 scholarships of $1,000 are available to any student who obtains all 56 trading cards. The program was reset at the beginning of this semester. The cards feature important people across the UH community, from esteemed UH faculty, members of the Board of Regents as well as famous alumni. Besides the scholarship, students can also win prizes. These include UH t-shirts, posters and other items,

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

news@thedailycougar.com

depending on the number of cards collected. The cards also inform students of the significance of being involved on campus and having pride in UH. The list of trading cards and the campus events that provide students with various trading cards are posted and updated at www. uh.edu/tradingcards. Bott also created the “Cougar Trading Cards” Facebook group, which he uses to post scholarship winners, notices of raffles for rare cards and places around campus that will offer students cards. Students can also post inquiries and offers for trading cards on the page. news@thedailycougar.com

Author and businessman Peter Thomas paid a three-day visit to the UH campus and signed copies of his book. Proceeds from campus book sales went towards scholarships for the Bauer College of Business. | Courtesy of Chase Pedigo

THOMAS continued from page 1

“Your personal principles define what is most important to you,” he said. Thomas discussed goals and fears, saying everyone should be realistic and really think about what they want to achieve in life. Whatever this may be, Thomas said, people should not let anything get in their way. “Don’t ever be afraid of failure,” he said. “Get up and do what you do.” Thomas strongly encourages people to visualize goals before they happen.

“Your mind sees it as a done deal,” he said. “First, see it. Second, imagine positive results. Lastly, believe it will happen.” Marcela Pinto, manager of the Ted Bauer Leadership Certificate Program, said students have already told her how beneficial it was to have someone like Thomas as a guest speaker. “It is beneficial to have a successful business person talk about what students learn in the classroom and how to apply all those things they learn in the certificate program,” Pinto said. Some students attended the events for class credit, but many attended for the chance to hear Thomas speak. “(Thomas was a) really interesting

speaker,” economics and global business junior Omar Barazi said. “A very influential guy I could really learn from. “Thomas encourages everyone to have A.M.C: a great Attitude, Motivation, and Commitment.” During his time on campus, Thomas made a large classroom visit and held a book-signing event. He also held a “LifePilot” workshop, which is designed to promote change and growth in participants. Proceeds from his book sales in the area also benefitted student scholarships at the Bauer school. news@thedailycougar.com

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periods like spring break where we as a staff won’t get any official days off, but if we took days off it wouldn’t negatively impact the instructional program.” One of the biggest problems with the budget deficit is the Texas Legislature itself. Because this is a huge session for the Legislature — it not only has to cut billions of dollars from the state budget but redistrict the entire state as well — the cuts may not be announced until late spring or even the summer. “The budget is likely to drag on; it’ll probably get done by August 1, because that’s when the school districts need their money,” Carlucci said. “It’s very likely to drag on through May into the summer. “How do we know what the target’s going to be if there’s uncertainty? And the answer is, we don’t know.”

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Tuesday, November 16, 2010

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opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

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EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Matthew Keever Newton Liu Hiba Adi, Jose Aguilar John Brannen, Christopher Losee Travis Hensley Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

City scrambling with red light camera aftermath Houstonians spoke loud and clear at the polls Nov. 2 when a majority voted down the proposition that would have kept the city’s red light cameras in operation. On Monday, the city took the first major step in making the cameras a thing of the past. City officials told media outlets that the 70 cameras at 50 intersections were turned off at 10 a.m., shortly after election results were certified by the City Council. Mayor Annise Parker told the Houston Chronicle that tickets issued to drivers before 10 a.m. were still valid and would have to be paid. City officials have not set a timetable for when the cameras would be removed. No more cameras means the Houston Police Department’s budget will now be about $10 million lighter each year. Parker and other city officials have already lamented how this loss of revenue would hinder officers’ ability to ensure more safety at perilous intersections. One can argue that this financial hit alone puts more Houstonians in harm’s way. But given that more than $44 million in fines have been collected since 2006 as a result of these cameras and city officials said there are $25 million more in uncollected fines, one could also reason that the cameras didn’t do enough to deter people from running red lights. The red light cameras provided a significant financial boon for the city. But their primary purpose was to dissuade drivers from putting the lives of others in jeopardy by running red lights. With revenue from red light cameras no longer available, Police Chief Charles A. McClelland Jr. and other police department officials will have to become more innovative with the methods they use to address the problem of red-light runners. The city was already in a tough spot of finding more resources for the police department against a shrinking budget. The voter’s will didn’t make this task any easier, but their voices are what matters most in the end. Now it’s time for city and police officials to make the necessary, though tough, adjustments.

ake a stroll down a Wal-Mart isle and nearly every other item you pick up will bare the infamous label “MADE IN CHINA.” America’s business sector gorges on cheap, outsourced products to please the consumer-based economy— the ideology being “buy cheap” on more than one front. Businesses are eager to increase profit margins by dancing between Trisha the lines of selling cheap Thacker and buying cheaper, which often requires a little assistance from now-booming Chinese manufacturers. This mentality is common, so what is there to complain about? Plenty, according to the American government. China has just about brought the US government to its wits end with its purposefully undervalued currency, the Renminbi. The purpose of this particular piece

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S

Global warming skeptics skip reality

STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Chinese currency is not to blame

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ext year the EPA will start regulating greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, a gas that was ruled a pollutant by the Supreme Court in 2007. Many Republicans on the hill are up in arms over this new policy, which they see as another overreach of the federal government. It is perfectly rational to think that the EPA’s new regulaDaniel tions may be bad for Renfrow businesses in the shortterm. But in the long-term, what could be worse for businesses than global warming? It is not like the EPA is padlocking refineries and dragging people out of their cars. The changes they are making are piecemeal. These essential changes will become increasingly more difficult as more people start to question the

of legislation is to discourage American consumers from purchasing Chinese goods. The mentality behind this is to decrease imports from China and increase US exports in foreign markets. The reality of the ramifications of this piece of legislation is that nearly nothing will change. Manufacturing goods in China is drastically cheaper than producing the same goods in America. Even if taxes were to double the cost of Chinese goods, companies would still flock to Chinese manufacturers for their needs. Even if the Renminbi were to inflate, and possibly help narrow the gap between America’s imports and exports, it would be nothing more than a bandaid for America’s gaping economic wounds. It could even potentially worsen them. Businesses rely too heavily on the many basics produced in China. The result would only be bloated price tags which would hurt the average American

validity of the science of global warming. According to a 2010 Gallup poll, 48 percent of Americans believe that the science on global warming is exaggerated. That is a seven-point increase from the 41 percent of Americans who thought so in 2009. Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey has questioned the causes of global warming. “Mankind, is it responsible for global warming? Well, I’ll tell you something. I have seen evidence on both sides of it. I’m skeptical,” Christie said. Not all evidence is equally valid. Christie has been misled, as many have, by global warming skeptics. Groups like the Heritage Foundation and the Heartland Institute are the prime emitters of anti-global warming rhetoric. The website of the Heartland Institute published an article saying, “The fundamental concern is whether globally warmer temperatures are factually worse

already suffering from the recession. Healing these wounds calls for a major change in infrastructure in the US. China maintaining an undervalued Renminbi at the supposed cost of the US encourages Americans to cry victim of a beggar-thy-neighbor approach. Much of US policy concerning this matter is based on the premise that an artificially cheap Renminbi is a major contributing factor to the slowed economic recovery of the US. However, simply raising the Renminbi will not dramatically decrease the margin between America’s exports and imports, and an 18th century British Parliamenttype tariff will do so neither. In order for there to be a significant effort towards balancing America’s imports, there must be a change in the consumer-based nature of the economy. Trisha Thacker is a biology freshman and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar.com.

(or better) for human societies — and more (or less) damaging to the environment — than colder temperatures (like those experienced during the ice ages and Little Ice Age).” The article also discusses how global warming is actually good for the environment because plants need carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is good for plants, but not when carbon dioxide levels make it too hot for that plant to exist in its native environment. Faulty reasoning must be avoided to help pass some environmentally friendly legislation. And hopefully lawmakers will realize this before D.C. turns into the new Venice, although the idea of traveling through D.C. on a gondola is rather romantic. Daniel Renfrow is an anthropology junior and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar. com.


Tuesday, November 16, 2010

The Daily Cougar

sports overtime

5

EDITORS John Brannen, Chris Losee E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Cougars rout Mavericks in opener Victor Araiza

THE DAILY COUGAR

NEWTON LIU THE DAILY COUGAR

BASKETBALL

Players notch conference awards for weekend performances; 4 recruits inked during early period Senior forward Maurice McNeil grabbed conference honors this week after he was named C-USA Player of the Week. McNeil averaged 15.5 points and 12.5 rebounds in the Cougars’ wins over Nicholls State and Alcorn State. After making the game-winning shot in the 63-62 overtime victory against Nicholls State, the 6-9 senior scored 19 points and 12 rebounds in the 20-point win over Alcorn State. The Cougars (2-0) have posted their best start in more a decade. The team will hit the road for the first time this season in a matchup with Louisiana Tech in at 7 p.m. Wednesday in Ruston, La. Women’s basketball senior forward Courtney Taylor was named Conference USA Co-Player of the Week after the Cougars defeated Texas-Arlington 8848 in their season opener. Taylor recorded her 41stdouble-double with 18 points and 10 rebounds. Men’s head basketball coach James Dickey announced Monday that the team added four prospects for next season. Jonathon Simmons, a 6-6 forward, is a junior college transfer from Midland Junior College who attended Smiley High School. Jherrod Stiggers is a 6-5 guard from Terrell High School and, as a junior, he averaged 18.5 points per game. Jevante Thompson, also a junior, is a 6-0 guard from Irving High School who averages15.6 points per game. The last is Tashawn Thomas, a 6-8 forward from Killeen High School. As a junior, he averaged 15 points, 11 boards and seven blocks a game. “This is an outstanding class, and we are extremely pleased with the group our staff put together. We certainly wanted talented student-athletes that are winners,” Dickey said in a release. — Cougar Sports Services

BASEBALL

UH adds 14 for next season In his first year, head baseball coach Todd Whitting signed his first recruiting class of the 2011 season, which includes five pitchers, four infielders, four outfielders and a catcher. Whitting made the announcement Friday.— Cougar Sports Services

CROSS COUNTRY

Cougars finish in top 10 at regional meet The women’s cross country team finished in 10th place at the NCAA South Central Regional meet Saturday in Waco. Megan Munoz was the Cougars’ top runner, finishing 44th overall in 21 minutes, 42 seconds. Kat Ducommun finished 65th in 22:16. Starla Garcia was close behind, placing 69th in 22:19.

The Cougars overcame any first-game jitters and imposed their defensive presence early in an 88-48 rout of Texas-Arlington at Hofheinz Pavilion on Sunday. “I want this to be NCAA-championship basketball,” said head coach Todd Buchanan, who made his regular-season debut with the Cougars. “That means I want every game to feel like if we don’t win, we don’t advance. “That’s why I wanted to challenge them individually and collectively early on.” The Cougars collected 32 points off turnovers, and converted 26 secondchance points — proving their defense was their best offense. “Our defense brought on our offense after we got off to a slow start,” forward Courtney Taylor said. Added Buchanan: “That’s why I’ve always been a defensive philosophy coach. There’s going to be nights like that, whether we’re here or on the road, where balls aren’t going into the baskets for a while, but we can always guard. We can always guard and defend, and I think that’s the brand and the backbone to every championship team.” Brittney Scott scored 18 points in her 62nd consecutive start. Taylor added 18 points and 10 rebounds as she moved into 10th place behind Sharonda Lasseter on the school’s career scoring list. “I think I was playing too fast at the beginning,” Taylor said. “I missed a lot of easy shots and got into foul trouble by not being as disciplined as I should be. In the second half, I picked it up and was able to stay on the court longer.” Porsche Landry, Lesslee Mason and Roxanna Button all reached double digits in points with 15, 12 and 11, respectively.

Courtney Taylor (24) overcame early foul trouble to record a double-double of 18 points and 10 rebounds in the Cougars’ 88-48 season-opening win over Texas-Arlington. | Daily Cougar File Photo Mason usually plays forward but started at center in Sunday’s contest. “Being a forward playing center, sometimes I have an advantage because I’m quicker than the other post players,” Mason said. “It’s very difficult, but I’m getting used to it. I just have to get over it, step up and play the position.” It’s not unusual to see the Cougars slay the Mavericks. UH now holds a 9-0 all-time series lead over UTA. However, this win had special significance, as it was the 100th of Buchanan’s career. “I’ve told them from day one that I’m going to be all in,” Buchanan said. “You can’t play the school board; you can’t play the competition at times. You got to play and push to be the best individually and collectively, because that gives us the best chance to be the best team we

AT A GLANCE SCOREBOARD

UTA ...................20 28 Houston .......... 43 45

48 88

KEY STAT

486

Attendance at Hofheinz Pavilion

WHAT’S NEXT?

The Cougars face New Mexico State (1-1) at 6 p.m. Saturday in Las Cruces, N.M. can be.” The Cougars will take their show on the road for a four-game stretch that starts with New Mexico State on Saturday in Las Cruces, N.M. sports@thedailycougar.com

VOLLEYBALL

UH pushes win streak to 7 matches Keith Cordero Jr.

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cougars increased their winning streak to seven matches with Friday night’s 3-0 sweep of East Carolina and a 3-2 win over Marshall on Sunday at the Athletics/ Alumni Center. “It was a big win,” head coach Molly Alvey said. “Marshall came off a big win against Rice and was coming in here pumped up and ready to go. I think it was huge for us to step up and win; we haven’t been in a five-set match in a long time.” Sunday was senior day for the Cougars, who honored libero Amanda Carson and outside hitter Marluci Toazzi. “It’s crazy,” Carson said. “I just can’t believe how fast these four years have gone by. It’s definitely bittersweet. It’s ending an old chapter of my life and starting a new one.” Carson is a four-year starter for the Cougars from Allen, and Toazzi is a two-year starter from Ivoti, Brazil who transferred to UH after playing at Arizona Western College. “(There are) a lot of emotions,” Toazzi

said. “Everything goes through your mind and you remember it all at once. It has been amazing to be here.” The Cougars (19-10, 13-4 C-USA) were led by Chandace Tryon’s 15 kills against Marshall. Lucy Charuk chipped in with 14 kills, and Toazzi tied a career-high with 12 kills in their 25-22, 23-25, 25-20, 23-25, 15-8 win over the Thundering Herd. “The past couple of games we won in three, so this was definitely a challenge for us,” Carson said. The opening game had Marshall off to a strong three-point lead, but the Cougars fought back to take a 22-19 lead and hang on for the win. The second game started out in Marshall’s favor, as it jumped out to a 16-8 lead. The Cougars rallied back on a 9-2 run to pull within 18-17, but the Herd held on. The Cougars raced out to an 8-0 lead in the third game, but the Herd settled down and went on an 11-5 run to cut UH’s lead to two. The Cougars went up 24-17 and outlasted Marshall from there. The fourth game was tied 17-17 after the Herd established a 14-11 lead. Marshall then took a slim 24-23 lead, looking to force a decisive fifth game. The Herd scored the

final point to win 25-23. The Cougars, however, dominated the fifth game, coasting to a 15-8 victory. “We didn’t come out as sharp as we usually do,” Carson said. “We just need to prepare better and just get more of a focus next game.” In Friday’s match against East Carolina, the Cougars rolled the Pirates 25-19, 25-17, 25-14 to sweep both matches in this season’s series. Stephanie Nwachukwu led the Cougars with 12 kills, while Toazzi contributed 11. UH dominated all three games against the one-win Pirates, holding them below 20 points in every match. The Cougars cruised to a 25-19 victory in the first game. The second game was no different, as the Cougars went up 16-6 to coast to a 25-17 win. The Cougars ran out to a 12-8 lead in the third game en route to finishing the match on a 13-6 run. “We preach ... that every time you step up on the court, you prepare the same way,” Alvey said. “It doesn’t matter if it’s Tulsa or Marshall. We’ve got to mentally prepare every time we step on the court.” sports@thedailycougar.com


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LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, November 16,2010

The Daily Cougar

Because Chris can be a woman’s name, too. Though The Daily Cougar strives for accuracy and fairness in its reporting, mistakes happen. Please report any errors you see in the paper to the editorial staff. Corrections will run on Page 2 as needed to amend the record. To report a correction, e-mail editor@thedailycougar.com or call (713) 743-5362.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

ELECTION

One of the worst things is finding your boyfriend or girlfriend crying. Learning how to cheer them shouldn’t be hard to do. | photos.com

COUGAR SUTRA

Cheering up sweetheart is easy task

WHEN 4 P.M. NOVEMBER 18, 2010 WHERE CAREER SERVICES CONFERENCE ROOM, STUDENT SERVICE CENTER 1 WHAT ELECTION THE SPRING 2011 EDITOR IN CHIEF OF THE DAILY COUGAR MEETING IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Don’t let other people’s tears ruin the fun Travis Hensley

THE DAILY COUGAR Being the one around when the person you’re dating is crying is a lot like stepping in dog poop with nothing to clean it up. You know that you’re going to track canine excrement somewhere in your world (that sounds a lot more vulgar than my original word choice). But unlike feces (still dirtier), you can’t just simply spray your girlfriend with a garden hose to get her to cheer up. The closest I’ve ever come to a

The SPC meets monthly during the school year to hear updates from the department’s units, to give a forum for public comment and to elect the editors in chief of The Daily Cougar and Houstonian yearbook. For more information, visit www.uh.edu/sp/committee

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Egg Donors Needed. Ages 21-32. Earn $5,000+, High demand for Asians. Earn $25,000+, Ages 21-39.

Cougar Sutra continues on page 8

Mostly because we’re a newspaper and we don’t have ears. But we would love to get your voice heard. Send us a guest column, around 400-600 words on a topic of your choosing, to opinion@thedailycougar.com.

classifieds HELP WANTED

is to be left alone. As a guy, if you see me crying, just give me a big hug, tell me to call and then leave (I don’t care what anyone says, “My Dog Skip� is a sad movie). Step 3: Make a fool out of yourself. If they want you to stay and you really want to cheer them up, be prepared to be a little goofy. So make funny voices while using sock puppets. Pretty much do anything that would make a 5-year-old laugh. Don’t go any lower in the comedy spectrum because you’ll just end up shaking your car keys at a person. The key shake, while hilarious for 2-year-olds, is just patronizing for those in their early 20s.

We can’t hear you.

If you require disability accommodations to attend the meeting, please call (713) 743-5353 to make arrangements.

BULLETIN BOARD

cure all for the problems of human emotion is laughter. Step 1: Know that you’re not Superman. If you still want to maintain some sort of superhero persona while you’re there, just think of your self as Aquaman on dry land, and the only thing that you can communicate with is a beta fish that’s hiding under a plastic pirate ship. In this situation, the extraordinary power of fixing others’ issues will only cause both of you more grief in the end. Step 2: The extra mile is not needed. You’re not fixing; you are just doing what is asked of you. If they need help, then do exactly what they say even if you know that it’s the wrong thing to do. The hardest thing a person that you care about can ask

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COMICS & MORE

The Daily Cougar

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

comics

crossword

F.M.L by Hoa-my Pham

ACROSS 1 Flower or weed 6 Houston pro 11 Drum, as fingers 14 Hitachi competitor 15 Reeves of “The Matrix” 16 Kind of system 17 Gym exercise (hyph.) 18 Bough breakers, often (2 wds.) 20 Hex halved 21 Marshal Dillon 23 Fixes potatoes 24 Target amount 26 Bluish-gray feline 28 Soup or salad 30 Mystiques 31 Word-processor command 32 Disgusting 33 Sweet murmur 36 Feigns 37 Hockey arenas 38 Emmy winner Delany 39 Right to decide 40 Devoutness 41 Venomous snake 42 Turnpike charges 43 Neglectful 44 Bet 47 Gourmet mushroom 48 Former students 49 Avatar of Vishnu 50 — and Perrins (steak sauce) 53 Couch protector 56 Approaches 58 Skosh 59 Swiss miss 60 Novelist Lessing 61 Map dir. 62 Backspace on a PC 63 So far (2 wds.)

Dim Sum by Ho Yi Lau

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

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DOWN 1 Attention getter 2 Fox’s abode 3 Classical times 4 Manhattan sch. 5 Highest 6 Japanese dog 7 Faction

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8 — kwon do 9 ER personnel 10 Win the game 11 — Haute, Ind. 12 Pinnacles 13 Entourage 19 Stable chow 22 Picnicked on 25 Coffee brewers 26 Full of gunk 27 Havens 28 1040 experts 29 Ocean predator 30 Bee and Polly 32 Give forth 33 Tiny blood vessel 34 Dollar bills 35 Boathouse items 37 Annoy 38 A good tip, once 40 Upscale wheels 41 Open porch 42 Fill-in worker 43 PC acronym

44 Squander 45 Adventurer Quatermain 46 Show the way 47 Victor — Hugo 49 Tulip colors 51 Ontario neighbor 52 D.A. backup 54 Poet’s contraction 55 Through 57 Aurora, to Plato

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2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

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LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, November 16,2010

Cougar Sutra continued from page 6

Step 4: Don’t make fun of anyone. Best friends and family don’t leave one’s life simply because someone gets upset. So if they hurt because of one of these things, don’t get on the insult

bandwagon. They’re caught up in the moment; you shouldn’t be. Think about how things are going to be awkward when they’ve made up, and you are left with your comment just floating out there in the world waiting to bite you on the butt. Step 5: Compliments are awesome. Don’t force them because

at the root of a good compliment is truth and specifics. If a girl is upset with the way she looks, don’t talk about the body. Go for everything above the neck, and you should be good. If anyone is feeling stupid, well let’s face it, you are reading The Daily Cougar. We misspelled “homecoming,” and we desperately need someone

The Daily Cougar

to remind us that we are smart and that our layout has improved. Final Step: Simply wait until the next day. When they get up tomorrow, everything might be better. Don’t bring up yesterday’s problems because there will be another set of them for today. arts@thedailycougar.com

Where do I get the latest UH news? www.thedailycougar.com

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