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REGISTRATION

Course schedule for Spring 2011 now available for CLASS

October 26, 2010

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Professor enlists in Navy Travis Masterson

The course schedule for the Spring 2011 semester is now available online for CLASS students in their myUH (Peoplesoft) accounts. Enrollment appointments for registration will begin in November. Students should check the area called “Enrollment Dates” in the myUH menu to find out when their specific time begins. Mandatory advising holds have been placed for CLASS seniors, as well as CLASS students with a cumulative UH GPA below a 2.0. The “Student Center” on myUH will inform students of any holds (financial or advising), and aid students in making an appointment with an advisor to ensure timely registration. — Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

THE DAILY COUGAR

Engineering professor Lawrence Schulze is sworn in by member of the US Navy at a ceremony on Oct. 14. Schulze is UH’s newest Naval Liasion Offi cer. | Courtesy of Cullen College of Engineering

Lawrence Schulze wanted to serve his country in order to honor those members of his family who served in two different world wars; he just went about it a different way. Schulze, a professor in the Cullen College of Engineering, was sworn in as UH’s Naval Liaison Officer by members of the US Navy. “A request was sent out to the UH community for anyone interested

in the Campus Liaison Officer post. I responded and made it through all of the hoops,” Schulze said. “Lt. Terry Turner, Nuclear Programs Officer, NRD Houston, guided me through the process.” His role as a lisason officer is to help the Navy recruit at UH and to help students who are interested in a naval career make an educated decision. “My duties are to bridge the academic environment and the Navy environment, and assist NAVAL continues on page 3

ELECTION

CAMPUS EVENT

Architect to deliver speech as part of Fall 2010 series Malcolm Holzman, a partner in Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture, LLP, will speak at 3 p.m. today at the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture. Holzman has completed commissions in 25 states, and completed more than 125 building projects over the course of his career. He has also won numerous awards for his body of work.

Students urged to get on bus, vote early

His firm, in its vision statement, aims to make the ordinary “extraordinary,” and to create “lively gathering spaces.”

Administration, SGA and group join forces to offer shuttle service to polls

Got an item for Newsline? Let us know! E-mail newsline@thedailycougar.com

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ON CAMPUS

October Fest 2010 For those in the Halloween spirit, there will be plenty to do today! Come to the UC at 11:30 p.m. for free food, games and prizes. There will be a pumpkin toss for who would rather watch them fly than carve them. At 7 p.m. in the UC Houston Room, there will be a costume contest with an iPod Shuffle as the prize!

AROUND TOWN

Bone Thugs-n-Harmony Cleveland hip-hop group Bone Thugs-n-Harmony will be in town tonight at 8:30 p.m. at the House of Blues. Their new album “Uni5: The World’s Enemy” was released in May. Grab some tickets soon! Find more campus and local events or add your own at thedailycougar.com/calendar

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A coalition of organizations and UH administration will be providing shuttle services to and from an early voting location this week. ReEnergize the Vote has joined forces with the Student Government Association, UH’s Division of Student Affairs and the Center for Student Involvement to offer this free service to students. “We’ve done it the last several years, and it’s an effort to make sure students get the opportunity to exercise the right to vote,” Juanita Jackson, assistant to the vice president for student affairs, said. “This will be the fourth time that we have done it and it gets increasingly better each time.” Jackson also said that any student registered in Harris County can vote in any early voting location and encourages students to take advantage of the shuttle buses. Shuttles will be departing on a continuous loop between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m, starting today and ending Thursday, from the University Center. One bus will be in use SHUTTLES continues on page 3

Hector Garcia (right), who served as the attorney for Felix Longoria’s family, is seen with former President Lyndon B. Johnson in the early 1960s. | Courtesy of the Hector P. Garcia Archives at Texas A&M University

CAMPUS EVENT

Discrimination, then and now Documentary focuses on often overlooked event and results of civil rights struggle Diane Sanchez

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Decorated soldier Pvt. Felix Longoria Jr., fought and died during World War II against fascism overseas, only for his family to face segregation and white supremacy at home. UH and the Center for Mexican American Studies is presenting a preview screening of the documentary “The Longoria Affair” at 6 p.m. Wednesday in room 150 of the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture. The film is based on Longoria, a soldier who was killed in June 1945 and would eventually become the first Mexican American to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. After the war, while most people came together to welcome the soldiers home and

J. Valadez

mourn for the dead, Longoria was denied the right to lie in state in a small town in south Texas when his remains were returned in 1949. The preparation for his funeral is what caused him to become a national symbol of

discrimination. Longoria’s family was denied a wake at the only funeral parlor in his hometown of Three Rivers. The funeral parlor was a “whites only” establishment. “The whites wouldn’t like it,” is the reason Tom Kennedy, the owner of the funeral parlor, gave Longoria’s widow in denying her request to hold the wake in his parlor. “Its an incredible thing to believe that a fallen soldier’s family would be denied the use of this facility,” CMAS Assistant Director LONGORIA continues on page 3


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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

CRIME LOG

The Daily Cougar

Have information on these or other incidents of crime on campus? Call 713-743-0600

crime log

The following is a partial report of campus crime between Oct. 18 and Thursday. All information is selected from the files of the UH Police Department. The information in bold indicates when the event was reported to UHPD and the event’s location. Information or questions regarding the cases below should be directed to UHPD at (713) 743-0600.

Motor Vehicle Theft – Oct. 18, 7:52 a.m. – Law Library — A staff member reported that someone damaged a Law Center golf cart and broke the signal switch on the cart’s steering column while possibly attempting to steal it. There are no suspects. Traffic Offense – Oct. 8, 2:13 p.m. – University Hilton Hotel — A staff member reported that another vehicle struck and damaged his vehicle while it was parked in the Hilton Hotel underground parking garage. The driver of the other vehicle failed to leave identifying information as required by law. There is a suspect and an investigation is underway. Indecent Exposure – Oct. 18, 11:35 p.m. – M.D. Anderson Library — A staff member reported that a man exposed his genitals to her inside M.D. Anderson Library. The man left the area before UH DPS police officers arrived. There are no suspects. Theft of Service – Oct. 19, 8:17 a.m. – University Hilton Hotel — A Hilton Hotel employee witnessed a vehicle exit the hotel parking garage without paying for parking services. An investigation is ongoing. Burglary of a Motor Vehicle – Oct. 19, 11:25 a.m. – Lot 18 A — A student reported that someone entered her unattended and secured motor vehicle while it was parked in lot 18 A and removed her parking permit. There are no suspects. Theft – Oct. 19, 8:51 p.m. – Welcome Center— A student reported that someone stole his computer pad from the top of a parking pay station outside the Welcome Center parking garage. There are no suspects. Burglary of a Motor Vehicle – Wednesday, 11:25 a.m. – Lot 6 C — A visitor reported that

Expanded Program for Teaching Excellence Awards A new plan has been put in place to expand the size and scope of the Teaching Excellence Awards, which are the highest form of recognition the University of Houston offers for excellence in teaching. The new awards structure was created with the endorsement of the UH Board of Regents, and unified recommendations from the Provost appointed Accountability Task Force, the Teaching Excellence Awards Committee, and the new Center for Teaching Excellence. The amounts of the awards have been substantially increased. There are also new categories of awards including:

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Group Teaching Excellence Awards. Two awards ($30,000) Distinguished Leadership in Teaching Award ($15,000) Teaching Career Award ($12,000) Community Engagement in Teaching Award ($8,000)

All awards for faculty offered in the past are have been increased to 8,000, and the awards for Teaching Assistants have been raised to $3,500. Details are available on the Provost web page http://www.uh.edu/provost/awards/, under “Teaching Excellence Awards” or on the CTE website http://cte.uh.edu/ under “Faculty Grants Awards and Incentives”. If you would like to nominate someone for these awards, contact Heidi Kennedy at: HAKennedy@Central.UH.EDU.

Nominations from students are encouraged.

For the complete report and to view past reports, go to www. uh.edu/police/home.html

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Direct news tips and story ideas to the News Desk. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@thedailycougar. com or fax (713) 743-5384. A “Submit news item” form is also available online at thedailycougar.com. COPYRIGHT No part of the newspaper in print or online may be reproduced without the written consent of the director of the Student Publications Department.

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someone burglarized his unsecured and unattended motor vehicle while it was parked in lot 6 C. There are no suspects. Theft – Wednesday, 12:05 p.m. – Engineering Complex — A staff member reported that someone stole a UH master key from a unsecured desk drawer in her unsecured office. There are no suspects. Sexual Assault – Thursday, 5:29 a.m. – Moody Towers — A non-UH student residing in a UH residential hall was arrested for sexual assault, after having forcible sexual intercourse with a female student. The suspect was transported to the Harris County Jail. Theft – Thursday, 1:38 p.m. – Cougar Village — A student reported that an unknown individual stole the memory card located inside of her unattended and unsecured personal computer. There are no suspects. Criminal Mischief – Thursday, – 5:29 p.m. – Lot 9C — A student reported that her secured and unattended vehicle’s tire was slashed by an unknown individual while parked in UH Lot 9C. There are no suspects. Motor Vehicle Theft – Thursday, 10:10 p.m. – Lot 20C — A student reported that his unattended/unsecured vehicle was stolen while parked in UH parking lot 20-C. There are no suspects. Burglary of a Motor Vehicle – Thursday, 11:46 a.m. – Off Campus — A student reported his unattended and secured vehicle was forcibly entered and his radio was stolen from the Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church parking lot. There are no suspects.

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

NEWS

The Daily Cougar

NAVAL continued from page 1

Felix Longoria Jr., was the first Mexican American to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. | Courtesy of the Hector P. Garcia Archives at Texas A&M University

LONGORIA continued from page 1

Lorenzo Cano said. “The screening is an important opportunity for students to see the historical discrimination of people of Mexican descent.” Cano said that the current antiimmigrant hysteria in the United States is a continuation of those sentiments — and of repression and persecution as well. This act of discrimination helped thrust the American GI Forum’s civil rights agenda into the national spotlight. “When most people in this country think of civil rights, they don’t tend to think about the contribution that Mexican-Americans have made towards the equality and freedom of all people,” John J. Valadez, director of

the documentary, said. “People should know about that contribution.” The destinies of Kennedy, Dr. Hector Garcia, who served as the Longoria family’s attorney, and then-U.S. Senator Lyndon B. Johnson were all shaped by the events following Kennedy’s refusal to hold Longoria’s wake. “The story is about how their lives intersecting would then transform American history in very deep and profound ways,” Valadez said. Longoria’s daughter, Adela, will be attend the screening, which will be followed by a Q-and-A session with Valadez. The event is free and open to the public. The film will premiere Nov. 9 on PBS program “Independent Lens.”

the Navy and students to find the best matches, especially regarding academic qualifications,” Schulze said. “I also will be able to provide information on the opportunities available in the US Navy.” Schulze may be new to the Naval Liaison position, but he already has done his part to help with the military as director of the Camo to Classroom to Career Program, which recruits veterans to come to UH and helps them make the transition from the military to the classroom. “I am the Director of the program, (which) is designed to recruit veterans, active duty, and reservists to UH,” Schulze said. The initial effort and funding

SHUTTLES continued from page 1

today with a second bus added for Wednesday and Thursday operations. “Students shouldn’t have to wait more than five to 10 minutes in either location because it’s going to be a continuous loop,” Liana Lopez, lead campus organizer for ReEnergize the Vote, said. “They’re not going to spend their time waiting

was an Army captain in World War I. His father was a staff-sergeant in World War II and survived the Ardennes, North Africa and the Battle of the Bulge. One of his uncles survived the Normandy invasion in World War II, while another, who is still living, survived Okinawa. Schulze said he also applied for the position because of the desire to help those who served. “I felt it was my duty to honor those men, and all in uniform who have served after them, with the opportunity to get an advanced education and increase their opportunities,” Schulze said. “They have given, and give, their lives for our liberties and freedoms that we enjoy and quite often take for granted.”

for the bus, they’re going to spend it voting.” Lopez said the time spent voting is due to the size of the ballot, and students should allot 20-30 minutes for the whole process. ReEnergize the Vote will also have two rallies, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. On Wednesday, students can watch Pretentious Percussion presents: Funk and African Drumming with Phindisela Mkhatshwa, Gabriel Bata, Nick Cooper and

Adam Carman at Lynn Eusan Park. On Thursday, the rally moves to the lower level of the UC, where DJ Auditory will be the musical guest. “We’ll be tabling, getting pledges to vote and telling people about the shuttle,” Lopez said. Lopez also said there has been good interest from students wanting to use the shuttle service, and she hopes they follow through.

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Get your event listed. www.thedailycougar.com/calendar

WWW.UH.EDU/RECREATION 7 1 3 - 7 4 3 - P L A Y

Aquatics & Safety

Intramural Sport

Adult & Youth Swim Lessons November 1 - 24 November 2- 30

Team Sport Entry Deadline

Monday/Wednesday and Tuesday/Thursday

Fall Classic Tournament November 1

CRWC Members: $35/45 Non-Members: $45-55

Early Registration

Masters Swim Who: Adults 18+ (all skill levels!) Where: CRWC Natatorium When: Monday - Friday 6:00am-7:15am and 11:45am- 1:00pm Cost: Students $35/month, Member $40/ month, Non-Member $45/month plus $150 annual joining fee

713-743-9509

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for the Camo program has been provided by Joseph Tedesco, dean of the Cullen College of Engineering. “The idea is to help (veterans transition) to the classroom by using the unit cohesiveness of the military, the ( Veterans Student) office and the veterans alumni association on campus to provide mentoring through the education process, career guidance and position placement,” Shulze said. The program is organizing its advisory board, of which most members will be veterans, and will also include representatives from the top 100 most military-friendly companies. Schulze felt the urge to give back to his country and the military because of family ties to the service. Schulze’s paternal grandfather

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For class times inforamtion, visit our webpage at www.uh.edu/recreation

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Spring Basketball December 6 Alternative Sports Entry Deadline Punt/Pass/Kick November 12 Wii Sports Tourn. November 1 Golf Singles ($25) November 8 Poker Tournament November 29 Any additional questions, please call 713.743.8041.

Outdoor Adventure Trip Schedule Saturday, October 30-31

Pedal the Pines

(Mandatory Meeting 10/26 @ 5pm) Hop on a bike and ride through the Lost Pines and surrounding hills for two days of pedaling.

-- $60

Saturday, November 20

Farmer’s Market Bike Tour

Don’t miss your last chance to get your local produce, handmade goodies, and ride around Houston with OA!

-- $10

Tuesday, November 23-27

Big Bend National Park

(Mandatory Meeting 11/16 @ 5pm) Spend Thanksgiving exploring one of the last remaining wild corners of the United States.

-- $175 One spot available

All trips must be paid in full at time of enrollment. For more information contact Caleb Wells at (713) 743-0808 or stop by CRWC Room 1007.

Haunted Penthouse Thursday, October 28 CRWC 3:00 pm - 6:00pm First 100 Victims Receive a Free T-Shirt Bring a canned food item to enter.


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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

DEMOCRATIC CARDIAC ARREST by Courtesy USBICEF Stranahan Program

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Matthew Keever Newton Liu Hiba Adi, Jose Aguilar John Brannen, Christopher Losee Travis Hensley Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Don’t be influenced by campaign ads

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new campaign ad denouncing Democratic candidate for governor Bill While and supporting incumbent Gov. Rick Perry has begun a heated debate among Texans — especially among Houstonians. “Four years ago, my husband Rodney, a Houston police officer, was murdered in the line of duty by an undocumented alien, who had been convicted and arrested several times before,” Sgt. Joslyn Johnson says in the ad. “In the past, Bill White supported sanctuary city policies that made it difficult for officers to safely do their jobs. I trust Gov. Perry to secure our safety. Bill White had his opportunity as mayor of Houston, and he failed.” In Austin, White publically called the ad “a shameless exploitation of a widow’s grief,” saying that, “professional politicians like Rick Perry, in the last stages of the campaign... will do anything to push emotional buttons in order to stay in office.” White has made the same claims about Perry, saying that he allowed records to be deleted from Texas’ state database. “Rick Perry cleaned the records of thousands of convicted sex offenders who were deported and kept this policy until we confronted him about it,” White said. “Perry even let deported criminals keep valid drivers licenses… Because of Perry’s failure to secure the border, local police spend their time arresting illegal immigrants who commit crimes every day, as they did when I was Houston’s mayor.” So it seems an issue of pot versus kettle, and instead of endorsing one candidate and attacking the other, we’ll implore voters to research the issues, the candidates and especially the advertisements, assuming they’ve had any effect on your decision. In politics, it’s never as it seems, and this is a key example. One candidate throws blame, and the other reveals some old documents that make it look like the first candidate’s fault. It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s important you do some independent research before you head to the voting booths. That, or you can stay in the dark and receive all your news from one place all the time, which is, well, dumb.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Angry politics fuel Islamaphobia

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n the lingering tension of last week’s Murfreesboro, Tenn., mosque protests, several more indications have risen that Islamaphobia is becoming more than just a flash in the pan issue in this country. On Friday, two Muslim women were John assaulted at a gas station Gervais in Tukwila, Wash. The women said 37-year-old Jennifer Leigh Adams approached them, yelling comments like “suicide bomber,” “why don’t you go back to your country,” and eventually slammed one of the women’s legs in her car door and pushed the other. Fortunately, Adams was arrested and slapped with two felony accounts of malicious harassment. Other incidents have been less direct, but still perpetuate the ongoing problem with this country’s perception of Islam. President Barack Obama is scheduled to visit India next month, and

it is not likely he will visit the Golden Temple in Amritsar in fear that wearing the religious head covering required to enter would rekindle the rumors that he is a Muslim. The President’s decision to avoid visiting the Temple has disappointed the Sikh community here at home and abroad. For a president that has transcended issues of race, it arguably could be seen as a missed opportunity to confront the issue of Islamaphobia head-on and perhaps create a healthy dialogue opposite to the dialogue of violence and vandalism we have seen so far. Also making headlines was NPR’s firing of reporter Juan Williams. Williams stated on the O’Reilly Factor that he “gets nervous” when riding on an airplane with passengers who are wearing “Muslim garb.” The major critic of NPR’s decision has been Fox News, which has decided to hire Williams and highlight the

incident as being unfair and even racist. The opinions given by Williams were unacceptable to NPR due to contract and were the ultimate justification given for Williams’ firing. NPR Chief Executive Officer Vivian Schiller has acknowledged that the practice of releasing Williams from the reporting staff wasn’t done correctly but still stands by NPR’s decision. Islamaphobia is a result of an inability to understand something that is foreign to one’s own way of thinking. Just as we’ve seen in the past with any other civil rights issue that has consumed this country, it is up to us to learn the facts. Acceptance of others and resistance to negativity is something our generation should strive for. Ultimately, it may be up to us to make a difference. John Gervais is a psychology senior and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar.com.

Brains should breed the bombshell title

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t’s not a surprising when you’re waiting at the grocery store’s check-out line and you see multiple newspapers and magazines publishing the same routine headline of America’s privileged blonde heiress involved in a scandalous and stupid incident. The more ridiculous the act, the more publicity she gets. This is the generation that makes it acceptable — and even Margarita the norm — to act out of Campos stupidity. America considers its first dumb blonde as none other than Marilyn Monroe. She allured men with her voluptuous figure and witty catchphrases, photographed in questionable poses while holding Dostoyevsky or Proust. Men awed by her beauty would be able to ground themselves again by mocking her intelligence, despite the fact that Monroe read diligently, married an

intellectual man and now even has a collection of poetry published. Women knew it was cool to be smart back then. It mattered to have a mind of one’s own and an educated opinion that would not fall flat. New generations outdo the preceding — and the present generation has the idea that it’s cool to be smart has faded into its own materialistic pool of pretentious thoughts and mindless chitchat. The television show “Modern Family” recently portrayed this in an episode. The older sister taught her younger sister that completing homework was not cool. It doesn’t just occur in the normal American household, but in the homes of politicians like Sarah Palin, too. Who can forget the many hilarious Palin moments? The ones where she was caught looking at the notes written on her hand for a speech, or when she was caught making up words that don’t even exist in the English language.

We live in Palin’s America — and frankly, that is the antithesis of cool. It’s not cool to be a politician and not be able to correctly source court cases or historical events, and it’s definitely not cool to be given power and then create new English words. In the long run, no one likes to be remembered as stupid. Maybe Paris Hilton doesn’t mind because at the end the only thing that matters is the love of Tinker Bell, her Chihuahua, but Monroe never intended to be remembered as an object. It’s time we make being smart cool again. To not let others bring us down as individuals and realize if we made an honest mistake, it’s OK; it doesn’t mean we are stupid. It’s time to realize what it means to be an ideal human being and an intelligent woman. Margarita Campos is a sophomore creative writing major and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.


Tuesday, October 26, 2010

The Daily Cougar

sports overtime

SOCCER

Cougars fall out of 1st place Joshua Siegel

THE DAILY COUGAR

FOOTBALL

Pair of players honored; new ticket plans available Two Houston Cougars attained Conference USA honors for their performances Saturday against SMU that helped the team defeat the Mustangs 45-20. Tyron Carrier notched Special Teams Player of the Week for his 91-yard kickoff return. It was his first of the season. He has six total in his career, one away from tying the NCAA record owned by C.J. Spiller of Clemson. Junior linebacker Sammy Brown was named CoDefensive Player of the Week after he recorded 8 tackles Saturday, four for a loss. Brown also forced a fumble that resulted in three points. He shares the award with UCF defensive end Darius Nall after the Knights went on to defeat Rice 41-14. In the past two weeks, Brown has left his own imprint on the defense, posting nine tackles for a loss and four sacks. With only two more meetings at Robertson Stadium, the Athletics Department is offering several different ticket options. The Friday Football Four-Pack includes four seats, drinks, hotdogs and hats for the Cougars’ Nov. 5 contest against UCF, which will air on ESPN2. The ticket option costs $100 plus any associated fees. This package cannot be purchased on gameday. The second option available to fans is the Conference USA Two-Pack that can either be purchased for $75 for the Public Reserved section or $125 for Priority East seating. For further information contact the Houston Athletics Ticket Office at 713-462--6647. — Cougar Sports Services

SWIM AND DIVE

UH sees success, but SMU wins meet The Cougar swimming and diving team also traveled to Dallas this weekend to compete with the No. 19-ranked SMU Mustangs. Beccy Hillis claimed two event titles, winning the 100 and 200-yard breaststroke. Lacey Truelove finished as the top performer in the 3-meter dive with a personal-best score of 321.15 points. “I couldn’t be happier,” head coach Mark Taylor said in a release. “We have such a young team that if we’re fighting this hard now that I know the sky’s the limit for this team.” — Cougar Sports Services

TENNIS

Senior dealt loss in consolation quarterfinals Joanna Kacprzyk lost in the quarterfinal round to Paula Dinuta of North Texas at the UTSA/ITA Texas Regional in Waco on Monday. With the defeat, Kacprzyk’s three-game win streak was snapped. — Cougar Sports Services

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EDITORS John Brannen, Chris Losee E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

Loss, tie drop UH to third in Conference USA standings as match against Rice looms

JACK WEHMAN THE DAILY COUGAR

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The Cougars stumbled into some inclement weather — and results — in their final out-of-state road trip of the season. The Cougars lost 2-0 to UAB in Birmingham, Ala., before tying Memphis 1-1 in a double-overtime match that was interrupted by thunderstorms. The Cougars, who have yet to lose at Robertson Stadium this season (8-1-0 overall at home), now fall to 0-2-2 on the

road in conference play. Road victories have proved elusive for Conference USA teams this season. Only three of the 12 teams in C-USA – UCF, SMU and the Tigers — have a .500 record or better in away matches. The Cougars, who are third in C-USA with an average of 17.7 shots per game, managed 11 against the Blazers, five of which were on goal. Against the Tigers, the Cougars managed to get four of their seven shots on goal, but only connected on one of them. Sophomore Kaci Bush scored the Cougars lone goal, her second of the season, off a header with freshman Jasmine Martinez, who picked up her second assist of the year. The Cougars will head across town to

face Rice on Friday at 7 p.m. to close out the regular season. The Owls have gone winless in their last five matches (0-3-2) after beginning conference play with a 5-0-0 record. The Cougars have already clinched a spot in the C-USA tournament, but can secure a first round bye with a victory and Blazers victory at the Tigers. The tournament features the top six teams in C-USA, the winner of which receives a bid the to NCAA Championships. Memphis beat Rice 1-0 Friday, and moved up to second place in C-USA after tying with UH. UCF dominated, defeating Tulsa Friday 3-1 and shutting out SMU Sunday 3-0. sports@thedailycougar.com

VOLLEYBALL

Team bounces back after Friday loss Keith Cordero Jr.

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cougars’ three-game home winning streak came to an end Friday night with a 3-1 loss to Conference USA leader Tulsa, but bounced back Saturday night with an impressive 3-1 win against SMU. UH had four players with double figure kills in the win, led Lucy Charuk’s 17 kills and seven blocks. Stephanie Nwachukwu chipped in with 15 kills in the 3-1 (26-24, 25-21, 21-25, 28-26). “Two matches back-to-back this late in October is very difficult to bounce back,” head coach Molley Alvey said. “It goes to show that we’ve been working a lot on our mental aspect of the game.” A thrilling first set was back-and-forth, tying at 12-12. SMU built a 19-14 lead, but the Cougars fought back to take a 22-21 lead. SMU went back ahead 24-22; the Cougars called a timeout and finished the match by scoring four straight huge points to win game one 26-24. The Cougars had a 19-16 lead in game two, but SMU surged back to make it a 21-21 game. The Cougars closed out the game on a 4-0 run to take a 2-0 match lead. “To be able to keep your composure, do what you need to do as an individual so that it contributes to the team, we had everybody step up,” Alvey said. SMU would win game three to force a fourth set. The Cougars and SMU were tied 24-24 in the fourth game. It went to extra points and was evened up at 25-25 then 26-26. The Cougars hung on with two huge points at the end to win the set 28-26 and the match. “I think it was absolutely huge to that we finished that match in four (sets),” Alvey said. Tulsa extended its win streak to 19 games Friday with a 3-1 (25-23, 22-25, 16-25, 19-25) win over the Cougars to stay undefeated in C-USA. “I thought we had glimpses of brilliance,” Alvey said. “The first two sets were absolutely phenomenal volleyball on both

After a loss to Tulsa and a win against SMU last weekend, the Cougars sit at fourth place in Conference USA. | Brianna Leigh Morrison/The Daily Cougar sides. No matter what aspect of the game, we have to find a way to react and respond.” Despite a first game win, UH dropped the next three games and the match against a tough Golden Hurricane team led by Tyler Henderson’s game-high 26 kills. The Cougars’ balanced attack was led by Charuk, Nwachukwu and Chandace Tryon who posted 13, 12 and 10 kills respectively. “Lucy (Charuk) is really letting her personality show a little bit more,” Alvey said. “It means that much more to them to the team when someone in that role really shows their passion.” The first game had the Cougars in a 14-14 tie after trailing early 3-1. The Cougars came back strong to take a 20-18 lead, and hung on to a 25-23 first set game. The second through fourth games weren’t the same result for the Cougars, as

Tulsa proved why they are the top team in C-USA. The Cougars held a slim 13-12 lead in game two, but a late 7-3 Tulsa run gave them the set win 25-22. Tulsa carried the momentum from game two to a 25-16 game win and a 2-1 match lead heading into set four. The fourth set was all Tulsa again, as they lead the majority of the game. UH crept back in to the game trailing only 20-18. The Golden Hurricane answered the Houston run with a 5-1 to end the set and match, giving Tulsa a 3-1 win. UH is back on the road for their next two games at Marshall Oct.29, and at East Carolina on Oct 31. After the trip the team will return with a four-game homestand between Nov. 5. and Nov. 14. sports@thedailycougar.com


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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

LIFE&ARTS

The Daily Cougar

LOCAL MUSIC

Band fights social stigma Matthew Keever

THE DAILY COUGAR Christian rock bands tend to get a bad rep, usually failing to garner attention or critical acclaim because, in general, they’re just not very creative. But what about bands that are full of members who profess Christianity but don’t use Jesus’ name in every chorus? That’s the case with Cyrios, a band composed of a UH student, a UH alumnus, a Houston Community College student and a friend of theirs. While all members recognize Jesus Christ as their Lord and savior, they don’t use his name in

order to make fans, receive interest or sell albums. “The difference between ourselves and other Christian bands is that we don’t sing worship and praise songs,� said UH marketing senior David Hitchcock, who sings and plays guitar for Cyrios. “That is not to say those things are bad in the slightest, (because) there is definitely a place for them. However, we wanted to put a message out there that would reach people who either were never Christian or who have been disenfranchised by Christians not behaving like Christians should. CYRIOS continues on page 8

Think you can do better than this? You might be right, but there’s only way to prove it. Join The Daily Cougar staff today. We offer paid positions for reporters, photographers, columnists and editors. For more information, e-mail editor@thedailycougar.com or visit www.uh.edu/sp/jobs

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COMICS & MORE

The Daily Cougar

comics

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

7

crossword

Robbie & Bobby by Jason Poland

ACROSS 1 Plumbing problem 5 Sixth sense 8 Cook in a wok 12 Scarf down (2 wds.) 14 Thickening agent 15 Eggplant color 16 Inner self 17 Baja fast food 18 Storage bin 19 Backed 21 Prone 23 Grandee’s title 24 Trendy 25 Olive in the comics 26 French philosopher 30 Star in Cygnus 32 Bygone rulers 33 Arbors 36 Grab 37 Sports violations 38 Earthenware jar 40 Dante’s ideal 42 Specks 43 Moon position 44 Marquand sleuth (2 wds.) 45 IOU part 48 — for the books 49 Rx monitor 50 Observation 52 Intricatelywoven fabric 57 Insect resins 58 Malevolent 60 Snow shelter 61 Refinery shipments 62 Fiber from cocoons 63 Con man’s decoy 64 “Da” opposite 65 “The Closer” station 66 Auction

Dim Sum by Ho Yi Lau

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

DOWN 1 Unhearing 2 Hindu royalty 3 Don’t rub — —! 4 Reebok rival 5 Major Hoople’s word

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41 Explorer Heyerdahl 42 Euphrates people 44 XL squared 45 Wrinkle-resistant synthetic 46 Bushed 47 Banquet host 49 “Columbo” star 51 D.A. backup 52 Forsake a lover 53 Disgusted grunts 54 Et — (and others) 55 Drum sound 56 Allot 59 Nice wine

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Cul-de- — Drags out Humane org. Powerful engine Without warmth Refuse to obey Bamboo eaters Nefertiti’s god Mil rank. Belief prefix — Oberon of “These Three” Portland hrs. Melville captain For Pete’s —! Low-cost Card before trey Flower Self-confidence Choir voice Venetian-blind unit Bluntest Huge Japanese volcano

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2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

Previous puzzle solved S L A P

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8

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

LIFE&ARTS

The Daily Cougar

CYRIOS continued from page 6

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you say we are a Christian band, think of us in the same light as Flyleaf, Anberlin and Killswitch Engage, (which are also) Christian bands,â&#x20AC;? Hitchcock said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there in the lyrics, but it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily in your face. Because of this approach, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve actually found welcome reception in both Christian and secular audiences.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tightrope walk, but Cyriosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; members are open about their faiths while also trying not to disenfranchise non-religious fans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do not market to the Christian audience. We strive to bring hope and good feelings to all listeners through our music and lyrics,â&#x20AC;? UH alumnus Ronald Collins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you listen close enough to the lyrics, you may find a few Christian undertones.â&#x20AC;? Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music scene is difficult for bands such as Cyrios to thrive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hard rock and metal are probably the least popular genres here in Houston, while hip hop is definitely the most listened to,â&#x20AC;? Collins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even see big metal bands come through Houston often. Most of the time, big bands skip over Houston and go straight to San Antonio and Austin, where the metal scene is

more accepted. It is definitely a struggle to get off the ground for metal/hard rock bands in Houston.â&#x20AC;? Cyriosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sound is radio-friendly, melodic metal. It may not be the most well-received genre in Houston, but with the popularity of 94.5 The Buzz and the accessibility of The Texas Buzz, these musicloving students may be on the radio before they know it. Band members strongly believe that it can make it work with help from family, friends and fans, all of whom have been extremely supportive in all of Cyriosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; endeavors. And if they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it big, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to play as frequently as they can book shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music is everything to me,â&#x20AC;? bassist Stephen Hague said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I can play and make it a career, that would be awesome. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out of the question, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do it part time to keep me sane.â&#x20AC;? No matter listenersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; religions or preference of genre, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard not to get behind Cyriosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; underlying message of hope. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that our listeners are getting a positive message out of our songs and go away feeling uplifted,â&#x20AC;? Collins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If our music can make lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problems seem distant for even a second, I am happy.â&#x20AC;? arts@thedailycougar.com

"E)NFORMED"E%NGAGED"E6OCAL6/4%

We " lots & /CTOBERTH°/CTOBERTH lots of AM PM Drop off and pick up pointâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;UC Circle Shuttle goes to Palm Center location

Inside Loop 610 1. Main Office: Harris County Administration Bldg., 1001 Preston, 1st Floor, 77002 2. Moody Park: Moody Park Community Center, 3725 Fulton, 77009 3. Kashmere: Kashmere Multi-Service Center, 4802 Lockwood Dr., 77026 4. Downtown-East: Ripley House, 4410 Navigation Blvd., 77011 5. Southeast Houston: H.C.C.S. Southeast College, Learning Hub, 6815 Rustic, 77087 6. Palm Center: Justice of the Peace/Constable Entry, 5300 Griggs Road, 77021 7. Astrodome Area: Fiesta Mart, Inc., 8130 Kirby Drive, 77054 8. Neartown: Metropolitan Mutli-Service Center, 1475 W. Gray, 77019

Outside Loop 610

Harris County Early Voting Hours of Operation Oct. 18 - Oct. 22: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 23: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 24: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 25 - Oct. 29: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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For voting information in your area:

Harris County

www.tax.co.harris.tx.us

Brazoria County

www.brazoria-county.com

Chambers County

www.co.chambers.tx.us

Fort Bend County

www.co.fort-bend.tx.us

Galveston County

www.co.galveston.tx.us

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* Indicates change in location

Monday, October 18th Friday, October 29th

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19. Humble: Octavia Fields Branch Library, 1503 South Houston Ave., Humble, 77338 20. * Kingwood: Kingwood Branch Library, 4400 Bens View Lane, Kingwood, 77345 21. Wallisville Road: North Channel Branch Library, 15741 Wallisville Road, 77049 22. Baytown: Baytown Community Center, 2407 Market Street, Baytown, 77520 23. Pasadena: Harris County Courthouse Annex #25, 7330 Spencer Highway,Pasadena, 77505 24. Clear Lake: Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane, 77062 25. Alief: Henington-Alief Regional Library, 7979 South Kirkwood, 77072 26. West Houston: Lac Hong Square, 6628 Wilcrest Dr., 77072 27. Far W. Houston: Nottingham Park, 926 Country Place Dr., 77079 28. Far West/Katy: Franz Road Storefront, 19818 Franz Road, Katy, 77449 29. Bear Creek: Bear Creek Park Community Center, 3055 Bear Creek Dr. at Patterson Rd., 77084 30. Jersey Village: City of Jersey Village-City Hall, 16327 Lakeview Drive, Jersey Village, 77040 31. Tomball: Tomball Public Works Building, 501 B James St., Tomball, 77375 32. Cypress Creek: Champion Forest Baptist Church, Multi-Purpose Building, 4840 Strack Road, 77069 33. Far North: Ponderosa Fire Station No. 1, 17061 Rolling Creek Drive, 77090 34. Cypress: Cypress Top Park, 26026 Hempstead Highway, Cypress, 77429 35. George Bush Park: Glen Cheek Education Building, 16002 Westheimer Parkway,77082 36. Lone Star College: University Park - Visitors Center, 20515 State Hwy 249, 77070 37. Crosby: Crosby ISD Administration Building, 706 Runneburg Road, Crosby, 77532

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9. Northeast Houston: Northeast Multi-Service Center, 9720 Spaulding, 77016 10. Galena Park: Galena Park Branch Library, 1500 Keene Street, Galena Park, 77547 11. Hobby Area: I.B.E.W. Hall #66, 4345 Allen Genoa Road, Pasadena, 77504 12. Sunnyside: Sunnyside Multi-Purpose Center, 4605 Wilmington, 77051 13. S. Houston Area: Townwood Park, 3403 Simsbrook, 77045 14. SW. Houston: Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet (near Hillcroft), 77074 15. Near West Side: Tracy Gee Community Center, 3599 Westcenter Drive, 77042, 16. Spring Branch: Trini Mendenhall Sosa Comm. Center, 1414 Wirt Road, 77055 17. Acres Homes: Acres Homes Multi-Service Center, 6719 W. Montgomery Road, 77091 18. North: Hardy Senior Center, 11901 West Hardy Road, 77076

Early Voting:

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Montgomery County

www.co.montgomery.tx.us

Victoria County www.vctx.org

General Election Day: Nov. 2

TO: AR D ILY COUGA THE DA

T THEOD: A

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Click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Write a letterâ&#x20AC;? at thedailycougar.com


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